COUNTING SUBSETS OF A SET: COMBINATIONS

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1 COUNTING SUBSETS OF A SET: COMBINATIONS DEFINITION 1: Let n, r be nonnegative integers with r n. An r-combination of a set of n elements is a subset of r of the n elements. EXAMPLE 1: Let S {a, b, c, d}. Then the 1-combinations are : {a}, {b}, {c}, {d} the -combinations are : {a, b}, {a, c}, {a, d}, {b, c}, {b, d}, {c, d} the -combinations are : {a, b, c}, {a, b, d}, {a, c, d}, {b, c, d} the -combination is : {a, b, c, d}. DEFINITION : n The symbol, read n choose r, denotes the number of r-combinations that can be r chosen from a set of n elements. EXAMPLE : It follows from Example 1 that, 6,, 1 1. THEOREM: Let n, r be nonnegative integers with r n. Then n n! r r! (n r)!. EXAMPLE : We have!! ( )!!!! 1 (1 ) (1 ) 1 6,!! ( )!!! 1! 1 (1 ) 1 1,!! ( )!!! 0! 1 (1 ) , 8 8!! (8 )! 8!!! (1 ) (1 )

2 PROBLEMS: 1. Suppose members of a group of 1 are to be chosen to work as a team on a special project. How many distinct -person teams can be formed?. Suppose two members of the group of 1 insist on working as a pair any team must either contain both or neither. How many distinct -person teams can be formed?. Suppose two members of the group of 1 refuse to work together on a team. How many distinct -person teams can be formed?. Suppose the group of 1 consists of men and women. (a) How many -person teams can be chosen that consist of men and women? (b) How many -person teams contain at least one man? (c) How many -person teams contain at most one man?. Consider various ways of ordering the letters in the word MISSISSIPPI: IIMSSPISSIP, ISSSPMIIPIS, PIMISSSSIIP, and so on. How many distinguishable orderings are there?

3 SOLUTIONS: 1. Suppose members of a group of 1 are to be chosen to work as a team on a special project. How many distinct -person teams can be formed? Solution: The number of distinct -person teams is the same as the number of subsets of size (or -combinations) that can be chosen from the set of 1. This number is 1 1!! (1 )! 1! !! (1 ) (1 6 ) Suppose two members of the group of 1 insist on working as a pair any team must either contain both or neither. How many distinct -person teams can be formed? Solution: Call the two members of the group that insist on working as a pair A and B. Then any team formed must contain or neither A nor B. By Theorem 1 (The Addition Rule) we have: number of -person teams containing or neither A nor B number of -person teams containing + number of -person teams containing neither A nor B Because a team that contains contains exactly other people from the remaining 10 in the group, there are as many such teams as there are subsets of people that can be chosen from the remaining 10. This number is 10 10!! (10 )! 10!!! (1 ) (1 6 ) Similarly, because a team that contains neither A nor B contains exactly people from the remaining 10 in the group, there are as many such teams as there are subsets of people that can be chosen from the remaining 10. This number is 10 10!! (10 )! 10!!! (1 ) (1 ) Therefore, number of -person teams containing or neither A nor B 10 +.

4 . Suppose two members of the group of 1 refuse to work together on a team. How many distinct -person teams can be formed? Solution: Call the two members of the group that refuse to work together A and B. By Theorem (The Difference Rule) we have: number of -person teams [ number of -person teams total number of that don t contain that contain -person teams Suppose the group of 1 consists of men and women. (a) How many -person teams can be chosen that consist of men and women? (b) How many -person teams contain at least one man? (c) How many -person teams contain at most one man? Solution: (a) Note, that there are ways to choose the three men out of the five and ways to choose the two women out of the seven. Therefore, by The Multiplication Rule we have: [ number of -person teams that 10. contain men and women (b) By Theorem (The Difference Rule) we have: [ [ [ number of -person teams total number number of -person teams with at least one man of -person teams that do not contain any men Now a -person team with no men consists of women chosen from the seven women in the group. So, there are 1 such teams. Also, the total number of -person teams is 1 9. Therefore, [ number of -person teams with at least one man (c) By Theorem 1 (The Addition Rule) we have: [ [ number of -person teams number of -person teams with at most one man without any men. [ number of -person teams + with one man Now a -person team without any men consists of women chosen from the women in the group. So, there are 1 such teams. Also, by The Multiplication Rule there are 1 teams with one man. Therefore, 1 [ number of -person teams with at most one man.

5 . Consider various ways of ordering the letters in the word MISSISSIPPI: IIMSSPISSIP, ISSSPMIIPIS, PIMISSSSIIP, and so on. How many distinguishable orderings are there? Solution: Since there are 11 positions in all, there are 11 subsets of positions for the S s. Once the four S s are in place, there are subsets of positions for the I s. After the I s are in place, there are subsets of positions for the P s. That leaves just one position for the M. Hence, by The Multiplication Rule we have: [ number of ways to position all the letters 11, 60.

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