It s a Matter of the Heart Investigating the Circulatory System

Save this PDF as:
 WORD  PNG  TXT  JPG

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "It s a Matter of the Heart Investigating the Circulatory System"

Transcription

1 It s a Matter of the Heart Investigating the Circulatory System OBJECTIVE Students will investigate the structure and function of the heart in relation to the circulatory system. Students will identify the role that the heart plays and the relationship between the circulatory system and other body systems. LEVEL Middle Grades Life Science NATIONAL STANDARDS UCP. 1, UCP. 5, C.5, A.1 CONNECTIONS TO AP AP Biology: III. Organisms and Populations B. Structure and Function of Plants and Animals TIME FRAME 50 minutes MATERIALS (For a class of 28 working in groups of 2) 14 preserved sheep hearts 14 dissection scissors 14 dissection scalpels 70 dissection pins (5 per group) 14 dissection blunt-end probes/seekers protective gloves 14 forceps 14 dissection trays 14 red colored pencils 14 blue colored pencils model(s) of human heart T E A C H E R P A G E S TEACHER NOTES This lesson is designed to give students an understanding of the function of the circulatory system by investigating the structure of the heart. Students will identify both external and internal structures that are involved in the function of the heart. Students will also identify relationships between the heart and the other systems of the body. This activity should be used to accompany a unit on body systems and should be taught after students have an understanding of body organization (cells-tissues-organs-organs systems). Students should also have some knowledge of the respiratory system and a basic understanding of the purpose and types of muscle tissue. Preserved sheep hearts need to be purchased in advance of this lab. It should be noted that some students will be opposed to working with preserved specimens. Check with your administration to identify the proper protocol for you, the teacher, in the event that a student does not want to participate. Alternate activity suggestions include: Copyright 2010 Laying the Foundation, Inc. Dallas, TX. All rights reserved. Visit: 1

2 Having the student work from their book to study the heart structure and function. The data and observations, analysis and conclusion included in this lab can still be answered if working from a book. A computer simulation could be used, however most must be purchased. This would also require student access to computers and software. Dissection Notes/Setup: Note: This dissection should be a teacher-led, whole group activity. Although the procedures are listed, it will be more effective to make sure each procedure is done by each student with the teacher guiding the cuts and the probing. To assist you in the process, it would be best to do the first cut before handing out the hearts your first cut will be into the vena cava and students can then cut from there by following your further instruction and the procedure. It is also advised that a pre-cut heart be available for demonstration/viewing purposes. You may also choose to pre-cut all hearts and keep them together with a rubber band. As you follow the procedure, you can still allow them to probe, explore, just advise that cuts were already made. Label the dissection trays to indicate the correct orientation of the heart so that students understand what they are looking at. The student will be observing in anatomical position so they will see the left side of the heart on their right side and vice-versa. Label the tray as follows before giving trays to students: Top T E A C H E R P A G E S Right Left Bottom Figure 1 Copyright 2010 Laying the Foundation, Inc. Dallas, TX. All rights reserved. Visit: 2

3 Also, make sure you rinse the sheep hearts before placing them in the trays. The heart dissection will provide students an insight to the valve location, space location as well as exit/entry points for blood into and out of the heart. To correctly orient the preserved heart make sure that the apex (rounded bottom area) of the heart is pointed towards the bottom of the dissection tray and the anterior (front) portion of the heart is facing up. Note: You can hold the heart in your hand and locate the darker flaps of tissue at the top of the heart you can also give the heart a gentle squeeze the thicker, more muscular side of the heart is the left side. To begin dissection, you should be looking at the anterior (front) of the heart, A good clue to indicate that you are looking at the anterior side of the heart is the darker muscle tissue (see Figure 1) the right ventricle is a smaller patch of dark muscle tissue while the left ventricle is a larger dark patch of muscle. Also, the coronary vessel will divide the heart for you, externally (see Figure 1). The apex will point slightly to the left if you are viewing the heart in anatomical position. Another indicator is the auricles (darker patches of tissue at the top of the heart) are both visible and sitting nicely atop the heart. Vessels will be more visible on the posterior (back ) region of the heart. External structures of importance are the aorta and the apex although diagrams in this activity will include vena cava, most preserved specimens do not have a clear visualization of these (we ll locate them when we get to the inside of the heart). The internal structures of importance are the right and left atria (plural) the right atrium (singular) houses blood entering the heart from the vena cava, while the left atrium is the space that house blood returning to the heart from the lungs. Other structures to note are the right and left ventricles. The right ventricle is the space that houses blood before it leaves the heart to go to the lungs, while the left ventricle houses blood that is leaving the heart through the aorta. The valves that control the heart are found (and will not be easily identified, so note that to the students) between the right atrium/ventricle, between the left atrium/ventricle, and also found in the aorta and pulmonary artery. The function of valves is to prevent the backflow of blood. The tricuspid valve, found between the right atrium and right ventricle, prevents the mixing of blood in the two chambers. The valve found between the left atrium and left ventricle is called the bicuspid, or mitral valve, which prevents mixing of blood in those two chambers. T E A C H E R P A G E S Blood returning from the body enters the right side of the heart through the vena cava. The blood is emptied into the right atrium, and then moves through a valve into the right ventricle. Blood found on the right side of the heart is lacking oxygen, or de-oxygenated. This is because it is returning from the body and has dropped off the oxygen to the cells. At the same time, it has picked up carbon dioxide (a gas that our body does not use, waste). It is returning to the heart to pick up more oxygen. When the blood leaves the right ventricle, it travels through pulmonary arteries to the lungs to pick up oxygen and drop off carbon dioxide. A valve in the pulmonary artery prevents backflow of blood once it is oxygenated. From the lungs, it returns through the pulmonary veins, enters the left side of the heart. It is emptied into the left atrium and moves through a valve into the left ventricle. From here, it is pumped out of the heart through the aorta. The aorta contains a valve that helps prevent the oxygenated blood from flowing back into the heart. The left side of the heart is also much more muscular so that it is able to pump the blood to the body. Copyright 2010 Laying the Foundation, Inc. Dallas, TX. All rights reserved. Visit: 3

