More Mathematical Induction. October 27, 2016

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "More Mathematical Induction. October 27, 2016"

Transcription

1 More Mathematical Induction October 7, 016

2 In these slides... Review of ordinary induction. Remark about exponential and polynomial growth. Example a second proof that P(A) = A. Strong induction. Least integer principle.

3 Principle of Mathematical Induction To prove a property P holds for all integers n k : (Base step) Prove P holds for k. Induction step) Assume P holds for some n k (induction hypothesis) and deduce P holds for n + 1. More formally: From and you can conclude P(k) n((n k P(n)) P(n + 1)) n(n k P(n)).

4 Examples from the last class. For all n Z +, For all n 50, n j = j=1 n(n + 1). 1.3 n > n 3.

5 Aside exponential versus polynomial growth More generally, if c > 1, k > 0, then for all sufficiently large values of n, c n > n k. In fact, And similarly, n k lim n c n = 0. (log n) k lim n n = 0.

6 Consequences for efficiency of algorithms Algorithm 1 requires time T 1 (n) = c 1 n log n on inputs of length n. (e.g., mergesort). Algorithm requires time T (n) = c n on inputs of length n. (e.g., insertion sort). Since T 1 (n) lim n T (n) = 0, Algorithm 1 is much faster, as long as the input size is large enough.

7 Another example Earlier we showed that for any finite set A, P(A) = A. We did this by showing a bijection F : {0, 1} {0, 1} P({1,..., n}). }{{} n times Here we give a new proof of the same fact by mathematical induction.

8 Main idea of the argument Every time you add an element {1,, 3}... You double the number of subsets: {3} {1} {1, 3} {} {, 3} {1, } {1,, 3}

9 Official proof Statement: For all n 0, if A = n, then P(A) = n. Base step, if A = 0, then A =, so P(A) = { }, thus P(A) = 1 = 0. Inductive step: Let n 0 and suppose that every set with n elements has n subsets. (Inductive hypothesis.) Now let A = n + 1. We write where all the a i are distinct. Let A = {a 1,..., a n }. A = {a 1,..., a n, a n+1 },

10 Official proof continued P(A) is the disjoint union P(A ) {X A : a n+1 X}. P(A ) = n by inductive hypothesis. Y Y {a n+1 } gives a bijection between P(A ) and {X A : a n+1 X}, which thus also has n elements. Thus P(A) = P(A ) + {X A : a n+1 X} = n + n = n+1, so the claim holds for sets of cardinality n + 1.

11 Strong Induction

12 The unstacking game You have a stack of n bricks. On each move, you break a stack into two smaller stacks, and earn k points, where k is the product of the sizes of the two smaller stacks.

13 Example: =10 points

14 Example: =10 points

15 Conjecture: The unstacking strategy doesn t matter! No matter how you do it, the total number of points for completely breaking apart a stack of n disks is (n 1) + (n ) = How would you prove such a thing? n(n 1).

16 The basic reasoning principle Suppose your first move is to break a stack into two stacks with m 1 and m bricks, respectively. If the conjecture is correct for the smaller stacks, then we will get m 1 m + m 1(m 1 1) + m (m 1) points for completely breaking the original stack. Need to check that m 1 m + m 1(m 1 1) + m (m 1) = (m 1 + m )(m 1 + m 1)

17 Principle of strong mathematical induction To prove a property P holds for all n k, it suffices to prove: (Base step): P(k). (Inductive step): Assume for some n > k that P(m) holds for all m with k m < n, (not just n 1) and deduce P(n). We make a stronger inductive hypothesis.

18 Official strong induction proof of the the unstacking game theorem Statement: For all n 1, the number of points obtained by unstacking a stack of n bricks is n(n 1), independent of the strategy. Base step: If n = 1, there is no unstacking to do. You get points. 0 = 1(1 1) Inductive step: Let n > 1. Suppose that for all positive integers less m < n, you get m(m 1)/ points for unstacking a stack of m bricks. On the first move, you break the stack into two smaller stacks of sizes m and (n m), where 1 m < n. You get m(n m) points for this move.

19 Official proof, continued By the inductive hypothesis, since both m < n and n m < m, the total number of points for the complete unstacking is thus m(n m) + m(m 1) + (n m)(n m 1) 1 ((mn m ) + (m m) + (n mn + m n + m)) = n n n(n 1) So the formula holds for n bricks as well. This completes the proof. = =

20 revisited The same reasoning is behind the proof that there are no integers m, n > 0 with n = m (proof that is irrational). Clearly there is no positive integer m such that 1 = m. Let n > 1, and suppose that for every 1 k < n, there is no positive integer l such that k = l. If there were m Z + with n = m, we could argue as before that there is an integer l with m = l. Since m < n, this contradicts the inductive hypothesis, which says that no such l exists.

21 Least Integer Principle Used in this manner, the principle of strong induction is sometimes called the least integer principle: Every nonempty set of positive integers has a least element. If you want to use this to prove that some property P holds for no positive integer, suppose that P holds for some positive integer, and then set n to be the least positive integer for which this is true. Then obtain a contradiction by showing that n 1, and that if such an n exists, there must be a smaller value for which P holds.

