Mat Foundations. 6.1 Introduction. 6.2 Combined Footings

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "Mat Foundations. 6.1 Introduction. 6.2 Combined Footings"

Transcription

1 6 Mat Foundations 6.1 Introduction Under normal conditions, square and rectangular footings such as those described in Chapters 3 and 4 are economical for supporting columns and walls. However, under certain circumstances, it may be desirable to construct a footing that supports a line of two or more columns. These footings are referred to as combined footings. When more than one line of columns is supported by a concrete slab, it is called a mat foundation. Combined footings can be classified generally under the following categories: a. Rectangular combined footing b. Trapezoidal combined footing c. Strap footing Mat foundations are generally used with soil that has a low bearing capacity. A brief overview of the principles of combined footings is given in Section 6., followed by a more detailed discussion on mat foundations. 6. Combined Footings Rectangular Combined Footing In several instances, the load to be carried by a column and the soil bearing capacity are such that the standard spread footing design will require extension of the column foundation beyond the property line. In such a case, two or more columns can be supported on a single rectangular foundation, as shown in Figure 6.1. If the net allowable soil pressure is known, the size of the foundation (B 3 L) can be determined in the following manner: a. Determine the area of the foundation A 5 Q 1 1 Q q net(all) where Q 1, Q 5 column loads q net(all) 5 net allowable soil bearing capacity (6.1) 91

2 9 Chapter 6: Mat Foundations L Q 1 X Q 1 Q L 3 Q L 1 Section B q net(all) /unit length L Property line B Plan Figure 6.1 Rectangular combined footing b. Determine the location of the resultant of the column loads. From Figure 6.1, X 5 Q L 3 Q 1 1 Q (6.) c. For a uniform distribution of soil pressure under the foundation, the resultant of the column loads should pass through the centroid of the foundation. Thus, L 5 (L 1 X) where L 5 length of the foundation. d. Once the length L is determined, the value of can be obtained as follows: L 1 5 L L L 3 Note that the magnitude of L will be known and depends on the location of the property line. e. The width of the foundation is then L 1 B 5 A L (6.3) (6.4) (6.5) Trapezoidal Combined Footing Trapezoidal combined footing (see Figure 6.) is sometimes used as an isolated spread foundation of columns carrying large loads where space is tight. The size of the foundation that will uniformly distribute pressure on the soil can be obtained in the following manner: a. If the net allowable soil pressure is known, determine the area of the foundation: A 5 Q 1 1 Q q net(all)

3 6. Combined Footings 93 L X Q 1 Q L 1 Q 1 L 3 Q B q net(all) /unit length B 1 q net(all) /unit length Section B 1 B Property line L Plan Figure 6. Trapezoidal combined footing From Figure 6., A 5 B 1 1 B L (6.6) b. Determine the location of the resultant for the column loads: c. From the property of a trapezoid, X 5 Q L 3 Q 1 1 Q X 1 L 5 B 1 1 B L B 1 1 B 3 (6.7) With known values of A, L, X, and L, solve Eqs. (6.6) and (6.7) to obtain B 1 and B. Note that, for a trapezoid, L 3, X 1 L, L

4 94 Chapter 6: Mat Foundations Strap Section Strap Section Strap Plan Strap Plan (a) (b) Wall Section Strap Strap Plan (c) Figure 6.3 Cantilever footing use of strap beam Cantilever Footing Cantilever footing construction uses a strap beam to connect an eccentrically loaded column foundation to the foundation of an interior column. (See Figure 6.3). Cantilever footings may be used in place of trapezoidal or rectangular combined footings when the allowable soil bearing capacity is high and the distances between the columns are large. 6.3 Common Types of Mat Foundations The mat foundation, which is sometimes referred to as a raft foundation, is a combined footing that may cover the entire area under a structure supporting several columns and walls. Mat foundations are sometimes preferred for soils that have low load-bearing capacities, but that will have to support high column or wall loads. Under some conditions, spread footings would have to cover more than half the building area, and mat foundations might be more economical. Several types of mat foundations are used currently. Some of the common ones are shown schematically in Figure 6.4 and include the following: 1. Flat plate (Figure 6.4a). The mat is of uniform thickness.. Flat plate thickened under columns (Figure 6.4b). 3. Beams and slab (Figure 6.4c). The beams run both ways, and the columns are located at the intersection of the beams. 4. Flat plates with pedestals (Figure 6.4d). 5. Slab with basement walls as a part of the mat (Figure 6.4e). The walls act as stiffeners for the mat.

5 6.3 Common Types of Mat Foundations 95 Section Section Section Plan Plan Plan (a) (b) (c) Section Section Plan Plan (d) (e) Figure 6.4 Common types of mat foundations Mats may be supported by piles, which help reduce the settlement of a structure built over highly compressible soil. Where the water table is high, mats are often placed over piles to control buoyancy. Figure 6.5 shows the difference between the depth D f and the width B of isolated foundations and mat foundations. Figure 6.6 shows a flat-plate mat foundation under construction. B D f D f B Figure 6.5 Comparison of isolated foundation and mat foundation (B 5 width, D f 5 depth)

6 96 Chapter 6: Mat Foundations Figure 6.6 A flat plate mat foundation under construction (Courtesy of Dharma Shakya, Geotechnical Solutions, Inc., Irvine, California) 6.4 Bearing Capacity of Mat Foundations The gross ultimate bearing capacity of a mat foundation can be determined by the same equation used for shallow foundations (see Section 3.6), or q u 5 crn c F cs F cd F ci 1 qn q F qs F qd F qi 1 1 gbn g F gs F gd F gi [Eq. (3.19)] (Chapter 3 gives the proper values of the bearing capacity factors, as well as the shape depth, and load inclination factors.) The term B in Eq. (3.19) is the smallest dimension of the mat. The net ultimate capacity of a mat foundation is q net(u) 5 q u q [Eq. (3.14)] A suitable factor of safety should be used to calculate the net allowable bearing capacity. For mats on clay, the factor of safety should not be less than 3 under dead load or maximum live load. However, under the most extreme conditions, the factor of safety should be at least 1.75 to. For mats constructed over sand, a factor of safety of 3 should normally be used. Under most working conditions, the factor of safety against bearing capacity failure of mats on sand is very large. For saturated clays with f50 and a vertical loading condition, Eq. (3.19) gives q u 5 c u N c F cs F cd 1 q (6.8)

7 6.4 Bearing Capacity of Mat Foundations 97 where c u 5 undrained cohesion. (Note: N c , N q 5 1, and N g 5 0. ) From Table 3.4, for f50, and F cs B L N q B N c L B L F cd D f B Substitution of the preceding shape and depth factors into Eq. (6.8) yields q u c u B L D f B 1 q (6.9) Hence, the net ultimate bearing capacity is q net(u) 5 q u q c u B L D f B (6.10) For FS 5 3, the net allowable soil bearing capacity becomes (6.11) The net allowable bearing capacity for mats constructed over granular soil deposits can be adequately determined from the standard penetration resistance numbers. From Eq. (5.64), for shallow foundations, where q net(all) 5 q u(net) FS c 0.195B u 1 1 L D f B N 60 5 standard penetration resistance B 5 width (m) F d (D f >B) < 1.33 S e 5 settlement, (mm) q net (kn>m ) 5 N B F B d S e 5 When the width B is large, the preceding equation can be approximated as [Eq. (5.64)] q net (kn>m ) 5 N F d S e 5 5 N B D f B RBS e(mm) 5 < 16.63N 60 B S e(mm) R 5 R (6.1)

8 98 Chapter 6: Mat Foundations In English units, Eq. (6.1) may be expressed as q net(all) (kip>ft ) 5 0.5N 60 B D f B R3S e(in.)4 < 0.33N 60 3S e (in.)4 (6.13) Generally, shallow foundations are designed for a maximum settlement of 5 mm and a differential settlement of about 19 mm. However, the width of the raft foundations are larger than those of the isolated spread footings. As shown in Table 5.3, the depth of significant stress increase in the soil below a foundation depends on the width of the foundation. Hence, for a raft foundation, the depth of the zone of influence is likely to be much larger than that of a spread footing. Thus, the loose soil pockets under a raft may be more evenly distributed, resulting in a smaller differential settlement. Accordingly, the customary assumption is that, for a maximum raft settlement of 50 mm, the differential settlement would be 19 mm. Using this logic and conservatively assuming that F d 5 1, we can respectively approximate Eqs. (6.1) and (6.13) as q net(all) 5 q net (kn>m ) < 5N 60 (6.14a) The net allowable pressure applied on a foundation (see Figure 6.7) may be expressed as q 5 Q A gd f (6.15) where Q 5 dead weight of the structure and the live load A 5 area of the raft In all cases, q should be less than or equal to allowable q net. D f Unit weight Q Figure 6.7 Definition of net pressure on soil caused by a mat foundation

9 6.5 Differential Settlement of Mats 99 Example 6.1 Determine the net ultimate bearing capacity of a mat foundation measuring 15 m 3 10 m on a saturated clay with c u 5 95 kn>m, f50, and D f 5 m. Solution From Eq. (6.10), q net(u) c u B B L RB D f B R 5 (5.14)(95) B kn,m RB R 10 Example 6. What will be the net allowable bearing capacity of a mat foundation with dimensions of 15 m 3 10 m constructed over a sand deposit? Here, D f 5 m, the allowable settlement is 5 mm, and the average penetration number N Solution From Eq. (6.1), or q net(all) 5 N B D f B R S e 5 < 16.63N 60 S e 5 q net(all) B1 1 R kn,m 6.5 Differential Settlement of Mats In 1988, the American Concrete Institute Committee 336 suggested a method for calculating the differential settlement of mat foundations. According to this method, the rigidity factor is calculated as where K r Er 5 modulus of elasticity of the material used in the structure E s 5 modulus of elasticity of the soil B 5 width of foundation I b 5 moment of inertia of the structure per unit length at right angles to B The term ErI b can be expressed as K r 5 ErI b E s B 3 ErI b 5 Er I F 1 a Ir b 1 a ah 3 1 (6.16) (6.17)