4 REFERENCES A really nice photo of the sheep heart and what students should see when it is opened up: And another: Photo of sheep heart, just out of package (external anatomy) Photo of the first cut (right side of heart atrium and ventricle labeled) Photo of the second cut (left side of heart atrium and ventricle labeled) DATA AND OBSERVATIONS Vena Cava Structure Function Location Right Atrium Right Ventricle Pulmonary Artery Pulmonary Vein Left Atrium Left Ventricle Aorta Return blood from the body to the heart chamber that holds blood entering the heart from the body Chamber that holds blood before it moves into the lungs Carries blood away from the heart to the lungs Carries blood back to the heart from the lungs Chamber that holds blood when it returns from the lungs Chamber that holds blood before it is pumped out of the heart to the body Carries blood from the heart back to the body Right side of the heart near the right atrium Right side of the heart Right side of the heart Between the right ventricle and the lungs Between the left atrium and the lungs Left side of the heart Left side of the heart Left ventricle and moving upwards to the top of the heart Blood (Oxygenated or De-oxygenated) De-oxygenated De-oxygenated De-oxygenated De-oxygenated Oxygenated Oxygenated Oxygenated oxygenated T E A C H E R P A G E S Copyright 2010 Laying the Foundation, Inc. Dallas, TX. All rights reserved. Visit: 4

5 ANALYSIS Label the following diagram of the human heart. Using red and blue colored pencils, trace the flow of blood through the heart, beginning with the vena cava and ending with the aorta. Red will be used to indicate blood that is oxygenated and blue will be used to indicate blood that is de-oxygenated. 1. What is the purpose of heart valves? To prevent the backflow of blood 2. What is the purpose of blood traveling to the lungs? T E A C H E R P A G E S To pick up oxygen and drop of carbon dioxide 3. Can an artery carry de-oxygenated blood? If yes, give a specific example. Yes, the pulmonary artery carries de-oxygenated blood away from the heart to the lungs. CONCLUSION QUESTIONS 1. What is the primary purpose of the circulatory system? What is the role of the heart in the circulatory system? To deliver oxygenated blood to cells. It also serves to return de-oxygenated blood to the heart so that it can become oxygenated. The heart serves as the pump in this system. Copyright 2010 Laying the Foundation, Inc. Dallas, TX. All rights reserved. Visit: 5

6 2. Compare the sheep heart structure to human heart structure; include among other comparisons how many chambers each have? (You may use your notes and text as a reference.) Both have a right and left side Both have vena cava Both have pulmonary veins/arteries Both have valves other answers, as appropriate The human heart has 4 chambers, the sheep heart has 4 chambers. 3. Why is it important for the heart to be composed of muscle tissue? What type of muscle is the human heart (voluntary or involuntary)? The heart must pump blood to the body muscle tissue aids in movement Involuntary muscle tissue 4. Describe the relationship between the circulatory system and the respiratory system. The respiratory system exchanges gases oxygen and carbon dioxide. The circulatory system picks up oxygen in the lungs and carries the oxygen to the cells of the body and brings the carbon dioxide (waste) back to the lungs to be exhaled. 5. Why do cells need oxygen? T E A C H E R P A G E S To create energy. Energy is created through a process known as cellular respiration. In this process, oxygen diffuses into cells and is used to create ATP, the molecule that cells use for energy. A waste product of cellular respiration is carbon dioxide, which is exhaled during breathing. 6. Imagine that the wall between the right and left ventricle of the heart was removed. Would this affect the function of the human heart? Why or why not? It would affect the function the blood in the right ventricle is de-oxygenated and the blood in the left ventricle is oxygenated. The blood would mix and never become truly oxygenated, therefore shutting down the primary purpose of the circulatory system. Copyright 2010 Laying the Foundation, Inc. Dallas, TX. All rights reserved. Visit: 6

7 7. A person has been diagnosed with mitral valve prolapse, a condition in which the valve that separates the blood in the left side of the heart does not close properly. Based on your knowledge of blood flow in the heart, what problems may this cause in the heart? Would these problems be noticeable to the person? Why or why not? The blood may mix in the atrium and ventricle. The blood may not all be reaching the ventricle to be pumped to the body. Students can argue either way yes, it could matter or no it wouldn t. In either case, they need to back up their answer with what they have learned about blood flow and valve function. In most cases, the person with mitral valve prolapse will exhibit no symptoms however, in severe cases there can be fatigue, shortness of breath, etc. 8. What is the significance of the heart muscle tissue being thicker in the walls of the left side of the heart as opposed to the right side of the heart? The walls are thicker because that is the pumping side of the heart. The blood returning from the lungs goes to this side of the heart to be pumped to the entire body. On the right side, blood is simply returning (or spilling into) the heart. T E A C H E R P A G E S Copyright 2010 Laying the Foundation, Inc. Dallas, TX. All rights reserved. Visit: 7

8 It s a Matter of the Heart Investigating the Circulatory System The heart can be considered one of the body s most important muscles. Muscles can be either voluntary, where the movement is not automatically controlled, or involuntary, where the nervous system automatically controls the movement. The heart has the job of pumping blood to all tissues in the body so that each cell within those tissues has oxygen. In order to do that, blood must circulate through the body. The blood circulating through the body stays within vessels, called arteries, capillaries and veins. This working body system is called the circulatory system. Most body systems work together. The circulatory system works together with the lungs in the respiratory system. Recall that your respiratory system exchanges carbon dioxide when you exhale for oxygen when you inhale. Because your cells require oxygen, they must rely on the respiratory system to supply the circulatory system with that oxygen. At the level of the cell, the oxygen is exchanged for the carbon dioxide, which is not needed by our bodies and is removed as waste. The structure of the heart includes spaces within the heart, called atria and ventricles. These spaces hold blood until it is pumped to other spaces with each heartbeat. In general (but not in all cases), veins carry blood that has lost its oxygen to cells (de-oxygenated) and arteries carry blood that have received new oxygen in the lungs (oxygenated). There are two large veins that carry blood from the body back to the heart, called vena cava. These veins dump blood into the space in the heart called the right atrium. Once in the right atrium, the blood moves into the right ventricle. In both of the spaces, the right atrium and ventricle, the blood lacks oxygen, or is deoxygenated. From the right ventricle, blood moves to the lungs through the pulmonary arteries. In the lungs, blood receives oxygen and releases carbon dioxide through a process called simple diffusion and then moves back into the heart through the pulmonary veins. When blood moves back into the heart it is considered oxygenated and moves into the space called the left atrium. From the left atrium it travels to the left ventricle, which has a thick wall of muscle. The purpose of this thick wall of muscle is to then pump the blood out of the heart, through the aorta and then into the arteries of the body. PURPOSE In this lab, you will identify the structure of the heart and relate the structure to the function of the circulatory system. You will also make comparisons between the sheep heart and the human heart. Copyright 2010 Laying the Foundation, Inc. Dallas, TX. All rights reserved. Visit: 1

