The spectacular eruption of a volcano, the magnificent scenery of a

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "The spectacular eruption of a volcano, the magnificent scenery of a"

Transcription

1 Section What Is Earth Science 1 FOCUS Section Objectives 1.1 Define Earth science. 1.2 Describe the formation of Earth and the solar system. Build Vocabulary Word Parts Ask students to use a dictionary to determine the meanings of the following word parts: geo- (Earth); astro- (outer space); -ology (study of); -ography (study of); -onomy (study of) Based on this discussion and their prior knowledge, have students predict the meaning of this section s vocabulary words. Then, have students look up the words in the Glossary to check their predictions and make any necessary corrections. Meteorology will likely present a problem, with most students predicting that it is the study of meteors, rather than the study of the atmosphere. Reading Strategy a. Earth, earthquakes, mountains, volcanoes, Earth s history b. oceanography c. composition and movements of seawater, coastal processes, seafloor topography, marine life d. meteorology e. atmosphere, weather, climate f. astronomy g. universe, solar system 2 Reading Focus INSTRUCT Overview of Earth Science Build Reading Literacy Refer to p. 216D in Chapter 8, which provides guidelines for comparing and contrasting. Compare and Contrast Have students create a table to compare and contrast physical geology and historical geology. They should fill in their table as they read the first part of this section. Areas to consider include the focus of each area and examples of what is studied. Key Concepts What is the study of Earth science How did Earth and the solar system form Figure 1 Scientists called paleontologists study fossils, which are signs of life in the distant past, to find out how life-forms have changed through time. Posing Questions What questions do you have about this fossil 2 Chapter 1 Vocabulary Earth science geology oceanography meteorology astronomy Reading Strategy Categorizing As you read about the different branches of Earth science, fill in the column with the name of each branch and list some of the things that are studied. geology a. b. c. d. e. f. g. The spectacular eruption of a volcano, the magnificent scenery of a rocky coast, and the destruction created by a hurricane are all subjects for Earth science. The study of Earth science deals with many fascinating and practical questions about our environment. What forces produced the mountains shown on page 1 Why does our daily weather change Is our climate changing How old is Earth How is Earth related to the other planets in the solar system What causes ocean tides What was the Ice Age like Will there be another Understanding Earth is not an easy task because our planet is always changing. Earth is a dynamic planet with a long and complex history. Overview of Earth Science Earth science is the name for the group of sciences that deals with Earth and its neighbors in space. Earth science includes many subdivisions of geology such as geochemistry, geophysics, geobiology and paleontology, as well as oceanography, meteorology, and astronomy. Units 1 through 4 focus on the science of geology, a word that means study of Earth. Geology is divided into two broad areas physical geology and historical geology. Physical geology includes the examination of the materials that make up Earth and the possible explanations for the many processes that shape our planet. Processes below the surface create earthquakes, build mountains, and produce volcanoes. Processes at the surface break rock apart and create 2 Chapter 1

2 different landforms. Erosion by water, wind, and ice results in different landscapes. You will learn that rocks and minerals form in response to Earth s internal and external processes. Understanding the origin of rocks and minerals is an important part of understanding Earth. In contrast to physical geology, the aim of historical geology is to understand Earth s long history. Historical geology tries to establish a timeline of the vast number of physical and biological changes that have occurred in the past. See Figure 1. We study physical geology before historical geology because we must first understand how Earth works before we try to unravel its past. What are the two main areas of geology Unit 5 is devoted to oceanography. Oceanography integrates the sciences of chemistry, physics, geology, and biology. Oceanographers study the composition and movements of seawater, as well as coastal processes, seafloor topography, and marine life. See Figure 2. Unit 6 examines the composition of Earth s atmosphere. The combined effects of Earth s motions and energy from the sun cause the atmosphere to produce different weather conditions. This, in turn, creates the basic pattern of global climates. Meteorology is the study of the atmosphere and the processes that produce weather and climate. Like oceanography, meteorology also involves other branches of science. Unit 7 demonstrates that understanding Earth requires an understanding of Earth s position in the universe. The science of astronomy, the study of the universe, is useful in probing the origins of our own environment. All objects in space, including Earth, are subject to the same physical laws. Learning about the other members of our solar system and the universe beyond helps us to understand Earth. Throughout its long existence, Earth has been changing. In fact, it is changing as you read this page and will continue to do so. Sometimes the changes are rapid and violent, such as when tornados, landslides, or volcanic eruptions occur. Many changes, however, take place so gradually that they go unnoticed during a lifetime. Formation of Earth Earth is one of nine planets that revolve around the sun. Our solar system has an orderly nature. Scientists understand that Earth and the other planets formed during the same time span and from the same material as the sun. The nebular hypothesis suggests that the bodies of our solar system evolved from an enormous rotating cloud called the solar nebula. It was made up mostly of hydrogen and helium, with a small percentage of heavier elements. Figure 3 on page 4 summarizes some key points of this hypothesis. Figure 2 Oceanographers study all aspects of the ocean the chemistry of its waters, the geology of its seafloor, the physics of its interactions with the atmosphere, and the biology of its organisms. Use Community Resources The USGS (United States Geological Survey) has a network of regional offices where geologists study geological phenomena at local, regional, and global levels. Their activities include monitoring earthquake activity, mapping subsurface rock formations, and providing the public with information about geologic events such as floods and landslides. Ask a USGS geologist from a local office to talk to the class about what geologists do at their jobs. Ask students to prepare questions in advance. Interpersonal Formation of Earth Build Reading Literacy Refer to p. 186D in Chapter 7, which provides guidelines for relating text and visuals. Relate Text and s Have students turn ahead in the text to Figure 3 on p. 4 for a visual representation of the nebular hypothesis. Have them read the figure caption, then use the figure to describe the major steps in the nebular hypothesis. (Solar system begins as cloud of dust and gases. Cloud starts to rotate and collapse. Heated center forms the sun. Cooling creates solid particles. Collisions create asteroid-sized bodies. Asteroids form the inner planets. Lighter materials and gases form the outer planets.) Introduction to Earth Science 3 Customize for English Language Learners Students should use the words and word parts they just learned, along with their prior knowledge, to define the following words: oceanographer, meteorologist, geography, geologist, geological, astronaut, astronomer. Students should then use a dictionary to check their definitions. Review the correct meanings of these words with students when they are finished. Answer to... The two main areas of geology are physical geology and historical geology. Introduction to Earth Science 3

