AP BIOLOGY SUMMER ASSIGNMENT: DISTRIBUTED MAY, 2012

Save this PDF as:
 WORD  PNG  TXT  JPG

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "AP BIOLOGY SUMMER ASSIGNMENT: DISTRIBUTED MAY, 2012"

Transcription

1 AP BIOLOGY SUMMER ASSIGNMENT: DISTRIBUTED MAY, 2012 Instructor: Mr. Crispin A. Zanca Required Material for Summer Assignment: Contact: Course Textbook: Biology 7 th AP Edition Campbell and Reese, 2005 ISBN: In order to get a strong start to the year, you are required to complete the summer assignment described below. This work will be briefly covered when we return in the fall. It is advised that you not wait until the last minute to begin the assignment, as it is considerable. The summer assignment is worth 250 points. It must be completed when you arrive the first day of school. There will be a test on chapters 1, 2, 3 & 5 at the end of the first full week of school. There will be a test on chapters 50, at the end of the second week. There are three components to your Summer Assignment. 1. Read the textbook chapters: 1,2,3,5.(Themes and the Chemical Context of Life, 7% of AP Exam) and chapters 50, (Ecology, 10% of AP Exam) 2. Writing answers to the two assigned Free Response (Essay) Questions Take an open book multiple choice test. Below are the details of the assignment 1& 2 above. Each part of the assignment should have its own section dedicated to it in a three hole binder with separations. This will make it easier to grade and it will make it easier for you when it is used as a review for the AP Exam. (35 points for organization and neatness) Read the eight assigned chapters in the textbook: While reading the textbook this will help you find the answers to the Learning Objectives for chapters 1, 2, 3, & 5. To help you understand the textbook, reading all the captions below the figures and diagrams is suggested. Write out (preferably word-processing) answers to all the objectives. Some may be answered in a full sentence. Some may need solid explanations. This is the bulk of your work load and the bulk of the points. Please number the answers to your objectives. (115 total points) Chapter 1- Introduction: Themes in the study of Life Chapter 2- The Chemical Context of Life Chapter 3- Water and the Fitness of the Environment Chapter 5- The Structure and Functions of Macromolecules For Chapters 50, you should write the answers to the concept checks at the end of each chapter section and the self quizzes at the end of each chapter. Do these on your own at first and then check the answers in the back of the book. (mark and record how you did) (110 total points) Chapter 50- An Introduction to Ecology and the Biosphere Chapter 52- Population Ecology Chapter 53-Community Ecology Chapter 54- Ecosystems Chapter 55- Conservation Biology and Restoration Ecology

2 2. Free Response (Essay) Questions: Answer the two essays in a thoughtful and organized manner. Please refer to the sample answers provided for other questions. Do not write an introduction or conclusion; simply start answering the questions from the first sentence. Be sure to set the answers up as they are written (a, b, c, etc). (90 points) For Chapter 22 you should read the chapter and take the attached test as an open book test. FREE RESPONSE QUESTIONS FOR 2011 SUMMER READING 1) The unique properties (characteristics) of water make life possible on Earth. Select three properties of water and: a) For each property, identify and define the property and explain it in terms of the physical/chemical nature of water. b) For each property, describe one example of how the property affects the functioning of living organisms. 2) Using an example for each, discuss the following ecological concepts. a) Succession b) Energy flow between trophic levels c) Limiting factors d) Carrying capacity CHAPTER 1 THEMES IN THE STUDY OF LIFE Learning objectives: Inquiring about the World of Life 1. Briefly describe the unifying themes that characterize the biological sciences. 2. Diagram the hierarchy of structural levels in biological organization. 3. Explain how novel properties of life emerge from complex organization. 4. Describe the dilemma of reductionism. 5. Describe the two major dynamic processes of any ecosystem. 6. Name two characteristics shared by all cells. 7. Distinguish between prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. 8. Describe the basic structure and function of DNA. 9. Discuss the goals and activities of systems biology. List the three research developments that have advanced systems biology. Explain the importance of regulatory mechanisms in living things. Distinguish between positive and negative feedback. Organizing the Diversity of Life

3 11. Distinguish among the three domains of life. List and distinguish among the three kingdoms of multicellular, eukaryotic life. 12. Explain the phrase: life s dual nature of unity and diversity. Explain how evolution accounts for the unity and diversity of living things. 13. Describe the observations and inferences that led Charles Darwin to his theory of evolution by natural selection. Explain why diagrams of evolutionary relationships have a treelike form. The Process of Science 15. Distinguish between discovery science and hypothesis-based science. Explain why both types of exploration contribute to our understanding of nature. 16. Distinguish between quantitative and qualitative data. 17. Distinguish between inductive and deductive reasoning. 18. Explain why hypotheses must be testable and falsifiable but are not provable. 19. Describe what is meant by a controlled experiment. 20. Distinguish between the everyday meaning of the term theory and its meaning to scientists. 21. Describe an example that illustrates how science may be influenced by social and cultural factors. Distinguish between science and technology. Explain how science and technology are interdependent. CHAPTER 2 THE CHEMICAL CONTEXT OF LIFE Learning objectives Elements and compounds 1. Distinguish between an element and a compound. 2. Identify the four elements that make up 96% of living matter. Define the term trace element and give an example. Atoms and molecules 4. Draw and label a simplified model of an atom. Explain how this model misrepresents our understanding of atomic structure. 5. Distinguish between each of the following pairs of terms: a. Neutron and proton b. Atomic number and mass number c. Atomic weight and mass number d. Explain how the atomic number and mass number of an atom can be used to determine the number of neutrons. e. Explain how two isotopes of an element are similar. Explain how they are different. Describe a biological application that uses radioactive isotopes.

