Chillin Out: Designing an Insulator

Save this PDF as:
 WORD  PNG  TXT  JPG

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "Chillin Out: Designing an Insulator"

Transcription

1 SHPE Jr. Chapter May 2015 STEM Activity Instructor Resource Chillin Out: Designing an Insulator Students learn about the three ways heat can be transferred from one object to another. They also learn what makes a material a good insulator. Working in teams, students design a system intended to keep a cup of water cool for an hour. Learning objectives Understand thermal conductivity and the three types of heat transfer Assess materials as conductors or insulators Understand how different materials can facilitate or slow heat transfer Predict which materials in what type of design will best insulate a cup of cold water. Engineering/STEM areas: Thermodynamics, materials science, product design Materials Student Resource Sheets (in lesson) Student Worksheets (in lesson) A pitcher or thermos with water and ice in it (enough water to fill one cup per group of students) Waxed paper cups (Plain paper may leak. One per group of students) Thermometer (one per group of students) Materials to use for insulation, such as foil, cotton balls, felt, moss, cardboard, paper, duct tape, straws, string, yarn, packing foam, styrofoam cups, sand, cloth or clothing such as socks or mittens, coffee filters, aquarium marbles, etc. Plastic wrap to hold the insulating materials around the paper cups Time required 45 mins + 15 mins. Note: the activity requires that the insulated cups sit for an hour. During that time, students can do the life skills portion of the class. Suggested group size: 2-3 depending on number of students

2 Preparation 1. Read through both the student and instructor resources so you have the background information 2. Gather all the insulation materials that students will have access to. Suggestions are listed in the Materials section above. 3. Make enough copies of the Student Resource so that each student has one 4. Make one copy of the Student Worksheet per group, plus a few extras 5. Build your own insulated cup that you can show as a demo 6. Set aside an area where students can set their cups during for an hour after they ve constructed them. If possible, make this spot easily accessible so that students can take a temperature reading after 30 minutes. 7. Collect a few insulating containers that do not rely on a vacuum (i.e. not a Thermos). You could use an insulated lunch bag, stryofoam or regular foam insulators, potholders, etc. Procedure 1. Pass around the insulating materials you ve collected and ask students to consider what they re made of. 2. Point out that these items can be used both to keep something warm and to keep it cool. Ask how that can be. 3. Give students this scenario: It s a warm spring day (hopefully it actually will be!) and they re having a picnic. Unfortunately, they forgot a cooler or ice, and they need to devise a way to keep their drinks cold. Fortunately, there are lots of materials in their backpacks and in the environment around them. Their task is to come up with a way to insulate their drinks. 4. Go over the information in the Student Resource and Worksheet, making sure students understand the three types of heat transfer and the properties of heat conductors and insulators. 5. Go over the materials available to build the insulators. Give each group a cup, and allot about minutes for students to design their cup insulators on paper. If you want students to be able to compare how different materials insulate, assign different sets of materials to different groups. 6. Next, give students about 20 minutes to build their cup insulators. They should wrap their cups in only one or two layers of plastic wrap, to hold the insulating material together. (You may want to ask students to consider whether or not plastic is a good insulator.) 7. When each group finishes their insulated cup, fill the cup with ice water and give the students a thermometer to put in the cup. Tell students to let the thermometer sit for about a minute. When the temp looks like it s stopped going down, they should record the thermometer reading on their student worksheet.

3 8. When all the cups are full, tell students to place them in the area you set aside for them (with the thermometers in them). Tell students the cups will sit for an hour, after which students will compare starting and ending temperatures. 9. If possible, give students time to record a temperature reading halfway through the hour. 10. After an hour, students should record their thermometer readings. Ask each group how much the temperature rose in their cup. Compare how the different groups materials and designs performed as insulators. Assessments Each group should describe the following to other students: Why they think their insulator performed as it did, based on the properties of the materials and the types of heat transfer that occurred. They need to describe specific properties the materials must possess to have been as effective (or ineffective) as they were. Students can compare their chosen materials with their classmates choices or with other materials they decided not to use. What improvements they would make to their design and why Extensions Have students research different types of housing insulation and come up with three different insulation plans suited to three different climates. Discuss the way that vacuums can be used for insulation, and why they can be good insulators. Use examples such as a Thermos, Experiment and calculate the thermal conductivity of different materials. ( has an interesting example with lots of background information.) Resources/Bibliography BBC Keeping Warm lesson plan html Maine Energy Education Curriculum Insulation Materials Investigation uoh_insulation/uoh_insulation_activity1.xml Keep It Cool lesson plan

4 May 2015 SHPE Jr. Chapter STEM Activity Student Resource Chillin Out: Designing an Insulator It s a warm spring day. You and your friends are headed to the park for a picnic, toting bottles of cold water and juice. You ve got a variety of ways of keeping those bottles cold. Some are in foam cozies, others are on ice in a plastic cooler, and others are tucked away puffy bag lined with silver material. On a chillier day, you might have warm foods packed in the puffy bag and be putting those cozies around cups of hot cocoa. How is it that the same insulator can keep things both hot and cold? It s all about heat transfer Insulating something isn t really about keeping that thing hot or cold, it s about maintaining a certain temperature. The way an insulator maintains temperature is by slowing the process of heat moving from one place to another. For example, on a cold day, heat leaves your bare hands and goes into the air around them. When you put your hands in your pockets, two things happen: you slow the transfer of heat from your hands to the air, and some heat from your body is transferred to your hands. There are three different ways that heat can move from one place to another, and you probably see examples of each one every day. In order to understand them, we need to think about the difference between heat and temperature. Temperature is a measure of the kinetic energy of particles in a substance or object. Heat is the movement of that energy from the substance or object to another substance or object. Since this movement occurs in a world ruled by entropy, the energy (heat) will always move from the object with the higher

