Lab: Heat and Calorimetry

Save this PDF as:
 WORD  PNG  TXT  JPG

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "Lab: Heat and Calorimetry"

Transcription

1 Objectives Lab: Heat and Calorimetry Gain applicable knowledge about calories Compare the calorie content of food samples Introduction Most people are aware that foods contain calories, but what is a calorie? A calorie is the amount of energy necessary to raise the temperature of 1 gram of water 1 degree Celsius. Your body burns the energy contained in the foods you eat. On average, most people burn approximately 2000 calories per day. Have you noticed that your body feels warmer the more you exercise? That is because heat is one way that energy is transferred. Figure 1: Federally required nutrition labels provide people with information about the amount of energy contained in each serving. The labels also provide other nutritional information. One of the physical properties of any substance is specific heat. Specific heat is the energy required to raise the temperature of 1.00 gram of the substance by 1 degree Celsius. In Table 1, you can view the specific heat of many common substances. In this laboratory experiment, you will burn food to measure the amount of heat energy it produces from that you will be able to determine the amount of calories (energy) that food contains. The equation below shows the relationship between the amount of energy, in the form of heat, which is added to a substance to change the temperature of that substance: E = mct E = Energy measure in calories m = mass of the substance in grams c = specific heat in cal/g - C T = the change in temperature ( C or K)

2 In order to measure the temperature of a food sample, you will need to burn it and measure the amount of heat it gives off. You will need to construct a calorimeter to measure the heat produced from the burning material this is referred to as an indirect measurement. The heat from the burning food sample will heat a container filled with water. A thermometer will measure the change in temperature of the water. Since energy is always conserved, the heat absorbed by the water from the burning food sample will provide us with the information necessary to calculate the amount of energy contained in the food sample. The amount of energy in food is measured in Calories. One Calorie (with a capital C ) is equivalent to 1 kilocalorie, or 1000 calories (with a lowercase c ). Substance Cal/g K Gold Lead Copper Iron Glass Aluminum Wood Alcohol Water Table 1: Specific heat of common substances. Example Calculation: Here s an example on the steps necessary to calculate the calories in a piece of food. This is accomplished by measuring the amount of energy transferred by heating milliliters of water from 24 to 36.5 degrees Celsius by burning a marshmallow which masses at grams. 1. Determine the mass of the water heated: Mass = Density x Volume m = (1.00 g/ml) x (100.0 ml) = 100 g 2. Apply the constant for the specific heat of water: c = 1.00 cal/g C 3. Calculate the change in the temperature of the water: T = (36.5 C - 24 C) = 12.5 C

3 4. Calculate the energy lost by the marshmallow this equals the energy gained by the water: E = mct E = (100.0 g) x (1.00 cal/g C) x (12.5 C) = 1250 cal 5. Calculate the calories per gram of marshmallow: calories/g marshmallow = 1250 cal g = cal/g 6. Convert from calories to Calories (kilocalories) per gram of marshmallow: calories/g marshmallow = cal 1 Cal x = Calories/g g 1000 cal Pre-lab Questions 1. How does a food calorie differ from a food Calorie? What does a calorie measure in terms of food? 2. A gummie bear was tested through a flame-calorimeter test. The bear had a mass of grams and the temperature of milliliters of water increased by 15.0 degrees Celsius. How many Calories were in the gummie bear? Show all of your calculations.

4 Experiment: Heat and Calorimetry CAUTION: In this experiment, you will be working with fire, hot water, and heated metal. The experiment will produce smoke. Be sure to work in a well ventilated area, such as a stove hood, or near an open window and with the supervision of an adult. DO NOT burn foods that you know you are allergic to such as peanuts. You will need to construct a calorimeter with the equipment listed. Be sure that the thermometer does not touch the sides or bottom of the soda can. Materials Eye googles or safety glasses and gloves Large (unfolded) paper clips Butane lighter Thermometer Cork from bottle (2) 12 ounce aluminum soda can Tripod (can be constructed from tin can or wire coat hanger and canning lid) Snack foods from container with nutrition label Water Glass jars Measuring cups Kitchen measuring scale

5 Procedure 1. Measure 1 cup (118 milliliters) of distilled water. 2. Carefully pour the measured water into an empty aluminum soda can. 3. Set the aluminum can on the tripod as shown in Figure Insert a thermometer into a split cork to use as a stopper. Place the thermometer into the can as shown in Figure 1, with the stopper resting on the top of the can. You can adjust the height of the thermometer by sliding the stopper up or down. The thermometer should touch the water but not the bottom or sides of the can. 5. Insert the end of the unfolded paper clip that is still folded into a cork. 6. Tear a junk food sample into a piece that is about 1 centimeter squared (cm 2 ). Determine the mass of the piece of junk food and record it in the data table. NO eating in the lab!