4 Electron distribution and chemical properties 9. Define the terms energy and potential energy. Explain why electrons in the first electron shell have less potential energy than electrons in higher electron shells. 10. Distinguish between nonpolar covalent, polar covalent and ionic bonds. 11. Explain why strong covalent bonds and weak bonds are both essential in living organisms. 12. Distinguish between hydrogen bonds and van der Waals interactions. 13. Give an example that illustrates how a molecule s shape can determine its biological function. Explain what is meant by a chemical equilibrium. CHAPTER 3 WATER AND THE FITNESS OF THE ENVIRONMENT Learning objectives The Properties of Water 1. With the use of a diagram or diagrams, explain why water molecules are: a. polar b. capable of hydrogen bonding with 4 neighboring water molecules c. List four characteristics of water that are emergent properties resulting from hydrogen bonding. d. Define cohesion and adhesion. Explain how water s cohesion and adhesion contribute to the movement of water from the roots to the leaves of a tree. e. Distinguish between heat and temperature, using examples to clarify your definitions. Explain the following observations by referring to the properties of water: Coastal areas have milder climates than adjacent inland areas. Ocean temperatures fluctuate much less than temperatures on land. Insects like water striders can walk on the surface of a pond without breaking the surface. If you slightly overfill a water glass, the water will form a convex surface above the top of the glass. If you place a paper towel so that it touches spilled water, the towel will draw in the water. Ice floats on water. Humans sweat and dogs pant to cool themselves on hot days. The Solvent of Life 6. Distinguish between a solute, a solvent and a solution. 7. Distinguish between hydrophobic and hydrophilic substances. Explain how you would make up a one molar (1M) solution of ethyl alcohol. The Dissociation of Water Molecules

5 9. Name the products of the dissociation of water and give their concentration in pure water. 10. Define acid, base, and ph. 11. Explain how acids and bases may directly or indirectly alter the hydrogen ion concentration of a solution. 12. Using the bicarbonate buffer system as an example, explain how buffers work. 13. Briefly explain how the burning of fossil fuels may affect: a. Acid precipitation b. Ocean acidification (There is no chapter 4) CHAPTER 5 THE STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION OF LARGE BIOLOGICAL MACROMOLECULES Learning objectives The Molecules of Life List the four major classes of macromolecules. Distinguish between monomers and polymers. Draw diagrams to illustrate condensation and hydrolysis reactions. Carbohydrates Serve as Fuel and Building Material Distinguish between monosaccharides, disaccharides, and polysaccharides. Describe the formation of a glycosidic linkage. Distinguish between the glycosidic linkages found in starch and cellulose. Explain why the difference is biologically important. Describe the role of symbiosis in cellulose digestion by animals. Lipids are a Diverse Group of Hydrophobic Molecules Describe the building-block molecules, structure, and biological importance of fats, phospholipids, and steroids. Identify an ester linkage and describe how it is formed. Distinguish between saturated and unsaturated fats. Distinguish between cis and trans fat molecules. Name the principal energy storage molecules of plants and animals. Proteins have Many Structures, Resulting in a Wide Range of Functions Distinguish between a protein and a polypeptide. Explain how a peptide bond forms between two amino acids.

6 List and describe the four major components of an amino acid. Explain how amino acids may be grouped according to the physical and chemical properties of the R group. Explain what determines protein structure and why it is important. Explain how the primary structure of a protein is determined. Name two types of secondary protein structure. Explain the role of hydrogen bonds in maintaining secondary structure. Explain how weak interactions and disulfide bridges contribute to tertiary protein structure. List four conditions under which proteins may be denatured. Explain how chaperonins may assist in proper folding of proteins. List and briefly describe three complementary approaches to determining protein structure. Nucleic Acids Store and Transmit Hereditary Information List the major components of a nucleotide, and describe how these monomers are linked to form a nucleic acid. Distinguish between: pyrimidine and purine nucleotide and nucleoside ribose and deoxyribose 5 end and 3 end of a nucleotide Briefly describe the three-dimensional structure of DNA. Explain how DNA or protein comparisons may allow us to assess evolutionary relationships between species.

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

Unit 1: Chemistry of Life Guided Reading Questions (70 pts total)

Unit 1: Chemistry of Life Guided Reading Questions (70 pts total) AP Biology Biology, Campbell and Reece, 10th Edition Adapted from chapter reading guides originally created by Lynn Miriello Name: Unit 1: Chemistry of Life Guided Reading Questions (70 pts total) Chapter

More information

A disaccharide is formed when a dehydration reaction joins two monosaccharides. This covalent bond is called a glycosidic linkage.