9 MATERIALS preserved sheep heart dissection scalpel dissection blunt-end probe/seeker Forceps red colored pencil model of human heart dissection scissor 5 dissection pins gloves dissection tray blue colored pencil Safety Alert You are working with preserved specimens. You should wear appropriate lab aprons, goggles, and gloves. Handle sharp dissecting tools carefully, with blades and sharp ends pointed toward the floor and away from your body. When cutting with blades, cut away from your body. PROCEDURE 1. Obtain a sheep heart and dissection tools from your teacher. 2. Locate the apex of the heart. It should be pointed towards the bottom of your dissection tray. Notice that your tray is labeled, top, bottom, left and right. 3. Next, your teacher will help you identify the left and right sides of the heart. Make sure your heart lies correctly in your dissection tray with the left side facing the side labeled left and the right side facing the side labeled right. Your heart is now in anatomical position. Notice that the left side of the heart is thicker and more muscular. This is because blood is pumped out of the heart and to all parts of the body from that side. 4. Using your blunt-end probe, locate the vessels that open into the right, top-side of the heart. This is the vena cava, the vessel that empties blood from the body into the heart. 5. Your vena cava has already been cut and you can look into the vena cava to see the right atrium. You may also see a valve when looking into the atrium (strings of tissue) this is the triscuspid valve. 6. Using your scissors, continue the cut towards the bottom of the heart. The space below the valve is the right ventricle. 7. Next you will use your blunt-tip probe to locate the pulmonary arteries beginning in the right ventricle. Follow your teacher s instructions on how to use the probe to locate these arteries 8. Next, you will follow your teachers instructions to open the left side of the heart. To open the left atrium, use the blade of the scissors to cut through the outer wall of the left atrium. You will cut towards the apex of the heart. Copyright 2010 Laying the Foundation, Inc. Dallas, TX. All rights reserved. Visit: 2

10 9. You will see another valve separating the left atrium and the left ventricle. This is the bicuspid valve, or mitral valve. 10. Follow your teacher s instructions to use your blunt-tip probe to locate the pulmonary veins beginning in the left atrium, probe into the vessels that bring blood back to the heart from the lungs. 11. Follow your teacher s instructions to use your blunt-tip probe to locate the aorta by inserting it in the left ventricle and probing upward through the vessel the probe should come out at the top of the heart. 12. Using your dissected sheep heart, models of the human heart and your notes/textbook, complete the Data Table in your student answer pages. 13. Complete the analysis and conclusion questions that follow. Copyright 2010 Laying the Foundation, Inc. Dallas, TX. All rights reserved. Visit: 3

11 It s a Matter of the Heart Investigating the Circulatory System DATA AND OBSERVATIONS Data Table: Structure and Function of the Heart Structure Function Location Blood (Oxygenated or De-oxygenated) Vena Cava Right Atrium Right Ventricle Pulmonary Artery Pulmonary Vein Left Atrium Left Ventricle Aorta Copyright 2010 Laying the Foundation, Inc. Dallas, TX. All rights reserved. Visit: 4

12 ANALYSIS Label the following diagram of the human heart. Using red and blue colored pencils, trace the flow of blood through the heart, beginning with the vena cava and ending with the aorta. Red will be used to indicate blood that is oxygenated and blue will be used to indicate blood that is de-oxygenated. 1. What is the purpose of heart valves? 2. What is the purpose of blood traveling to the lungs? 3. Can an artery carry de-oxygenated blood? If yes, give a specific example. Copyright 2010 Laying the Foundation, Inc. Dallas, TX. All rights reserved. Visit: 5

13 CONCLUSION QUESTIONS 1. What is the primary purpose of the circulatory system? What is the role of the heart in the circulatory system? 2. Compare the sheep heart structure to human heart structure; include among other comparisons how many chambers each have? (You may use your notes and text as a reference.) 3. Why is it important for the heart to be composed of muscle tissue? What type of muscle is the human heart (voluntary or involuntary)? 4. Describe the relationship between the circulatory system and the respiratory system. 5. Why do cells need oxygen? 6. Imagine that the wall between the right and left ventricle of the heart was removed. Would this affect the function of the human heart? Why or why not? Copyright 2010 Laying the Foundation, Inc. Dallas, TX. All rights reserved. Visit: 6

14 7. A person has been diagnosed with mitral valve prolapse, a condition in which the valve that separates the blood in the left side of the heart does not close properly. Based on your knowledge of blood flow in the heart, what problems may this cause in the heart? Would these problems be noticeable to the person? Why or why not? 8. What is the significance of the heart muscle tissue being thicker in the walls of the left side of the heart as opposed to the right side of the heart? Copyright 2010 Laying the Foundation, Inc. Dallas, TX. All rights reserved. Visit: 7

Distance Learning Program Anatomy of the Human Heart/Pig Heart Dissection Middle School/ High School

Distance Learning Program Anatomy of the Human Heart/Pig Heart Dissection Middle School/ High School Distance Learning Program Anatomy of the Human Heart/Pig Heart Dissection Middle School/ High School This guide is for middle and high school students participating in AIMS Anatomy of the Human Heart and

More information

BIOLOGY 165 CARDIOVASCULAR/CIRCULATORY SYSTEM LAB MANUAL

BIOLOGY 165 CARDIOVASCULAR/CIRCULATORY SYSTEM LAB MANUAL BIOLOGY 165 CARDIOVASCULAR/CIRCULATORY SYSTEM LAB MANUAL NOTE: You may be asked to identify any structure, cell, tissue, or organ labeled in the figures/pictures within this lab manual. In addition, you

More information

Biol 111 Comparative & Human Anatomy Lab 9: Circulatory System of the Cat Spring 2014

Biol 111 Comparative & Human Anatomy Lab 9: Circulatory System of the Cat Spring 2014 Biol 111 Comparative & Human Anatomy Lab 9: Circulatory System of the Cat Spring 2014 Philip J. Bergmann Lab Objectives 1. To learn how blood flows through a dual circuit circulation with lungs. 2. To

More information

The Circulatory System (How are materials moved by the circulatory system?)