10 300 Chapter 6: Mat Foundations where ErI b 5 flexural rigidity of the superstructure and foundation per unit length at right angles to B SErIr b 5 flexural rigidity of the framed members at right angles to B S(Erah 3 >1) 5 flexural rigidity of the shear walls a 5 shear wall thickness h 5 shear wall height ErI F 5 flexibility of the foundation Based on the value of K r, the ratio (d) of the differential settlement to the total settlement can be estimated in the following manner: 1. If K r. 0.5, it can be treated as a rigid mat, and d50.. If K r 5 0.5, then d < If K r 5 0, then d50.35 for square mats (B>L 5 1) and d50.5 for long foundations (B>L 5 0). 6.6 Field Settlement Observations for Mat Foundations Several field settlement observations for mat foundations are currently available in the literature. In this section, we compare the observed settlements for some mat foundations constructed over granular soil deposits with those obtained from Eqs. (6.1) and (6.13). Meyerhof (1965) compiled the observed maximum settlements for mat foundations constructed on sand and gravel, as listed in Table 6.1. In Eq. (6.1), if the depth factor, (D f >B), is assumed to be approximately unity, then S e (mm) < q net(all) N 60 (6.18) q net(all) From the values of and N 60 given in Columns 6 and 5, respectively, of Table 6.1, the magnitudes of S e were calculated and are given in Column 8. Column 9 of Table 6.1 gives the ratios of calculated to measured values of S e. These ratios vary from about 0.79 to Thus, calculating the net allowable bearing capacity with the use of Eq. (6.1) or (6.13) will yield safe and conservative values. 6.7 Compensated Foundation Figure 6.7 and Eq. (6.15) indicate that the net pressure increase in the soil under a mat foundation can be reduced by increasing the depth D f of the mat. This approach is generally referred to as the compensated foundation design and is extremely useful when structures are to be built on very soft clays. In this design, a deeper basement is made below the higher portion of the superstructure, so that the net pressure increase in soil at any depth is relatively uniform. (See Figure 6.8.) From Eq. (6.15) and Figure 6.7, the net average applied pressure on soil is q 5 Q A gd f

11 Table 6.1 Settlement of Mat Foundations on Sand and Gravel (Based on Meyerhof, 1965) (Based on Meyerhof, G. G., (1965). Shallow Foundations, Journal of the Soil Mechanics and Foundation Engineering Divsion, American Society of Civil Engineers, Vol. 91, No., pp. 1 31, Table 1. With permission from ASCE.) Observed calculated S e Calculated maximum maximum Case B Average q net(all) settlement, settlement, No. Structure Reference m N kn,m 60 S e mm S e mm observed S e (1) () (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) 1 T. Edison Rios and Silva (1948) São Paulo, Brazil Banco do Brazil Rios and Silva (1948); São Paulo, Brazil Vargas (1961) Iparanga Vargas (1948) São Paulo, Brazil C.B.I., Esplanda Vargas (1961) São Paulo, Brazil Riscala Vargas (1948) São Paulo, Brazil Thyssen Schultze (196) Düsseldorf, Germany Ministry Schultze (196) Düsseldorf, Germany Chimney Schultze (196) Cologne, Germany

12 30 Chapter 6: Mat Foundations Figure 6.8 Compensated foundation For no increase in the net pressure on soil below a mat foundation, q should be zero. Thus, D f 5 Q Ag (6.19) D f This relation for is usually referred to as the depth of a fully compensated foundation. The factor of safety against bearing capacity failure for partially compensated foundations (i.e., D f, Q>Ag) may be given as FS 5 q net(u) q 5 q net(u) Q A gd f (6.0) where q net(u) 5 net ultimate bearing capacity. For saturated clays, the factor of safety against bearing capacity failure can thus be obtained by substituting Eq. (6.10) into Eq. (6.0): FS c u B L D f B Q A gd f (6.1) Example 6.3 The mat shown in Figure 6.7 has dimensions of 18.3 m m. The total dead and live load on the mat is kn kip. The mat is placed over a saturated clay having a unit weight of kn>m 3 and c u kn>m. Given that D f m, determine the factor of safety against bearing capacity failure.

13 Solution From Eq. (6.1), the factor of safety We are given that c u kn>m, kn>m 3. Hence, FS 5 FS c u B L D f B Q A gd f 6.7 Compensated Foundation 303 D f m, B m, L m, (5.14)(134) B1 1 (0.195)(18.3) RB R kn (18.87)(1.5) and g5 Example 6.4 Consider a mat foundation 30 m 3 40 m in plan, as shown in Figure 6.9. The total dead load and live load on the raft is kn. Estimate the consolidation settlement at the center of the foundation. Solution From Eq. (1.61) S c(p) 5 C ch c log sr o 1Dsr av 1 1 e o sr o sr o 5 (3.67)(15.7) 1 (13.33)( ) 1 6 ( ) < 08 kn>m H c 5 6 m C c e o For Q kn, the net load per unit area is q 5 Q A gd f 5 (15.7)() < 135. kn>m In order to calculate Dsr av we refer to Section 5.5. The loaded area can be divided into four areas, each measuring 15 m 3 0 m. Now using Eq. (5.19), we can calculate the average stress increase in the clay layer below the corner of each rectangular area, or Dsr av(h >H 1 ) 5 q o B H I a(h ) H 1 I a(h1 ) R H H B ( )I a(h ) ( )I a(h1 ) R 6

14 304 Chapter 6: Mat Foundations m 1.67 m 30 m 40 m Q z Sand 15.7 kn/m 3 Groundwater table m Sand sat 19.1 kn/m 3 6 m I a(h ) For, Sand m 5 B H 5 From Fig. 5.7, for m and n , the value of is 0.1. Again, for From Figure 5.7, I a(h1 ) 5 0.5, so Dsr av(h >H 1 ) B Normally consolidated clay kn/m 3 sat 0.8; e o 0.9 C c n 5 L H m 5 B H n 5 L H Figure 6.9 Consolidation settlement under a mat foundation I a(h ) (1)(0.1) (15)(0.5) R kn>m 6 I a(h1 ), So, the stress increase below the center of the 30 m 3 40 m area is (4)(3.3) kn>m. Thus S c(p) 5 (0.8)(6) log m mm 6.8 Structural Design of Mat Foundations The structural design of mat foundations can be carried out by two conventional methods: the conventional rigid method and the approximate flexible method. Finite-difference and finite-element methods can also be used, but this section covers only the basic concepts of the first two design methods.

15 Conventional Rigid Method 6.8 Structural Design of Mat Foundations 305 The conventional rigid method of mat foundation design can be explained step by step with reference to Figure 6.10: Step 1. Figure 6.10a shows mat dimensions of L 3 B and column loads of Q 1, Q, Q 3, c. Calculate the total column load as Q 5 Q 1 1 Q 1 Q 3 1 c (6.) Step. Determine the pressure on the soil, q, below the mat at points A, B, C, D, c, by using the equation q 5 Q A 6 M yx I y 6 M xy I x (6.3) where A 5 BL I x 5 (1>1)BL 3 5 moment of inertia about the x-axis I y 5 (1>1)LB 3 5 moment of inertia about the y-axis M x 5 moment of the column loads about the x-axis 5 Qe y M y 5 moment of the column loads about the y-axis 5 Qe x The load eccentricities, e x and e y, in the x and y directions can be determined by using (xr, yr) coordinates: xr 5 Q 1xr 1 1 Q xr 1 Q 3 xr 3 1 c Q (6.4) and e x 5 xr B (6.5) Similarly, yr 5 Q 1yr 1 1 Q yr 1 Q 3 yr 3 1 c Q (6.6) and e y 5 yr L (6.7) Step 3. Step 4. Compare the values of the soil pressures determined in Step with the net allowable soil pressure to determine whether q < q all(net). Divide the mat into several strips in the x and y directions. (See Figure 6.10). Let the width of any strip be B 1.

16 y y A B 1 B 1 B 1 B 1 B C Q 9 Q 10 Q 11 D Q 1 B 1 e x e y B 1 L J E x Q 5 Q 6 Q 7 Q 8 B 1 Q 1 Q Q 3 Q 4 I H G F B (a) x FQ 1 FQ FQ 3 I H G FQ 4 F B 1 q av(modified) unit length B (b) Edge of mat Edge of mat L d/ d/ L d/ b o L L Edge of mat d/ d/ L b o L L (c) L L d/ d/ d/ d/ b o (L L ) L 306 Figure 6.10 Conventional rigid mat foundation design

17 6.8 Structural Design of Mat Foundations 307 Step 5. Draw the shear, V, and the moment, M, diagrams for each individual strip (in the x and y directions). For example, the average soil pressure of the bottom strip in the x direction of Figure 6.10a is q av < q I 1 q F (6.8) where q I and q F 5 soil pressures at points I and F, as determined from Step. The total soil reaction is equal to q av B 1 B. Now obtain the total column load on the strip as Q 1 1 Q 1 Q 3 1 Q 4. The sum of the column loads on the strip will not equal q av B 1 B, because the shear between the adjacent strips has not been taken into account. For this reason, the soil reaction and the column loads need to be adjusted, or Average load 5 q avb 1 B 1 (Q 1 1 Q 1 Q 3 1 Q 4 ) (6.9) Now, the modified average soil reaction becomes q av(modified) 5 q av average load q av B 1 B (6.30) and the column load modification factor is average load F 5 Q 1 1 Q 1 Q 3 1 Q 4 (6.31) Step 6. So the modified column loads are FQ 1, FQ, FQ 3, and FQ 4. This modified loading on the strip under consideration is shown in Figure 6.10b. The shear and the moment diagram for this strip can now be drawn, and the procedure is repeated in the x and y directions for all strips. Determine the effective depth d of the mat by checking for diagonal tension shear near various columns. According to ACI Code (Section c, American Concrete Institute, 1995), for the critical section, U 5 b o d3f(0.34)"fr c 4 (6.3) where U 5 factored column load (MN), or (column load) 3 (load factor) f5reduction factor fr c 5 compressive strength of concrete at 8 days (MN>m ) The units of b o and d in Eq. (6.3a) are in meters. The expression for b o in terms of d, which depends on the location of the column with respect to the plan of the mat, can be obtained from Figure 6.10c.