A disaccharide is formed when a dehydration reaction joins two monosaccharides. This covalent bond is called a glycosidic linkage. CH 5 Structure & Function of Large Molecules: Macromolecules Molecules of Life All living things are made up of four classes of large biological molecules: carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and nucleic

More information

AP Biology Summer Assignment Chapter 2 Quiz

AP Biology Summer Assignment Chapter 2 Quiz AP Biology Summer Assignment Chapter 2 Quiz 2016-17 Multiple Choice Identify the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question. 1. Which six elements provide most of the mass of the

More information

Carbohydrates, proteins and lipids

Carbohydrates, proteins and lipids Carbohydrates, proteins and lipids Chapter 3 MACROMOLECULES Macromolecules: polymers with molecular weights >1,000 Functional groups THE FOUR MACROMOLECULES IN LIFE Molecules in living organisms: proteins,

More information

WEEK ONE VOCABULARY. Adhesion- the attraction between water molecules and other molecules

WEEK ONE VOCABULARY. Adhesion- the attraction between water molecules and other molecules WEEK ONE VOCABULARY Acid- hydrogen donors; acids increase the hydrogen ion concentration in solution Adhesion- the attraction between water molecules and other molecules Alpha (α) helix- secondary protein

More information

Chapter 5: The Structure and Function of Large Biological Molecules

Chapter 5: The Structure and Function of Large Biological Molecules Name Period Concept 5.1 Macromolecules are polymers, built from monomers 1. The large molecules of all living things fall into just four main classes. Name them. 2. Circle the three classes that are called

More information

AP BIOLOGY READING GUIDE: CHAPTER 05 THE STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION OF LARGE BIOLOGICAL MOLECULES

AP BIOLOGY READING GUIDE: CHAPTER 05 THE STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION OF LARGE BIOLOGICAL MOLECULES AP BIOLOGY READING GUIDE: CHAPTER 05 THE STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION OF LARGE BIOLOGICAL MOLECULES Name: Date: CONCEPT 5.1: Macromolecules are polymers, built from monomers CONCEPT 5.2: Carbohydrates serve

More information

Chapter 3 Chemistry of Life

Chapter 3 Chemistry of Life Chapter Outline Chapter 3 Chemistry of Life Section 1: Matter and Substances KEY IDEAS > What makes up matter? > Why do atoms form bonds? > What are some important interactions between substances in living

More information

Chemical Basis of Life Module A Anchor 2

Chemical Basis of Life Module A Anchor 2 Chemical Basis of Life Module A Anchor 2 Key Concepts: - Water is a polar molecule. Therefore, it is able to form multiple hydrogen bonds, which account for many of its special properties. - Water s polarity

More information

Lesson Overview. Carbon Compounds. Lesson Overview 2.3

Lesson Overview. Carbon Compounds. Lesson Overview 2.3 Lesson Overview 2.3 The Chemistry of Carbon Carbon atoms can form strong covalent bonds with many other elements. Molecules containing carbon are called organic. Living organisms are composed of molecules

More information

After attending lecture, reviewing lecture notes and reading the text, you should be able to: - Distinguish between inductive and deductive reasoning

After attending lecture, reviewing lecture notes and reading the text, you should be able to: - Distinguish between inductive and deductive reasoning Objectives for BIO105 Principles of Biology Mark S. Wilson Science as a way of knowing - Outline the scientific method. - Distinguish between inductive and deductive reasoning - Distinguish between science

More information

CHAPTER 3 THE CHEMISTRY OF ORGANIC MOLECULES

CHAPTER 3 THE CHEMISTRY OF ORGANIC MOLECULES CHAPTER 3 THE CHEMISTRY OF ORGANIC MOLECULES 3.1 Organic Molecules The chemistry of carbon accounts for the diversity of organic molecules found in living things. Carbon has six electrons, four of which

More information

WHY IS THIS IMPORTANT?

WHY IS THIS IMPORTANT? CHAPTER 2 FUNDAMENTAL CHEMISTRY FOR MICROBIOLOGY Charles D. Winters / Science Photo Library WHY IS THIS IMPORTANT? An understanding of chemistry is essential to understand cellular structure and function,

More information

Atoms. Chapter 2: Fundamentals of Chemistry. The main subatomic particles Atomic Model. Isotopes. Building blocks of matter

Atoms. Chapter 2: Fundamentals of Chemistry. The main subatomic particles Atomic Model. Isotopes. Building blocks of matter You need to know this for the Chemistry Quiz Atoms Chapter 2: Fundamentals of Chemistry Dr. Amy Rogers Bio 139 Microbiology Some figures courtesy of Biology: A Guide to the Natural World by Krogh Building

More information

copyright cmassengale Macromolecules

copyright cmassengale Macromolecules Macromolecules 1 2 Properties of Life Living organisms: are composed of cells are complex and ordered respond to their environment can grow and reproduce obtain and use energy maintain internal balance

More information

Disaccharides consist of two monosaccharide monomers covalently linked by a glycosidic bond. They function in sugar transport.

Disaccharides consist of two monosaccharide monomers covalently linked by a glycosidic bond. They function in sugar transport. 1. The fundamental life processes of plants and animals depend on a variety of chemical reactions that occur in specialized areas of the organism s cells. As a basis for understanding this concept: 1.

More information

Enjoy your summer, Mr. Dotolo

Enjoy your summer, Mr. Dotolo Welcome to AP Biology. I look forward to working with you in the fall. Your summer assignment is to prepare for a test on chapters 1-5 of Campbell s Biology (7 th edition). Chapters 1-5 cover the biology

More information

Lab 3 Organic Molecules of Biological Importance

Lab 3 Organic Molecules of Biological Importance Name Biology 3 ID Number Lab 3 Organic Molecules of Biological Importance Section 1 - Organic Molecules Section 2 - Functional Groups Section 3 - From Building Blocks to Macromolecules Section 4 - Carbohydrates

More information

AP Biology Review: The Chemistry of Life Chapter 2: The Chemical Context of Life

AP Biology Review: The Chemistry of Life Chapter 2: The Chemical Context of Life AP Biology Review: The Chemistry of Life Chapter 2: The Chemical Context of Life You Must Know 1. The three subatomic particles and their significance. 2. The types of bonds, how they form, and their relative