The Circulatory System (How are materials moved by the circulatory system?) The Circulatory System (How are materials moved by the circulatory system?) Why? Blood is a living, liquid tissue made up of many components. The heart is the pump that forces the blood throughout the

More information

Blood vessels. transport blood throughout the body

Blood vessels. transport blood throughout the body Circulatory System Parts and Organs Blood vessels transport blood throughout the body Arteries blood vessels that carry blood AWAY from the heart Pulmonary arteries carry the deoxygenated blood from heart

More information

Heart Dissection. Learning Objectives

Heart Dissection. Learning Objectives Learning Objectives - Human body systems have basic structures, functions, and needs. - Students will understand the parts and functions of the heart and circulatory system. State Standards Addressed -

More information

Circulatory System Review

Circulatory System Review Circulatory System Review 1. Draw a table to describe the similarities and differences between arteries and veins? Anatomy Direction of blood flow: Oxygen concentration: Arteries Thick, elastic smooth

More information

A Fishy Tale. Observing the Circulatory System of a Goldfish with a Compound Light Microscope

A Fishy Tale. Observing the Circulatory System of a Goldfish with a Compound Light Microscope A Fishy Tale Observing the Circulatory System of a Goldfish with a Compound Light Microscope A Fishy Tale About this Lesson In this lesson, students will explore a computer animation of the human body

More information

Comparing Organs BIOLOGY SCIENCE INSTRUCTIONAL TASKS

Comparing Organs BIOLOGY SCIENCE INSTRUCTIONAL TASKS BIOLOGY SCIENCE INSTRUCTIONAL TASKS Comparing Organs Grade-Level Expectations The exercises in these instructional tasks address content related to the following science grade-level expectation: Contents

More information

Our Human Body On-site student activities Years 5 6

Our Human Body On-site student activities Years 5 6 Our Human Body On-site student activities Years 5 6 Our Human Body On-site student activities: Years 5-6 Student activity (and record) sheets have been developed with alternative themes for students to

More information

BIOL 1108 Vertebrate Anatomy Lab

BIOL 1108 Vertebrate Anatomy Lab BIOL 1108 Vertebrate Anatomy Lab This lab explores major organs associated with the circulatory, excretory, and nervous systems of mammals. Circulatory System Vertebrates are among the organisms that have

More information

I.T.I. A. MALIGNANI UDINE THE HEART. First lesson. Objectives. Glossary. Pericardium. Atrium. Ventricle. Valve. Diastole. Systole.

I.T.I. A. MALIGNANI UDINE THE HEART. First lesson. Objectives. Glossary. Pericardium. Atrium. Ventricle. Valve. Diastole. Systole. I.T.I. A. MALIGNANI UDINE CLIL experience: April 2008 Classi: Seconde Biennio Istituto Tecnico Durata: 4 ore Docenti: Prof.sse Acchiardi Chiara e Boasso Annamaria THE HEART First lesson Objectives Learn

More information

Practical class 3 THE HEART

Practical class 3 THE HEART Practical class 3 THE HEART OBJECTIVES By the time you have completed this assignment and any necessary further reading or study you should be able to:- 1. Describe the fibrous pericardium and serous pericardium,

More information

Investigating the Human Body On-site student activities: Years 7-8 Investigating the Human Body On-site student activities Years 7 8

Investigating the Human Body On-site student activities: Years 7-8 Investigating the Human Body On-site student activities Years 7 8 Investigating the Human Body On-site student activities Years 7 8 Student activity (and record) sheets have been developed with alternative themes for students to use as guides and focus material during

More information

Human Circulatory System + Blood. Agha Zohaib Khan

Human Circulatory System + Blood. Agha Zohaib Khan Human Circulatory System + Blood Agha Zohaib Khan 2 Agha ZuhaibKhan ::: www.css.theazkp.com Introduction The human circulatory system functions to transport blood and oxygen from the lungs to the various

More information

Functions of Blood System. Blood Cells

Functions of Blood System. Blood Cells Functions of Blood System Transport: to and from tissue cells Nutrients to cells: amino acids, glucose, vitamins, minerals, lipids (as lipoproteins). Oxygen: by red blood corpuscles (oxyhaemoglobin - 4

More information

Chapter 19 Ci C r i cula l t a i t o i n

Chapter 19 Ci C r i cula l t a i t o i n Chapter 19 Circulation A closed system Circulatory System Consisting of Heart, Arteries, Veins, Capillaries, Blood & the Lymphatic system Blood Make up The blood is made up of Plasma and three main types

More information

CHAPTER 2: BLOOD CIRCULATION AND TRANSPORT

CHAPTER 2: BLOOD CIRCULATION AND TRANSPORT CHAPTER 2: BLOOD CIRCULATION AND TRANSPORT BLOOD CIRCULATION AND TRANSPORT HUMAN BEING PLANTS Function of heart Wilting Structure of heart Blood vessels: characteristics and functions Transpiration: function

More information

Circulatory System BLOOD

Circulatory System BLOOD Biology 104 Circulatory System Objectives: Be able to identify red and white blood cells. Know the heart anatomy of humans. Know the names of the major vessels. Know the direction of blood circulation

More information

1 The diagram shows blood as seen under a microscope. Which identifies parts P, Q, R and S of the blood?

1 The diagram shows blood as seen under a microscope. Which identifies parts P, Q, R and S of the blood? 1 1 The diagram shows blood as seen under a microscope. Which identifies parts P, Q, R and S of the blood? 2 The plan shows the blood system of a mammal. What does the part labelled X represent? A heart

More information

12.1: The Function of Circulation page 478

12.1: The Function of Circulation page 478 12.1: The Function of Circulation page 478 Key Terms: Circulatory system, heart, blood vessel, blood, open circulatory system, closed circulatory system, pulmonary artery, pulmonary vein, aorta, atrioventricular

More information

The Circulatory System. Chapter 17 Lesson 1

The Circulatory System. Chapter 17 Lesson 1 The Circulatory System Chapter 17 Lesson 1 Functions of the Circulatory System Your circulatory system maintains an internal environment in which all the cells in your body are nourished. As your heart

More information

2161-1 - Page 1. Name: 1) Choose the disease that is most closely related to the given phrase. Questions 10 and 11 refer to the following:

2161-1 - Page 1. Name: 1) Choose the disease that is most closely related to the given phrase. Questions 10 and 11 refer to the following: Name: 2161-1 - Page 1 1) Choose the disease that is most closely related to the given phrase. a disease of the bone marrow characterized by uncontrolled production of white blood cells A) meningitis B)

More information

Chapter 16: Circulation

Chapter 16: Circulation Section 1 (The Body s Transport System) Chapter 16: Circulation 7 th Grade Cardiovascular system (the circulatory system) includes the heart, blood vessels, and blood carries needed substances to the cells

More information

Students design a pumping device that will effectively pump fluid through a given cardiovascular system.