18 308 Chapter 6: Mat Foundations Step 7. Step 8. From the moment diagrams of all strips in one direction (x or y), obtain the maximum positive and negative moments per unit width (i.e., Mr 5 M>B 1 ). Determine the areas of steel per unit width for positive and negative reinforcement in the x and y directions. We have M u 5 (Mr)(load factor) 5fA s f y d a (6.33) and where a 5 A sf y 0.85fr c b A s 5 area of steel per unit width f y 5 yield stress of reinforcement in tension M u 5 factored moment f reduction factor (6.34) Examples 6.5 and 6.6 illustrate the use of the conventional rigid method of mat foundation design. Approximate Flexible Method In the conventional rigid method of design, the mat is assumed to be infinitely rigid. Also, the soil pressure is distributed in a straight line, and the centroid of the soil pressure is coincident with the line of action of the resultant column loads. (See Figure 6.11a.) In the approximate flexible method of design, the soil is assumed to be equivalent to an infinite number of elastic springs, as shown in Figure 6.11b. This assumption is sometimes referred to as the Winkler foundation. The elastic constant of these assumed springs is referred to as the coefficient of subgrade reaction, k. To understand the fundamental concepts behind flexible foundation design, consider a beam of width B 1 having infinite length, as shown in Figure 6.11c. The beam is subjected to a single concentrated load Q. From the fundamentals of mechanics of materials, d z M 5 E F I F dx (6.35) where M 5 moment at any section E F 5 modulus of elasticity of foundation material I moment of inertia of the cross section of the beam 5 ( 1)B 1 1 h 3 F 5 However, and dm dx dv dx 5 shear force 5 V 5 q 5 soil reaction (see Figure 6.11c).

19 Q 6.8 Structural Design of Mat Foundations 309 Q 1 Q Q 3 Resultant of soil pressure (a) Q Q 1 (b) A Point load B 1 h x Section at A A A q z (c) Figure 6.11 (a) Principles of design by conventional rigid method; (b) principles of approximate flexible method; (c) derivation of Eq. (6.39) for beams on elastic foundation Hence, d M dx 5 q Combining Eqs. (6.35) and (6.36) yields d 4 z E F I F dx 5 q 4 (6.36) (6.37) However, the soil reaction is q 5zkr

20 310 Chapter 6: Mat Foundations where z 5 deflection kr 5 kb 1 k 5 coefficient So, of subgrade reaction (kn>m 3 or lb>in 3 ) E F I F d4 z dx 4 5zkB 1 (6.38) Solving Eq. (6.38) yields z 5 e ax (Ar cos bx 1 As sin bx) (6.39) where Ar and As are constants and b5 4 Å B 1 k 4E F I F (6.40) The unit of the term b, as defined by the preceding equation, is (length) 1. This parameter is very important in determining whether a mat foundation should be designed by the conventional rigid method or the approximate flexible method. According to the American Concrete Institute Committee 336 (1988), mats should be designed by the conventional rigid method if the spacing of columns in a strip is less than 1.75>b. If the spacing of columns is larger than 1.75>b, the approximate flexible method may be used. To perform the analysis for the structural design of a flexible mat, one must know the principles involved in evaluating the coefficient of subgrade reaction, k. Before proceeding with the discussion of the approximate flexible design method, let us discuss this coefficient in more detail. If a foundation of width B (see Figure 6.1) is subjected to a load per unit area of q, it will undergo a settlement D. The coefficient of subgrade modulus can be defined as k 5 q D (6.41) B q Figure 6.1 Definition of coefficient of subgrade reaction, k

21 6.8 Structural Design of Mat Foundations 311 The unit of k is kn/m 3. The value of the coefficient of subgrade reaction is not a constant for a given soil, but rather depends on several factors, such as the length L and width B of the foundation and also the depth of embedment of the foundation. A comprehensive study by Terzaghi (1955) of the parameters affecting the coefficient of subgrade reaction indicated that the value of the coefficient decreases with the width of the foundation. In the field, load tests can be carried out by means of square plates measuring 0.3 m m, and values of k can be calculated. The value of k can be related to large foundations measuring B 3 B in the following ways: Foundations on Sandy Soils For foundations on sandy soils, k 5 k 0.3 B B (6.4) where k 0.3 and k 5 coefficients of subgrade reaction of foundations measuring 0.3 m m and B (m) 3 B (m), respectively (unit is kn>m 3 ). Foundations on Clays For foundations on clays, 0.3 (m) k(kn>m 3 ) 5 k 0.3 (kn>m 3 ) B B(m) R (6.43) The definitions of k and k 0.3 in Eq. (6.43) are the same as in Eq. (6.4). For rectangular foundations having dimensions of B 3 L (for similar soil and q), k 5 B k (B3B) L 1.5 (6.44) where k 5 coefficient of subgrade modulus of the rectangular foundation (L 3 B) k (B3B) 5 coefficient of subgrade modulus of a square foundation having dimension of B 3 B

22 31 Chapter 6: Mat Foundations Equation (6.44) indicates that the value of k for a very long foundation with a width B is approximately 0.67k (B3B). The modulus of elasticity of granular soils increases with depth. Because the settlement of a foundation depends on the modulus of elasticity, the value of k increases with the depth of the foundation. Table 6. provides typical ranges of values for the coefficient of subgrade reaction, k 0.3 (k 1 ), for sandy and clayey soils. For long beams, Vesic (1961) proposed an equation for estimating subgrade reaction, namely, kr 5 Bk E s B 4 É E F I F E s 1 m s or k E s B 4 É E F I F E s B(1 m s ) (6.45) where E s 5 modulus of elasticity of soil B 5 foundation width E F 5 modulus of elasticity of foundation material I F 5 moment of inertia of the cross section of the foundation m s 5 Poisson s ratio of soil Table 6. Typical Subgrade Reaction Values, k 0.3 (k 1 ) Soil type k 0.3 (k 1 ) MN,m 3 Dry or moist sand: Loose 8 5 Medium 5 15 Dense Saturated sand: Loose Medium Dense Clay: Stiff 10 5 Very stiff 5 50 Hard.50

23 For most practical purposes, Eq. (6.46) can be approximated as 6.8 Structural Design of Mat Foundations 313 k 5 E s B(1 m s ) (6.46) Now that we have discussed the coefficient of subgrade reaction, we will proceed with the discussion of the approximate flexible method of designing mat foundations. This method, as proposed by the American Concrete Institute Committee 336 (1988), is described step by step. The use of the design procedure, which is based primarily on the theory of plates, allows the effects (i.e., moment, shear, and deflection) of a concentrated column load in the area surrounding it to be evaluated. If the zones of influence of two or more columns overlap, superposition can be employed to obtain the net moment, shear, and deflection at any point. The method is as follows: Step 1. Step. Assume a thickness h for the mat, according to Step 6 of the conventional rigid method. (Note: h is the total thickness of the mat.) Determine the flexural ridigity R of the mat as given by the formula E F h 3 R 5 1(1 m F ) (6.47) where E F 5 modulus m F 5 Poisson s of elasticity of foundation material ratio of foundation material Step 3. Determine the radius of effective stiffness that is, Lr 5 4 R Å k (6.48) Step 4. where k 5 coefficient of subgrade reaction. The zone of influence of any column load will be on the order of 3 to 4 Lr. Determine the moment (in polar coordinates at a point) caused by a column load (see Figure 6.13a). The formulas to use are Q M r 5 radial moment 5 4 C A 1 (1 m F)A r S Lr (6.49) and Q M t 5 tangential moment 5 4 C m FA 1 1 (1 m F)A r S Lr (6.50)

24 314 Chapter 6: Mat Foundations 6 y 5 M r M y M t 4 r (a) M x x r L 3 1 A A4 A 1 A A 1, A, A 3, A 4 (b) Figure 6.13 Approximate flexible method of mat design Step 5. Step 6. Step 7. where r 5 radial distance from the column load Q 5 column load A 1, A 5 functions of r>lr The variations of A 1 and A with r>lr are shown in Figure 6.13b. (For details see Hetenyi, 1946.) In the Cartesian coordinate system (see Figure 6.13a), and M x 5 M t sin a1m r cos a (6.51) M y 5 M t cos a1m r sin a (6.5) For the unit width of the mat, determine the shear force V caused by a column load: V 5 Q (6.53) 4Lr A 3 The variation of A 3 with r>lr is shown in Figure 6.13b. If the edge of the mat is located in the zone of influence of a column, determine the moment and shear along the edge. (Assume that the mat is continuous.) Moment and shear opposite in sign to those determined are applied at the edges to satisfy the known conditions. The deflection at any point is given by The variation of A 4 d5 QLr 4R A 4 is presented in Figure 6.13b. (6.54)

25 6.8 Structural Design of Mat Foundations 315 Example 6.5 The plan of a mat foundation is shown in Figure Calculate the soil pressure at points A, B, C, D, E, and F. (Note: All column sections are planned to be 0.5 m 0.5 m.) y y A 400 kn G B I C 500 kn 450 kn 0.5 m 7 m 1500 kn 4.5 m 1500 kn 100 kn 8 m 4.5 m 7 m x 1500 kn 1500 kn 100 kn 7 m 400 kn 500 kn 350 kn F H E J D 8 m 8 m 0.5 m 0.5 m Figure 6.14 Plan of a mat foundation 0.5 m x Solution Eq. (6.3): q 5 Q A 6 M y x I y 6 M x y I x A (16.5)(1.5) m I x BL3 5 1 I y (16.5)(1.5)3 5 13,665 m 4 1 LB (1.5)(16.5)3 5 8,050 m 4 Q 350 ()(400) 450 ()(500) ()(100) (4)(1500) 11,000 kn M y 5 Qe x ; e x 5 x 9 B