3 Section 1.1 (continued) Use s Figure 3 Have students study the diagram illustrating the nebular hypothesis. Ask: What do all stages of this hypothesis have in common (In all stages, the system is spinning.) What was the first stage in the development of our solar system (Our solar system began as an enormous cloud of gas and dust.) Challenge students to make a timeline or flowchart of the key events in the formation of our solar system. (Students should make a timeline or flowchart based on steps A through E given in the figure caption.), Logical C A B Separation and Density Purpose Students see how substances separate based on density. Materials 2 large glass jars with lids, 100 ml sand, 100 ml rock salt, 100 ml sugar, 100 ml water, 100 ml vegetable oil, 100 ml corn syrup Procedure At the start of the class, place all of the solids in one jar and all the liquids in another jar. Put the lids on both jars and shake them carefully. Let the jars settle during the class. Then, have the students look at them. Ask: Why did the liquids separate (Differences in density made the liquids rise or fall and separate.) Why didn t the solids separate (The solid particles were unable to move past each other.) What state was Earth most likely in when it separated into layers (The materials that made up Earth must have been molten or nearly molten.) Expected Outcome The liquids will separate into different layers. The solids will remain mixed., Logical Figure 3 Formation of the Solar System According to the Nebular Hypothesis A Our solar system began as an enormous cloud of dust and gases made up mostly of hydrogen and helium with a small percentage of heavier elements. B This cloud, called a nebula, started to rotate and collapse toward the center of the cloud. Heat was generated at the center, which eventually formed the sun. C Cooling of the nebula caused rocky and metallic materials to form tiny solid particles. D Repeated collisions of these particles resulted in the formation of asteroid-sized bodies. E These asteroids eventually combined to form the four inner planets Mercury, Venus, Earth, and Mars. The lighter materials and gases combined farther away from the center to form the four outer planets Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune. 4 Chapter 1 E D Facts and Figures As Earth was forming, density differences caused denser materials to sink to Earth s core, while less dense materials escaped to the atmosphere. Density differences continue to shape Earth today. Today s volcanic eruptions are generally caused by less dense magma and gases rising up through the mantle until they penetrate the crust, resulting in a volcanic eruption. This is an example of the principle of uniformitarianism, which is essential to the study of geology. This principle states that the processes that exist on Earth today are identical to the processes that existed on Earth in the distant past. This principle allows geologists to make useful inferences based on contemporary observations. 4 Chapter 1

4 High temperatures and weak fields of gravity characterized the inner planets. As a result, the inner planets were not able to hold onto the lighter gases of the nebular cloud. The lightest gases, hydrogen and helium, were whisked away toward the heavier planets by the solar wind. Earth, Mars, and Venus were able to retain some heavier gases including water vapor and carbon dioxide. The materials that formed by outer planets contained high percentages of water, carbon dioxide, ammonia, and methane. The size and frigid temperatures of the outer planets provided the surface gravity to hold these heavier gases. Layers Form on Earth Shortly after Earth formed, the decay of radioactive elements, combined with heat released by colliding particles, produced some melting of the interior. This allowed the denser elements, mostly iron and nickel, to sink to Earth s center. The lighter, rocky components floated outward, toward the surface. This sinking and floating is believed to still be occurring, but on a much smaller scale. As a result of this process, Earth s interior is not made of uniform materials. It consists of layers of materials that have different properties. Why does Earth have layers An important result of this process is that gaseous materials were allowed to escape from Earth s interior, just as gases escape today during volcanic eruptions. In this way, an atmosphere gradually formed along with the ocean. It was composed mainly of gases that were released from within the planet. Section 1.1 Assessment Build Science Skills Inferring Based on the information in this section, ask students to infer which of Earth s layers will be the densest. Have students turn ahead in the text to Figure 6 on p. 8 to see a diagram of Earth s layers. Logical ASSESS 3 Evaluate Understanding To assess students knowledge of section content, ask them to answer the Key Concepts questions at the beginning of this section. Reteach Have students use Figure 3 to explain in their own words the formation of our solar system. Because Earth is an ever-changing planet, all the spheres on Earth are interactive and affect one another. To understand Earth s existence and history, it is important to study all aspects of Earth together. Reviewing Concepts 1. What are the sciences that are included in Earth science 2. What topics are included in the study of physical geology 3. Explain how physical geology differs from historical geology. 4. Describe the nebular hypothesis. Critical Thinking 5. Forming Conclusions Explain why Earth is called a dynamic planet. 6. Inferring Would meteorology be a useful science to apply to the study of planets such as Mercury and Mars Explain. 7. Hypothesizing Suppose that as Earth formed, all lighter elements were released to surrounding space. How might this affect the structure of Earth today Summarizing Earth science is composed of many different areas of study. Why is it important to include all of these areas in the study of Earth and the solar system Introduction to Earth Science 5 Answer to... Earth has layers because denser elements sank to Earth s center and less dense elements floated to the surface. Section 1.1 Assessment 1. Earth science includes many subdivisions of geology such as geochemistry, geophysics, geobiology, and paleontology, as well as meteorology, oceanography, and astronomy. 2. Physical geology includes processes that operate on and below Earth s surface such as volcanoes, mountain building, erosion, and earthquakes. 3. Historical geology s aim is to understand Earth s history. Physical geology s aim is to understand the processes that shape Earth. 4. This hypothesis suggests that the solar system began as an enormous cloud of dust and gas. The cloud began to rotate, heat was produced, and the cloud began to collapse toward the center. The sun formed at the center from this heat. Cooling of the cloud caused rocky and metallic materials to form the inner planets. The outer planets formed from lighter materials and gases. 5. The surface of Earth is continually changing due to its layered structure. 6. It would not be very useful because these two planets have only very thin atmospheres. Very few meteorological processes are occurring on them. 7. If all the lighter elements were no longer a part of Earth s structure, Earth probably would not have layers defined by their density. Introduction to Earth Science 5