Students design a pumping device that will effectively pump fluid through a given cardiovascular system. Students design a pumping device that will effectively pump fluid through a given cardiovascular system. Grades 4-8 Estimated time: 60 minutes Student Outcomes: 1. Students will be able to design and build

More information

CARDIOVASCULAR AND RESPIRATORY SYSTEMS

CARDIOVASCULAR AND RESPIRATORY SYSTEMS G.C.S.E. PHYSICAL EDUCATION Unit 1 Factors Affecting Participation and Performance CARDIOVASCULAR AND RESPIRATORY SYSTEMS Name: G.C.S.E. P.E. Teacher:. By the end of this booklet you should: Be able to

More information

Heart and Vascular System Practice Questions

Heart and Vascular System Practice Questions Heart and Vascular System Practice Questions Student: 1. The pulmonary veins are unusual as veins because they are transporting. A. oxygenated blood B. de-oxygenated blood C. high fat blood D. nutrient-rich

More information

Grade 5 Science Unit B: Life Science Chapter 3: Basic Structures of Organisms Lesson 1: Basic Structures of Organisms

Grade 5 Science Unit B: Life Science Chapter 3: Basic Structures of Organisms Lesson 1: Basic Structures of Organisms Grade 5 Science Unit B: Life Science Chapter 3: Basic Structures of Organisms Lesson 1: Basic Structures of Organisms Organism A form of life that is considered as an entity; an animal, plant, fungus,

More information

Transport of Materials in Plants and Animals

Transport of Materials in Plants and Animals 26 Transport of Materials in Plants and Animals All plants need water. The wilted leaves recover when water is added to the soil, which means that water has been conducted upward into the leaves. You have

More information

The Body s Transport System

The Body s Transport System Circulation Name Date Class The Body s Transport System This section describes how the heart, blood vessels, and blood work together to carry materials throughout the body. Use Target Reading Skills As

More information

Respiration occurs in the mitochondria in cells.

Respiration occurs in the mitochondria in cells. B3 Question Which process occurs in the mitochondria in cells? Why do the liver and muscle cells have large number of mitochondria? What is the function of the ribosomes? Answer Respiration occurs in the

More information

Name Class Date. Materials Part 1. Part 1: Microscopic Structure of Muscle. Part 1: Microscopic Structure of Muscle Diagrams.

Name Class Date. Materials Part 1. Part 1: Microscopic Structure of Muscle. Part 1: Microscopic Structure of Muscle Diagrams. Name Class Date Station # Laboratory Investigation 12 Chapter 24C: The Muscular System Human Anatomy & Physiology: Muscular System You may refer to pages 426-428 in your textbook for a general discussion

More information

GRADE 5 GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT

GRADE 5 GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT GRADE 5 GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT GRADE: 5 LESSON: 1 THEME: BODY SYSTEMS CONCEPT: THE RESPIRATORY SYSTEM IS ESSENTIAL FOR GETTING OXYGEN INTO AND CARBON DIOXIDE OUT OF THE BODY PREPARATION:

More information

CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM

CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM Introduction: We will be observing the cells and tissues of the cardiovascular system, as well as, performing physiological experiments measuring student blood pressure and heart

More information

Paper 1 Answer all questions. Each question is followed by four options, A, B, C and D. For each question, choose one answer only

Paper 1 Answer all questions. Each question is followed by four options, A, B, C and D. For each question, choose one answer only hapter 19 lood irculation and Transport Paper 1 nswer all questions. Each question is followed by four options,,, and. For each question, choose one answer only 1. Type of blood cell P Q R Function Protects

More information

Some Background Concerning Life Science Content Standards for Fifth-Grade Teachers:

Some Background Concerning Life Science Content Standards for Fifth-Grade Teachers: Some Background Concerning Life Science Content Standards for Fifth-Grade Teachers: Human Body Systems by Ellen Deehan, M.S. Contents 1. Introduction 2. Biological Context: Internal Structures of Organisms

More information

Cardiovascular System

Cardiovascular System Cardiovascular System The cardiovascular systems function is to pump blood and deliver it to the rest of the body. The cardiovascular system is most closely related to the circulatory system. The blood

More information

In 2009, Canadian astronaut Robert Thirsk began a six-month stay

In 2009, Canadian astronaut Robert Thirsk began a six-month stay Topic 1.4 How do systems work together in the human body? Key Concepts The respiratory system carries oxygen to and removes carbon dioxide from the blood. The circulatory system transports dissolved gases

More information

CHAPTER 1: THE LUNGS AND RESPIRATORY SYSTEM

CHAPTER 1: THE LUNGS AND RESPIRATORY SYSTEM CHAPTER 1: THE LUNGS AND RESPIRATORY SYSTEM INTRODUCTION Lung cancer affects a life-sustaining system of the body, the respiratory system. The respiratory system is responsible for one of the essential

More information

Exchange solutes and water with cells of the body

Exchange solutes and water with cells of the body Chapter 8 Heart and Blood Vessels Three Types of Blood Vessels Transport Blood Arteries Carry blood away from the heart Transport blood under high pressure Capillaries Exchange solutes and water with cells

More information

Chapter 2 The Human Cardiovascular System

Chapter 2 The Human Cardiovascular System Chapter 2 The Human Cardiovascular System 2.1 Introduction Before delving into the computational methods of CHD, this chapter provides a preliminary understanding of the circulatory system from a physiological

More information

HUMAN BODY SECTION 6: RESPIRATION From Hands on Science by Linda Poore, 2003.

HUMAN BODY SECTION 6: RESPIRATION From Hands on Science by Linda Poore, 2003. HUMAN BODY SECTION 6: RESPIRATION From Hands on Science by Linda Poore, 2003. STANDARDS: Students know how blood circulates through the heart chambers, lungs, and body, and how carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) and

More information

STAGE 5: Interacting Systems

STAGE 5: Interacting Systems Stage 5: In this stage, students will explore how systems interact with each other to maintain healthy and optimal body functioning, including how the body responds to changes in the environment such as

More information

Human Body Vocabulary Words Week 1

Human Body Vocabulary Words Week 1 Vocabulary Words Week 1 1. arteries Any of the blood vessels that carry blood away from the heart to all parts of the body 2. heart The muscular organ inside the chest that pumps blood through the body

More information

33.1 The Circulatory System

33.1 The Circulatory System 33.1 The Circulatory System Lesson Objectives Identify the functions of the human circulatory system. Describe the structure of the heart and explain how it pumps blood through the body. Name three types

More information

The Pumping Heart LESSON

The Pumping Heart LESSON 14 LESSON The Pumping Heart WOOD RIVER GALLERY/PNI INTRODUCTION You now know the ingredients that cells need to release energy oxygen and nutrients. How do these essential ingredients get to the cells?