6.2 Permutations continued

6.2 Permutations continued 6.2 Permutations continued Theorem A permutation on a finite set A is either a cycle or can be expressed as a product (composition of disjoint cycles. Proof is by (strong induction on the number, r, of

More information

Solutions for Practice problems on proofs

Solutions for Practice problems on proofs Solutions for Practice problems on proofs Definition: (even) An integer n Z is even if and only if n = 2m for some number m Z. Definition: (odd) An integer n Z is odd if and only if n = 2m + 1 for some

More information

Mathematical Induction

Mathematical Induction Mathematical Induction (Handout March 8, 01) The Principle of Mathematical Induction provides a means to prove infinitely many statements all at once The principle is logical rather than strictly mathematical,

More information

Full and Complete Binary Trees

Full and Complete Binary Trees Full and Complete Binary Trees Binary Tree Theorems 1 Here are two important types of binary trees. Note that the definitions, while similar, are logically independent. Definition: a binary tree T is full

More information

Mathematical induction. Niloufar Shafiei

Mathematical induction. Niloufar Shafiei Mathematical induction Niloufar Shafiei Mathematical induction Mathematical induction is an extremely important proof technique. Mathematical induction can be used to prove results about complexity of

More information

MODULAR ARITHMETIC. a smallest member. It is equivalent to the Principle of Mathematical Induction.

MODULAR ARITHMETIC. a smallest member. It is equivalent to the Principle of Mathematical Induction. MODULAR ARITHMETIC 1 Working With Integers The usual arithmetic operations of addition, subtraction and multiplication can be performed on integers, and the result is always another integer Division, on

More information

Mathematical Induction. Lecture 10-11

Mathematical Induction. Lecture 10-11 Mathematical Induction Lecture 10-11 Menu Mathematical Induction Strong Induction Recursive Definitions Structural Induction Climbing an Infinite Ladder Suppose we have an infinite ladder: 1. We can reach

More information

HOMEWORK 5 SOLUTIONS. n!f n (1) lim. ln x n! + xn x. 1 = G n 1 (x). (2) k + 1 n. (n 1)!

HOMEWORK 5 SOLUTIONS. n!f n (1) lim. ln x n! + xn x. 1 = G n 1 (x). (2) k + 1 n. (n 1)! Math 7 Fall 205 HOMEWORK 5 SOLUTIONS Problem. 2008 B2 Let F 0 x = ln x. For n 0 and x > 0, let F n+ x = 0 F ntdt. Evaluate n!f n lim n ln n. By directly computing F n x for small n s, we obtain the following

More information

PART I. THE REAL NUMBERS

PART I. THE REAL NUMBERS PART I. THE REAL NUMBERS This material assumes that you are already familiar with the real number system and the representation of the real numbers as points on the real line. I.1. THE NATURAL NUMBERS

More information

MATH 289 PROBLEM SET 4: NUMBER THEORY

MATH 289 PROBLEM SET 4: NUMBER THEORY MATH 289 PROBLEM SET 4: NUMBER THEORY 1. The greatest common divisor If d and n are integers, then we say that d divides n if and only if there exists an integer q such that n = qd. Notice that if d divides

More information

SECTION 10-2 Mathematical Induction

SECTION 10-2 Mathematical Induction 73 0 Sequences and Series 6. Approximate e 0. using the first five terms of the series. Compare this approximation with your calculator evaluation of e 0.. 6. Approximate e 0.5 using the first five terms

More information

Lemma 5.2. Let S be a set. (1) Let f and g be two permutations of S. Then the composition of f and g is a permutation of S.

Lemma 5.2. Let S be a set. (1) Let f and g be two permutations of S. Then the composition of f and g is a permutation of S. Definition 51 Let S be a set bijection f : S S 5 Permutation groups A permutation of S is simply a Lemma 52 Let S be a set (1) Let f and g be two permutations of S Then the composition of f and g is a

More information

GROUPS SUBGROUPS. Definition 1: An operation on a set G is a function : G G G.

GROUPS SUBGROUPS. Definition 1: An operation on a set G is a function : G G G. Definition 1: GROUPS An operation on a set G is a function : G G G. Definition 2: A group is a set G which is equipped with an operation and a special element e G, called the identity, such that (i) the

More information

3. Mathematical Induction

3. Mathematical Induction 3. MATHEMATICAL INDUCTION 83 3. Mathematical Induction 3.1. First Principle of Mathematical Induction. Let P (n) be a predicate with domain of discourse (over) the natural numbers N = {0, 1,,...}. If (1)

More information

PROBLEM SET 7: PIGEON HOLE PRINCIPLE

PROBLEM SET 7: PIGEON HOLE PRINCIPLE PROBLEM SET 7: PIGEON HOLE PRINCIPLE The pigeonhole principle is the following observation: Theorem. Suppose that > kn marbles are distributed over n jars, then one jar will contain at least k + marbles.