5 Earth s Place in the Universe Earth s Place in the Universe Background The Milky Way is a collection of several hundred billion stars, the oldest of which is about 10 billion years. It is one of a cluster of approximately 28 galaxies, called the Local Group, that exists in our region of the universe. Initially, the oldest stars in the Milky Way formed from nearly pure hydrogen. Later, succeeding generations of younger stars, including our Sun, would have heavier, more complex atoms available for their formation. Teaching Tips As students read the feature and look at Figure 4, have them make a timeline of the events shown from the big bang to the present. While reading Earth s Place in the Universe feature, have students create a flowchart showing the chain of events starting with the big bang and ending with the formation of our sun and the planets of our solar system. (Big Bang Protons and neutrons appear Hydrogen and helium form Hydrogen and helium condense into clouds Galaxies and galaxy clusters form and start spreading apart Clouds of gas and dust collapse, forming stars Stars become supernovas Nebula, enriched from supernovas, contracts, rotates, and flattens Planets and our sun form) Students may think that the Milky Way is at the center of the universe. They may have inferred this from learning that almost all galaxies are moving away from the Milky Way in all directions. To dispel this misconception, have students mark with a black marker a number of dots on a partially inflated balloon. Blow up the balloon and observe what happens to the dots. They all move away from each other, as do almost all galaxies. All points in the universe can be thought of as being the center of the universe, as everything else is moving away from everything else. Big Bang The realization that the universe is immense and orderly began in the early 1900s. Edwin Hubble and other scientists demonstrated that the Milky Way galaxy is one of hundreds of billions of galaxies, each of which contains billions of stars. Evidence supports that Earth, its materials, and all living things are the result of the Big Bang theory. The universe began between 13 and 14 billion years ago as a dense, hot, massive amount of material exploded with violent force. See Figure 4. Within about one second, the temperature of the expanding universe cooled to approximately 10 billion degrees. Basic atomic particles called protons and neutrons began to appear. After a few minutes, atoms of the simplest elements hydrogen and helium had formed. The initial conversion of energy to matter in the young universe was completed. During the first billion years or so, matter (essentially hydrogen and helium) in the expanding universe clumped together to form enormous clouds that eventually collapsed to become galaxies and clusters of galaxies. Inside these collapsing clouds, smaller concentrations of matter formed into stars. One of the billions of galaxies to form was the Milky Way. During the life of most stars, energy produced as hydrogen nuclei (protons) fuses with other hydrogen Dust and gases collect 6 Chapter 1 Quasars form Active galaxies form Milky Way forms Local group For centuries, people who have gazed at the night sky have wondered about the nature of the universe, Earth s place within it, and whether or not we are alone. Today many exciting discoveries in astronomy are beginning to provide answers about the origin of the universe, the formation and evolution of stars, and how Earth came into existence. nuclei to form helium. During this process, called nuclear fusion, matter is converted to energy. Stars begin to die when their nuclear fuel is used up. Massive stars often have explosive deaths. During these events, called supernovas, nuclear fusion produces atoms such as oxygen, carbon, and iron. These atoms may become the materials that make up future generations of stars. From the debris scattered during the death of a preexisting star, our sun, and the solar system formed Our star, the sun, is at the very least a secondgeneration star. Along with the planets in our solar system, the sun began forming nearly 5 billion years ago from a large interstellar cloud called a nebula. This nebula consisted of dust particles and gases enriched in heavy elements from supernova explosions. Gravitational energy caused the nebula to contract, rotate, and flatten. Inside, smaller concentrations of matter began condensing to form the planets. At the center of the nebula there was sufficient pressure and heat to initiate hydrogen nuclear fusion, and our sun was born. It has been said that all life on Earth is related to the stars. This is true because the atoms in our bodies and the atoms that make up everything on Earth, owe their origin to a supernova event that occurred billions of years ago, trillions of kilometers away. 14 b.y. 13 b.y. 10 b.y. 5 b.y. Present Solar Galaxies evolve and move apart Sun Milky Way Figure 4 Big Bang Theory Between 13 and 14 billion years ago, a huge explosion sent all of the universe s matter flying outward at great speed. After a few billion years, the material cooled and condensed into the first stars and galaxies. About 5 billion years ago, our solar system began forming in a galaxy that is now called the Milky Way galaxy. 6 Chapter 1

4 HOW OUR SOLAR SYSTEM FORMED 750L

4 HOW OUR SOLAR SYSTEM FORMED 750L 4 HOW OUR SOLAR SYSTEM FORMED 750L HOW OUR SOLAR SYSTEM FORMED A CLOSE LOOK AT THE PLANETS ORBITING OUR SUN By Cynthia Stokes Brown, adapted by Newsela Planets come from the clouds of gas and dust that

More information

1 A Solar System Is Born

1 A Solar System Is Born CHAPTER 3 1 A Solar System Is Born SECTION Formation of the Solar System BEFORE YOU READ After you read this section, you should be able to answer these questions: What is a nebula? How did our solar system

More information

Introduction to the Solar System

Introduction to the Solar System Introduction to the Solar System Lesson Objectives Describe some early ideas about our solar system. Name the planets, and describe their motion around the Sun. Explain how the solar system formed. Introduction

More information

SGL 101 MATERIALS OF THE EARTH Lecture 1 C.M.NYAMAI LECTURE 1. 1.0 ORIGIN, STRUCTURE AND COMPOSITION OF THE EARTH

SGL 101 MATERIALS OF THE EARTH Lecture 1 C.M.NYAMAI LECTURE 1. 1.0 ORIGIN, STRUCTURE AND COMPOSITION OF THE EARTH LECTURE 1. 1.0 ORIGIN, STRUCTURE AND COMPOSITION OF THE EARTH 1.1 INTRODUCTION. Welcome to Lecture 1 of this unit. To start with, stop and look around you wherever you are. Take a look at all the things

More information

Introduction and Origin of the Earth

Introduction and Origin of the Earth Page 1 of 5 EENS 1110 Tulane University Physical Geology Prof. Stephen A. Nelson Introduction and Origin of the Earth This page last updated on 30-Jul-2015 Geology, What is it? Geology is the study of

More information

California Standards Grades 9 12 Boardworks 2009 Science Contents Standards Mapping

California Standards Grades 9 12 Boardworks 2009 Science Contents Standards Mapping California Standards Grades 912 Boardworks 2009 Science Contents Standards Mapping Earth Sciences Earth s Place in the Universe 1. Astronomy and planetary exploration reveal the solar system s structure,

More information

Lecture 10 Formation of the Solar System January 6c, 2014

Lecture 10 Formation of the Solar System January 6c, 2014 1 Lecture 10 Formation of the Solar System January 6c, 2014 2 Orbits of the Planets 3 Clues for the Formation of the SS All planets orbit in roughly the same plane about the Sun. All planets orbit in the