26 316 Chapter 6: Mat Foundations xr 5 Q 1xr 1 1 Q xr 1 Q 3 xr 3 1 c Q (8.5)( ) ,000 C 1 (16.5)( ) 1 (0.5)( ) S m e x 5 x 9 B m < 0.44 m Hence, the resultant line of action is located to the left of the center of the mat. So M y (11,000)(0.44) 4840 kn-m. Similarly M x 5 Qe y ; e y 5 yr L yr 5 Q 1yr 1 1 Q yr 1 Q 3 yr 3 1 c Q 5 1 (0.5)( ) 1 (7.5)( ) c 11,000 1(14.5)( ) 1 (1.5)( ) d m e y 5 y 9 L m The location of the line of action of the resultant column loads is shown in Figure M x (11,000)(0.1) 1100 kn-m. So q 5 11, x y 13, x y( kn>m ) y y A 400 kn G B I C 500 kn 450 kn 0.5 m 7 m 1500 kn 4.5 m 0.1 m 1500 kn 8 m 0.44 m 100 kn 4.5 m 7 m x 1500 kn 1500 kn 100 kn 7 m 400 kn 500 kn F H E J 8 m 8 m 0.5 m 350 kn D 0.5 m 0.5 m x Figure 6.15

27 6.8 Structural Design of Mat Foundations 317 Therefore, At A: q 31.0 (0.6)(8.5) (0.08)(10.75) kn/m At B: q 31.0 (0.6)(0) (0.08)(10.75) kn/m At C: q 31.0 (0.6)(8.5) (0.08)(10.75) 6.91 kn/m At D: q 31.0 (0.6)(8.5) (0.08)(10.75) 5.19 kn/m At E: q 31.0 (0.6)(0) (0.08)(10.75) kn/m At F: q 31.0 (0.6)(8.5) (0.08)(10.75) kn/m Example 6.6 Divide the mat shown in Figure 6.14 into three strips, such as AGHF (B m), GIJH (B 1 8 m), and ICDJ (B m). Use the result of Example 6.5, and determine the reinforcement requirements in the y direction. Here, f c 0.7 MN/m, f y MN/m, and the load factor is 1.7. Solution Determination of Shear and Moment Diagrams for Strips: Strip AGHF: Average soil pressure 5 q av 5 q ( at A) 1 q ( at F) kn>m Total soil reaction q av B 1 L (35.95)(4.5)(1.50) 385 kn load due to soil reaction 1 column loads Average load kn So, modified average soil pressure, q av(modified) 5 q ava b 5 (35.95) a354.5b kn>m 385 The column loads can be modified in a similar manner by multiplying factor F Figure 6.16 shows the loading on the strip and corresponding shear and moment diagrams. Note that the column loads shown in this figure have been multiplied by F Also the load per unit length of the beam is equal to B 1 q av(modified) (4.5)(38.768) kn/m. Strip GIJH: In a similar manner, q av 5 q ( at B) 1 q ( at E) kn>m Total soil reaction (31)(8)(1.5) 533 kn Total column load 4000 kn

28 318 Chapter 6: Mat Foundations kn 0.5 m A kn kn kn 0.5 m 7 m 7 m 7 m F kn/m Shear (unit: kn) Moment (unit: kn-m) Figure 6.16 Load, shear, and moment diagrams for strip AGHF Average load q av(modified) 5 (31.0) a 4666 b kn>m 533 F kn The load, shear, and moment diagrams are shown in Figure Strip ICDJ: Figure 6.18 shows the load, shear, and moment diagrams for this strip. Determination of the Thickness of the Mat For this problem, the critical section for diagonal tension shear will be at the column carrying 1500 kn of load at the edge of the mat [Figure 6.19]. So b o 5 a0.5 1 d b 1 a0.5 1 d b 1 (0.5 1 d) d or U 5 (b o d)s(f)(0.34)"fc r T U (1.7)(1500) 550 kn.55 MN.55 5 (1.5 1 d)(d)s(0.85)(0.34)!0.7 T (1.5 d)(d) 1.94; d 0.68 m

29 6.8 Structural Design of Mat Foundations kn 0.5 m B kn kn kn 0.5 m 7 m 7 m 7 m E 17 kn/m Shear (unit: kn) Moment (unit: kn-m) Figure 6.17 Load, shear, and moment diagrams for strip GIJH 39.4 kn 0.5 m C kn kn 305. kn 0.5 m 7 m 7 m 7 m D 19.8 kn/m Shear (unit: kn) Moment (unit: kn-m) Figure 6.18 Load, shear, and moment diagrams for strip ICDJ

30 30 Chapter 6: Mat Foundations 1500 kn Column load Edge of mat d d/ Figure 6.19 Critical perimeter column Assuming a minimum cover of 76 mm over the steel reinforcement and also assuming that the steel bars to be used are 5 mm in diameter, the total thickness of the slab is h m 0.8 m The thickness of this mat will satisfy the wide beam shear condition across the three strips under consideration. Determination of Reinforcement From the moment diagram shown in Figures 6.16, 6.17, and 6.18, it can be seen that the maximum positive moment is located in strip AGHF, and its magnitude is Similarly, the maximum negative moment is located in strip ICDJ and its magnitude is From Eq. (6.33): M u 5 (Mr)( load factor) 5fA s f y ad a. b For the positive moment, 0.9. Also, from Eq. (6.34), M kn-m>m B Mr kn-m>m B M a0.68 a u 5 (406.5)(1.7) 5 (f)(a b s ) ( ) a 5 A s f y 0.85 f c 9 b 5 (A s)(413.7) (0.85)(0.7)(1) A s; or A s a (0.9)(0.045a)(413,700) a0.68 a b; or a < So, A s (0.045)(0.0645) m /m 740 mm /m.

31 6.8 Structural Design of Mat Foundations 31 Use 5-mm diameter bars at 175 mm center-to-center: ca s provided 5 (491) a b mm >md Similarly, for negative reinforcement, M u 5 (81.5)(1.7) 5 (f)(a s )( ) a0.68 a b So 0.9. A s 0.045a (0.9)(0.045a)( ) a0.68 a b; or a < So, A s (0.045)(0.045) m /m 1913 mm /m. Use 5-mm diameter bars at 55 mm center-to-center: [A s provided 195 mm ] Because negative moment occurs at midbay of strip ICDJ, reinforcement should be provided. This moment is Hence, M a0.68 a u 5 (68.)(1.7) 5 (0.9)(0.045a)( ) b; or a < M kn- m>m A s (0.0108)(0.045) m /m 459 mm /m Provide 16-mm diameter bars at 400 mm center-to-center: [A s provided 50 mm ] For general arrangement of the reinforcement see Figure 6.0. Top steel Bottom steel Top steel Additional top steel in strip ICDJ Figure 6.0 General arrangement of reinforcement

32 3 Chapter 6: Mat Foundations Problems 6.1 Determine the net ultimate bearing capacity of mat foundations with the following characteristics: c u 5 10 kn>m, f 50, B 5 8 m, L 5 18 m, D f 5 3 m 6. Following are the results of a standard penetration test in the field (sandy soil): Depth (m) Field value of N Estimate the net allowable bearing capacity of a mat foundation 6.5 m 3 5 m in plan. Here, D f m and allowable settlement 5 50 mm. Assume that the unit weight of soil, g516.5 kn>m Repeat Problem 6. for an allowable settlement of 30 mm. 6.4 A mat foundation on a saturated clay soil has dimensions of 0 m 3 0 m. Given: dead and live load 5 48 MN, c u 5 30 kn>m, and g clay kn>m 3. a. Find the depth, D f, of the mat for a fully compensated foundation. b. What will be the depth of the mat (D f ) for a factor of safety of against bearing capacity failure? 6.5 Repeat Problem 6.4 part b for c u 5 0 kn>m. 6.6 A mat foundation is shown in Figure P6.6. The design considerations are L 5 1 m, B 5 10 m, D f 5. m, Q 5 30 MN, x 1 5 m, x 5 m, x and preconsolidation pressure sr c < 105 kn>m m,. Calculate the consolidation settlement under the center of the mat. 6.7 For the mat foundation in Problem 6.6, estimate the consolidation settlement under the corner of the mat. 6.8 From the plate load test (plate dimensions 0.3 m m) in the field, the coefficient of subgrade reaction of a sandy soil is determined to be 14,900 kn>m 3. What will be the value of the coefficient of subgrade reaction on the same soil for a foundation with dimensions of 7.5 m m? 6.9 Refer to Problem If the full-sized foundation had dimensions of 1.3 m m, what will be the value of the coefficient of subgrade reaction? 6.10 The subgrade reaction of a sandy soil obtained from the plate load test (plate dimensions 1 m m) is 18 MN>m 3. What will be the value of k on the same soil for a foundation measuring 5 m m?