More information

Solutions to Homework 6 Mathematics 503 Foundations of Mathematics Spring 2014

Solutions to Homework 6 Mathematics 503 Foundations of Mathematics Spring 2014 Solutions to Homework 6 Mathematics 503 Foundations of Mathematics Spring 2014 3.4: 1. If m is any integer, then m(m + 1) = m 2 + m is the product of m and its successor. That it to say, m 2 + m is the

More information

I. GROUPS: BASIC DEFINITIONS AND EXAMPLES

I. GROUPS: BASIC DEFINITIONS AND EXAMPLES I GROUPS: BASIC DEFINITIONS AND EXAMPLES Definition 1: An operation on a set G is a function : G G G Definition 2: A group is a set G which is equipped with an operation and a special element e G, called

More information

Sample Induction Proofs

Sample Induction Proofs Math 3 Worksheet: Induction Proofs III, Sample Proofs A.J. Hildebrand Sample Induction Proofs Below are model solutions to some of the practice problems on the induction worksheets. The solutions given

More information

Section 6-2 Mathematical Induction

Section 6-2 Mathematical Induction 6- Mathematical Induction 457 In calculus, it can be shown that e x k0 x k k! x x x3!! 3!... xn n! where the larger n is, the better the approximation. Problems 6 and 6 refer to this series. Note that

More information

k, then n = p2α 1 1 pα k

k, then n = p2α 1 1 pα k Powers of Integers An integer n is a perfect square if n = m for some integer m. Taking into account the prime factorization, if m = p α 1 1 pα k k, then n = pα 1 1 p α k k. That is, n is a perfect square

More information

MATHEMATICAL INDUCTION. Mathematical Induction. This is a powerful method to prove properties of positive integers.

MATHEMATICAL INDUCTION. Mathematical Induction. This is a powerful method to prove properties of positive integers. MATHEMATICAL INDUCTION MIGUEL A LERMA (Last updated: February 8, 003) Mathematical Induction This is a powerful method to prove properties of positive integers Principle of Mathematical Induction Let P

More information

Clicker Question. Theorems/Proofs and Computational Problems/Algorithms MC215: MATHEMATICAL REASONING AND DISCRETE STRUCTURES

Clicker Question. Theorems/Proofs and Computational Problems/Algorithms MC215: MATHEMATICAL REASONING AND DISCRETE STRUCTURES MC215: MATHEMATICAL REASONING AND DISCRETE STRUCTURES Tuesday, 1/21/14 General course Information Sets Reading: [J] 1.1 Optional: [H] 1.1-1.7 Exercises: Do before next class; not to hand in [J] pp. 12-14:

More information

MATH10040 Chapter 2: Prime and relatively prime numbers

MATH10040 Chapter 2: Prime and relatively prime numbers MATH10040 Chapter 2: Prime and relatively prime numbers Recall the basic definition: 1. Prime numbers Definition 1.1. Recall that a positive integer is said to be prime if it has precisely two positive

More information

CS 103X: Discrete Structures Homework Assignment 3 Solutions

CS 103X: Discrete Structures Homework Assignment 3 Solutions CS 103X: Discrete Structures Homework Assignment 3 s Exercise 1 (20 points). On well-ordering and induction: (a) Prove the induction principle from the well-ordering principle. (b) Prove the well-ordering

More information

CSE373: Data Structures and Algorithms Lecture 3: Math Review; Algorithm Analysis. Linda Shapiro Winter 2015

CSE373: Data Structures and Algorithms Lecture 3: Math Review; Algorithm Analysis. Linda Shapiro Winter 2015 CSE373: Data Structures and Algorithms Lecture 3: Math Review; Algorithm Analysis Linda Shapiro Today Registration should be done. Homework 1 due 11:59 pm next Wednesday, January 14 Review math essential

More information

Cardinality. The set of all finite strings over the alphabet of lowercase letters is countable. The set of real numbers R is an uncountable set.

Cardinality. The set of all finite strings over the alphabet of lowercase letters is countable. The set of real numbers R is an uncountable set. Section 2.5 Cardinality (another) Definition: The cardinality of a set A is equal to the cardinality of a set B, denoted A = B, if and only if there is a bijection from A to B. If there is an injection

More information

Problem Set I: Preferences, W.A.R.P., consumer choice

Problem Set I: Preferences, W.A.R.P., consumer choice Problem Set I: Preferences, W.A.R.P., consumer choice Paolo Crosetto paolo.crosetto@unimi.it Exercises solved in class on 18th January 2009 Recap:,, Definition 1. The strict preference relation is x y

More information

Near Optimal Solutions

Near Optimal Solutions Near Optimal Solutions Many important optimization problems are lacking efficient solutions. NP-Complete problems unlikely to have polynomial time solutions. Good heuristics important for such problems.