More information

Proteins and Nucleic Acids

Proteins and Nucleic Acids Proteins and Nucleic Acids Chapter 5 Macromolecules: Proteins Proteins Most structurally & functionally diverse group of biomolecules. : o Involved in almost everything o Enzymes o Structure (keratin,

More information

Lecture Overview. Hydrogen Bonds. Special Properties of Water Molecules. Universal Solvent. ph Scale Illustrated. special properties of water

Lecture Overview. Hydrogen Bonds. Special Properties of Water Molecules. Universal Solvent. ph Scale Illustrated. special properties of water Lecture Overview special properties of water > water as a solvent > ph molecules of the cell > properties of carbon > carbohydrates > lipids > proteins > nucleic acids Hydrogen Bonds polarity of water

More information

Biochemistry of Cells

Biochemistry of Cells Biochemistry of Cells 1 Carbon-based Molecules Although a cell is mostly water, the rest of the cell consists mostly of carbon-based molecules Organic chemistry is the study of carbon compounds Carbon

More information

Incoming Human Anatomy & Physiology I (Biol 2401) Student Knowledge Expectations for Basic Chemistry and Cell Biology Effective Fall 2015

Incoming Human Anatomy & Physiology I (Biol 2401) Student Knowledge Expectations for Basic Chemistry and Cell Biology Effective Fall 2015 Incoming Human Anatomy & Physiology I (Biol 2401) Student Knowledge Expectations for Basic Chemistry and Cell Biology Effective Fall 2015 Prior to enrolling in Human Anatomy & Physiology I (Biol 2401),

More information

Study Guide B. Answer Key. Chemistry of Life

Study Guide B. Answer Key. Chemistry of Life Chemistry of Life Answer Key SECTION 1. ATOMS, IONS, AND MOLECULES 1. An element is a certain type of atom. 2. Sketch should resemble one of the illustrations in Figure 1.2 in Section 1. Nucleus should

More information

AP BIOLOGY SUMMER ASSIGNMENT Unit 1: Chemistry of Life Chapters: 1-5

AP BIOLOGY SUMMER ASSIGNMENT Unit 1: Chemistry of Life Chapters: 1-5 AP BIOLOGY SUMMER ASSIGNMENT Unit 1: Chemistry of Life Chapters: 1-5 Welcome to AP Biology! The two main goals of AP Biology are to help you develop a conceptual framework for modern biology and to gain

More information

The Molecules of Cells

The Molecules of Cells The Molecules of Cells I. Introduction A. Most of the world s population cannot digest milk-based foods. 1. These people are lactose intolerant because they lack the enzyme lactase. 2. This illustrates

More information

4. Which carbohydrate would you find as part of a molecule of RNA? a. Galactose b. Deoxyribose c. Ribose d. Glucose

4. Which carbohydrate would you find as part of a molecule of RNA? a. Galactose b. Deoxyribose c. Ribose d. Glucose 1. How is a polymer formed from multiple monomers? a. From the growth of the chain of carbon atoms b. By the removal of an OH group and a hydrogen atom c. By the addition of an OH group and a hydrogen

More information

The Structure and Function of Large Biological Molecules by Dr. Ty C.M. Hoffman

The Structure and Function of Large Biological Molecules by Dr. Ty C.M. Hoffman The Structure and Function of Large Biological Molecules by Dr. Ty C.M. Hoffman Slide 1 All of the biological macromolecules are built from smaller subunits. Each subunit features - H and - OH substituents

More information

Chapter 2: The Nature of Molecules and the Properties of Water

Chapter 2: The Nature of Molecules and the Properties of Water Chapter 2: The Nature of Molecules and the Properties of Water Biology is the study of living things, and it is important to understand their chemical nature. The processes that allow life to exist follow

More information

Atoms Atom smallest part of an element that has the characteristics of that element. Each element has a distinct atom based on structure.

Atoms Atom smallest part of an element that has the characteristics of that element. Each element has a distinct atom based on structure. Atoms Atom smallest part of an element that has the characteristics of that element. Each element has a distinct atom based on structure. Nucleus- positively charged contains protons (p+), neutrons(n0),

More information

Chapter 3: Water and Life

Chapter 3: Water and Life Name Period Chapter 3: Water and Life Concept 3.1 Polar covalent bonds in water result in hydrogen bonding 1. Study the water molecules at the right. On the central molecule, label oxygen (O) and hydrogen

More information

- smallest particle of matter that has all its chemical properties

- smallest particle of matter that has all its chemical properties Atom- - smallest particle of matter that has all its chemical properties -Atoms are made up of 3 smaller particles. These smaller particles are: protons particle with a positive charge located in the nucleus

More information

Chapter 5. The Structure and Function of Macromolecule s

Chapter 5. The Structure and Function of Macromolecule s Chapter 5 The Structure and Function of Macromolecule s Most Macromolecules are polymers: Polymer: (poly: many; mer: part) Large molecules consisting of many identical or similar subunits connected together.