More information

Circulatory System and Blood

Circulatory System and Blood Circulatory System and Blood 1. Identify the arteries in the diagram and give one function for each. Y: Common carotid artery: sends oxygenated blood to the brain, provide nutrients. X: Subclavian artery:

More information

Using Pulse Oximeters

Using Pulse Oximeters Using Pulse Oximeters Tutorial 1 the basics 1 World Health Organization, 2011. WHO, All rights 2011. reserved. The Pulse Oximeter In this tutorial you will learn about: The function of a pulse oximeter

More information

LYMPHATIC SYSTEM. A group of organs and tissues that collect fluid that leaks from blood and returns it to the blood.

LYMPHATIC SYSTEM. A group of organs and tissues that collect fluid that leaks from blood and returns it to the blood. LYMPHATIC SYSTEM A group of organs and tissues that collect fluid that leaks from blood and returns it to the blood. The lymphatic system is also part of the body s defense against disease. The lymph capillaries

More information

Chapter 9. The Cardiovascular System

Chapter 9. The Cardiovascular System Chapter 9 The Cardiovascular System Objectives Describe the anatomy of the heart and vascular systems. State the key characteristics of cardiac tissue. Calculate systemic vascular resistance given mean

More information

Earthworm Dissection

Earthworm Dissection Earthworm Dissection Directions: Follow the instructions carefully, check the boxes as you complete each step. Remember that dissection is about carefully exposing the organs to view, try not to damage

More information

Fourth Grade The Human Body: The Respiratory System Assessment

Fourth Grade The Human Body: The Respiratory System Assessment Fourth Grade The Human Body: The Respiratory System Assessment 1a. The brings air in and out of the body. a. respiratory system b. circulatory system 1b. The system is the part of the body responsible

More information

F211. BIOLOGY Cells, Exchange and Transport ADVANCED SUBSIDIARY GCE. Monday 16 May 2011 Morning

F211. BIOLOGY Cells, Exchange and Transport ADVANCED SUBSIDIARY GCE. Monday 16 May 2011 Morning ADVANCED SUBSIDIARY GCE BIOLOGY Cells, Exchange and Transport F211 *F215710611* Candidates answer on the question paper. OCR supplied materials: Insert (inserted) Other materials required: Electronic calculator

More information

Cardiovascular System

Cardiovascular System Cardiovascular System Major Jobs of the CV system? Transport O 2 & nutrients to tissues Removal of waste Helps regulate body temperature 1 A Coupled Unit Circulatory & Respiratory systems work TOGETHER

More information

Provided by the American Venous Forum: veinforum.org

Provided by the American Venous Forum: veinforum.org CHAPTER 1 NORMAL VENOUS CIRCULATION Original author: Frank Padberg Abstracted by Teresa L.Carman Introduction The circulatory system is responsible for circulating (moving) blood throughout the body. The

More information

AP Biology Lab 12: Dissolved Oxygen and Primary Productivity

AP Biology Lab 12: Dissolved Oxygen and Primary Productivity Name Period Date AP Biology Lab 12: Dissolved Oxygen and Primary Productivity Driving Questions What affects do temperature and light have on the dissolved oxygen content of water containing aquatic organisms?

More information

Educator s Guide and Script For Human Body: The Cardiovascular System

Educator s Guide and Script For Human Body: The Cardiovascular System Educator s Guide and Script For Human Body: The Cardiovascular System 1 Table of Contents Page Table of Contents and Rights. 2 Introduction 2 Advanced Vocabulary Definitions 2 Human Body: The Cardiovascular

More information

By Casey Schmidt and Wendy Ford

By Casey Schmidt and Wendy Ford By Casey Schmidt and Wendy Ford Body systems Digestive System Circulatory System Respiratory System Excretory System Immune System Reproductive System Nervous System Muscular System Skeletal System Endocrine

More information

Anatomy and Physiology: Understanding the Importance of CPR

Anatomy and Physiology: Understanding the Importance of CPR Anatomy and Physiology: Understanding the Importance of CPR Overview This document gives you more information about the body s structure (anatomy) and function (physiology). This information will help

More information

SHEEP EYE DISSECTION PROCEDURES

SHEEP EYE DISSECTION PROCEDURES SHEEP EYE DISSECTION PROCEDURES The anatomy of the human eye can be better shown and understood by the actual dissection of an eye. One eye of choice for dissection, that closely resembles the human eye,

More information

The Cardiac Cycle. Graphics are used with permission of: Pearson Education Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings (http://www.aw-bc.

The Cardiac Cycle. Graphics are used with permission of: Pearson Education Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings (http://www.aw-bc. The Cardiac Cycle Graphics are used with permission of: Pearson Education Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings (http://www.aw-bc.com) Page 1. Introduction The cardiac cycle includes all the events related

More information

Frog Dissection. Procedure

Frog Dissection. Procedure Name Class Date Skills Practice Lab Frog Dissection Amphibians, such as frogs, are examples of animals that have structural adaptations for living in or near water and for living on land. As tadpoles,

More information

Breathing and Holding Your Breath copyright, 2005, Dr. Ingrid Waldron and Jennifer Doherty, Department of Biology, University of Pennsylvania 1

Breathing and Holding Your Breath copyright, 2005, Dr. Ingrid Waldron and Jennifer Doherty, Department of Biology, University of Pennsylvania 1 Breathing and Holding Your Breath copyright, 2005, Dr. Ingrid Waldron and Jennifer Doherty, Department of Biology, University of Pennsylvania 1 Introduction Everybody breathes all day, every day. Why?

More information

What you don't know may hurt you. The integrated system of the heart and blood vessels is known as the cardiovascular system.

What you don't know may hurt you. The integrated system of the heart and blood vessels is known as the cardiovascular system. The Inside Story on Blood Pressure What you don't know may hurt you. The integrated system of the heart and blood vessels is known as the cardiovascular system. Underwritten by Novartis 2005 ANATOMICAL

More information

Diabetes and Your Circulatory System: The story of the lost limbs.