33 References 33 D f Size of mat B L Q Sand 16.0 kn/m 3 x 1 z Groundwater table x Sand sat 18.0 kn/m 3 x 3 sat e o C c C s Clay 17.5 kn/m Figure P6.6 References AMERICAN CONCRETE INSTITUTE (1995). ACI Standard Building Code Requirements for Reinforced Concrete, ACI , Farmington Hills, MI. AMERICAN CONCRETE INSTITUTE COMMITTEE 336 (1988). Suggested Design Procedures for Combined Footings and Mats, Journal of the American Concrete Institute, Vol. 63, No. 10, pp HETENYI,M.(1946). Beams of Elastic Foundations, University of Michigan Press, Ann Arbor, MI. MEYERHOF, G. G. (1965). Shallow Foundations, Journal of the Soil Mechanics and Foundations Division, American Society of Civil Engineers, Vol. 91, No. SM, pp RIOS, L., and SILVA, F. P. (1948). Foundations in Downtown São Paulo (Brazil), Proceedings, Second International Conference on Soil Mechanics and Foundation Engineering, Rotterdam, Vol. 4, p. 69. SCHULTZE, E. (196). Probleme bei der Auswertung von Setzungsmessungen, Proceedings, Baugrundtagung, Essen, Germany, p TERZAGHI, K. (1955). Evaluation of the Coefficient of Subgrade Reactions, Geotechnique, Institute of Engineers, London, Vol. 5, No. 4, pp VARGAS, M.(1948). Building Settlement Observations in São Paulo, Proceedings Second International Conference on Soil Mechanics and Foundation Engineering, Rotterdam, Vol. 4, p. 13. VARGAS, M.(1961). Foundations of Tall Buildings on Sand in São Paulo (Brazil), Proceedings, Fifth International Conference on Soil Mechanics and Foundation Engineering, Paris, Vol. 1, p VESIC, A. S. (1961). Bending of Beams Resting on Isotropic Solid, Journal of the Engineering Mechanics Division, American Society of Civil Engineers, Vol. 87, No. EM, pp

Module 5 (Lectures 17 to 19) MAT FOUNDATIONS

Module 5 (Lectures 17 to 19) MAT FOUNDATIONS Module 5 (Lectures 17 to 19) MAT FOUNDATIONS Topics 17.1 INTRODUCTION Rectangular Combined Footing: Trapezoidal Combined Footings: Cantilever Footing: Mat foundation: 17.2 COMMON TYPES OF MAT FOUNDATIONS

More information

(Lecture 19) MAT FOUNDATIONS

(Lecture 19) MAT FOUNDATIONS Module 5 (Lecture 19) MAT FOUNDATIONS Topics 1.1 STRUCTURAL DESIGN OF MAT FOUNDATIONS Conventional Rigid Method 1. Approximate Flexible Method Foundations on Sandy Soils Foundations on Clays 1.3 Example

More information

11 CHAPTER 11: FOOTINGS

11 CHAPTER 11: FOOTINGS CHAPTER ELEVEN FOOTINGS 1 11 CHAPTER 11: FOOTINGS 11.1 Footing Types Footings may be classified as deep or shallow. If depth of the footing is equal to or greater than its width, it is called deep footing,

More information

SHALLOW FOUNDATION III: COMBINED FOOTINGS AND MAT FOUNDATIONS

SHALLOW FOUNDATION III: COMBINED FOOTINGS AND MAT FOUNDATIONS CHAPTER 14 SHALLOW FOUNDATION III: COMBINED FOOTINGS AND MAT FOUNDATIONS 14.1 INTRODUCTION Chapter 12 has considered the common methods of transmitting loads to subsoil through spread footings carrying

More information

CE-632 Foundation Analysis and Design

CE-632 Foundation Analysis and Design CE-63 Foundation Analysis and Design Shallow Foundations 1 SUMMARY of Terminology Gross Loading Intensity Total pressure at the level of foundation including the weight of superstructure, foundation, and

More information

Foundation Analysis and

Foundation Analysis and CE-632 Foundation Analysis and Design Shallow Foundations 1 SUMMARY of Terminology Gross Loading Intensity Total pressure at the level of foundation including the weight of superstructure, foundation,

More information

REINFORCED CONCRETE. Reinforced Concrete Design. A Fundamental Approach - Fifth Edition

REINFORCED CONCRETE. Reinforced Concrete Design. A Fundamental Approach - Fifth Edition CHAPTER REINFORCED CONCRETE Reinforced Concrete Design A Fundamental Approach - Fifth Edition FOOTINGS Fifth Edition A. J. Clark School of Engineering Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

More information

PILE CAP DESIGN. A reinforced concrete slab or block which interconnects a group of piles and acts

PILE CAP DESIGN. A reinforced concrete slab or block which interconnects a group of piles and acts PILE CAP DESIGN PILE CAP:- A reinforced concrete slab or block which interconnects a group of piles and acts as a medium to transmit the load from wall or column to the Piles is called a Pile Cap. The

More information

The loads of the building are transferred to the soil through foundations. The sizes type of the foundation should be chosen so as,

The loads of the building are transferred to the soil through foundations. The sizes type of the foundation should be chosen so as, The loads of the building are transferred to the soil through foundations. The sizes type of the foundation should be chosen so as, to ensure structural safety of the foundation (no damage at the foundation),

More information

ENCE 4610 Foundation Analysis and Design. Combined Footings and Mat Foundations

ENCE 4610 Foundation Analysis and Design. Combined Footings and Mat Foundations ENCE 4610 Foundation Analysis and Design Combined Footings and Mat Foundations Mat Foundations A mat is continuous in two directions capable of supporting multiple columns, wall or floor loads. It has

More information

The Islamic university - Gaza Faculty of Engineering Civil Engineering Department CHAPTER (6) Mat Foundation. Instructor : Dr.

The Islamic university - Gaza Faculty of Engineering Civil Engineering Department CHAPTER (6) Mat Foundation. Instructor : Dr. The Islamic university - Gaza Faculty of Engineering Civil Engineering Department CHAPTER (6) Mat Foundation Instructor : Dr. Jehad Hamad Introduction Under normal conditions, square andrectangularfootings

More information

Foundation Design. p A. P D P L P u. q a. q g q net. q u. V c V u. w u

Foundation Design. p A. P D P L P u. q a. q g q net. q u. V c V u. w u Foundation Design Notation: a = name for width dimension A = name for area b = width of retaining wall stem at base = width resisting shear stress b o = perimeter length for two-way shear in concrete footing

More information

METHODS FOR ACHIEVEMENT UNIFORM STRESSES DISTRIBUTION UNDER THE FOUNDATION

METHODS FOR ACHIEVEMENT UNIFORM STRESSES DISTRIBUTION UNDER THE FOUNDATION International Journal of Civil Engineering and Technology (IJCIET) Volume 7, Issue 2, March-April 2016, pp. 45-66, Article ID: IJCIET_07_02_004 Available online at http://www.iaeme.com/ijciet/issues.asp?jtype=ijciet&vtype=7&itype=2

More information

ENCE 4610 Foundation Analysis and Design Shallow Foundations: Overview Terzaghi s Method of Bearing Capacity Estimation

ENCE 4610 Foundation Analysis and Design Shallow Foundations: Overview Terzaghi s Method of Bearing Capacity Estimation ENCE 4610 Foundation Analysis and Design Shallow Foundations: Overview Terzaghi s Method of Bearing Capacity Estimation Types of Shallow Foundations Shallow foundations are usually placed within a depth

More information

A STUDY ON BEARING CAPACITY OF STRIP AND SQUARE FOOTINGS IN SAND FROM N AND φ

A STUDY ON BEARING CAPACITY OF STRIP AND SQUARE FOOTINGS IN SAND FROM N AND φ Proceedings of Indian Geotechnical Conference December 22-24,2013, Roorkee A STUDY ON BEARING CAPACITY OF STRIP AND SQUARE FOOTINGS IN SAND FROM N AND φ S.V. Abhishek, PG Student, A.U. College of Engineering,

More information

Design and Detailing of steel in Combined Footings. Dr. M.C. NATARAJA

Design and Detailing of steel in Combined Footings. Dr. M.C. NATARAJA Design and Detailing of steel in Combined Footings Dr. M.C. NATARAJA Summary Sheet Session Number : Date : Subject Expert : 8 14.05.2007- Dr. M.C. Nataraja Professor Department of Civil Engineering, Sri

More information

Theory of simple bending (assumptions)

Theory of simple bending (assumptions) Theory of simple bending (assumptions) Material of beam is homogenous and isotropic => constant E in all direction Young s modulus is constant in compression and tension => to simplify analysis Transverse

More information

15 Footings 15-1 INTRODUCTION 15-2 SOIL PRESSURE UNDER FOOTINGS

15 Footings 15-1 INTRODUCTION 15-2 SOIL PRESSURE UNDER FOOTINGS 15 Footings 15-1 INTRODUCTION Footings and other foundation units transfer loads from the structure to the soil or rock supporting the structure. Because the soil is generally much weaker than the concrete

More information

Sheet Pile Walls. 9.1 Introduction

Sheet Pile Walls. 9.1 Introduction 9 Sheet Pile Walls 9.1 Introduction Connected or semiconnected sheet piles are often used to build continuous walls for waterfront structures that range from small waterfront pleasure boat launching facilities

More information

PUNCHING SHEAR CALCULATIONS 1 ACI 318; ADAPT-BUILDER

PUNCHING SHEAR CALCULATIONS 1 ACI 318; ADAPT-BUILDER Structural Concrete Software System TN192_Builder_punching_shear_aci_2 102505 PUNCHING SHEAR CALCULATIONS 1 ACI 318; ADAPT-BUILDER 1. OVERVIEW Punching shear calculation applies to column-supported slabs,

More information

CE-6502 FOUNDATION ENGINEERING UNIT 1 SITE INVESTIGATION AND SELECTION OF FOUNDATION PART A 1. List the various methods of soil exploration techniques. 2. What is the scope of soil investigation? 3. What

More information

Shallow Foundations: Ultimate Bearing Capacity

Shallow Foundations: Ultimate Bearing Capacity 3 Shallow Foundations: Ultimate Bearing Capacity 3.1 Introduction To perform satisfactorily, shallow foundations must have two main characteristics: 1. They have to be safe against overall shear failure

More information

Design of Reinforced Concrete Structures Prof. N. Dhang Department of Civil Engineering Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur

Design of Reinforced Concrete Structures Prof. N. Dhang Department of Civil Engineering Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur Design of Reinforced Concrete Structures Prof. N. Dhang Department of Civil Engineering Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur Lecture - 24 Design of Footings Part I Well so far done up to design of

More information

Suggested Modifications of the Conventional Rigid Method for Mat Foundation Design

Suggested Modifications of the Conventional Rigid Method for Mat Foundation Design Website: www.ijetae.com (ISSN 50-459, Volume, Issue 4, April 01) Suggested Modifications of the Conventional Rigid Method for Mat Foundation Design S. Shihada 1, J. Hamad and M. Alshorafa 3 1 Professor,