More information

UNIT V. Earth and Space. Earth and the Solar System

UNIT V. Earth and Space. Earth and the Solar System UNIT V Earth and Space Chapter 9 Earth and the Solar System EARTH AND OTHER PLANETS A solar system contains planets, moons, and other objects that orbit around a star or the star system. The solar system

More information

1 Branches of Earth Science

1 Branches of Earth Science CHAPTER 1 1 Branches of Earth Science SECTION The World of Earth Science BEFORE YOU READ After you read this section, you should be able to answer these questions: What are the four major branches of Earth

More information

Science Standard 4 Earth in Space Grade Level Expectations

Science Standard 4 Earth in Space Grade Level Expectations Science Standard 4 Earth in Space Grade Level Expectations Science Standard 4 Earth in Space Our Solar System is a collection of gravitationally interacting bodies that include Earth and the Moon. Universal

More information

Section 1.1 What Is Earth Science? This section explains what Earth science is and what Earth scientists study.

Section 1.1 What Is Earth Science? This section explains what Earth science is and what Earth scientists study. Section 11 What Is Earth Science? This section explains what Earth science is and what Earth scientists study Reading Strategy Categorizing As you read about the different branches of Earth science, fill

More information

4 HOW OUR SOLAR SYSTEM FORMED 890L

4 HOW OUR SOLAR SYSTEM FORMED 890L 4 HOW OUR SOLAR SYSTEM FORMED 890L HOW OUR SOLAR SYSTEM FORMED A CLOSE LOOK AT THE PLANETS ORBITING OUR SUN By Cynthia Stokes Brown, adapted by Newsela Planets are born from the clouds of gas and dust

More information

Georgia Performance Standards Framework for Science Grade 6. Unit Organizer: UNIVERSE AND SOLAR SYSTEM (Approximate Time 3 Weeks)

Georgia Performance Standards Framework for Science Grade 6. Unit Organizer: UNIVERSE AND SOLAR SYSTEM (Approximate Time 3 Weeks) The following instructional plan is part of a GaDOE collection of Unit Frameworks, Performance Tasks, examples of Student Work, and Teacher Commentary. Many more GaDOE approved instructional plans are

More information

Chapter 6 Formation of Planetary Systems Our Solar System and Beyond

Chapter 6 Formation of Planetary Systems Our Solar System and Beyond Chapter 6 Formation of Planetary Systems Our Solar System and Beyond The solar system exhibits clear patterns of composition and motion. Sun Over 99.9% of solar system s mass Made mostly of H/He gas (plasma)

More information

4 HOW OUR SOLAR SYSTEM FORMED 1020L

4 HOW OUR SOLAR SYSTEM FORMED 1020L 4 HOW OUR SOLAR SYSTEM FORMED 1020L HOW OUR SOLAR SYSTEM FORMED A CLOSE LOOK AT THE PLANETS ORBITING OUR SUN By Cynthia Stokes Brown, adapted by Newsela Planets are born from the clouds of gas and dust

More information

The Solar System. Unit 4 covers the following framework standards: ES 10 and PS 11. Content was adapted the following:

The Solar System. Unit 4 covers the following framework standards: ES 10 and PS 11. Content was adapted the following: Unit 4 The Solar System Chapter 7 ~ The History of the Solar System o Section 1 ~ The Formation of the Solar System o Section 2 ~ Observing the Solar System Chapter 8 ~ The Parts the Solar System o Section

More information

The Earth, Sun, and Moon

The Earth, Sun, and Moon reflect The Sun and Moon are Earth s constant companions. We bask in the Sun s heat and light. It provides Earth s energy, and life could not exist without it. We rely on the Moon to light dark nights.

More information

165 points. Name Date Period. Column B a. Cepheid variables b. luminosity c. RR Lyrae variables d. Sagittarius e. variable stars

165 points. Name Date Period. Column B a. Cepheid variables b. luminosity c. RR Lyrae variables d. Sagittarius e. variable stars Name Date Period 30 GALAXIES AND THE UNIVERSE SECTION 30.1 The Milky Way Galaxy In your textbook, read about discovering the Milky Way. (20 points) For each item in Column A, write the letter of the matching

More information

WHERE DID ALL THE ELEMENTS COME FROM??

WHERE DID ALL THE ELEMENTS COME FROM?? WHERE DID ALL THE ELEMENTS COME FROM?? In the very beginning, both space and time were created in the Big Bang. It happened 13.7 billion years ago. Afterwards, the universe was a very hot, expanding soup

More information

Chapter 8 Formation of the Solar System. What theory best explains the features of our solar system? Close Encounter Hypothesis

Chapter 8 Formation of the Solar System. What theory best explains the features of our solar system? Close Encounter Hypothesis Chapter 8 Formation of the Solar System What properties of our solar system must a formation theory explain? 1. Patterns of motion of the large bodies Orbit in same direction and plane 2. Existence of

More information

Chapter 8 Formation of the Solar System Agenda

Chapter 8 Formation of the Solar System Agenda Chapter 8 Formation of the Solar System Agenda Announce: Mercury Transit Part 2 of Projects due next Thursday Ch. 8 Formation of the Solar System Philip on The Physics of Star Trek Radiometric Dating Lab

More information

STUDY GUIDE: Earth Sun Moon

STUDY GUIDE: Earth Sun Moon The Universe is thought to consist of trillions of galaxies. Our galaxy, the Milky Way, has billions of stars. One of those stars is our Sun. Our solar system consists of the Sun at the center, and all

More information

Solar System Formation

Solar System Formation Solar System Formation Solar System Formation Question: How did our solar system and other planetary systems form? Comparative planetology has helped us understand Compare the differences and similarities

More information

Georgia Performance Standards Framework for Shaky Ground 6 th Grade

Georgia Performance Standards Framework for Shaky Ground 6 th Grade The following instructional plan is part of a GaDOE collection of Unit Frameworks, Performance Tasks, examples of Student Work, and Teacher Commentary. Many more GaDOE approved instructional plans are

More information

Chapter 1 Introduction to Earth Science

Chapter 1 Introduction to Earth Science Chapter 1 Introduction to Earth Science Section 1 What Is Earth Science? Key Concepts What is the study of Earth science? How did Earth and the solar system form? Vocabulary Earth science geology oceanography

More information

Earth Sciences -- Grades 9, 10, 11, and 12. California State Science Content Standards. Mobile Climate Science Labs