More information

Induction. Margaret M. Fleck. 10 October These notes cover mathematical induction and recursive definition

Induction. Margaret M. Fleck. 10 October These notes cover mathematical induction and recursive definition Induction Margaret M. Fleck 10 October 011 These notes cover mathematical induction and recursive definition 1 Introduction to induction At the start of the term, we saw the following formula for computing

More information

Sec 4.1 Vector Spaces and Subspaces

Sec 4.1 Vector Spaces and Subspaces Sec 4. Vector Spaces and Subspaces Motivation Let S be the set of all solutions to the differential equation y + y =. Let T be the set of all 2 3 matrices with real entries. These two sets share many common

More information

1 if 1 x 0 1 if 0 x 1

1 if 1 x 0 1 if 0 x 1 Chapter 3 Continuity In this chapter we begin by defining the fundamental notion of continuity for real valued functions of a single real variable. When trying to decide whether a given function is or

More information

Theory of Computation Prof. Kamala Krithivasan Department of Computer Science and Engineering Indian Institute of Technology, Madras

Theory of Computation Prof. Kamala Krithivasan Department of Computer Science and Engineering Indian Institute of Technology, Madras Theory of Computation Prof. Kamala Krithivasan Department of Computer Science and Engineering Indian Institute of Technology, Madras Lecture No. # 31 Recursive Sets, Recursively Innumerable Sets, Encoding

More information

Notes on counting finite sets

Notes on counting finite sets Notes on counting finite sets Murray Eisenberg February 26, 2009 Contents 0 Introduction 2 1 What is a finite set? 2 2 Counting unions and cartesian products 4 2.1 Sum rules......................................

More information

13 Infinite Sets. 13.1 Injections, Surjections, and Bijections. mcs-ftl 2010/9/8 0:40 page 379 #385

13 Infinite Sets. 13.1 Injections, Surjections, and Bijections. mcs-ftl 2010/9/8 0:40 page 379 #385 mcs-ftl 2010/9/8 0:40 page 379 #385 13 Infinite Sets So you might be wondering how much is there to say about an infinite set other than, well, it has an infinite number of elements. Of course, an infinite

More information

1. Prove that the empty set is a subset of every set.

1. Prove that the empty set is a subset of every set. 1. Prove that the empty set is a subset of every set. Basic Topology Written by Men-Gen Tsai email: b89902089@ntu.edu.tw Proof: For any element x of the empty set, x is also an element of every set since

More information

Discrete Mathematics: Solutions to Homework (12%) For each of the following sets, determine whether {2} is an element of that set.

Discrete Mathematics: Solutions to Homework (12%) For each of the following sets, determine whether {2} is an element of that set. Discrete Mathematics: Solutions to Homework 2 1. (12%) For each of the following sets, determine whether {2} is an element of that set. (a) {x R x is an integer greater than 1} (b) {x R x is the square

More information

POWER SETS AND RELATIONS

POWER SETS AND RELATIONS POWER SETS AND RELATIONS L. MARIZZA A. BAILEY 1. The Power Set Now that we have defined sets as best we can, we can consider a sets of sets. If we were to assume nothing, except the existence of the empty

More information

Dedekind s forgotten axiom and why we should teach it (and why we shouldn t teach mathematical induction in our calculus classes)

Dedekind s forgotten axiom and why we should teach it (and why we shouldn t teach mathematical induction in our calculus classes) Dedekind s forgotten axiom and why we should teach it (and why we shouldn t teach mathematical induction in our calculus classes) by Jim Propp (UMass Lowell) March 14, 2010 1 / 29 Completeness Three common

More information

x a x 2 (1 + x 2 ) n.

x a x 2 (1 + x 2 ) n. Limits and continuity Suppose that we have a function f : R R. Let a R. We say that f(x) tends to the limit l as x tends to a; lim f(x) = l ; x a if, given any real number ɛ > 0, there exists a real number

More information

Mathematics for Computer Science/Software Engineering. Notes for the course MSM1F3 Dr. R. A. Wilson

Mathematics for Computer Science/Software Engineering. Notes for the course MSM1F3 Dr. R. A. Wilson Mathematics for Computer Science/Software Engineering Notes for the course MSM1F3 Dr. R. A. Wilson October 1996 Chapter 1 Logic Lecture no. 1. We introduce the concept of a proposition, which is a statement

More information

Basic Proof Techniques

Basic Proof Techniques Basic Proof Techniques David Ferry dsf43@truman.edu September 13, 010 1 Four Fundamental Proof Techniques When one wishes to prove the statement P Q there are four fundamental approaches. This document

More information

CHAPTER II THE LIMIT OF A SEQUENCE OF NUMBERS DEFINITION OF THE NUMBER e.

CHAPTER II THE LIMIT OF A SEQUENCE OF NUMBERS DEFINITION OF THE NUMBER e. CHAPTER II THE LIMIT OF A SEQUENCE OF NUMBERS DEFINITION OF THE NUMBER e. This chapter contains the beginnings of the most important, and probably the most subtle, notion in mathematical analysis, i.e.,

More information

CONTINUED FRACTIONS AND PELL S EQUATION. Contents 1. Continued Fractions 1 2. Solution to Pell s Equation 9 References 12

CONTINUED FRACTIONS AND PELL S EQUATION. Contents 1. Continued Fractions 1 2. Solution to Pell s Equation 9 References 12 CONTINUED FRACTIONS AND PELL S EQUATION SEUNG HYUN YANG Abstract. In this REU paper, I will use some important characteristics of continued fractions to give the complete set of solutions to Pell s equation.