More information

Foundation size effect on modulus of sub grade reaction on Sandy soils

Foundation size effect on modulus of sub grade reaction on Sandy soils Foundation size effect on modulus of sub grade reaction on Sandy soils M.Janbaz 1, S.Janbaz 2 1- Department of Civil Engineering, International University of Imam Khomeini, Qazvin, Iran 2- Department of

More information

SLAB DESIGN. Introduction ACI318 Code provides two design procedures for slab systems:

SLAB DESIGN. Introduction ACI318 Code provides two design procedures for slab systems: Reading Assignment SLAB DESIGN Chapter 9 of Text and, Chapter 13 of ACI318-02 Introduction ACI318 Code provides two design procedures for slab systems: 13.6.1 Direct Design Method (DDM) For slab systems

More information

DESIGN OF SLABS. 3) Based on support or boundary condition: Simply supported, Cantilever slab,

DESIGN OF SLABS. 3) Based on support or boundary condition: Simply supported, Cantilever slab, DESIGN OF SLABS Dr. G. P. Chandradhara Professor of Civil Engineering S. J. College of Engineering Mysore 1. GENERAL A slab is a flat two dimensional planar structural element having thickness small compared

More information

Shallow Foundation Analysis on Heterogeneous Soil Formation in the Niger Delta of Nigeria

Shallow Foundation Analysis on Heterogeneous Soil Formation in the Niger Delta of Nigeria Shallow Foundation Analysis on Heterogeneous Soil Formation in the Niger Delta of Nigeria Akpila, S.B Department of Civil Engineering Rivers State University of Science & Technology, PortHarcourt. Eluozo,

More information

TABLE OF CONTENTS. Page No.

TABLE OF CONTENTS. Page No. TABLE OF CONTENTS Page No. DISCLAIMER... Ii 1. STRUCTURAL DESIGN GUIDELINES... 1 2. GENERAL REQUIREMENTS (FIGURE B.2, STEP 1)... 1 3. GENERAL LAYOUT AND GEOMETRY (FIGURE B.2, STEP 2)... 1 4. LOADS (FIGURE

More information

CE 366 BEARING CAPACITY (Problems & Solutions)

CE 366 BEARING CAPACITY (Problems & Solutions) CE 366 BEARING CAPACITY (Problems & Solutions) P1 Question: An excavation will be made for a ten storey 15x25 m building. Temporary support of earth pressure and water pressure will be made by deep secant

More information

FOUNDATION DESIGN. Instructional Materials Complementing FEMA 451, Design Examples

FOUNDATION DESIGN. Instructional Materials Complementing FEMA 451, Design Examples FOUNDATION DESIGN Proportioning elements for: Transfer of seismic forces Strength and stiffness Shallow and deep foundations Elastic and plastic analysis Foundation Design 14-1 Load Path and Transfer to

More information

GEOTECHNICAL ENGINEERING FORMULAS. A handy reference for use in geotechnical analysis and design

GEOTECHNICAL ENGINEERING FORMULAS. A handy reference for use in geotechnical analysis and design GEOTECHNICAL ENGINEERING FORMULAS A handy reference for use in geotechnical analysis and design TABLE OF CONTENTS Page 1. SOIL CLASSIFICATION...3 1.1 USCS: Unified Soil Classification System...3 1.1.1

More information

The Islamic University of Gaza Department of Civil Engineering. Design of Rectangular Concrete Tanks

The Islamic University of Gaza Department of Civil Engineering. Design of Rectangular Concrete Tanks The Islamic University of Gaza Department of Civil Engineering Design of Rectangular Concrete Tanks RECTANGULAR TANK DESIGN The cylindrical shape is structurally best suited for tank construction, but

More information

UNIT - III FLEXURAL STRESSES OR BENDING STRESSES IN BEAMS

UNIT - III FLEXURAL STRESSES OR BENDING STRESSES IN BEAMS UNIT - III FLEXURAL STRESSES OR BENDING STRESSES IN BEAMS BENDING STRESSES: The stresses induced by bending moment are known as bending stresses. PURE BENDING OR SIMPLE BENDING: If a length of a beam is

More information

twenty six concrete construction: foundation design ELEMENTS OF ARCHITECTURAL STRUCTURES: FORM, BEHAVIOR, AND DESIGN DR. ANNE NICHOLS SPRING 2014

twenty six concrete construction: foundation design ELEMENTS OF ARCHITECTURAL STRUCTURES: FORM, BEHAVIOR, AND DESIGN DR. ANNE NICHOLS SPRING 2014 ELEMENTS OF ARCHITECTURAL STRUCTURES: FORM, BEHAVIOR, AND DESIGN DR. ANNE NICHOLS SPRING 2014 lecture twenty six concrete construction: www.tamu.edu foundation design Foundations 1 Foundation the engineered

More information

KINGS COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING QUESTION BANK. UNIT I STRESS STRAIN DEFORMATION OF SOLIDS PART- A (2 Marks)

KINGS COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING QUESTION BANK. UNIT I STRESS STRAIN DEFORMATION OF SOLIDS PART- A (2 Marks) KINGS COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING QUESTION BANK SUB CODE/NAME: CE1259 STRENGTH OF MATERIALS YEAR/SEM: II / IV 1. What is Hooke s Law? 2. What are the Elastic Constants?

More information

CVEN 444: STRUCTURAL CONCRETE DESIGN CLASS PROJECT

CVEN 444: STRUCTURAL CONCRETE DESIGN CLASS PROJECT CLASS PROJECT The structural floor plan of a three-story (ground plus 3 floors) office building is shown on the next page. The roof covers the hole used for the elevator shaft and stairwells. The new building

More information

Stress Analysis Verification Manual

Stress Analysis Verification Manual Settle3D 3D settlement for foundations Stress Analysis Verification Manual 007-01 Rocscience Inc. Table of Contents Settle3D Stress Verification Problems 1 Vertical Stresses underneath Rectangular Footings

More information

CONVENTIONAL AND FINITE ELEMENT METHOD ANALYSIS OF FOUNDATION SOIL INETERACTION. Universiti Malaysia Sabah, Jalan UMS, Kota Kinabalu, Sabah.

CONVENTIONAL AND FINITE ELEMENT METHOD ANALYSIS OF FOUNDATION SOIL INETERACTION. Universiti Malaysia Sabah, Jalan UMS, Kota Kinabalu, Sabah. Proceeding of the 10 th Seminar of Science & Technology 1- December 01, Kota Kinabalu Sabah CONVENTIONAL AND FINITE ELEMENT METHOD ANALYSIS OF FOUNDATION SOIL INETERACTION Z.S. Tang 1*, N.S.V.K. Rao 1,

More information

The weigh of footing and the soil above should be heavy enough to offset the uplift forces from wind or seismic.

The weigh of footing and the soil above should be heavy enough to offset the uplift forces from wind or seismic. Determine size of footing Column subjected to axial column load and uplift Example 1: Determine footing sizes for axial loads and uplift. Column subjected to both axial column load and moment or eccentric

More information

Module 6 : Design of Retaining Structures. Lecture 27 : Cantilever sheet pile walls [ Section 27.1: Introduction ]

Module 6 : Design of Retaining Structures. Lecture 27 : Cantilever sheet pile walls [ Section 27.1: Introduction ] Lecture 27 : Cantilever sheet pile walls [ Section 27.1: Introduction ] Objectives In this section you will learn the following Introduction Lecture 27 : Cantilever sheet pile walls [ Section 27.1: Introduction

More information

twenty six concrete construction: foundation design Foundation Structural vs. Foundation Design Structural vs. Foundation Design

twenty six concrete construction: foundation design Foundation Structural vs. Foundation Design Structural vs. Foundation Design ELEMENTS OF ARCHITECTURAL STRUCTURES: FORM, BEHAVIOR, AND DESIGN DR. ANNE NICHOLS SRING 2014 lecture twenty six Foundation the engineered interface between the earth and the structure it supports that

More information

twenty six concrete construction: foundation design Foundation Structural vs. Foundation Design Structural vs. Foundation Design

twenty six concrete construction: foundation design Foundation Structural vs. Foundation Design Structural vs. Foundation Design ELEMENTS OF ARCHITECTURAL STRUCTURES: FORM, BEHAVIOR, AND DESIGN DR. ANNE NICHOLS SRING 2013 lecture twenty six Foundation the engineered interface between the earth and the structure it supports that

More information

DRILLED DEEP FOUNDATIONS

DRILLED DEEP FOUNDATIONS GROUPS: ADVANTAGES Figure 14-2. Group vs. Single Shaft (FHWA NHI-10-016). Large overturning moments are most effectively resisted using groups of shafts. Higher axial capacities. May be cost effective

More information

twenty seven concrete construction: foundation design ARCHITECTURAL STRUCTURES: FORM, BEHAVIOR, AND DESIGN HÜDAVERDİ TOZAN SPRING 2013 lecture

twenty seven concrete construction: foundation design ARCHITECTURAL STRUCTURES: FORM, BEHAVIOR, AND DESIGN HÜDAVERDİ TOZAN SPRING 2013 lecture ARCHITECTURAL STRUCTURES: FORM, BEHAVIOR, AND DESIGN HÜDAVERDİ TOZAN SPRING 2013 lecture twenty seven concrete construction: Bright Football Complex www.tamu.edu foundation design Foundations 1 Foundation

More information

Rigid pavement design

Rigid pavement design Chapter 29 Rigid pavement design 29.1 Overview As the name implies, rigid pavements are rigid i.e, they do not flex much under loading like flexible pavements. They are constructed using cement concrete.

More information

A slab is structural element whose thickness is small compared to its own length and width. Slabs are usually used in floor and roof construction.