More information

I. Polymers & Macromolecules Figure 1: Polymers. Polymer: Macromolecule: Figure 2: Dehydration Synthesis

I. Polymers & Macromolecules Figure 1: Polymers. Polymer: Macromolecule: Figure 2: Dehydration Synthesis I. Polymers & Macromolecules Figure 1: Polymers Polymer: Macromolecule: Figure 2: Dehydration Synthesis 1 Dehydration Synthesis: Figure 3: Hydrolysis Hydrolysis: II. Organic Macromolecules Class I: Carbohydrates:

More information

Section 2 1 The Nature of Matter (pages 35 39)

Section 2 1 The Nature of Matter (pages 35 39) Chapter 2 The Chemistry of Life Section 2 1 The Nature of Matter (pages 35 39) Key Concepts What three subatomic particles make up atoms? How are all of the isotopes of an element similar? What are the

More information

Section 2 1 The Nature of Matter (pages 35 39)

Section 2 1 The Nature of Matter (pages 35 39) Chapter 2 The Chemistry of Life Section 2 1 The Nature of Matter (pages 35 39) Key Concepts What three subatomic particles make up atoms? How are all of the isotopes of an element similar? What are the

More information

Chapter 2 - Chemical Foundations

Chapter 2 - Chemical Foundations Chapter 2 - Chemical Foundations I. Introduction By weight, cells are about 70% water, about 1% ions, about 6% small organic molecules (including amino acids, sugars, nucleotides), and about 23% macromolecules.

More information

BIOLOGICAL MOLECULES OF LIFE

BIOLOGICAL MOLECULES OF LIFE BIOLOGICAL MOLECULES OF LIFE C A R B O H Y D R A T E S, L I P I D S, P R O T E I N S, A N D N U C L E I C A C I D S The Academic Support Center @ Daytona State College (Science 115, Page 1 of 29) Carbon

More information

Chapter 3 Molecules of Cells

Chapter 3 Molecules of Cells Bio 100 Molecules of cells 1 Chapter 3 Molecules of Cells Compounds containing carbon are called organic compounds Molecules such as methane that are only composed of carbon and hydrogen are called hydrocarbons

More information

The Structure and Function of Macromolecules: Carbohydrates, Lipids & Phospholipids

The Structure and Function of Macromolecules: Carbohydrates, Lipids & Phospholipids The Structure and Function of Macromolecules: Carbohydrates, Lipids & Phospholipids The FOUR Classes of Large Biomolecules All living things are made up of four classes of large biological molecules: Carbohydrates

More information

Benchmark Study Guide Biology Fall Unit 1: Scientific Method. Independent Variable. Dependent Variable. Control. Constant

Benchmark Study Guide Biology Fall Unit 1: Scientific Method. Independent Variable. Dependent Variable. Control. Constant Benchmark Study Guide Biology Fall 2016 Name: Unit 1: Scientific Method Term Definition Independent Variable Dependent Variable Control Constant 1. Holly wants to know which plant food is the best for

More information

(Almost) Everything You NEED in Chemistry

(Almost) Everything You NEED in Chemistry (Almost) Everything You NEED in Chemistry An atom consists of a central portion, the NUCLEUS (made up of Protons and Neutrons) and Electrons which are found outside the nucleus. An uncharged atom has an

More information

Biology Content Standards

Biology Content Standards Biology Content Standards 1. The Chemistry of Life Broad Concept: Chemical elements form organic molecules that interact to perform the basic functions of life. 1.1 Recognize that biological organisms

More information

I. Chapter 5 Summary. II. Nucleotides & Nucleic Acids. III. Lipids

I. Chapter 5 Summary. II. Nucleotides & Nucleic Acids. III. Lipids I. Chapter 5 Summary A. Simple Sugars (CH 2 O) n : 1. One C contains a carbonyl (C=O) rest contain - 2. Classification by functional group: aldoses & ketoses 3. Classification by number of C's: trioses,

More information

Chemical Level of Organization

Chemical Level of Organization Chemical Level of Organization Matter and Energy Matter occupies space and has mass Energy is capacity to move mass Potential vs. kinetic Energy forms radiant-moving waves electrical-moving charged particles

More information

Biology: Science for Life with Physiology, 5e (Belk) Chapter 2 Science Fiction, Bad Science, and Pseudoscience: Water, Biochemistry, and Cells

Biology: Science for Life with Physiology, 5e (Belk) Chapter 2 Science Fiction, Bad Science, and Pseudoscience: Water, Biochemistry, and Cells Biology: Science for Life with Physiology, 5e (Belk) Chapter 2 Science Fiction, Bad Science, and Pseudoscience: Water, Biochemistry, and Cells 1) Which feature is present in all known living things? A)

More information

Name: Hour: Elements & Macromolecules in Organisms

Name: Hour: Elements & Macromolecules in Organisms Name: Hour: Elements & Macromolecules in Organisms Most common elements in living things are carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, and oxygen. These four elements constitute about 95% of your body weight. All compounds

More information

Keystone Study Guide Module A: Cells and Cell Processes

Keystone Study Guide Module A: Cells and Cell Processes Keystone Study Guide Module A: Cells and Cell Processes Topic 1: Biological Principles Cells and the Organization of Life Characteristics of Life all living things share the following characteristics:

More information

Biological molecules:

Biological molecules: Biological molecules: All are organic (based on carbon). Monomers vs. polymers: Monomers refer to the subunits that, when polymerized, make up a larger polymer. Monomers may function on their own in some

More information

Lecture 5: Basic Plant Biochemistry: Carbohydrates, Proteins, Nucleic Acids and Secondary metabolites

Lecture 5: Basic Plant Biochemistry: Carbohydrates, Proteins, Nucleic Acids and Secondary metabolites Lecture 5: Basic Plant Biochemistry: Carbohydrates, Proteins, Nucleic Acids and Secondary metabolites Reference texts for this lecture: Biology, 6th edition by Campbell and Reece Introduction to Botany

More information

Chapter 2 The Molecules of Cells

Chapter 2 The Molecules of Cells Chemistry is the science dealing with the properties & the transformations (chemical reactions) of all forms of matter Matter is any substance: solid, liquid, gas, plasma All matter is composed of elements

More information

Chapter 2: Atoms, Molecules & Life

Chapter 2: Atoms, Molecules & Life Chapter 2: Atoms, Molecules & Life What Are Atoms? An atom are the smallest unit of matter. Atoms are composed of Electrons = negatively charged particles. Neutrons = particles with no charge (neutral).