More information

Set theory as a foundation for mathematics

Set theory as a foundation for mathematics Set theory as a foundation for mathematics Waffle Mathcamp 2011 In school we are taught about numbers, but we never learn what numbers really are. We learn rules of arithmetic, but we never learn why these

More information

This chapter is all about cardinality of sets. At first this looks like a

This chapter is all about cardinality of sets. At first this looks like a CHAPTER Cardinality of Sets This chapter is all about cardinality of sets At first this looks like a very simple concept To find the cardinality of a set, just count its elements If A = { a, b, c, d },

More information

Proofs are short works of prose and need to be written in complete sentences, with mathematical symbols used where appropriate.

Proofs are short works of prose and need to be written in complete sentences, with mathematical symbols used where appropriate. Advice for homework: Proofs are short works of prose and need to be written in complete sentences, with mathematical symbols used where appropriate. Even if a problem is a simple exercise that doesn t

More information

SCORE SETS IN ORIENTED GRAPHS

SCORE SETS IN ORIENTED GRAPHS Applicable Analysis and Discrete Mathematics, 2 (2008), 107 113. Available electronically at http://pefmath.etf.bg.ac.yu SCORE SETS IN ORIENTED GRAPHS S. Pirzada, T. A. Naikoo The score of a vertex v in

More information

An example of a computable

An example of a computable An example of a computable absolutely normal number Verónica Becher Santiago Figueira Abstract The first example of an absolutely normal number was given by Sierpinski in 96, twenty years before the concept

More information

Homework until Test #2

Homework until Test #2 MATH31: Number Theory Homework until Test # Philipp BRAUN Section 3.1 page 43, 1. It has been conjectured that there are infinitely many primes of the form n. Exhibit five such primes. Solution. Five such

More information

WRITING PROOFS. Christopher Heil Georgia Institute of Technology

WRITING PROOFS. Christopher Heil Georgia Institute of Technology WRITING PROOFS Christopher Heil Georgia Institute of Technology A theorem is just a statement of fact A proof of the theorem is a logical explanation of why the theorem is true Many theorems have this

More information

IEOR 6711: Stochastic Models I Fall 2012, Professor Whitt, Tuesday, September 11 Normal Approximations and the Central Limit Theorem

IEOR 6711: Stochastic Models I Fall 2012, Professor Whitt, Tuesday, September 11 Normal Approximations and the Central Limit Theorem IEOR 6711: Stochastic Models I Fall 2012, Professor Whitt, Tuesday, September 11 Normal Approximations and the Central Limit Theorem Time on my hands: Coin tosses. Problem Formulation: Suppose that I have

More information

Lecture 15 An Arithmetic Circuit Lowerbound and Flows in Graphs

Lecture 15 An Arithmetic Circuit Lowerbound and Flows in Graphs CSE599s: Extremal Combinatorics November 21, 2011 Lecture 15 An Arithmetic Circuit Lowerbound and Flows in Graphs Lecturer: Anup Rao 1 An Arithmetic Circuit Lower Bound An arithmetic circuit is just like

More information

Worksheet on induction Calculus I Fall 2006 First, let us explain the use of for summation. The notation

Worksheet on induction Calculus I Fall 2006 First, let us explain the use of for summation. The notation Worksheet on induction MA113 Calculus I Fall 2006 First, let us explain the use of for summation. The notation f(k) means to evaluate the function f(k) at k = 1, 2,..., n and add up the results. In other

More information

Cartesian Products and Relations

Cartesian Products and Relations Cartesian Products and Relations Definition (Cartesian product) If A and B are sets, the Cartesian product of A and B is the set A B = {(a, b) :(a A) and (b B)}. The following points are worth special

More information

Sets and Counting. Let A and B be two sets. It is easy to see (from the diagram above) that A B = A + B A B

Sets and Counting. Let A and B be two sets. It is easy to see (from the diagram above) that A B = A + B A B Sets and Counting Let us remind that the integer part of a number is the greatest integer that is less or equal to. It is denoted by []. Eample [3.1] = 3, [.76] = but [ 3.1] = 4 and [.76] = 6 A B Let A

More information

Math 55: Discrete Mathematics

Math 55: Discrete Mathematics Math 55: Discrete Mathematics UC Berkeley, Fall 2011 Homework # 5, due Wednesday, February 22 5.1.4 Let P (n) be the statement that 1 3 + 2 3 + + n 3 = (n(n + 1)/2) 2 for the positive integer n. a) What

More information

Discrete Mathematics Problems

Discrete Mathematics Problems Discrete Mathematics Problems William F. Klostermeyer School of Computing University of North Florida Jacksonville, FL 32224 E-mail: wkloster@unf.edu Contents 0 Preface 3 1 Logic 5 1.1 Basics...............................