Earth Sciences -- Grades 9, 10, 11, and 12. California State Science Content Standards. Mobile Climate Science Labs Earth Sciences -- Grades 9, 10, 11, and 12 California State Science Content Standards Covered in: Hands-on science labs, demonstrations, & activities. Investigation and Experimentation. Lesson Plans. Presented

More information

Chapter 8 Welcome to the Solar System

Chapter 8 Welcome to the Solar System Chapter 8 Welcome to the Solar System 8.1 The Search for Origins What properties of our solar system must a formation theory explain? What theory best explains the features of our solar system? What properties

More information

The Birth of the Universe Newcomer Academy High School Visualization One

The Birth of the Universe Newcomer Academy High School Visualization One The Birth of the Universe Newcomer Academy High School Visualization One Chapter Topic Key Points of Discussion Notes & Vocabulary 1 Birth of The Big Bang Theory Activity 4A the How and when did the universe

More information

Summary: Four Major Features of our Solar System

Summary: Four Major Features of our Solar System Summary: Four Major Features of our Solar System How did the solar system form? According to the nebular theory, our solar system formed from the gravitational collapse of a giant cloud of interstellar

More information

Multiple Choice Identify the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question.

Multiple Choice Identify the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question. Test 2 f14 Multiple Choice Identify the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question. 1. Carbon cycles through the Earth system. During photosynthesis, carbon is a. released from wood

More information

Lecture 23: Terrestrial Worlds in Comparison. This lecture compares and contrasts the properties and evolution of the 5 main terrestrial bodies.

Lecture 23: Terrestrial Worlds in Comparison. This lecture compares and contrasts the properties and evolution of the 5 main terrestrial bodies. Lecture 23: Terrestrial Worlds in Comparison Astronomy 141 Winter 2012 This lecture compares and contrasts the properties and evolution of the 5 main terrestrial bodies. The small terrestrial planets have

More information

THE SOLAR SYSTEM - EXERCISES 1

THE SOLAR SYSTEM - EXERCISES 1 THE SOLAR SYSTEM - EXERCISES 1 THE SUN AND THE SOLAR SYSTEM Name the planets in their order from the sun. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 The asteroid belt is between and Which planet has the most moons? About how many?

More information

KINDERGARTEN 1 WEEK LESSON PLANS AND ACTIVITIES

KINDERGARTEN 1 WEEK LESSON PLANS AND ACTIVITIES KINDERGARTEN 1 WEEK LESSON PLANS AND ACTIVITIES UNIVERSE CYCLE OVERVIEW OF KINDERGARTEN UNIVERSE WEEK 1. PRE: Discovering misconceptions of the Universe. LAB: Comparing size and distances in space. POST:

More information

Class 2 Solar System Characteristics Formation Exosolar Planets

Class 2 Solar System Characteristics Formation Exosolar Planets Class 1 Introduction, Background History of Modern Astronomy The Night Sky, Eclipses and the Seasons Kepler's Laws Newtonian Gravity General Relativity Matter and Light Telescopes Class 2 Solar System

More information

The Main Point. Lecture #34: Solar System Origin II. Chemical Condensation ( Lewis ) Model. How did the solar system form? Reading: Chapter 8.

The Main Point. Lecture #34: Solar System Origin II. Chemical Condensation ( Lewis ) Model. How did the solar system form? Reading: Chapter 8. Lecture #34: Solar System Origin II How did the solar system form? Chemical Condensation ("Lewis") Model. Formation of the Terrestrial Planets. Formation of the Giant Planets. Planetary Evolution. Reading:

More information

Science Investigations: Investigating Astronomy Teacher s Guide

Science Investigations: Investigating Astronomy Teacher s Guide Teacher s Guide Grade Level: 6 12 Curriculum Focus: Astronomy/Space Duration: 7 segments; 66 minutes Program Description This library of videos contains seven segments on celestial bodies and related science.

More information

Rapid Changes in Earth s Surface

Rapid Changes in Earth s Surface TEKS investigate rapid changes in Earth s surface such as volcanic eruptions, earthquakes, and landslides Rapid Changes in Earth s Surface Constant Changes Earth s surface is constantly changing. Wind,

More information

The Sun and Solar Energy

The Sun and Solar Energy I The Sun and Solar Energy One of the most important forces behind global change on Earth is over 90 million miles distant from the planet. The Sun is the ultimate, original source of the energy that drives

More information

The Big Bang A Community in the Classroom Presentation for Grade 5

The Big Bang A Community in the Classroom Presentation for Grade 5 The Big Bang A Community in the Classroom Presentation for Grade 5 Richard Cupp Engineer STANARDS CONNECTION Grade 5 Physical Science: Elements and their combinations account for all the varied types of

More information

1 Branches of Earth Science

1 Branches of Earth Science CHAPTER 1 1 Branches of Earth Science SECTION The World of Earth Science BEFORE YOU READ After you read this section, you should be able to answer these questions: What are the four major branches of Earth

More information

galaxy solar system supernova (noun) (noun) (noun)

galaxy solar system supernova (noun) (noun) (noun) WORDS IN CONTEXT DAY 1 (Page 1 of 4) galaxy A galaxy is a collection of stars, gas, and dust. We live in the Milky Way galaxy. One galaxy may contain billions of stars. solar system A solar system revolves

More information

The Expanding Universe

The Expanding Universe Stars, Galaxies, Guided Reading and Study This section explains how astronomers think the universe and the solar system formed. Use Target Reading Skills As you read about the evidence that supports the

More information

The Solar System. Source http://starchild.gsfc.nasa.gov/docs/starchild/solar_system_level1/solar_system.html

The Solar System. Source http://starchild.gsfc.nasa.gov/docs/starchild/solar_system_level1/solar_system.html The Solar System What is the solar system? It is our Sun and everything that travels around it. Our solar system is elliptical in shape. That means it is shaped like an egg. Earth s orbit is nearly circular.

More information

Layers of the Earth s Interior

Layers of the Earth s Interior Layers of the Earth s Interior 1 Focus Question How is the Earth like an ogre? 2 Objectives Explain how geologists have learned about the interior of the Earth. Describe the layers of the Earth s interior.