More information

macromolecule: monomer: polymer: a. The elements found in carbohydrates occur in a specific ratio. Describe that ratio.

macromolecule: monomer: polymer: a. The elements found in carbohydrates occur in a specific ratio. Describe that ratio. NAME: DATE: Biological Macromolecule Poster Project HOUR: BIOLOGY You and your table mates will be researching and creating an informational poster on one of four biological macromolecules: carbohydrates,

More information

The Structure and Function of Large Biological Molecules

The Structure and Function of Large Biological Molecules Chapter 5 1 The Structure and Function of Large Biological Molecules PowerPoint Lecture Presentations for Biology Eighth Edition Neil Campbell and Jane Reece Lectures by Chris Romero, updated by Erin Barley

More information

Carbohydrates, Lipids, and Proteins 3.2

Carbohydrates, Lipids, and Proteins 3.2 Carbohydrates, Lipids, and Proteins 3.2 Organic vs. Inorganic compounds Organic compounds contain carbon and are found in living organisms Exceptions: hydrocarbonates, carbonates, oxides of carbon. Inorganic

More information

Anatomy and Physiology Placement Exam 2 Practice with Answers at End!

Anatomy and Physiology Placement Exam 2 Practice with Answers at End! Anatomy and Physiology Placement Exam 2 Practice with Answers at End! General Chemical Principles 1. bonds are characterized by the sharing of electrons between the participating atoms. a. hydrogen b.

More information

Slide 1. In this lesson, we will give you a general introduction to some of the organic molecules. Slide 2. Slide 3

Slide 1. In this lesson, we will give you a general introduction to some of the organic molecules. Slide 2. Slide 3 Slide 1 In this lesson, we will give you a general introduction to some of the organic molecules. At the end of this lesson, you should be able to, Slide 2 Describe carbon bonding and organic compounds

More information

KEY. BI 212 Summer Exam I. July 27 th 2015

KEY. BI 212 Summer Exam I. July 27 th 2015 KEY BI 212 Summer 2015 Exam I July 27 th 2015 On your scantron, please fill in: 1. Your name (First and Last) 2. Exam I 3. Date 4. Lab section: MW at 1 section 010; MW at 4 section 011; TR at 1 section

More information

Elements & Macromolecules in Organisms

Elements & Macromolecules in Organisms Elements & Macromolecules in rganisms Most common elements in living things are carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, and oxygen. These four elements constitute about 95% of your body weight. All compounds can be

More information

Organic Compounds. Essential Questions: What is Organic? What are the 4 major Organic Compounds? How are they made? What are they used for?

Organic Compounds. Essential Questions: What is Organic? What are the 4 major Organic Compounds? How are they made? What are they used for? Organic Compounds Essential Questions: What is Organic? What are the 4 major Organic Compounds? How are they made? What are they used for? Aristotle: Francesco Redi: What do we already know? Spontaneous

More information

Oxygen Hydrogen Nitrogen. Questions: 1. Name the 4 main elements that make up 95% of an organism. 2. Name the 4 types of bonds carbon can form.

Oxygen Hydrogen Nitrogen. Questions: 1. Name the 4 main elements that make up 95% of an organism. 2. Name the 4 types of bonds carbon can form. Biology 1 Elements & Macromolecules in rganisms Name Date our Most common elements in living things are carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, and oxygen. These four elements constitute about 95% of your body weight.

More information

Chapter 2 Chemical Principles

Chapter 2 Chemical Principles Chapter 2 Chemical Principles I. Chemistry. [Students should read this section on their own]. a. Chemistry is the study of the interactions between atoms and molecules. b. The atom is the smallest unit

More information

The polarity of water molecules results in hydrogen bonding [3]

The polarity of water molecules results in hydrogen bonding [3] GUIDED READING - Ch. 3 PROPERTIES OF WATER NAME: Please print out these pages and HANDWRITE the answers directly on the printouts. Typed work or answers on separate sheets of paper will not be accepted.

More information

9/11/2011. Lesson Overview. 2.1 The Nature of Matter? Atoms THINK ABOUT IT. Atoms. Atoms. 2.1 The Nature of Matter. Lesson Overview.

9/11/2011. Lesson Overview. 2.1 The Nature of Matter? Atoms THINK ABOUT IT. Atoms. Atoms. 2.1 The Nature of Matter. Lesson Overview. 2.1? 2.1 2.1.1 Identify the three subatomic Particles found in atoms. 2.1.2 Explain how all the isotopes of an element are similar and how they are different. 2.1.3 Explain how compounds are different

More information

Elements in Biological Molecules

Elements in Biological Molecules Chapter 3: Biological Molecules 1. Carbohydrates 2. Lipids 3. Proteins 4. Nucleic Acids Elements in Biological Molecules Biological macromolecules are made almost entirely of just 6 elements: Carbon (C)

More information

Carbohydrates, Lipids, and Proteins 3.2

Carbohydrates, Lipids, and Proteins 3.2 Carbohydrates, Lipids, and Proteins 3.2 Organic vs. Inorganic compounds Organic compounds contain carbon and are found in living organisms Exceptions: hydrocarbonates, carbonates, oxides of carbon. Inorganic

More information

1) What is the name of the chart that describes the atomic elements in ascending order of mass.