A slab is structural element whose thickness is small compared to its own length and width. Slabs are usually used in floor and roof construction. ONE-WAY SLAB Introduction A slab is structural element whose thickness is small compared to its own length and width. Slabs are usually used in floor and roof construction. One-way slabs: When the ratio

More information

TYPES OF FOUNDATIONS

TYPES OF FOUNDATIONS TYPES OF FOUNDATIONS 1 Foundation Systems Shallow Foundation Deep Foundation Pile Foundation Pier (Caisson) Foundation Isolated spread footings Wall footings Combined footings Cantilever or strap footings

More information

MODULE 2 Part 2 Seismic design according to codes used in Palestine

MODULE 2 Part 2 Seismic design according to codes used in Palestine MODULE 2 Part 2 Seismic design according to codes used in Palestine Seismic design according to codes used in Palestine ID subject 1 Seismic Forces- Methods of analysis 2 Selection of Analysis Method (UBC

More information

Preliminary Examination- Design Question

Preliminary Examination- Design Question Student s Name (Please Print) Structural Engineering Mechanics and Materials Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California at Berkeley Spring Semester 2014 Preliminary Examination-

More information

Module 4 : Design of Shallow Foundations. Lecture 16 : Introduction [ Section16.1 : Introduction ] Objectives

Module 4 : Design of Shallow Foundations. Lecture 16 : Introduction [ Section16.1 : Introduction ] Objectives Lecture 16 : Introduction [ Section16.1 : Introduction ] Objectives In this section you will learn the following Introduction Different types of footings Lecture 16 : Introduction [ Section16.1 : Introduction

More information

Numerical Analysis of Piles in Layered Soils: A Parametric Study

Numerical Analysis of Piles in Layered Soils: A Parametric Study Numerical Analysis of Piles in Layered Soils: A Parametric Study Ravi Kumar Reddy C #1 Padmakar K C #2, Manjari M #3, Ekasaikumar CH #4, Saikumar K P R K #5 # Department of Civil Engineering, K L University

More information

Structural Redesign Two way slab / Drop panels My redesign of Fordham Place will comprise of a 9 flat slab with 5 ½ drop panels. Materials used for

Structural Redesign Two way slab / Drop panels My redesign of Fordham Place will comprise of a 9 flat slab with 5 ½ drop panels. Materials used for Structural Redesign Two way slab / Drop panels My redesign of Fordham Place will comprise of a 9 flat slab with 5 ½ drop panels. Materials used for this redesign is normal weight concrete with compressive

More information

ADAPT-BUILDER FLOOR-Pro Module VERIFICATION

ADAPT-BUILDER FLOOR-Pro Module VERIFICATION 123103 Verification_Title.p65 MNL410 STRUCTURAL CONCRETE SOFTWARE SYSTEM ADAPT-BUILDER FLOOR-Pro Module VERIFICATION Dr. Bijan O. Aalami Professor Emeritus, San Fancisco State University Structural Engineer

More information

Module 5 : Design of Deep Foundations. Lecture 25 : Pile Groups [ Section 25.1 : Different types of pile groups ]

Module 5 : Design of Deep Foundations. Lecture 25 : Pile Groups [ Section 25.1 : Different types of pile groups ] Lecture 25 : Pile Groups [ Section 25.1 : Different types of pile groups ] Objectives In this section you will learn the following Different types of pile groups Lecture 25 : Pile Groups [ Section 25.1

More information

BEAMS: COMPOSITE BEAMS; STRESS CONCENTRATIONS

BEAMS: COMPOSITE BEAMS; STRESS CONCENTRATIONS LECTURE Third Edition BEAMS: COMPOSITE BEAMS; STRESS CONCENTRATIONS A. J. Clark School of Engineering Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering 11 Chapter 4.6 4.7 by Dr. Ibrahim A. Assakkaf SPRING

More information

Design of Steel Structures Dr. Damodar Maity Department of Civil Engineering Indian Institute of Technology, Guwahati

Design of Steel Structures Dr. Damodar Maity Department of Civil Engineering Indian Institute of Technology, Guwahati Design of Steel Structures Dr. Damodar Maity Department of Civil Engineering Indian Institute of Technology, Guwahati Module - 06 Flexural Members Lecture - 08 Design of Shear Connectors and Purlins Hello,

More information

Concept of Reinforced Cement Concrete Design Based on Working Stress Method (WSM) Suraj Kr Ray B. Tech (civil)

Concept of Reinforced Cement Concrete Design Based on Working Stress Method (WSM) Suraj Kr Ray B. Tech (civil) Concept of Reinforced Cement Concrete Design Suraj Kr Ray B. Tech (civil) Concept of Reinforced Cement Concrete Design (RCC) Concrete: Concrete is a substance which obtained by mixing Cement, Sand, Aggregates

More information

Cost Effectiveness of Several Types of Foundation

Cost Effectiveness of Several Types of Foundation Cost Effectiveness of Several Types of Foundation Dinesh S.Patil 1, Prof.Anil S.Chander 2 PG Student, Dept. Of Civil Engg. S.N.D.College Of Engineering & Research Center, Yevola., MH, India 1 Assistant

More information

Design of Reinforced Concrete Structures Prof. N. Dhang Department of Civil Engineering Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur

Design of Reinforced Concrete Structures Prof. N. Dhang Department of Civil Engineering Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur Design of Reinforced Concrete Structures Prof. N. Dhang Department of Civil Engineering Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur Lecture 14 Design of Slabs Today, we shall start design of slabs. So, we

More information

MECHANICS OF SOLIDS - BEAMS TUTORIAL 1 STRESSES IN BEAMS DUE TO BENDING. On completion of this tutorial you should be able to do the following.

MECHANICS OF SOLIDS - BEAMS TUTORIAL 1 STRESSES IN BEAMS DUE TO BENDING. On completion of this tutorial you should be able to do the following. MECHANICS OF SOLIDS - BEAMS TUTOIAL 1 STESSES IN BEAMS DUE TO BENDING This is the first tutorial on bending of beams designed for anyone wishing to study it at a fairly advanced level. You should judge

More information

Module 7 (Lecture 24 to 28) RETAINING WALLS

Module 7 (Lecture 24 to 28) RETAINING WALLS Module 7 (Lecture 24 to 28) RETAINING WALLS Topics 24.1 INTRODUCTION 24.2 GRAVITY AND CANTILEVER WALLS 24.3 PROPORTIONING RETAINING WALLS 24.4 APPLICATION OF LATERAL EARTH PRESSURE THEORIES TO DESIGN 24.5

More information

Module 6 : Design of Retaining Structures. Lecture 29 : Braced cuts [ Section 29.1 : Introduction ]

Module 6 : Design of Retaining Structures. Lecture 29 : Braced cuts [ Section 29.1 : Introduction ] Lecture 29 : Braced cuts [ Section 29.1 : Introduction ] Objectives In this section you will learn the following Introduction Lecture 29 : Braced cuts [ Section 29.1 : Introduction ] Introduction Deep

More information

CE6502 Foundation Engineering Question Bank

CE6502 Foundation Engineering Question Bank DEPARTMENT: CIVIL SUBJECT CODE: CE6502 QUESTION BANK SEMESTER: V SUBJECT NAME: FOUNDATION ENGINEERING UNIT 1- SITE INVESTIGATION AND SELECTION OF FOUNDATION PART A (2 Marks) 1. List the various methods

More information

FOUNDATIONS. Further reading of geotechnical books is recommended to get in depth details.

FOUNDATIONS. Further reading of geotechnical books is recommended to get in depth details. INTRODUCTION: FOUNDATIONS In the following paragraphs the failure of foundation is briefly explained with respect to earthquake. The failures do occur even for gravity forces but due care has to be considered

More information

NOTES ON THE APLICATION OF SPRING CONSTANT AND SOIL STRUCTURE INTERACTION PROBLEM

NOTES ON THE APLICATION OF SPRING CONSTANT AND SOIL STRUCTURE INTERACTION PROBLEM NOTES ON THE APLICATION OF SPRING CONSTANT AND SOIL STRUCTURE INTERACTION PROBLEM GOUW Tjie-Liong Senior Geotechnical Consultant Green Garden Blok I-9 No. 28 A - Jakarta 11520 INDONESIA Email: geotech@cbn.net.id

More information

CE 110 Sample Final Exam

CE 110 Sample Final Exam CE 110 Sample Final Exam Name: Section: 1A, 1B, 1C, 1D or Springfield Select the best (closest) answer. a b c d e value 1. O O O O O 3 2. O O O O O 3 3. O O O O O 3 4. O O O O O 3 5. O O O O O 3 6. O O

More information

Seismic Design of Shallow Foundations

Seismic Design of Shallow Foundations Shallow Foundations Page 1 Seismic Design of Shallow Foundations Reading Assignment Lecture Notes Other Materials Ch. 9 FHWA manual Foundations_vibrations.pdf Homework Assignment 10 1. The factored forces

More information

Study On Effective Bracing Systems for High Rise Steel Structures

Study On Effective Bracing Systems for High Rise Steel Structures Study On Effective Bracing Systems for High Rise Steel Structures Adithya. M 1, Swathi rani K.S 2, Shruthi H K 3, Dr. Ramesh B.R 4 1 M.Tech student, 2 Assistant Professor, 3 Assistant Professor, 4 Professor

More information

Tutorial 1 FORCE SYSTEM

Tutorial 1 FORCE SYSTEM Tutorial 1 FORCE SYSTEM 1 Find out the magnitude and direction of the resultant with reference to horizontal axis for the system shown in fig. The forces F1,F and F3 all of which act on a point A of the

More information

Technical Notes 3B - Brick Masonry Section Properties May 1993

Technical Notes 3B - Brick Masonry Section Properties May 1993 Technical Notes 3B - Brick Masonry Section Properties May 1993 Abstract: This Technical Notes is a design aid for the Building Code Requirements for Masonry Structures (ACI 530/ASCE 5/TMS 402-92) and Specifications

More information

COST MODELING OF FOUNDATIONS OF REINFORCED CONCRETE BUILDINGS DESIGNED FOR SEISMIC EFFECTS

COST MODELING OF FOUNDATIONS OF REINFORCED CONCRETE BUILDINGS DESIGNED FOR SEISMIC EFFECTS COST MODELING OF FOUNDATIONS OF REINFORCED CONCRETE BUILDINGS DESIGNED FOR SEISMIC EFFECTS V. Thiruvengadam 1, J. C. Wason 2 and K. I. Praseeda 3 1 Professor, Dept. of Building Engineering and Management,

More information

cos 2u - t xy sin 2u (Q.E.D.)

cos 2u - t xy sin 2u (Q.E.D.) 09 Solutions 46060 6/8/10 3:13 PM Page 619 010 Pearson Education, Inc., Upper Saddle River, NJ. ll rights reserved. This material is protected under all copyright laws as they currently 9 1. Prove that

More information

MECHANICS OF SOLIDS - BEAMS TUTORIAL 2 SHEAR FORCE AND BENDING MOMENTS IN BEAMS

MECHANICS OF SOLIDS - BEAMS TUTORIAL 2 SHEAR FORCE AND BENDING MOMENTS IN BEAMS MECHANICS OF SOLIDS - BEAMS TUTORIAL 2 SHEAR FORCE AND BENDING MOMENTS IN BEAMS This is the second tutorial on bending of beams. You should judge your progress by completing the self assessment exercises.