More information

Related Standards and Background Information

Related Standards and Background Information Related Standards and Background Information Earth Patterns, Cycles and Changes This strand focuses on student understanding of patterns in nature, natural cycles, and changes that occur both quickly and

More information

1.1 A Modern View of the Universe" Our goals for learning: What is our place in the universe?"

1.1 A Modern View of the Universe Our goals for learning: What is our place in the universe? Chapter 1 Our Place in the Universe 1.1 A Modern View of the Universe What is our place in the universe? What is our place in the universe? How did we come to be? How can we know what the universe was

More information

Review 1. Multiple Choice Identify the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question.

Review 1. Multiple Choice Identify the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question. Review 1 Multiple Choice Identify the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question. 1. When hydrogen nuclei fuse into helium nuclei a. the nuclei die. c. particles collide. b. energy

More information

Study Guide: Solar System

Study Guide: Solar System Study Guide: Solar System 1. How many planets are there in the solar system? 2. What is the correct order of all the planets in the solar system? 3. Where can a comet be located in the solar system? 4.

More information

The Sun and the Stars

The Sun and the Stars www.k5learning.com Objective Concepts (gravity, climate, solar system, hydrogen, helium, elements, core, ultraviolet rays, cluster, galaxy, Milky Way Galaxy); Sight words (surface, middle, dangerous, causes,

More information

Study Guide due Friday, 1/29

Study Guide due Friday, 1/29 NAME: Astronomy Study Guide asteroid chromosphere comet corona ellipse Galilean moons VOCABULARY WORDS TO KNOW geocentric system meteor gravity meteorite greenhouse effect meteoroid heliocentric system

More information

CHARACTERISTICS OF THE SOLAR SYSTEM

CHARACTERISTICS OF THE SOLAR SYSTEM reflect Our solar system is made up of thousands of objects, at the center of which is a star, the Sun. The objects beyond the Sun include 8 planets, at least 5 dwarf planets, and more than 170 moons.

More information

Solar System Fact Sheet

Solar System Fact Sheet Solar System Fact Sheet (Source: http://solarsystem.nasa.gov; http://solarviews.com) The Solar System Categories Mercury Venus Earth Mars Jupiter Saturn Uranus Neptune Rocky or Gas Rocky Rocky Rocky Rocky

More information

Assignment 5. Multiple Choice Identify the letter of the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question.

Assignment 5. Multiple Choice Identify the letter of the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question. Assignment 5 Multiple Choice Identify the letter of the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question. 1. What is the single most important reason that astronomers have learned more

More information

astronomy 2008 1. A planet was viewed from Earth for several hours. The diagrams below represent the appearance of the planet at four different times.

astronomy 2008 1. A planet was viewed from Earth for several hours. The diagrams below represent the appearance of the planet at four different times. 1. A planet was viewed from Earth for several hours. The diagrams below represent the appearance of the planet at four different times. 5. If the distance between the Earth and the Sun were increased,

More information

2007 Pearson Education Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley. The Jovian Planets

2007 Pearson Education Inc., publishing as Pearson Addison-Wesley. The Jovian Planets The Jovian Planets The Jovian planets are gas giants - much larger than Earth Sizes of Jovian Planets Planets get larger as they get more massive up to a point... Planets more massive than Jupiter are

More information

The Earth System. The geosphere is the solid Earth that includes the continental and oceanic crust as well as the various layers of Earth s interior.

The Earth System. The geosphere is the solid Earth that includes the continental and oceanic crust as well as the various layers of Earth s interior. The Earth System The atmosphere is the gaseous envelope that surrounds Earth. It consists of a mixture of gases composed primarily of nitrogen, oxygen, carbon dioxide, and water vapor. The atmosphere and

More information

Stellar Evolution: a Journey through the H-R Diagram

Stellar Evolution: a Journey through the H-R Diagram Stellar Evolution: a Journey through the H-R Diagram Mike Montgomery 21 Apr, 2001 0-0 The Herztsprung-Russell Diagram (HRD) was independently invented by Herztsprung (1911) and Russell (1913) They plotted

More information

Match the term or person with the appropriate phrase. You may use each answer once, more than once or not at all.

Match the term or person with the appropriate phrase. You may use each answer once, more than once or not at all. CHAPTER 1 OCE 1001 (Introduction to Oceanography, Professor Chiappone) INTRODUCTION TO PLANET EARTH (Trujillo and Thurman, 11 th edition) SAMPLE QUESTIONS Matching Questions Match the term or person with

More information

Astro 102 Test 5 Review Spring 2016. See Old Test 4 #16-23, Test 5 #1-3, Old Final #1-14

Astro 102 Test 5 Review Spring 2016. See Old Test 4 #16-23, Test 5 #1-3, Old Final #1-14 Astro 102 Test 5 Review Spring 2016 See Old Test 4 #16-23, Test 5 #1-3, Old Final #1-14 Sec 14.5 Expanding Universe Know: Doppler shift, redshift, Hubble s Law, cosmic distance ladder, standard candles,

More information

The Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) Correlation to. EarthComm, Second Edition. Project-Based Space and Earth System Science

The Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) Correlation to. EarthComm, Second Edition. Project-Based Space and Earth System Science The Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) Achieve, Inc. on behalf of the twenty-six states and partners that collaborated on the NGSS Copyright 2013 Achieve, Inc. All rights reserved. Correlation to,

More information

CHAPTER 6 THE TERRESTRIAL PLANETS

CHAPTER 6 THE TERRESTRIAL PLANETS CHAPTER 6 THE TERRESTRIAL PLANETS MULTIPLE CHOICE 1. Which of the following is NOT one of the four stages in the development of a terrestrial planet? 2. That Earth, evidence that Earth differentiated.

More information

7. In which part of the electromagnetic spectrum are molecules most easily detected? A. visible light B. radio waves C. X rays D.

7. In which part of the electromagnetic spectrum are molecules most easily detected? A. visible light B. radio waves C. X rays D. 1. Most interstellar matter is too cold to be observed optically. Its radiation can be detected in which part of the electromagnetic spectrum? A. gamma ray B. ultraviolet C. infrared D. X ray 2. The space

More information

Section 1 The Earth System

Section 1 The Earth System Section 1 The Earth System Key Concept Earth is a complex system made up of many smaller systems through which matter and energy are continuously cycled. What You Will Learn Energy and matter flow through

More information

A: Planets. Q: Which of the following objects would NOT be described as a small body: asteroids, meteoroids, comets, planets?