More information

INTRODUCTORY SET THEORY

INTRODUCTORY SET THEORY M.Sc. program in mathematics INTRODUCTORY SET THEORY Katalin Károlyi Department of Applied Analysis, Eötvös Loránd University H-1088 Budapest, Múzeum krt. 6-8. CONTENTS 1. SETS Set, equal sets, subset,

More information

Proseminar on Semantic Theory Fall 2013 Ling 720. Problem Set on the Formal Preliminaries : Answers and Notes

Proseminar on Semantic Theory Fall 2013 Ling 720. Problem Set on the Formal Preliminaries : Answers and Notes 1. Notes on the Answers Problem Set on the Formal Preliminaries : Answers and Notes In the pages that follow, I have copied some illustrative answers from the problem sets submitted to me. In this section,

More information

(x + a) n = x n + a Z n [x]. Proof. If n is prime then the map

(x + a) n = x n + a Z n [x]. Proof. If n is prime then the map 22. A quick primality test Prime numbers are one of the most basic objects in mathematics and one of the most basic questions is to decide which numbers are prime (a clearly related problem is to find

More information

The Prime Numbers. Definition. A prime number is a positive integer with exactly two positive divisors.

The Prime Numbers. Definition. A prime number is a positive integer with exactly two positive divisors. The Prime Numbers Before starting our study of primes, we record the following important lemma. Recall that integers a, b are said to be relatively prime if gcd(a, b) = 1. Lemma (Euclid s Lemma). If gcd(a,

More information

Mathematical Induction. Mary Barnes Sue Gordon

Mathematical Induction. Mary Barnes Sue Gordon Mathematics Learning Centre Mathematical Induction Mary Barnes Sue Gordon c 1987 University of Sydney Contents 1 Mathematical Induction 1 1.1 Why do we need proof by induction?.... 1 1. What is proof by

More information

Basic Concepts of Point Set Topology Notes for OU course Math 4853 Spring 2011

Basic Concepts of Point Set Topology Notes for OU course Math 4853 Spring 2011 Basic Concepts of Point Set Topology Notes for OU course Math 4853 Spring 2011 A. Miller 1. Introduction. The definitions of metric space and topological space were developed in the early 1900 s, largely

More information

Proof of Infinite Number of Fibonacci Primes. Stephen Marshall. 22 May Abstract

Proof of Infinite Number of Fibonacci Primes. Stephen Marshall. 22 May Abstract Proof of Infinite Number of Fibonacci Primes Stephen Marshall 22 May 2014 Abstract This paper presents a complete and exhaustive proof of that an infinite number of Fibonacci Primes exist. The approach

More information

Chapter 3. Cartesian Products and Relations. 3.1 Cartesian Products

Chapter 3. Cartesian Products and Relations. 3.1 Cartesian Products Chapter 3 Cartesian Products and Relations The material in this chapter is the first real encounter with abstraction. Relations are very general thing they are a special type of subset. After introducing

More information

CONTRIBUTIONS TO ZERO SUM PROBLEMS

CONTRIBUTIONS TO ZERO SUM PROBLEMS CONTRIBUTIONS TO ZERO SUM PROBLEMS S. D. ADHIKARI, Y. G. CHEN, J. B. FRIEDLANDER, S. V. KONYAGIN AND F. PAPPALARDI Abstract. A prototype of zero sum theorems, the well known theorem of Erdős, Ginzburg

More information

APPLICATIONS OF THE ORDER FUNCTION

APPLICATIONS OF THE ORDER FUNCTION APPLICATIONS OF THE ORDER FUNCTION LECTURE NOTES: MATH 432, CSUSM, SPRING 2009. PROF. WAYNE AITKEN In this lecture we will explore several applications of order functions including formulas for GCDs and

More information

MA651 Topology. Lecture 6. Separation Axioms.

MA651 Topology. Lecture 6. Separation Axioms. MA651 Topology. Lecture 6. Separation Axioms. This text is based on the following books: Fundamental concepts of topology by Peter O Neil Elements of Mathematics: General Topology by Nicolas Bourbaki Counterexamples

More information

1 Introduction to Counting

1 Introduction to Counting 1 Introduction to Counting 1.1 Introduction In this chapter you will learn the fundamentals of enumerative combinatorics, the branch of mathematics concerned with counting. While enumeration problems can

More information

n k=1 k=0 1/k! = e. Example 6.4. The series 1/k 2 converges in R. Indeed, if s n = n then k=1 1/k, then s 2n s n = 1 n + 1 +...

n k=1 k=0 1/k! = e. Example 6.4. The series 1/k 2 converges in R. Indeed, if s n = n then k=1 1/k, then s 2n s n = 1 n + 1 +... 6 Series We call a normed space (X, ) a Banach space provided that every Cauchy sequence (x n ) in X converges. For example, R with the norm = is an example of Banach space. Now let (x n ) be a sequence

More information

Homework 5 Solutions

Homework 5 Solutions Homework 5 Solutions 4.2: 2: a. 321 = 256 + 64 + 1 = (01000001) 2 b. 1023 = 512 + 256 + 128 + 64 + 32 + 16 + 8 + 4 + 2 + 1 = (1111111111) 2. Note that this is 1 less than the next power of 2, 1024, which

More information

The chromatic spectrum of mixed hypergraphs

The chromatic spectrum of mixed hypergraphs The chromatic spectrum of mixed hypergraphs Tao Jiang, Dhruv Mubayi, Zsolt Tuza, Vitaly Voloshin, Douglas B. West March 30, 2003 Abstract A mixed hypergraph is a triple H = (X, C, D), where X is the vertex

More information

WHAT ARE MATHEMATICAL PROOFS AND WHY THEY ARE IMPORTANT?