Diabetes and Your Circulatory System: The story of the lost limbs. Diabetes and Your Circulatory System: The story of the lost limbs. Dr. Falak Almiladi William H Brown Math and Science Academy IIT Research Mentor: Dr. Eric Brey This material is based upon work supported

More information

Circulation Stations

Circulation Stations Circulation Stations This worksheet corresponds with stations around the classrooms. Work in groups of 3 and do the stations in any order. Name: Station 1: Blood smear under a microscope Materials: - Microscope

More information

Modeling Photosynthesis and Cellular Respiration Teacher Information

Modeling Photosynthesis and Cellular Respiration Teacher Information STO-122 Modeling Photosynthesis and Cellular Respiration Teacher Information Summary Students use simple snap beads to model the reactants and products of photosynthesis and cellular respiration. Optional

More information

Cardiology. Anatomy and Physiology of the Heart.

Cardiology. Anatomy and Physiology of the Heart. Cardiology Self Learning Package Module 1: Anatomy and Physiology of the Heart. Module 1: Anatomy and Physiology of the Heart Page 1 CONTENT Introduction Page 3 How to use the ECG Self Learning package.page

More information

The Respiratory System

The Respiratory System Work Hard. Get Smart. On Task 100% Effort Physician s Name: Class: 8 Date: Pen/Pencil Mrs. Bouchard 8 th On time Grade Science Academic Language 1. The respiratory system. It from the outside environment.

More information

Pre-requisites: Successful completion of 4th grade science and the 4th grade science assessment.

Pre-requisites: Successful completion of 4th grade science and the 4th grade science assessment. Throughout each unit, assessments are incorporated into lessons. These assessments are activities that occur within the context of each lesson providing the guidelines for assessing students' progress.

More information

within this time frame. The course is intended for those students who would like to Room 220

within this time frame. The course is intended for those students who would like to Room 220 Human Anatomy Instructor Dr. Donald Bowlin Phone 412-571-6000 Ext. 1220 Mission Statement The KOSD s mission is to provide a safe learning environment that prepares critical thinkers to become responsible

More information

HeartSmart Teachable Moments. the powerful heart. Grades 2 3. HeartSmart Kids 2015 Heart and Stroke Foundation Grades 2-3 The Powerful Heart 1

HeartSmart Teachable Moments. the powerful heart. Grades 2 3. HeartSmart Kids 2015 Heart and Stroke Foundation Grades 2-3 The Powerful Heart 1 HeartSmart Teachable Moments the powerful heart Grades 2 3 HeartSmart Kids 2015 Heart and Stroke Foundation Grades 2-3 The Powerful Heart 1 The Powerful Heart The Heart and The Circulatory System Summary

More information

Phlebotomy Handbook Blood Collection Essentials Seventh Edition

Phlebotomy Handbook Blood Collection Essentials Seventh Edition Phlebotomy Handbook Blood Collection Essentials Seventh Edition Diana Garza Kathleen Becan-McBride Chapter Four The Cardiovascular System Introduction Circulatory system is a transport system. Contributes

More information

Circulatory System Nelly Tsai EDTEP 587, Windschitl/Thompson Practicum Project March 5, 2004

Circulatory System Nelly Tsai EDTEP 587, Windschitl/Thompson Practicum Project March 5, 2004 Circulatory System Nelly Tsai EDTEP 587, Windschitl/Thompson Practicum Project March 5, 2004 Student Learning Reflection 1. The strategy, eliciting students ideas, was incorporated into my lesson on the

More information

CELERY LAB - Structure and Function of a Plant

CELERY LAB - Structure and Function of a Plant CELERY LAB - Structure and Function of a Plant READ ALL INSTRUCTIONS BEFORE BEGINNING! YOU MAY WORK WITH A PARTNER ON THIS ACTIVITY, BUT YOU MUST COMPLETE YOUR OWN LAB SHEET! Plants are incredible organisms!

More information

GRADE 11F: Biology 3. UNIT 11FB.3 9 hours. Human gas exchange system and health. Resources. About this unit. Previous learning.

GRADE 11F: Biology 3. UNIT 11FB.3 9 hours. Human gas exchange system and health. Resources. About this unit. Previous learning. GRADE 11F: Biology 3 Human gas exchange system and health UNIT 11FB.3 9 hours About this unit This unit is the third of six units on biology for Grade 11 foundation. The unit is designed to guide your

More information

Gas Exchange. Graphics are used with permission of: Pearson Education Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings (http://www.aw-bc.com)

Gas Exchange. Graphics are used with permission of: Pearson Education Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings (http://www.aw-bc.com) Gas Exchange Graphics are used with permission of: Pearson Education Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings (http://www.aw-bc.com) Page 1. Introduction Oxygen and carbon dioxide diffuse between the alveoli

More information

LAB. LEAF STRUCTURE. light energy. light energy

LAB. LEAF STRUCTURE. light energy. light energy Period Date LAB. LEAF STRUCTURE Plants are incredible organisms! They can make all their own food from the simple inputs of: sunlight air (carbon dioxide) water minerals This biological wizardry is accomplished

More information

The diagram shows how this artificial heart is fitted inside the body.

The diagram shows how this artificial heart is fitted inside the body. Q. The photograph shows one type of artificial heart. The diagram shows how this artificial heart is fitted inside the body. Photo: www.heartreplacement.com Diagram: www.abiomed.com/patients_families/what_is_abiocor.cfm

More information

Arterial Blood Gases, Digital Pulse Oximetry, and Routine Blood Work. By John R. Goodman BS RRT

Arterial Blood Gases, Digital Pulse Oximetry, and Routine Blood Work. By John R. Goodman BS RRT Arterial Blood Gases, Digital Pulse Oximetry, and Routine Blood Work By John R. Goodman BS RRT Patients with chronic lung disease frequently are tested to determine their lung function. The lungs basically

More information

ECG REVIEW: ECGS MADE EASY by Cathy Dockx, ART PRE-READING MATERIAL SECTION I: Pre-reading ECG review ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY

ECG REVIEW: ECGS MADE EASY by Cathy Dockx, ART PRE-READING MATERIAL SECTION I: Pre-reading ECG review ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY ECG REVIEW: ECGS MADE EASY by Cathy Dockx, ART PRE-READING MATERIAL SECTION I: ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY THE ELECTROCARDIOGRAPHY MACHINE GRAPH PAPER & MEASUREMENTS - 1 - ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY The Heart is

More information

Page 1. Introduction The blood vessels of the body form a closed delivery system that begins and ends at the heart.