5 temperature to the object with the lower one. Each of the three modes of heat transfer, therefore, has to involve a transfer of energy. And how that transfer happens is related to the properties of the materials involved. Conduction: transferring energy through collisions The most familiar and visible form of heat transfer is conduction. Conduction happens when two objects of different temperatures are in contact. When you wrap your cold hands around a warm mug of coffee, you re heating your hands through conduction. Conduction transfers energy through collisions between particles. The particles in the warmer substance, in this case, the coffee, have a higher temperature, and therefore more kinetic energy. When they collide with the less-energized particles on the sides of the cooler ceramic coffee mug, some of their energy is transferred to those ceramic particles. And those now-energized ceramic particles collide with other particles in the mug, transferring energy again. As this process happens repeatedly, the kinetic energy of the particles (in other words, the temperature) of the mug goes up and the temperature of the coffee goes down. When you wrap your hands around the mug, the same process happens between the outside of the mug and your hands. Particles in a substance heated by a flame at one end become more energized. When they collide with other particles, they pass that energy along. Sometimes an engineer is tasked with designing something (like an insulating cup, for instance) intended to slow the rate at which heat is transferred. In that case, she wants to choose materials that are good thermal insulators (in other words, materials that aren t good thermal conductors). There are many factors that can affect the thermal conductivity of a material. Here are two of the most important ones: Density of particles: The more tightly packed the particles are in a material, the more readily it will transfer heat. When particles on the inside of the mug get energized by colliding with hot coffee molecules, they ll quickly run into neighboring ceramic particles and pass the energy along to them, too. The more particles there are nearby, the more likely the

6 newly energized particles will run into them. And the more run-ins there are between particles, the faster the energy will be passed along. Air permeability: Materials like foam and Styrofoam are good insulators because they trap air inside them. Gases and liquids can be good insulators: they fill up space using fewer particles than a solid such as ceramic. If you fill a Styrofoam cup with coffee, for example, heat gets trapped in pockets of air inside the styrofoam. That air takes longer to receive and pass long energy than a solid would. Metals conduct heat very readily in a different way. If you were to pour that hot coffee into a metal cup, you d find the metal got much warmer, and heated much more quickly, than the ceramic. That s because metals can conduct heat in a way similar to how they conduct electricity, by using electrons. As the electrons move through the metal, they transfer energy. This thermal conductivity isn t the same as electrical conductivity, so thankfully you just get some hot metal but you don t get a shock! Convection: circulating currents of heat Conduction works well in solids but not so well in liquids and gases, because the particles are much farther from each other. A phenomenon called convection is the way heat moves through liquids and gases. You ve seen convection at work in a pot of boiling water. Heat is initially transferred to the water through conduction, when the pot is put on a hot burner. The water at the bottom of the pot gets heated, the particles gain more energy and move away from each other, making the hot water less dense. The less-dense water rises toward the top of the pot, and the cooler, denser water falls to the bottom. The warmer water at the top cools off as it moves away from the heat source, and the water that s fallen to the bottom of the pot gets warmer and less dense. This change in densities sets up a cycle of water falling and rising in the pot. The cycle creates convection currents, which you can see as the rolling boil of the water. When you heat your room in the wintertime, you re also making use of convection. A radiator heats the air around it, making that air less dense. The warm air rises, pushing the cool air toward the bottom of the room, where it s

7 heated by the radiator and rises. The air moves around in much the same way the boiling water does. Convection may be less visible to us than conduction, but it can be found all around us. Convection currents are constantly moving through the ocean, and convection currents in the atmosphere contribute to our weather. It s important to note in important difference between convection and conduction: In conduction, all the material that s transferring heat stays pretty much where it is. The heat passes through the material by collisions of individual particles. In conduction, the particles and therefore the material itself moves. Radiation: electromagnetic waves We feel warmth from the sun, but we certainly aren t in contact with the sun for conduction to occur. And it s not convection currents that give us sunburn. We feel the sun s warmth because of a third form of heat transfer: radiation. Radiation is the transfer of thermal energy using electromagnetic waves. These waves are just like the electromagnetic waves that we use to broadcast a radio signal, take an x- ray, or see as light. In fact, heat often radiates in wavelengths that make up the Infrared photo of hands, showing how they radiate heat of different temperatures. infrared part of the electromagnetic spectrum, and have just slightly less energy than waves our eyes are sensitive to. With special lenses and filters, we can take photos of objects and see the infrared (or heat) radiation. The hotter the object, the higher the energy of the thermal radiation it s sending out. Take your toaster, for example. When it s not toasting, the coils inside are a plain gray. Those coils probably aren t radiating heat because they re the same temperature as their surroundings. But when you turn the toaster on, those coils heat up fast and furious. The particles in them get so much energy that they radiate heat in wavelengths that have enough energy for us to see them. That s why we can see the red coils: not because they ve turned red, but because they are radiating heat.

8 Like all other electromagnetic waves (such as light), thermal radiation doesn t require any particles at all to make its way through space. Which is a good thing, because there s a lot of empty space between us and the sun. Three s a charm In many everyday situations, more than one type of heat transfer is taking place in a given system. Remember our cup of coffee? It s going through all three forms of heat transfer. Heat is being conducted through the mug. Convection currents are sending coffee upward from the bottom and downward from the top (you can see this movement by pouring a bit of cream in and watching it spread out). And if you hold your hands near the mug, you ll feel how it s radiating heat into the environment. It s sometimes an engineer s job to come up with materials and design objects that control or direct each of these processes. And that s what you ll be doing in this activity: keeping the warmth of the atmosphere from making its way to a cup of ice water. Vocabulary Conduction The transfer of heat as particles with higher energy collide with particles of lower energy. Conduction occurs in solids and liquids, but not gasses. Convection The transfer of heat through a substance as mass motion of the substance away from the source of heat. Convection occurs in gasses and liquids, but not solids. Heat The movement of energy in the form of temperature. Insulator A material that slows the process of heat transfer. Radiation The transfer of heat through electromagnetic waves. Temperature The measure of the average kinetic energy of a particle in a substance.