1) What is the name of the chart that describes the atomic elements in ascending order of mass. SFCC: Winter 2011 Dr. Timm Name: 1) What is the name of the chart that describes the atomic elements in ascending order of mass. Periodic Table of elements 2) The atomic number describes the number of

More information

Lesson Overview. The Nature of Matter. Lesson Overview. 2.1 The Nature of Matter

Lesson Overview. The Nature of Matter. Lesson Overview. 2.1 The Nature of Matter Lesson Overview 2.1 2.1? 2.1.1 Identify the three subatomic Particles found in atoms. 2.1.2 Explain how all the isotopes of an element are similar and how they are different. 2.1.3 Explain how compounds

More information

ATOMS AND BONDS. Bonds

ATOMS AND BONDS. Bonds ATOMS AND BONDS Atoms of elements are the simplest units of organization in the natural world. Atoms consist of protons (positive charge), neutrons (neutral charge) and electrons (negative charge). The

More information

Elements & Macromolecules in Organisms

Elements & Macromolecules in Organisms Name: Date: Per: Table # Elements & Macromolecules in rganisms Most common elements in living things are carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, and oxygen. These four elements constitute about 95% of your body weight.

More information

Biology 111. General Biology 1

Biology 111. General Biology 1 Biology 111 General Biology 1 Course Description This introduction to biology covers in detail the basic biological concepts of scientific method, cell structure and function, metabolism, evolution, genetics,

More information

NO CALCULATORS OR CELL PHONES ALLOWED

NO CALCULATORS OR CELL PHONES ALLOWED Biol 205 Exam 1 TEST FORM A Spring 2008 NAME Fill out both sides of the Scantron Sheet. On Side 2 be sure to indicate that you have TEST FORM A The answers to Part I should be placed on the SCANTRON SHEET.

More information

Chemistry Comes Alive: Part B

Chemistry Comes Alive: Part B 2 Chemistry Comes Alive: Part B Classes of Compounds Inorganic compounds Water, salts, and many acids and bases Do not contain carbon Organic compounds Carbohydrates, fats, proteins, and nucleic acids

More information

c. On the planet Earth weight and mass may be considered synonymous. 1. Define mass. 2. Define weight.

c. On the planet Earth weight and mass may be considered synonymous. 1. Define mass. 2. Define weight. Biology 150 - Fall Semester Introductory Workshop Exercise (Life & Its Chemistry) PART 1: Chemistry - A Fundamental Theme in the Study of Life. Life is organized on many different structural levels - from

More information

1.4: Carbohydrates and Lipids pg. 29 38

1.4: Carbohydrates and Lipids pg. 29 38 UNIT 1: Biochemistry 1.4: Carbohydrates and Lipids pg. 29 38 Carbohydrates Function, primary energy source for the cell, can also be a structural component of cells and organisms. Carbohydrates are the

More information

NAME: BLOCK: Elements & Macromolecules in Organisms

NAME: BLOCK: Elements & Macromolecules in Organisms NAME: BLK: Elements & Macromolecules in rganisms Most common elements in living things are carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, and oxygen. These four elements constitute about 95% of your body weight. All compounds

More information

1. When applying the process of science, which of these is tested? a. an observation b. a result c. a hypothesis d. a question e.

1. When applying the process of science, which of these is tested? a. an observation b. a result c. a hypothesis d. a question e. BCOR 11 Exam 1, 2004 MULTIPLE CHOICE. Choose the one alternative that best completes the statement or answers the question. 1. When applying the process of science, which of these is tested? a. an observation

More information

BIO 3A LABORATORY Biologically Important Molecules Carbohydrates, Lipids, Proteins and Nucleic Acids

BIO 3A LABORATORY Biologically Important Molecules Carbohydrates, Lipids, Proteins and Nucleic Acids BIO 3A LABORATORY Biologically Important Molecules Carbohydrates, Lipids, Proteins and Nucleic Acids Objectives To perform tests that detect the presence of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and nucleic

More information

the nature and importance of biomacromolecules in the chemistry of the cell: synthesis of biomacromolecules through the condensation reaction lipids

the nature and importance of biomacromolecules in the chemistry of the cell: synthesis of biomacromolecules through the condensation reaction lipids the nature and importance of biomacromolecules in the chemistry of the cell: synthesis of biomacromolecules through the condensation reaction lipids and their sub-units; the role of lipids in the plasma

More information

The Molecules of Life - Overview. The Molecules of Life. The Molecules of Life. The Molecules of Life

The Molecules of Life - Overview. The Molecules of Life. The Molecules of Life. The Molecules of Life The Molecules of Life - Overview The Molecules of Life The Importance of Carbon Organic Polymers / Monomers Functions of Organic Molecules Origin of Organic Molecules The Molecules of Life Water is the

More information

Guided Reading Activities

Guided Reading Activities Name Period Chapter 2: The Chemical Basis of Life Guided Reading Activities Big idea: Elements, atom, and compounds Answer the following questions as you read modules 2.1 2.4: 1. Match the following terms

More information

Unit 3 Review Questions. AP Biology

Unit 3 Review Questions. AP Biology Unit 3 Review Questions AP Biology 1. What was the first organic molecule to be synthesized in the laboratory? A. ammonium cyanate B. hydrogen cyanide C. urea D. acetic acid E. methane 2. Carbon is an

More information

Activity 4/5.1 How Can You Identify Organic Macromolecules?