Page 1. Introduction The blood vessels of the body form a closed delivery system that begins and ends at the heart. Anatomy Review: Blood Vessel Structure & Function Graphics are used with permission of: Pearson Education Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings (http://www.aw-bc.com) Page 1. Introduction The blood vessels

More information

Overview of the Cardiovascular System

Overview of the Cardiovascular System Overview of the Cardiovascular System 2 vascular (blood vessel) loops: Pulmonary circulation: from heart to lungs and back) Systemic circulation: from heart to other organs and back Flow through systemic

More information

UNIT 3 : MAINTAINING DYNAMIC EQUILIBRIUM

UNIT 3 : MAINTAINING DYNAMIC EQUILIBRIUM BIOLOGY - 2201 UNIT 3 : MAINTAINING DYNAMIC EQUILIBRIUM What happens to your body as you run? Breathing, heart rate, temperature, muscle pain, thirsty... Homeotasis Homeostasis is the process of maintaining

More information

Note: The left and right sides of the heart must pump exactly the same volume of blood when averaged over a period of time

Note: The left and right sides of the heart must pump exactly the same volume of blood when averaged over a period of time page 1 HEART AS A PUMP A. Functional Anatomy of the Heart 1. Two pumps, arranged in series a. right heart: receives blood from the systemic circulation (via the great veins and vena cava) and pumps blood

More information

Year 2 Science: The Human Body Resource Pack

Year 2 Science: The Human Body Resource Pack Year 2 Science: The Human Body Resource Pack Body Systems II Body Systems Digestion our bodies break down food and use Skeletal system the skeleton is made up of bones that support our the nutrients to

More information

Gas Exchange Graphics are used with permission of: adam.com (http://www.adam.com/) Benjamin Cummings Publishing Co (http://www.awl.

Gas Exchange Graphics are used with permission of: adam.com (http://www.adam.com/) Benjamin Cummings Publishing Co (http://www.awl. Gas Exchange Graphics are used with permission of: adam.com (http://www.adam.com/) Benjamin Cummings Publishing Co (http://www.awl.com/bc) Page 1. Introduction Oxygen and carbon dioxide diffuse between

More information

B3 2 Transporting Materials

B3 2 Transporting Materials B3 2 Transporting Materials 78 minutes 78 marks Page of 23 Q. Sometimes your doctor needs to know how much blood there is in your body. To find this out he first injects a special solution into your blood.

More information

Chapter 10 The Cardiovascular System and Exercise

Chapter 10 The Cardiovascular System and Exercise Chapter 10 The Cardiovascular System and Exercise Slide Show developed by: Richard C. Krejci, Ph.D. Professor of Public Health Columbia College 10.18.11 Objectives 1. List important functions of the cardiovascular

More information

Fact: The heart beats, circulating all of the blood through the body, more than 100,000 times per day.

Fact: The heart beats, circulating all of the blood through the body, more than 100,000 times per day. Section 1: The Circulatory System Every cell in the body needs food and oxygen to survive. In order to meet the needs of all of these cells, we have a complex system that circulates a versatile fluid,

More information

Understanding your child s heart Atrial septal defect

Understanding your child s heart Atrial septal defect Understanding your child s heart Atrial septal defect About this factsheet This factsheet is for the parents of babies and children who have an atrial septal defect (ASD). It explains, what an atrial septal

More information

THE CIRCULATORY SYSTEM from The Human Body Systems Series

THE CIRCULATORY SYSTEM from The Human Body Systems Series THE CIRCULATORY SYSTEM from The Human Body Systems Series Teacher's Guide 1 The Circulatory System from The Human Body Systems Series catalog # 3135 Published & Distributed by AGC/UNITED LEARNING 1560

More information

CardioHEADS Level I: The Heart and Exercise Unit Introduction: The Heart What Do You Know?

CardioHEADS Level I: The Heart and Exercise Unit Introduction: The Heart What Do You Know? CardioHEADS Level I: The Heart and Exercise Unit Introduction: The Heart What Do You Know? Name: Date: Period: In this CardioHEADS unit, you will learn about the heart, heart rate, and the effects of exercise

More information

Essentials of Human Anatomy & Physiology. 7 th edition Marieb, Elaine, 2003. Chapters 10-11. Lab Manual, 2 nd edition and coloring book, 7 th edition

Essentials of Human Anatomy & Physiology. 7 th edition Marieb, Elaine, 2003. Chapters 10-11. Lab Manual, 2 nd edition and coloring book, 7 th edition Topic/Unit: Anatomy & Physiology Circulatory System Curricular Goals/ Learning Outcomes: Students will be able to identify the composition of blood and its function. Students will be able to differentiate

More information

Human Anatomy and Physiology II Laboratory

Human Anatomy and Physiology II Laboratory Human Anatomy and Physiology II Laboratory The Circulation (Two Weeks) 1 This lab involves two weeks work studying the vasculature of the human body. Both weeks involve the exercise in the lab manual entitled

More information

2.2.1 Pressure and flow rate along a pipe: a few fundamental concepts

2.2.1 Pressure and flow rate along a pipe: a few fundamental concepts 1.1 INTRODUCTION Single-cell organisms live in direct contact with the environment from where they derive nutrients and into where they dispose of their waste. For living systems containing multiple cells,

More information

Advanced Subsidiary GCE Biology

Advanced Subsidiary GCE Biology Advanced Subsidiary GCE Biology F211 Cells, Exchange and Transport - High banded Candidate style answer Introduction OCR has produced these candidate style answers to support teachers in interpreting the

More information

WHAT IS BLOOD PRESSURE?

WHAT IS BLOOD PRESSURE? HYPERTENSION Hypertension - also known as high blood pressure - is a chronic medical condition that is caused by a persistent elevation of the pressure inside the circulatory system. Hypertension is one

More information

Unit 3L.4: Body Parts and Functions

Unit 3L.4: Body Parts and Functions Unit 3L.4: Organs in the Human body Keeping Healthy The Skeleton Science skills: Classification Observing Making models Data collection By the end of this unit you should: Compare the structure of humans

More information

Lesson: Breathing models

Lesson: Breathing models Lesson: Breathing models Teacher: Unit Theme/Course: Date: Timing: Kaylan Duthie Human Respiration 7 th Grade Life Science November 5 th, 8 th, 9 th 3 days Rationale/Goal: Breathing is the mechanical process

More information