9 May SHPE Jr. Chapter STEM Activity Student Worksheet Chillin Out: Designing an Insulator Activity Procedure You and your friends are having a picnic on a warm spring day. You ve got lots of cold drinks, but no one remembered to bring a cooler. But not to worry: there are plenty of good insulating materials around, and your instructor has collected many of them for you. Your task is to design an insulator that will keep a cup of cold water chilled for an hour. Here s what you ll need: Waxed paper cup Thermometer Insulating materials How will you slow heat transfer? For starters, think about how you imagine heat might transfer to your cup. How much is through conduction? Convection? Radiation? Then consider the materials you have at hand. Which of them seem best at reducing the different types of heat transfer in your particular situation? Why? In the box below, make a list of materials you plan to use in your insulator. Either describe how they will be placed, or make a drawing of your proposed insulator.

10 Next, put your insulator together. Secure all the pieces in place by wrapping it once or twice with plastic wrap. Do not put more than two layers of plastic wrap around it! Have your instructor fill the cup with ice water. Put your thermometer in the cup just after it s filled. Let the thermometer sit for a minute or two, making sure that the temperature reading has stabilized. Record your temperature in the space below: Recorded temperatures: After 1 minute After 30 minutes After 60 minutes Then set the cup in the area your instructor has set aside for you. If you can, measure the temperature again after 30 minutes, and one more time after 60 minutes, recording the result each time. How many degrees did your water warm up over the hour? Where do you think heat transfer occurred the most? What makes you think so? What would you do to improve your design and why?

Conduction, Convention & Radiation

Conduction, Convention & Radiation Name: Class: Date: Grade 11A Science Related Reading/Physics Conduction, Convention & Radiation Physics Gr11A Pre Reading Activity Using prior knowledge, write the definition for each vocabulary term.

More information

Heat Transfer: Conduction, Convection, and Radiation

Heat Transfer: Conduction, Convection, and Radiation Heat Transfer: Conduction, Convection, and Radiation Introduction We have learned that heat is the energy that makes molecules move. Molecules with more heat energy move faster, and molecules with less

More information

Provided by TryEngineering - www.tryengineering.org

Provided by TryEngineering - www.tryengineering.org Provided by TryEngineering - Lesson Focus Lesson focuses on the engineering behind keeping food and other items cool. Students work in teams to develop a system to make an insulated liquid container that

More information

Hot Leaks. See how the temperature of liquids changes the way they flow.

Hot Leaks. See how the temperature of liquids changes the way they flow. P h y s i c s Q u e s t A c t i v i t i e s Activity 2 1 Hot Leaks See how the temperature of liquids changes the way they flow. Safety: This experiment requires using the hot water tap and straight pins.

More information

Chapter 4: Transfer of Thermal Energy

Chapter 4: Transfer of Thermal Energy Chapter 4: Transfer of Thermal Energy Goals of Period 4 Section 4.1: To define temperature and thermal energy Section 4.2: To discuss three methods of thermal energy transfer. Section 4.3: To describe

More information

Introduction to Chapter 27

Introduction to Chapter 27 9 Heating and Cooling Introduction to Chapter 27 What process does a hot cup of coffee undergo as it cools? How does your bedroom become warm during the winter? How does the cooling system of a car work?

More information

TEACHER BACKGROUND INFORMATION THERMAL ENERGY

TEACHER BACKGROUND INFORMATION THERMAL ENERGY TEACHER BACKGROUND INFORMATION THERMAL ENERGY In general, when an object performs work on another object, it does not transfer all of its energy to that object. Some of the energy is lost as heat due to

More information

Project TECHNOcean Lesson/Activity Plan

Project TECHNOcean Lesson/Activity Plan Heat Transfer Hayley Vatcher Anna Reh-Gingerich Murray Middle, 7th Objective: Students should be able to: Define and describe conduction Define and describe convection List some good conductors, and poor

More information

CPI Links Content Guide & Five Items Resource

CPI Links Content Guide & Five Items Resource CPI Links Content Guide & Five Items Resource Introduction The following information should be used as a companion to the CPI Links. It provides clarifications concerning the content and skills contained

More information

OBJECTIVES THE STUDENTS WILL: Participate in cooperative problem solving in a group setting.

OBJECTIVES THE STUDENTS WILL: Participate in cooperative problem solving in a group setting. ICE CAPADES THE POWER OF INSULATION GRADE LEVEL: Upper Elementary/Middle School (High School with extensions) SUBJECT AREA: Sciences, Mathematics DURATION: Preparation time 30 minutes Activity time: One

More information

What is Energy? What is the relationship between energy and work?

What is Energy? What is the relationship between energy and work? What is Energy? What is the relationship between energy and work? Compare kinetic and potential energy What are the different types of energy? What is energy? Energy is the ability to do work. Great, but

More information

Convection, Conduction & Radiation

Convection, Conduction & Radiation Convection, Conduction & Radiation There are three basic ways in which heat is transferred: convection, conduction and radiation. In gases and liquids, heat is usually transferred by convection, in which

More information

4 TH GRADE AIR AND AIR PRESSURE

4 TH GRADE AIR AND AIR PRESSURE 4 TH GRADE AIR AND AIR PRESSURE Summary: Students experiment with air by finding that it has mass and pressure. Warm air is less dense than cool air and this is tested using a balance. Students experiment

More information

Heat Energy FORMS OF ENERGY LESSON PLAN 2.7. Public School System Teaching Standards Covered

Heat Energy FORMS OF ENERGY LESSON PLAN 2.7. Public School System Teaching Standards Covered FORMS OF ENERGY LESSON PLAN 2.7 Heat Energy This lesson is designed for 3rd 5th grade students in a variety of school settings (public, private, STEM schools, and home schools) in the seven states served