WHAT ARE MATHEMATICAL PROOFS AND WHY THEY ARE IMPORTANT? WHAT ARE MATHEMATICAL PROOFS AND WHY THEY ARE IMPORTANT? introduction Many students seem to have trouble with the notion of a mathematical proof. People that come to a course like Math 216, who certainly

More information

Fundamentele Informatica II

Fundamentele Informatica II Fundamentele Informatica II Answer to selected exercises 1 John C Martin: Introduction to Languages and the Theory of Computation M.M. Bonsangue (and J. Kleijn) Fall 2011 Let L be a language. It is clear

More information

8 Divisibility and prime numbers

8 Divisibility and prime numbers 8 Divisibility and prime numbers 8.1 Divisibility In this short section we extend the concept of a multiple from the natural numbers to the integers. We also summarize several other terms that express

More information

a 11 x 1 + a 12 x 2 + + a 1n x n = b 1 a 21 x 1 + a 22 x 2 + + a 2n x n = b 2.

a 11 x 1 + a 12 x 2 + + a 1n x n = b 1 a 21 x 1 + a 22 x 2 + + a 2n x n = b 2. Chapter 1 LINEAR EQUATIONS 1.1 Introduction to linear equations A linear equation in n unknowns x 1, x,, x n is an equation of the form a 1 x 1 + a x + + a n x n = b, where a 1, a,..., a n, b are given

More information

Math212a1010 Lebesgue measure.

Math212a1010 Lebesgue measure. Math212a1010 Lebesgue measure. October 19, 2010 Today s lecture will be devoted to Lebesgue measure, a creation of Henri Lebesgue, in his thesis, one of the most famous theses in the history of mathematics.

More information

Continued Fractions and the Euclidean Algorithm

Continued Fractions and the Euclidean Algorithm Continued Fractions and the Euclidean Algorithm Lecture notes prepared for MATH 326, Spring 997 Department of Mathematics and Statistics University at Albany William F Hammond Table of Contents Introduction

More information

Handout #1: Mathematical Reasoning

Handout #1: Mathematical Reasoning Math 101 Rumbos Spring 2010 1 Handout #1: Mathematical Reasoning 1 Propositional Logic A proposition is a mathematical statement that it is either true or false; that is, a statement whose certainty or

More information

princeton univ. F 13 cos 521: Advanced Algorithm Design Lecture 6: Provable Approximation via Linear Programming Lecturer: Sanjeev Arora

princeton univ. F 13 cos 521: Advanced Algorithm Design Lecture 6: Provable Approximation via Linear Programming Lecturer: Sanjeev Arora princeton univ. F 13 cos 521: Advanced Algorithm Design Lecture 6: Provable Approximation via Linear Programming Lecturer: Sanjeev Arora Scribe: One of the running themes in this course is the notion of

More information

Page 331, 38.4 Suppose a is a positive integer and p is a prime. Prove that p a if and only if the prime factorization of a contains p.

Page 331, 38.4 Suppose a is a positive integer and p is a prime. Prove that p a if and only if the prime factorization of a contains p. Page 331, 38.2 Assignment #11 Solutions Factor the following positive integers into primes. a. 25 = 5 2. b. 4200 = 2 3 3 5 2 7. c. 10 10 = 2 10 5 10. d. 19 = 19. e. 1 = 1. Page 331, 38.4 Suppose a is a

More information

FUNCTIONAL ANALYSIS LECTURE NOTES: QUOTIENT SPACES

FUNCTIONAL ANALYSIS LECTURE NOTES: QUOTIENT SPACES FUNCTIONAL ANALYSIS LECTURE NOTES: QUOTIENT SPACES CHRISTOPHER HEIL 1. Cosets and the Quotient Space Any vector space is an abelian group under the operation of vector addition. So, if you are have studied

More information

Elementary Number Theory We begin with a bit of elementary number theory, which is concerned

Elementary Number Theory We begin with a bit of elementary number theory, which is concerned CONSTRUCTION OF THE FINITE FIELDS Z p S. R. DOTY Elementary Number Theory We begin with a bit of elementary number theory, which is concerned solely with questions about the set of integers Z = {0, ±1,

More information

8 Primes and Modular Arithmetic

8 Primes and Modular Arithmetic 8 Primes and Modular Arithmetic 8.1 Primes and Factors Over two millennia ago already, people all over the world were considering the properties of numbers. One of the simplest concepts is prime numbers.

More information

This asserts two sets are equal iff they have the same elements, that is, a set is determined by its elements.