A: Planets. Q: Which of the following objects would NOT be described as a small body: asteroids, meteoroids, comets, planets? Q: Which of the following objects would NOT be described as a small body: asteroids, meteoroids, comets, planets? A: Planets Q: What can we learn by studying small bodies of the solar system? A: We can

More information

NOTES: GEORGIA HIGH SCHOOL SCIENCE TEST THE SOLAR SYSTEM

NOTES: GEORGIA HIGH SCHOOL SCIENCE TEST THE SOLAR SYSTEM NOTES: GEORGIA HIGH SCHOOL SCIENCE TEST THE SOLAR SYSTEM 1.What is a Solar system? A solar system consists of: * one central star, the Sun and * nine planets: Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn,

More information

Asteroids. Earth. Asteroids. Earth Distance from sun: 149,600,000 kilometers (92,960,000 miles) Diameter: 12,756 kilometers (7,926 miles) dotted line

Asteroids. Earth. Asteroids. Earth Distance from sun: 149,600,000 kilometers (92,960,000 miles) Diameter: 12,756 kilometers (7,926 miles) dotted line Image taken by NASA Asteroids About 6,000 asteroids have been discovered; several hundred more are found each year. There are likely hundreds of thousands more that are too small to be seen from Earth.

More information

Characteristics of the. thermosphere

Characteristics of the. thermosphere Characteristics of the Atmosphere. If you were lost in the desert, you could survive for a few days without food and water. But you wouldn't last more than five minutes without the ' Objectives Describe

More information

Georgia Performance Standards Framework for Science Grade 6. Unit Organizer: Geology: Inside the Earth (Approximate Time: 7 Weeks)

Georgia Performance Standards Framework for Science Grade 6. Unit Organizer: Geology: Inside the Earth (Approximate Time: 7 Weeks) The following instructional plan is part of a GaDOE collection of Unit Frameworks, Performance Tasks, examples of Student Work, and Teacher Commentary. Many more GaDOE approved instructional plans are

More information

Tectonic plates have different boundaries.

Tectonic plates have different boundaries. KEY CONCEPT Plates move apart. BEFORE, you learned The continents join and break apart The sea floor provides evidence that tectonic plates move The theory of plate tectonics helps explain how the plates

More information

Earth Is Not the Center of the Universe

Earth Is Not the Center of the Universe Earth Is Not the Center of the Universe Source: Utah State Office of Education Introduction Have you ever looked up at the night sky and wondered about all the pinpoint lights? People through the ages

More information

Origins of the Cosmos Summer 2016. Pre-course assessment

Origins of the Cosmos Summer 2016. Pre-course assessment Origins of the Cosmos Summer 2016 Pre-course assessment In order to grant two graduate credits for the workshop, we do require you to spend some hours before arriving at Penn State. We encourage all of

More information

Welcome to Class 4: Our Solar System (and a bit of cosmology at the start) Remember: sit only in the first 10 rows of the room

Welcome to Class 4: Our Solar System (and a bit of cosmology at the start) Remember: sit only in the first 10 rows of the room Welcome to Class 4: Our Solar System (and a bit of cosmology at the start) Remember: sit only in the first 10 rows of the room What is the difference between dark ENERGY and dark MATTER? Is Earth unique,

More information

Chapter 1 Student Reading

Chapter 1 Student Reading Chapter 1 Student Reading Chemistry is the study of matter You could say that chemistry is the science that studies all the stuff in the entire world. A more scientific term for stuff is matter. So chemistry

More information

FORMATION OF EARTH. Today we are going to talk about the earth.how it was formed.

FORMATION OF EARTH. Today we are going to talk about the earth.how it was formed. FORMATION OF EARTH Have you ever wondered about the universe? What made it possible.how it was formed? Of course, religion has explained for centuries the intricacies of creation. And as always, science

More information

Grade 6 Standard 3 Unit Test A Astronomy. 1. The four inner planets are rocky and small. Which description best fits the next four outer planets?

Grade 6 Standard 3 Unit Test A Astronomy. 1. The four inner planets are rocky and small. Which description best fits the next four outer planets? Grade 6 Standard 3 Unit Test A Astronomy Multiple Choice 1. The four inner planets are rocky and small. Which description best fits the next four outer planets? A. They are also rocky and small. B. They

More information

Foundations of Earth Science (Lutgens and Tarbuck, 6 th edition, 2011)

Foundations of Earth Science (Lutgens and Tarbuck, 6 th edition, 2011) EAS 100 Study Guide to Textbook Foundations of Earth Science (Lutgens and Tarbuck, 6 th edition, 2011) STUDY GUIDE 8/2010 The textbook for EAS 100, Foundations of Earth Science, by Lutgens and Tarbuck

More information

Foundations of Earth Science (Lutgens and Tarbuck, 5 th edition, 2008)

Foundations of Earth Science (Lutgens and Tarbuck, 5 th edition, 2008) EAS 100 Study Guide to Textbook Foundations of Earth Science (Lutgens and Tarbuck, 5 th edition, 2008) STUDY GUIDE 1/08 The textbook for EAS 100, Foundations of Earth Science, by Lutgens and Tarbuck is

More information

Third Grade Science Vocabulary Investigation Design & Safety

Third Grade Science Vocabulary Investigation Design & Safety recycle dispose reuse goggles data conclusion predict describe observe record identify investigate evidence analyze mass matter float sink attract force magnet magnetic magnetism pole pull push repel Third

More information

Lesson 1.1: Earth and Space Science - Introduction

Lesson 1.1: Earth and Space Science - Introduction Weekly Focus: Main Idea Weekly Skill: Introduction Lesson Summary: This week students will take a pre- self-evaluation to determine their background knowledge in Earth and space science. They will also

More information

Unit 8 Lesson 2 Gravity and the Solar System

Unit 8 Lesson 2 Gravity and the Solar System Unit 8 Lesson 2 Gravity and the Solar System Gravity What is gravity? Gravity is a force of attraction between objects that is due to their masses and the distances between them. Every object in the universe

More information

Solar System Fundamentals. What is a Planet? Planetary orbits Planetary temperatures Planetary Atmospheres Origin of the Solar System

Solar System Fundamentals. What is a Planet? Planetary orbits Planetary temperatures Planetary Atmospheres Origin of the Solar System Solar System Fundamentals What is a Planet? Planetary orbits Planetary temperatures Planetary Atmospheres Origin of the Solar System Properties of Planets What is a planet? Defined finally in August 2006!