More information

Bay Area Scientists in Schools Presentation Plan

Bay Area Scientists in Schools Presentation Plan Bay Area Scientists in Schools Presentation Plan Lesson Name Heat Transfer: It s So Cool! Presenter(s) Kevin Metcalf, Sarika Goel, David Ojala, Melanie Drake, Carly Anderson Grade Level 3 Standards Connection(s)

More information

Heating the Atmosphere. Dr. Michael J Passow

Heating the Atmosphere. Dr. Michael J Passow Heating the Atmosphere Dr. Michael J Passow Heat vs. Temperature Heat refers to energy transferred from one object to another Temperature measures the average kinetic energy in a substance. When heat energy

More information

Test Bank - Chapter 3 Multiple Choice

Test Bank - Chapter 3 Multiple Choice Test Bank - Chapter 3 The questions in the test bank cover the concepts from the lessons in Chapter 3. Select questions from any of the categories that match the content you covered with students. The

More information

(Walter Glogowski, Chaz Shapiro & Reid Sherman) INTRODUCTION

(Walter Glogowski, Chaz Shapiro & Reid Sherman) INTRODUCTION Convection (Walter Glogowski, Chaz Shapiro & Reid Sherman) INTRODUCTION You know from common experience that when there's a difference in temperature between two places close to each other, the temperatures

More information

Lesson 7: Building an Insulated Water Bottle

Lesson 7: Building an Insulated Water Bottle Lesson 7: Building an Insulated Water Bottle Overview Students investigate the insulating properties of a variety of materials. Using their knowledge of heat transfers, students design an insulated water

More information

Energy and Energy Transformations Test Review

Energy and Energy Transformations Test Review Energy and Energy Transformations Test Review Completion: 1. Mass 13. Kinetic 2. Four 14. thermal 3. Kinetic 15. Thermal energy (heat) 4. Electromagnetic/Radiant 16. Thermal energy (heat) 5. Thermal 17.

More information

Multiple Choice For questions 1-10, circle only one answer.

Multiple Choice For questions 1-10, circle only one answer. Test Bank - Chapter 1 The questions in the test bank cover the concepts from the lessons in Chapter 1. Select questions from any of the categories that match the content you covered with students. The

More information

Chapter 18 Temperature, Heat, and the First Law of Thermodynamics. Problems: 8, 11, 13, 17, 21, 27, 29, 37, 39, 41, 47, 51, 57

Chapter 18 Temperature, Heat, and the First Law of Thermodynamics. Problems: 8, 11, 13, 17, 21, 27, 29, 37, 39, 41, 47, 51, 57 Chapter 18 Temperature, Heat, and the First Law of Thermodynamics Problems: 8, 11, 13, 17, 21, 27, 29, 37, 39, 41, 47, 51, 57 Thermodynamics study and application of thermal energy temperature quantity

More information

Mechanisms of Heat Transfer. Amin Sabzevari

Mechanisms of Heat Transfer. Amin Sabzevari Mechanisms of Heat Transfer Amin Sabzevari Outline Definition of Heat and Temperature Conduction, Convection, Radiation Demonstrations and Examples What is Heat? Heat is the spontaneous flow of energy

More information

UNIT 1 GCSE PHYSICS Energy Transfer by Heating 2011 FXA HEAT TRANSFER PROCESS COLD

UNIT 1 GCSE PHYSICS Energy Transfer by Heating 2011 FXA HEAT TRANSFER PROCESS COLD 11 The transfer of energy by conduction, convection, evaporation and condensation involves particles, and how this transfer takes place. How the arrangement and movement of particles determine whether

More information

What Is Heat? What Is Heat?

What Is Heat? What Is Heat? What Is Heat? Paul shivered inside the wood cabin. It was cold outside, and inside the cabin it wasn t much warmer. Paul could hear the rain beating down on the roof. Every few minutes there would be a

More information

[8] SA1.2 The student demonstrates an understanding of the processes of science by collaborating

[8] SA1.2 The student demonstrates an understanding of the processes of science by collaborating Convection and Wind Levels Overview: During this project, students observe convection current by performing a lab experiment. As a result of this activity, students develop an understanding of the process

More information

Heat Transfer. Convection. Introduction. Natural convection

Heat Transfer. Convection. Introduction. Natural convection Heat Transfer Convection Introduction Convection is defined as the circulation of fluids (liquids or gases), either natural or forced. Hot or cold fluids can add or remove heat. Natural convection is caused

More information

Energy - Heat, Light, and Sound

Energy - Heat, Light, and Sound Science Benchmark: 06:06 Heat, light, and sound are all forms of energy. Heat can be transferred by radiation, conduction and convection. Visible light can be produced, reflected, refracted, and separated

More information

Temperature. Temperature

Temperature. Temperature Chapter 8 Temperature Temperature a number that corresponds to the warmth or coldness of an object measured by a thermometer is a per-particle property no upper limit definite limit on lower end Temperature

More information

2.0 Heat affects matter in different ways

2.0 Heat affects matter in different ways 2.0 Heat affects matter in different ways 2.1 States of Matter and The Particle Model of Matter Matter is made up of tiny particles and exists in three states: solid, liquid and gas. The Particle Model

More information

ATM S 111, Global Warming: Understanding the Forecast

ATM S 111, Global Warming: Understanding the Forecast ATM S 111, Global Warming: Understanding the Forecast DARGAN M. W. FRIERSON DEPARTMENT OF ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES DAY 1: OCTOBER 1, 2015 Outline How exactly the Sun heats the Earth How strong? Important concept

More information

Chapter 10 Temperature and Heat

Chapter 10 Temperature and Heat Chapter 10 Temperature and Heat What are temperature and heat? Are they the same? What causes heat? What Is Temperature? How do we measure temperature? What are we actually measuring? Temperature and Its