More information

Design of Steel Structures Prof. Damodar Maity Department of Civil Engineering Indian Institute of Technology, Guwahati

Design of Steel Structures Prof. Damodar Maity Department of Civil Engineering Indian Institute of Technology, Guwahati Design of Steel Structures Prof. Damodar Maity Department of Civil Engineering Indian Institute of Technology, Guwahati Module 8 Virtual Method and Energy Method 1 Lecture No. # 02 Column Base Part 2 An

More information

Recitation #6 October 14, 2003

Recitation #6 October 14, 2003 Recitation #6 October 14, 2003 TORSION OF CIRCULAR SECTIONS Assumptions 1) This analysis can only be applied to solid or hollow circular sections 2) The material must be homogeneous 3) Torque is constant

More information

The Design of Reinforced Concrete Slabs

The Design of Reinforced Concrete Slabs EGN-5439 The Design of Tall Buildings Lecture #14 The Design of Reinforced Concrete Slabs Via the Direct Method as per ACI 318-05 L. A. Prieto-Portar - 2008 Reinforced concrete floor systems provide an

More information

Reinforced Concrete Design SHEAR IN BEAMS

Reinforced Concrete Design SHEAR IN BEAMS CHAPTER Reinforced Concrete Design Fifth Edition SHEAR IN BEAMS A. J. Clark School of Engineering Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering Part I Concrete Design and Analysis 4a FALL 2002 By Dr.

More information

DESIGN OF SLABS. Department of Structures and Materials Engineering Faculty of Civil and Environmental Engineering University Tun Hussein Onn Malaysia

DESIGN OF SLABS. Department of Structures and Materials Engineering Faculty of Civil and Environmental Engineering University Tun Hussein Onn Malaysia DESIGN OF SLABS Department of Structures and Materials Engineering Faculty of Civil and Environmental Engineering University Tun Hussein Onn Malaysia Introduction Types of Slab Slabs are plate elements

More information

Ce 479 Reinforced Masonry Fall 2006

Ce 479 Reinforced Masonry Fall 2006 INTRODUCTION TO STRUCTURAL DESIGN OF REINFORCED MASONRY In the preceding lecture on structural design of masonry, we have seen examples of unreinforced masonry bearing walls. In bearing walls, when the

More information

Module 11. Foundations - Theory and Design. Version 2 CE IIT, Kharagpur

Module 11. Foundations - Theory and Design. Version 2 CE IIT, Kharagpur Module 11 Foundations - Theory and Design Lesson 29 Design of Foundations Instructional Objectives: At the end of this lesson, the student should be able to: understand and apply the design considerations

More information

Chapter 13 Flat Plates

Chapter 13 Flat Plates Chapter 13 Flat Plates 13.1 Introduction Flat plate A structural member whose middle surface lies in a plane Thickness is normal to the mid-surface plane Thickness relatively small to length and width

More information

REINFORCED CONCRETE. Reinforced Concrete Design. A Fundamental Approach - Fifth Edition

REINFORCED CONCRETE. Reinforced Concrete Design. A Fundamental Approach - Fifth Edition HANDOUT REINFORCED CONCRETE Reinforced Concrete Design A Fundamental Approach - Fifth Edition RETAINING WALLS Fifth Edition A. J. Clark School of Engineering Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

More information

Finite Element Analysis of Elastic Settlement of Spreadfootings Founded in Soil

Finite Element Analysis of Elastic Settlement of Spreadfootings Founded in Soil Finite Element Analysis of Elastic Settlement of Spreadfootings Founded in Soil Jae H. Chung, Ph.D. Bid Bridge Software Institute t University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA Content 1. Background 2.

More information

CE 366 SETTLEMENT (Problems & Solutions)

CE 366 SETTLEMENT (Problems & Solutions) CE 366 SETTLEMENT (Problems & Solutions) P. 1) LOAD UNDER A RECTANGULAR AREA (1) Question: The footing shown in the figure below exerts a uniform pressure of 300 kn/m 2 to the soil. Determine vertical

More information

The Pressure class is related to the long term strength or HDB of the pipe as follows;

The Pressure class is related to the long term strength or HDB of the pipe as follows; Pressure class... The Pressure class is related to the long term strength or HDB of the pipe as follows; P C (HDB/FS)/(2t S /D E ) HDB = Hydrostatic Design Basis, kn/m² FS = Minimum factor of safety, 1.8

More information

The following sketches show the plans of the two cases of one-way slabs. The spanning direction in each case is shown by the double headed arrow.

The following sketches show the plans of the two cases of one-way slabs. The spanning direction in each case is shown by the double headed arrow. 9.2 One-way Slabs This section covers the following topics. Introduction Analysis and Design 9.2.1 Introduction Slabs are an important structural component where prestressing is applied. With increase

More information

Investigation of strip footings under column loads

Investigation of strip footings under column loads Investigation of strip footings under column loads Group: Greg Deacon, John Brogan, David McDonnell and Richard Delaney Course: Structural Engineering (Dt024/4) Lecturers: Dr. Colin Caprani, Lacour Ayompe

More information

Civil Engineering License Exam Review

Civil Engineering License Exam Review Civil Engineering License Exam Review Geotechnical - Session 2 Old Dominion University Brian Crowder briancrowder@cox.net Geotechnical Engineering Technical Areas for Geotechnical Engineering Session 2

More information

Hello viewers welcome to lesson 12 module 4. (Refer Slide Time: 00:00:55 min)

Hello viewers welcome to lesson 12 module 4. (Refer Slide Time: 00:00:55 min) Introduction to Transportation Engineering Prof. K. Sudhakar Reddy Department of Civil Engineering Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur Lecture - 35 Analysis of Concrete Pavements Hello viewers welcome

More information

DESIGN OF STRUCTURES. Engr. Faizan Tahir

DESIGN OF STRUCTURES. Engr. Faizan Tahir DESIGN OF STRUCTURES Engr. Faizan Tahir RETAINING WALLS Function of retaining wall Retaining walls are used to hold back masses of earth or other loose material where conditions make it impossible to let

More information

VERTICAL STRESS INCREASES IN SOILS TYPES OF LOADING

VERTICAL STRESS INCREASES IN SOILS TYPES OF LOADING 14.53 THEORETICAL SOIL MECHANICS VERTICAL STRESS INCREASES IN SOILS TYPES OF LOADING Point Loads (P) Line Loads (q/unit length) Figure 6.11. Das FGE (005). Examples: -Posts Figure 6.1. Das FGE (005). Examples:

More information

ENGINEERING SCIENCE H1 OUTCOME 1 - TUTORIAL 3 BENDING MOMENTS EDEXCEL HNC/D ENGINEERING SCIENCE LEVEL 4 H1 FORMERLY UNIT 21718P

ENGINEERING SCIENCE H1 OUTCOME 1 - TUTORIAL 3 BENDING MOMENTS EDEXCEL HNC/D ENGINEERING SCIENCE LEVEL 4 H1 FORMERLY UNIT 21718P ENGINEERING SCIENCE H1 OUTCOME 1 - TUTORIAL 3 BENDING MOMENTS EDEXCEL HNC/D ENGINEERING SCIENCE LEVEL 4 H1 FORMERLY UNIT 21718P This material is duplicated in the Mechanical Principles module H2 and those

More information

Soil-Foundation-Superstructure Interaction for Tall Buildings on Combined Pile-Raft Foundations

Soil-Foundation-Superstructure Interaction for Tall Buildings on Combined Pile-Raft Foundations Soil-Foundation-Superstructure Interaction for Tall Buildings on Combined Pile-Raft Foundations Konstantinos Syngros, Ph.D., P.E. Alan Poeppel, P.E. Langan Engineering & Environmental Services, Inc. Langan

More information

Design of Reinforced Concrete Structures Prof. Nirjhar Dhang Department of Civil Engineering Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur

Design of Reinforced Concrete Structures Prof. Nirjhar Dhang Department of Civil Engineering Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur Design of Reinforced Concrete Structures Prof. Nirjhar Dhang Department of Civil Engineering Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur Lecture - 03 Different Methods of Design of Reinforced Concrete Structures

More information

Appendix : According to IBC 2003, table , the minimum uniformly distributed live loads and minimum concentrated live loads are as follow:

Appendix : According to IBC 2003, table , the minimum uniformly distributed live loads and minimum concentrated live loads are as follow: Appendix Dead and Live Loads International Building Code 2003 (IBC) 1607.1: According to IBC 2003, table 1607.1, the minimum uniformly distributed live loads and minimum concentrated live loads are as

More information

DESIGN NOTE INTERMEDIATE SLAB CHECK FOR SCAFFOLDING LOADS

DESIGN NOTE INTERMEDIATE SLAB CHECK FOR SCAFFOLDING LOADS CONTRACTOR DOC No. REV. DATE SHEET 1 OF 15 PREP D CHK D APP D DESIGN NOTE INTERMEDIATE SLAB CHECK FOR SCAFFOLDING LOADS REV. DATE PAGE DESCRIPTION PREP D CHK D APP D Intermediate slab Check for scaffolding

More information