More information

Chemical Building Blocks: Chapter 3: Elements and Periodic Table

Chemical Building Blocks: Chapter 3: Elements and Periodic Table Name: Class: Date: Chemical Building Blocks: Chapter 3: Elements and Periodic Table Study Guide Multiple Choice Identify the letter of the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question.

More information

Cosmic Journey: A Solar System Adventure General Information

Cosmic Journey: A Solar System Adventure General Information Cosmic Journey: A Solar System Adventure General Information Imagine it a huge spiral galaxy containing hundreds of billions of stars, spiraling out from a galactic center. Nestled deep within one of the

More information

The Layout of the Solar System

The Layout of the Solar System The Layout of the Solar System Planets fall into two main categories Terrestrial (i.e. Earth-like) Jovian (i.e. Jupiter-like or gaseous) [~5000 kg/m 3 ] [~1300 kg/m 3 ] What is density? Average density

More information

Georgia Performance Standards for Science Grade 6. This Performance Standards document includes four major components. They are

Georgia Performance Standards for Science Grade 6. This Performance Standards document includes four major components. They are Sixth Grade Science Curriculum One Stop Shop For Educators The Georgia Performance Standards are designed to provide students with the knowledge and skills for proficiency in science at the sixth grade

More information

[Geology Layers of the Earth] [Basic: Grade 2-3] [Advanced: Grade 5: Introduction to Plate Tectonics}

[Geology Layers of the Earth] [Basic: Grade 2-3] [Advanced: Grade 5: Introduction to Plate Tectonics} [Geology Layers of the Earth] [Basic: Grade 2-3] [Advanced: Grade 5: Introduction to Plate Tectonics} BACKGROUND Scientists and geologists have been able to do some drilling on Earth. They are also able

More information

Probing for Information

Probing for Information Name Class Date Inquiry Lab Probing for Information Using Scientific Methods Information about planets in our solar system has been collected by observation from Earth and from probes, or scientific instruments,

More information

Pretest Ch 20: Origins of the Universe

Pretest Ch 20: Origins of the Universe Name: _Answer key Pretest: _2_/ 58 Posttest: _58_/ 58 Pretest Ch 20: Origins of the Universe Vocab/Matching: Match the definition on the left with the term on the right by placing the letter of the term

More information

DESCRIPTION ACADEMIC STANDARDS INSTRUCTIONAL GOALS VOCABULARY BEFORE SHOWING. Subject Area: Science

DESCRIPTION ACADEMIC STANDARDS INSTRUCTIONAL GOALS VOCABULARY BEFORE SHOWING. Subject Area: Science DESCRIPTION Host Tom Selleck conducts a stellar tour of Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and Pluto--the outer planets of Earth's solar system. Information from the Voyager space probes plus computer models

More information

Name: Period: # Plate Tectonics. Journey to the center of the Earth

Name: Period: # Plate Tectonics. Journey to the center of the Earth Plate Tectonics Journey to the center of the Earth Use pages 124 129 to answer the following questions. Exploring Inside Earth (p. 125-126) 1. What are the two main types of evidence that Geologist use

More information

Week 1-2: Overview of the Universe & the View from the Earth

Week 1-2: Overview of the Universe & the View from the Earth Week 1-2: Overview of the Universe & the View from the Earth Hassen M. Yesuf (hyesuf@ucsc.edu) September 29, 2011 1 Lecture summary Protein molecules, the building blocks of a living organism, are made

More information

Chapter 1: Our Place in the Universe. 2005 Pearson Education Inc., publishing as Addison-Wesley

Chapter 1: Our Place in the Universe. 2005 Pearson Education Inc., publishing as Addison-Wesley Chapter 1: Our Place in the Universe Topics Our modern view of the universe The scale of the universe Cinema graphic tour of the local universe Spaceship earth 1.1 A Modern View of the Universe Our goals

More information

Earth Egg Model Teacher Notes

Earth Egg Model Teacher Notes Ancient Greeks tried to explain earthquakes and volcanic activity by saying that a massive bull lay underground and the land shook when it became angry. Modern theories rely on an understanding of what

More information

Chapter 3 Student Reading

Chapter 3 Student Reading Chapter 3 Student Reading If you hold a solid piece of lead or iron in your hand, it feels heavy for its size. If you hold the same size piece of balsa wood or plastic, it feels light for its size. The

More information

What is the Sloan Digital Sky Survey?

What is the Sloan Digital Sky Survey? What is the Sloan Digital Sky Survey? Simply put, the Sloan Digital Sky Survey is the most ambitious astronomical survey ever undertaken. The survey will map one-quarter of the entire sky in detail, determining

More information

3 HOW WERE STARS FORMED?

3 HOW WERE STARS FORMED? 3 HOW WERE STARS FORMED? David Christian explains how the first stars were formed. This two-part lecture begins by focusing on what the Universe was like in its first 200 million years of existence, a

More information

FOURTH GRADE PLATE TECTONICS 1 WEEK LESSON PLANS AND ACTIVITIES

FOURTH GRADE PLATE TECTONICS 1 WEEK LESSON PLANS AND ACTIVITIES FOURTH GRADE PLATE TECTONICS 1 WEEK LESSON PLANS AND ACTIVITIES PLATE TECTONIC CYCLE OVERVIEW OF FOURTH GRADE VOLCANOES WEEK 1. PRE: Comparing different structures of volcanoes. LAB: Modeling three types

More information

Earth Science Landforms, Weathering, and Erosion Reading Comprehension. Landforms, Weathering, and Erosion

Earth Science Landforms, Weathering, and Erosion Reading Comprehension. Landforms, Weathering, and Erosion Reading Comprehension Name 1 How many people have been to the Rocky Mountains or the Grand Canyon? When people go to visit these natural wonders, they may not realize that it took millions of years for

More information

1. Michigan Geological History Presentation (Michigan Natural Resources)

1. Michigan Geological History Presentation (Michigan Natural Resources) 1. Michigan Geological History Presentation (Michigan Natural Resources) The Michigan Geological History Presentation provides an overview of the approximately 3 billion years of Earth Processes that the

More information

Lesson 6: Earth and the Moon

Lesson 6: Earth and the Moon Lesson 6: Earth and the Moon Reading Assignment Chapter 7.1: Overall Structure of Planet Earth Chapter 7.3: Earth s Interior More Precisely 7-2: Radioactive Dating Chapter 7.5: Earth s Magnetosphere Chapter

More information