More information

The Science of Hot Air Balloons. Grade 7 Activity Plan

The Science of Hot Air Balloons. Grade 7 Activity Plan The Science of Hot Air Balloons Grade 7 Activity Plan 1 The Science of Hot Air Balloons Objectives: 1. To compare two methods of heat transfer: conduction and convection 2. To understand that the physical

More information

Energy Heats Maine. Heat Transfer Scenes

Energy Heats Maine. Heat Transfer Scenes Energy Heats Maine 1G G2 Energy Heats Maine Energy Heats Maine 3G G4 Energy Heats Maine Energy Heats Maine 5G G6 Energy Heats Maine Energy Heats Maine 7G G8 Energy Heats Maine Energy Heats Maine 9G G10

More information

Lesson 5: Conduction, Convection, Radiation

Lesson 5: Conduction, Convection, Radiation Lesson 5: Conduction, Convection, Radiation Investigating Heat Transfers Overview Heat moves from warmer matter to cooler matter in different ways. Students consider heat transfers that occur in everyday

More information

Temperature Scales. temperature scales Celsius Fahrenheit Kelvin

Temperature Scales. temperature scales Celsius Fahrenheit Kelvin Ch. 10-11 Concept Ch. 10 #1, 3, 7, 8, 9, 11 Ch11, # 3, 6, 11 Problems Ch10 # 3, 5, 11, 17, 21, 24, 25, 29, 33, 37, 39, 43, 47, 59 Problems: CH 11 # 1, 2, 3a, 4, 5, 6, 9, 13, 15, 22, 25, 27, 28, 35 Temperature

More information

Topic Page Contents Page

Topic Page Contents Page Heat energy (11-16) Contents Topic Page Contents Page Heat energy and temperature 3 Latent heat energy 15 Interesting temperatures 4 Conduction of heat energy 16 A cooling curve 5 Convection 17 Expansion

More information

Exploring Energy. Third - Fifth TEKS. Vocabulary

Exploring Energy. Third - Fifth TEKS. Vocabulary Exploring Energy Third - Fifth TEKS Third Grade: 3.5A, 3.5B, 3.5C, 3.6A Fourth Grade: 4.5A, 4.5B, 4.6A, 4.6B, 4.6C Fifth Grade: 5.5A, 5.6A, 5.6B Vocabulary conductor, convection, conversions, electrical,

More information

Name: Class: Date: 10. Some substances, when exposed to visible light, absorb more energy as heat than other substances absorb.

Name: Class: Date: 10. Some substances, when exposed to visible light, absorb more energy as heat than other substances absorb. Name: Class: Date: ID: A PS Chapter 13 Review Modified True/False Indicate whether the statement is true or false. If false, change the identified word or phrase to make the statement true. 1. In all cooling

More information

Heat. Chapter 4. 1. What is the difference between heat and temperature? 2. Why does an ice cube melt in your hand?

Heat. Chapter 4. 1. What is the difference between heat and temperature? 2. Why does an ice cube melt in your hand? Chapter 4 Heat Have you ever seen a hot air balloon float high above Earth s surface? What about a hang glider or a soaring bird of prey like a hawk? Each of these objects a hot air balloon, a hang glider,

More information

CRT Science Review #1 Physical Science: Matter

CRT Science Review #1 Physical Science: Matter CRT Science Review #1 Physical Science: Matter Standard: Matter Matter has various states with unique properties that can be used as the basis for organization. The relationship between the properties

More information

Partnerships Implementing Engineering Education Worcester Polytechnic Institute Worcester Public Schools Supported by: National Science Foundation

Partnerships Implementing Engineering Education Worcester Polytechnic Institute Worcester Public Schools Supported by: National Science Foundation Temperature: 6.D.3 Temperature and Heat Transfer Grade Level 6 Sessions Seasonality Instructional Mode(s) Team Size WPS Benchmarks MA Frameworks Key Words 1 Approximately 1.5 hours (10 minutes for cleanup)

More information

Teaching Sciences by Ocean Inquiry SMS 491/ EDW 472 Spring 2008

Teaching Sciences by Ocean Inquiry SMS 491/ EDW 472 Spring 2008 Teaching Sciences by Ocean Inquiry SMS 491/ EDW 472 Spring 2008 HEAT AND TEMPERATURE LAB: Part II 1. Thermal expansion/water thermometer A flask One-hole stopper A long glass tube A container filled with

More information

Chapter 2 Student Reading

Chapter 2 Student Reading Chapter 2 Student Reading Atoms and molecules are in motion We warm things up and cool things down all the time, but we usually don t think much about what s really happening. If you put a room-temperature

More information

Pressure. Curriculum for Excellence. Weather and Climate Cross-curricular project Section 2. Background Information:

Pressure. Curriculum for Excellence. Weather and Climate Cross-curricular project Section 2. Background Information: Curriculum for Excellence Weather and Climate Cross-curricular project Section 2 Pressure Background Information: Air pressure is the force exerted by air particles. The air around us pushes on us and

More information

Forms of Energy. Freshman Seminar

Forms of Energy. Freshman Seminar Forms of Energy Freshman Seminar Energy Energy The ability & capacity to do work Energy can take many different forms Energy can be quantified Law of Conservation of energy In any change from one form

More information

Chapter 10: Temperature and Heat

Chapter 10: Temperature and Heat Chapter 10: Temperature and Heat 1. The temperature of a substance is A. proportional to the average kinetic energy of the molecules in a substance. B. equal to the kinetic energy of the fastest moving

More information

Section 7. Laws of Thermodynamics: Too Hot, Too Cold, Just Right. What Do You See? What Do You Think? Investigate.