Activity 4/5.1 How Can You Identify Organic Macromolecules? Answers? Activity 4/5.1 ow an You Identify rganic Macromolecules? efer to the figure (Some Simple hemistry) on the next page when doing this activity. Part A. Answer the questions. Then use your answers

More information

Southeastern Louisiana University Dual Enrollment Program--Chemistry

Southeastern Louisiana University Dual Enrollment Program--Chemistry Southeastern Louisiana University Dual Enrollment Program--Chemistry The Southeastern Dual Enrollment Chemistry Program is a program whereby high school students are given the opportunity to take college

More information

Use the diagram to answer the questions. 1. What are the negatively charged electrons attracted to?

Use the diagram to answer the questions. 1. What are the negatively charged electrons attracted to? Protons, Neutrons, and The diagram shows a model of an atom. It shows the nucleus, protons, neutrons, and electrons. The diagram is not to scale. Label a proton, a neutron, an electron, and the nucleus.

More information

Introduction to Chemistry

Introduction to Chemistry Introduction to Chemistry Study Guide List and give an example of the levels of biological organization by starting with an ecosystem and ending with atom. Distinguish between atom, molecule, element,

More information

Guided Reading Activities

Guided Reading Activities Name Period Chapter 3: The Molecules of Cells Guided Reading Activities Big idea: Introduction to organic compounds Answer the following questions as you read modules 3.1 3.3: 1. Is this molecule an organic

More information

Biology, I: Midterm Review Mrs. DiMarcella

Biology, I: Midterm Review Mrs. DiMarcella Unit 1: Foundations of Biology Biology, I: Midterm Review Mrs. DiMarcella The Science of Life (pages 4-29).................................. 2 o The World of Biology o Themes in Biology o The Study of

More information

Carbon-organic Compounds

Carbon-organic Compounds Elements in Cells The living substance of cells is made up of cytoplasm and the structures within it. About 96% of cytoplasm and its included structures are composed of the elements carbon, hydrogen, oxygen,

More information

Name Period. Biology Biochemistry

Name Period. Biology Biochemistry Name Period Biology Biochemistry Date Assignment Points Earned Possible Points Chapter 2 Vocabulary 25 Unique Properties of Water Notes 5 Writing Prompts 1 & 2 7 Organic Molecules: Lipids / Carbohydrates

More information

Chapter 2. The Chemistry of Life Worksheets

Chapter 2. The Chemistry of Life Worksheets Chapter 2 The Chemistry of Life Worksheets (Opening image courtesy of David Iberri, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/file:camkii.png, and under the Creative Commons license CC-BY-SA 3.0.) Lesson 2.1: Matter

More information

AP Biology Summer Work

AP Biology Summer Work AP Biology Summer Work Welcome to AP Biology! Over the summer I expect you to read and learn the first 5 chapters in the textbook. These chapters should be mostly review for you with only a few new things

More information

Chapter 3: Biological Molecules. 1. Carbohydrates 2. Lipids 3. Proteins 4. Nucleic Acids

Chapter 3: Biological Molecules. 1. Carbohydrates 2. Lipids 3. Proteins 4. Nucleic Acids Chapter 3: Biological Molecules 1. Carbohydrates 2. Lipids 3. Proteins 4. Nucleic Acids Elements in Biological Molecules Biological macromolecules are made almost entirely of just 6 elements: Carbon (C)

More information

MACROMOLECULES PRACTICE TEST MULTIPLE CHOICE

MACROMOLECULES PRACTICE TEST MULTIPLE CHOICE Name Date Period Biology I, Ms. Desfossé MACROMOLECULES PRACTICE TEST MULTIPLE CHOICE 1. The molecule below is a a. carbohydrate b. lipid c. steroid d. A and C e. B and C 2. The molecule below is a polymer

More information

Biology. Based on the principles of chemistry and physics All living organisms are a collection of atoms and molecules

Biology. Based on the principles of chemistry and physics All living organisms are a collection of atoms and molecules Biology Based on the principles of chemistry and physics All living organisms are a collection of atoms and molecules 1 Atoms Smallest functional units of matter that form all chemical substances Cannot

More information

Advanced Cell Biology. Lecture 3

Advanced Cell Biology. Lecture 3 Advanced Cell Biology. Lecture 3 Alexey Shipunov Minot State University January 18, 2012 Outline Questions and answers Organic molecules Basics of organic chemistry Outline Questions and answers Organic

More information

Worksheet 13.1. Chapter 13: Human biochemistry glossary

Worksheet 13.1. Chapter 13: Human biochemistry glossary Worksheet 13.1 Chapter 13: Human biochemistry glossary α-helix Refers to a secondary structure of a protein where the chain is twisted to form a regular helix, held by hydrogen bonds between peptide bonds

More information

Molecular Cell Biology

Molecular Cell Biology Harvey Lodish Arnold Berk Paul Matsudaira Chris A. Kaiser Monty Krieger Matthew P. Scott Lawrence Zipursky James Darnell Molecular Cell Biology Fifth Edition Chapter 2: Chemical Foundations Copyright 2004

More information

Chapter 5: The Structure and Function of Large Biological Molecules

Chapter 5: The Structure and Function of Large Biological Molecules Name Period Chapter 5: The Structure and Function of Large Biological Molecules Concept 5.1 Macromolecules are polymers, built from monomers 1. The large molecules of all living things fall into just four

More information

Organic Molecules of Life - Exercise 2

Organic Molecules of Life - Exercise 2 Organic Molecules of Life - Exercise 2 Objectives -Know the difference between a reducing sugar and a non-reducing sugar. -Distinguish Monosaccharides from Disaccharides and Polysaccharides -Understand

More information