This asserts two sets are equal iff they have the same elements, that is, a set is determined by its elements. 3. Axioms of Set theory Before presenting the axioms of set theory, we first make a few basic comments about the relevant first order logic. We will give a somewhat more detailed discussion later, but

More information

A Course in Discrete Structures. Rafael Pass Wei-Lung Dustin Tseng

A Course in Discrete Structures. Rafael Pass Wei-Lung Dustin Tseng A Course in Discrete Structures Rafael Pass Wei-Lung Dustin Tseng Preface Discrete mathematics deals with objects that come in discrete bundles, e.g., 1 or 2 babies. In contrast, continuous mathematics

More information

P (A) = lim P (A) = N(A)/N,

P (A) = lim P (A) = N(A)/N, 1.1 Probability, Relative Frequency and Classical Definition. Probability is the study of random or non-deterministic experiments. Suppose an experiment can be repeated any number of times, so that we

More information

Discrete Mathematics and Probability Theory Fall 2009 Satish Rao,David Tse Note 11

Discrete Mathematics and Probability Theory Fall 2009 Satish Rao,David Tse Note 11 CS 70 Discrete Mathematics and Probability Theory Fall 2009 Satish Rao,David Tse Note Conditional Probability A pharmaceutical company is marketing a new test for a certain medical condition. According

More information

THE BANACH CONTRACTION PRINCIPLE. Contents

THE BANACH CONTRACTION PRINCIPLE. Contents THE BANACH CONTRACTION PRINCIPLE ALEX PONIECKI Abstract. This paper will study contractions of metric spaces. To do this, we will mainly use tools from topology. We will give some examples of contractions,

More information

Georg Cantor and Set Theory

Georg Cantor and Set Theory Georg Cantor and Set Theory. Life Father, Georg Waldemar Cantor, born in Denmark, successful merchant, and stock broker in St Petersburg. Mother, Maria Anna Böhm, was Russian. In 856, because of father

More information

Chapter 3. Distribution Problems. 3.1 The idea of a distribution. 3.1.1 The twenty-fold way

Chapter 3. Distribution Problems. 3.1 The idea of a distribution. 3.1.1 The twenty-fold way Chapter 3 Distribution Problems 3.1 The idea of a distribution Many of the problems we solved in Chapter 1 may be thought of as problems of distributing objects (such as pieces of fruit or ping-pong balls)

More information

U.C. Berkeley CS276: Cryptography Handout 0.1 Luca Trevisan January, 2009. Notes on Algebra

U.C. Berkeley CS276: Cryptography Handout 0.1 Luca Trevisan January, 2009. Notes on Algebra U.C. Berkeley CS276: Cryptography Handout 0.1 Luca Trevisan January, 2009 Notes on Algebra These notes contain as little theory as possible, and most results are stated without proof. Any introductory

More information

Pigeonhole Principle Solutions

Pigeonhole Principle Solutions Pigeonhole Principle Solutions 1. Show that if we take n + 1 numbers from the set {1, 2,..., 2n}, then some pair of numbers will have no factors in common. Solution: Note that consecutive numbers (such

More information

Crossing the Bridge at Night

Crossing the Bridge at Night A1:01 Crossing the Bridge at Night Günter Rote Freie Universität Berlin, Institut für Informatik Takustraße 9, D-14195 Berlin, Germany rote@inf.fu-berlin.de A1:02 August 21, 2002 A1:03 A1:04 Abstract We

More information

3 0 + 4 + 3 1 + 1 + 3 9 + 6 + 3 0 + 1 + 3 0 + 1 + 3 2 mod 10 = 4 + 3 + 1 + 27 + 6 + 1 + 1 + 6 mod 10 = 49 mod 10 = 9.

3 0 + 4 + 3 1 + 1 + 3 9 + 6 + 3 0 + 1 + 3 0 + 1 + 3 2 mod 10 = 4 + 3 + 1 + 27 + 6 + 1 + 1 + 6 mod 10 = 49 mod 10 = 9. SOLUTIONS TO HOMEWORK 2 - MATH 170, SUMMER SESSION I (2012) (1) (Exercise 11, Page 107) Which of the following is the correct UPC for Progresso minestrone soup? Show why the other numbers are not valid

More information

Basic Set Theory. Chapter Set Theory. can be written: A set is a Many that allows itself to be thought of as a One.

Basic Set Theory. Chapter Set Theory. can be written: A set is a Many that allows itself to be thought of as a One. Chapter Basic Set Theory A set is a Many that allows itself to be thought of as a One. - Georg Cantor This chapter introduces set theory, mathematical induction, and formalizes the notion of mathematical

More information

2.3 Scheduling jobs on identical parallel machines

2.3 Scheduling jobs on identical parallel machines 2.3 Scheduling jobs on identical parallel machines There are jobs to be processed, and there are identical machines (running in parallel) to which each job may be assigned Each job = 1,,, must be processed

More information

Week 7: Divide and Conquer

Week 7: Divide and Conquer Agenda: Divide and Conquer technique Multiplication of large integers Exponentiation Matrix multiplication 1 2- Divide and Conquer : To solve a problem we can break it into smaller subproblems, solve each

More information

Exponential time algorithms for graph coloring

Exponential time algorithms for graph coloring Exponential time algorithms for graph coloring Uriel Feige Lecture notes, March 14, 2011 1 Introduction Let [n] denote the set {1,..., k}. A k-labeling of vertices of a graph G(V, E) is a function V [k].

More information

THE DIMENSION OF A VECTOR SPACE

THE DIMENSION OF A VECTOR SPACE THE DIMENSION OF A VECTOR SPACE KEITH CONRAD This handout is a supplementary discussion leading up to the definition of dimension and some of its basic properties. Let V be a vector space over a field

More information