Section 7. Laws of Thermodynamics: Too Hot, Too Cold, Just Right. What Do You See? What Do You Think? Investigate. Chapter 6 Electricity for Everyone Section 7 Laws of Thermodynamics: Too Hot, Too Cold, Just Right What Do You See? Learning Outcomes In this section, you will Assess experimentally the final temperature

More information

Heat and Temperature. Temperature Scales. Thermometers and Temperature Scales

Heat and Temperature. Temperature Scales. Thermometers and Temperature Scales Heat and Temperature Thermometers and Temperature Scales The mercury-based one you see here relies on the fact that mercury expands at a predictable rate with temperature. The scale of the thermometer

More information

Green Heating. Pupil Research Brief. Teachers Notes. Syllabus Coverage Subject Knowledge and Understanding. Route through the Brief UPIL ESEARCHER

Green Heating. Pupil Research Brief. Teachers Notes. Syllabus Coverage Subject Knowledge and Understanding. Route through the Brief UPIL ESEARCHER R P UPIL ESEARCHER Green Heating I NITIATIVE Pupil Research Brief Teachers Notes Syllabus Coverage Subject Knowledge and Understanding all types of electromagnetic radiation form a continuous spectrum

More information

PARADISE VALLEY COMMUNITY COLLEGE PHYSICS 101 - INTRODUCTION TO PHYSICS LABORATORY. Calorimetry

PARADISE VALLEY COMMUNITY COLLEGE PHYSICS 101 - INTRODUCTION TO PHYSICS LABORATORY. Calorimetry PARADISE VALLEY COMMUNITY COLLEGE PHYSICS 101 - INTRODUCTION TO PHYSICS LABORATORY Calorimetry Equipment Needed: Large styrofoam cup, thermometer, hot water, cold water, ice, beaker, graduated cylinder,

More information

ES 106 Laboratory # 2 HEAT AND TEMPERATURE

ES 106 Laboratory # 2 HEAT AND TEMPERATURE ES 106 Laboratory # 2 HEAT AND TEMPERATURE Introduction Heat transfer is the movement of heat energy from one place to another. Heat energy can be transferred by three different mechanisms: convection,

More information

SUGGESTED ACTIVITIES

SUGGESTED ACTIVITIES SUGGESTED ACTIVITIES (Thermal Energy) From Invitations to Science Inquiry 2 nd Edition by Tik L. Liem: Activity Page Number Concept Warm a Bottle by Shaking 184 Heat, Friction The Confused Bottles 206

More information

Name Period 4 th Six Weeks Notes 2015 Weather

Name Period 4 th Six Weeks Notes 2015 Weather Name Period 4 th Six Weeks Notes 2015 Weather Radiation Convection Currents Winds Jet Streams Energy from the Sun reaches Earth as electromagnetic waves This energy fuels all life on Earth including the

More information

Heat and Temperature: Front End Evaluation Report. Joshua Gutwill. October 1999

Heat and Temperature: Front End Evaluation Report. Joshua Gutwill. October 1999 Heat and Temperature: Front End Evaluation Report Joshua Gutwill October 1999 Keywords: 1 Heat and Temperature Front End Evaluation Report October 28, 1999 Goal:

More information

Potential and Kinetic Energy

Potential and Kinetic Energy Potential and Kinetic Energy What is Energy? The ability to cause change Energy notes entry # 4 11/5 Potential Energy Kinetic Energy Definitions Dependent on Examples Forms of Potential Energy Definition

More information

Safety Considerations:

Safety Considerations: Lesson Title How do you keep an ice cube from melting?: The Penguin Problem Grade Band 3 rd Heat Energy Submitted by Donna Barrett & Denise Huddlestun, Metro RESA Georgia Performance Standards: S3P1. Students

More information

Learning outcomes. Students will be able to:

Learning outcomes. Students will be able to: Learning structure of the lesson The big picture This lesson is designed to exemplify an argumentation approach to practical work, using a predict-observe-explain framework. Students often think that some

More information

Heat Transfer. Leslie Van Montgomery Blair High School Silver Spring, Maryland Summer 2005

Heat Transfer. Leslie Van Montgomery Blair High School Silver Spring, Maryland Summer 2005 Montgomery Blair High School Silver Spring, Maryland Summer 2005 Research Host: Dr. Margery Anderson Dr. Maria Mayda Walter Reed Army Institute of Research Lesson # 17 Appropriate citation: Van, Leslie

More information

Practical Applications of Freezing by Boiling Process

Practical Applications of Freezing by Boiling Process Practical Applications of Freezing by Boiling Process Kenny Gotlieb, Sasha Mitchell and Daniel Walsh Physics Department, Harvard-Westlake School 37 Coldwater Canyon, N. Hollywood, CA 9164 Introduction

More information

Chapter 2, Lesson 1: Heat, Temperature, and Conduction

Chapter 2, Lesson 1: Heat, Temperature, and Conduction Chapter 2, Lesson 1: Heat, Temperature, and Conduction Key Concepts Adding energy (heating) atoms and molecules increases their motion, resulting in an increase in temperature. Removing energy (cooling)

More information

How Matter Emits Light: 1. the Blackbody Radiation

How Matter Emits Light: 1. the Blackbody Radiation How Matter Emits Light: 1. the Blackbody Radiation Announcements n Quiz # 3 will take place on Thursday, October 20 th ; more infos in the link `quizzes of the website: Please, remember to bring a pencil.

More information

Cold Stuff. Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility - Office of Science Education http://education.jlab.org/

Cold Stuff. Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility - Office of Science Education http://education.jlab.org/ Cold Stuff Cold Stuff What materials make good insulators? Problem Which substance makes the best insulator: cotton, air or steel wool? Research Answer the following True or False questions about insulators:

More information

UNIT 1 GCSE PHYSICS 1.1.1 Infrared Radiation 2011 FXA

UNIT 1 GCSE PHYSICS 1.1.1 Infrared Radiation 2011 FXA 1 All objects emit and absorb thermal radiation. The hotter an object is the infrared radiation it radiates in a given time. It is continually being transferred to and from all objects. The hotter the

More information

Practice Test. 4) The planet Earth loses heat mainly by A) conduction. B) convection. C) radiation. D) all of these Answer: C

Practice Test. 4) The planet Earth loses heat mainly by A) conduction. B) convection. C) radiation. D) all of these Answer: C Practice Test 1) Increase the pressure in a container of oxygen gas while keeping the temperature constant and you increase the A) molecular speed. B) molecular kinetic energy. C) Choice A and choice B

More information

Energy Test Study Guide

Energy Test Study Guide Name: Energy Test Study Guide (Test Dates: A Day May 5 th B Day May 6 th ) USE YOUR INTERACTIVE NOTEBOOK TO STUDY CLASSROOM ASSIGNMENTS, LABS, FORMATIVE ASSESSMENTS, AND HOMEWORK. ENERGY AND THE TWO MAIN

More information

Kinetic Molecular Theory and Gas Laws

Kinetic Molecular Theory and Gas Laws Kinetic Molecular Theory and Gas Laws I. Handout: Unit Notes II. Modeling at the Atomic Scale I. In another unit you learned about the history of the atom and the different models people had of what the

More information

Every mathematician knows it is impossible to understand an elementary course in thermodynamics. ~V.I. Arnold

Every mathematician knows it is impossible to understand an elementary course in thermodynamics. ~V.I. Arnold Every mathematician knows it is impossible to understand an elementary course in thermodynamics. ~V.I. Arnold Radiation Radiation: Heat energy transmitted by electromagnetic waves Q t = εσat 4 emissivity

More information

Forms of Energy Explain

Forms of Energy Explain Forms of Energy Explain DIRECTIONS 1. For the Explain portion of the section, work through each slide 2. For each form there are three slides: 1. Introduce the form of energy 2. Give examples of the form

More information

SAM Teachers Guide Heat and Temperature

SAM Teachers Guide Heat and Temperature SAM Teachers Guide Heat and Temperature Overview Students learn that temperature measures average kinetic energy, and heat is the transfer of energy from hot systems to cold systems. They consider what

More information

Module 2.2. Heat transfer mechanisms

Module 2.2. Heat transfer mechanisms Module 2.2 Heat transfer mechanisms Learning Outcomes On successful completion of this module learners will be able to - Describe the 1 st and 2 nd laws of thermodynamics. - Describe heat transfer mechanisms.

More information

Hands-On Labs SM-1 Lab Manual

Hands-On Labs SM-1 Lab Manual EXPERIMENT 4: Separation of a Mixture of Solids Read the entire experiment and organize time, materials, and work space before beginning. Remember to review the safety sections and wear goggles when appropriate.

More information

Unit/Lesson Plan Title: Transfer of Heat: Conduction. Integrated Subjects Math Grade Level(s) 5

Unit/Lesson Plan Title: Transfer of Heat: Conduction. Integrated Subjects Math Grade Level(s) 5 Unit/Lesson Plan Title: Transfer of Heat: Conduction Primary Subject Physical Science Integrated Subjects Math Grade Level(s) 5 Length of Unit 2 weeks Research Sources http://www.teachertube.com/viewvideo.php?video_id=186099

More information

Melting ice Student sheet

Melting ice Student sheet Melting ice Student sheet Predict Which ice cube will melt first? Observe Describe what you saw happen. Why? (Give a scientific explanation) Questions to think about: Why does ice melt? Why might one ice

More information

Things you need. Time ?????? Large pyrex beaker preferably 500 to 1000ml, or large steel vacuum

Things you need. Time ?????? Large pyrex beaker preferably 500 to 1000ml, or large steel vacuum This experiment is a means of observing the effect of cold temperatures on a range of everyday items. A freezing solution is made for this purpose by adding dry ice to a pure alcohol. This is strictly

More information

Chapter 1 Student Reading

Chapter 1 Student Reading Chapter 1 Student Reading Chemistry is the study of matter You could say that chemistry is the science that studies all the stuff in the entire world. A more scientific term for stuff is matter. So chemistry

More information

AZ State Standards. Concept 3: Conservation of Energy and Increase in Disorder Understand ways that energy is conserved, stored, and transferred.

AZ State Standards. Concept 3: Conservation of Energy and Increase in Disorder Understand ways that energy is conserved, stored, and transferred. Forms of Energy AZ State Standards Concept 3: Conservation of Energy and Increase in Disorder Understand ways that energy is conserved, stored, and transferred. PO 1. Describe the following ways in which

More information

MULTIPLE CHOICE. Choose the one alternative that best completes the statement or answers the question.

MULTIPLE CHOICE. Choose the one alternative that best completes the statement or answers the question. Sample Mid-Term 3 MULTIPLE CHOICE. Choose the one alternative that best completes the statement or answers the question. 1) If you double the frequency of a vibrating object, its period A) is quartered.

More information

Can Gases Act Like a Greenhouse?

Can Gases Act Like a Greenhouse? Can Gases Act Like a Greenhouse? Activity 1 Following a discussion that enables student to express what they already know about the greenhouse effect, students conduct a controlled experiment to confirm

More information

HOW HVAC WORKS. How HVAC. Works PAGE 1

HOW HVAC WORKS. How HVAC. Works PAGE 1 How HVAC Works PAGE 1 Heat - What is it? Heat is more than a physical concept - it is a feeling. Heat is taught to us at a very young age as a danger to be avoided. Yet, have you ever stopped and thought

More information

Atmosphere, pressure and wind the story for teachers

Atmosphere, pressure and wind the story for teachers Atmosphere, pressure and wind the story for teachers These notes are reproduced from materials accompanying the CPD workshop Science Through the Window, by permission of the Scottish Earth Science Education

More information

2. Room temperature: C. Kelvin. 2. Room temperature:

2. Room temperature: C. Kelvin. 2. Room temperature: Temperature I. Temperature is the quantity that tells how hot or cold something is compared with a standard A. Temperature is directly proportional to the average kinetic energy of molecular translational

More information

The Water Cycle Now You See It, Now You Don t

The Water Cycle Now You See It, Now You Don t The Water Cycle Now You See It, Now You Don t Unit: Salinity Patterns & the Water Cycle l Grade Level: Elementary l Time Required: Introduction - 30 min. - Activity as groups 45min Wrap Up 20 min l Content

More information

Solids, Liquids, and Gases

Solids, Liquids, and Gases Solids, Liquids, and Gases nd Intended for Grade: 2 Grade Subject: Science Description: Activities to help students understand solids, liquids, gases, and the changes between these states. Objective: The

More information

Year 10 Investigation. What Makes Ice Melt Fastest? By Rebecca Hogan

Year 10 Investigation. What Makes Ice Melt Fastest? By Rebecca Hogan Investigation What Makes Ice Melt Fastest? MY WEBSITE: http://whatsubstancemeltsicefastest.weebly.com/ Nature of Investigation: What keeps us cool on hot days? What is used in our cool, refreshing beverages?

More information

Science Standard 3 Energy and Its Effects Grade Level Expectations

Science Standard 3 Energy and Its Effects Grade Level Expectations Science Standard 3 Energy and Its Effects Grade Level Expectations Science Standard 3 Energy and Its Effects The flow of energy drives processes of change in all biological, chemical, physical, and geological

More information

Earth Science Lecture Summary Notes Chapter 7 - Water and Atmospheric Moisture

Earth Science Lecture Summary Notes Chapter 7 - Water and Atmospheric Moisture Earth Science Lecture Summary Notes Chapter 7 - Water and Atmospheric Moisture (based on Christopherson, Geosystems, 6th Ed., 2006) Prof. V.J. DiVenere - Dept. Earth & Environmental Science - LIU Post

More information

1. At which temperature would a source radiate the least amount of electromagnetic energy? 1) 273 K 3) 32 K 2) 212 K 4) 5 K

1. At which temperature would a source radiate the least amount of electromagnetic energy? 1) 273 K 3) 32 K 2) 212 K 4) 5 K 1. At which temperature would a source radiate the least amount of electromagnetic energy? 1) 273 K 3) 32 K 2) 212 K 4) 5 K 2. How does the amount of heat energy reflected by a smooth, dark-colored concrete

More information

Chapter 2: Forms of Energy

Chapter 2: Forms of Energy Chapter 2: Forms of Energy Goals of Period 2 Section 2.1: To describe the forms of energy Section 2.2: To illustrate conversions from one form of energy to another Section 2.3: To define the efficiency

More information

PEAK Lab: Insulation Keeping Heat In and Keeping Heat Out. PEAK Student Energy Action Activity: Insulation Audit

PEAK Lab: Insulation Keeping Heat In and Keeping Heat Out. PEAK Student Energy Action Activity: Insulation Audit PEAK Lab: Insulation Keeping Heat In and Keeping Heat Out Lesson Description: Students build model hot water heaters and examine the role insulation plays in blocking the flow of heat energy. Student Learning

More information

It's Cool: The Shape of Change

It's Cool: The Shape of Change It's Cool: The hape of Change The text of Lesson 4: It's Cool From the books The hape of Change and The hape of Change: tocks and Flows By Rob Quaden and Alan Ticotsky With Debra Lyneis Illustrated by

More information

Integrated Physics & Chemistry Supply List (2010)

Integrated Physics & Chemistry Supply List (2010) Integrated Physics & Chemistry Supply List (2010) Integrated Physics and Chemistry is a physical science course covering basic concepts found in chemistry and physics. Topics included in the study are

More information

Understanding Density

Understanding Density Understandings of Consequence Project Teacher Overview Understanding Density What is density and why is it hard to understand? This overview outlines concepts in the Density curriculum and explains difficulties

More information

Heating and Cooling [kindergarten]

Heating and Cooling [kindergarten] Trinity University Digital Commons @ Trinity Understanding by Design: Complete Collection Understanding by Design 7-2012 Heating and Cooling [kindergarten] Kyla McGlynn Trinity University Follow this and

More information

Why hot water freezes faster than cold water

Why hot water freezes faster than cold water Why hot water freezes faster than cold water By Daniel Muthukrishna Undergraduate Engineering/Physics Student at the University of Queensland Images also produced by Daniel Muthukrishna Some of the main

More information

Calorimetry Lab - Specific Heat Capacity

Calorimetry Lab - Specific Heat Capacity Introduction Calorimetry Lab - Specific Heat Capacity Experience tells us that if a hot piece of metal is added to water, the temperature of the water will rise. If several different metals having the

More information

Unit Organizer: Third Grade--Heat 4 Weeks

Unit Organizer: Third Grade--Heat 4 Weeks The following instructional plan is part of a GaDOE collection of Unit Frameworks, Performance Tasks, examples of Student Work, and Teacher Commentary. Many more GaDOE approved instructional plans are

More information

Heat Transfer THE TEAK PROJECT: TRAVELING ENGINEERING ACTIVITY KITS

Heat Transfer THE TEAK PROJECT: TRAVELING ENGINEERING ACTIVITY KITS THE TEAK PROJECT: TRAVELING ENGINEERING ACTIVITY KITS Heat Transfer Partial support for this project was provided by the National Science Foundation's Course, Curriculum, and Laboratory Improvement (CCLI)

More information

Temperature affects water in the air.

Temperature affects water in the air. KEY CONCEPT Most clouds form as air rises and cools. BEFORE, you learned Water vapor circulates from Earth to the atmosphere Warm air is less dense than cool air and tends to rise NOW, you will learn How

More information

The Atmosphere and Winds

The Atmosphere and Winds Oceanography 10, T. James Noyes, El Camino College 8A-1 The Atmosphere and Winds We need to learn about the atmosphere, because the ocean and atmosphere are tightly interconnected with one another: you

More information