6 7. Insert the straightened end of the food holder into the sample. HINT: If this does not hold the sample you can make a loop at the end of the paper clip to rest the sample in. 8. Fill a large glass jar or bowl approximately half full of water near your calorimeter. Use this to extinguish smoke after the sample has finished burning. 9. In Table 1, record the initial temperature of the water inside the aluminum can. 10. Light the butane lighter. CAUTION: Burns can occur with the use of flames. 11. Hold the cork end of the sample holder and carefully bring the sample into the flame until it ignites. HINT: The sample should be held in the flame for a few seconds to assure the sample will burn strongly. 12. Immediately and carefully bring the burning food approximately 1 centimeter below the bottom of the aluminum can in order to minimize the amount of heat lost. CAUTION: Excessive smoke can result from the ignited sample and can be a respiratory irritant. If there is excessive smoke, relight the sample immediately. 13. Watch the thermometer as the food sample completely burns to ash. If the food sample goes out before it is completely burned or is producing only a little flame and excessive smoke, quickly relight it in the lighter flame and place it back under the aluminum can. Record the maximum temperature that is reached. 14. Immediately after the sample has completely burned, dip it into the beaker of water and wait for it to cool. 15. Place the remains of the sample in the trash. Wash end of the paper clip, and then dry it with a paper towel. 16. Repeat steps 7-16 using other foods from your pantry. (Hint: Use a sample size that has a similar mass to the previous sample.)

7 Data Junk Food Volume of Water (ml) Mass of Water (g) Mass of Food Sample (g) Initial Water Temp. ( C) Max. Water Temp. ( C) Water T ( C) Sample A (Specify) 118 ml Sample B (Specify) 118 ml Sample C (Specify) 118 ml Sample D (Specify) 118 ml Calculations 1. If all of the heat from the food sample was transferred to the water in the can, calculate the Calories per gram that each sample contains. Remember, Calories are measured in kilocalories. a. Food sample A b. Food sample B

8 c. Food sample C d. Food sample D 2. Use the information from the nutrition facts label, including the serving size, to calculate the amount of calories each food contains. a. Food sample A b. Food sample B

9 c. Food sample C d. Food sample D

10 Post-lab Questions 1. Which food sample had the highest number of calories per gram? Were you surprised by these findings? 2. Did your measurements match those reported by the food manufacturer? 3. Where did error most likely occur in this experiment? 4. Is it important for the food to completely burn? Why or why not? 5. How could the experiment be modified to reduce the amount of error?

The Great Peanut Problem

The Great Peanut Problem elearning 2009 Introduction The Great Peanut Problem Calorimetry Publication No. 91259 All human activity requires burning food for energy. How much energy is released when food burns in the body? How

More information

EXPERIMENT 4 THE DETERMINATION OF THE CALORIC CONTENT OF A CASHEW NUT

EXPERIMENT 4 THE DETERMINATION OF THE CALORIC CONTENT OF A CASHEW NUT EXPERIMENT 4 THE DETERMINATION OF THE CALORIC CONTENT OF A CASHEW NUT Textbook reference: pp103-105 Purpose: In this Activity, students determine how many calories are released per gram when cashews burn

More information

Burn Baby Burn: The Power Within! Feedstock Calorimetry. (by Mary C. Criss & Shannon Ralph)

Burn Baby Burn: The Power Within! Feedstock Calorimetry. (by Mary C. Criss & Shannon Ralph) Burn Baby Burn: The Power Within! Feedstock Calorimetry (by Mary C. Criss & Shannon Ralph) Objective The purpose of this experiment is to determine the amount of chemical energy stored in different biofuel

More information

3 Energy Content of Food

3 Energy Content of Food Lab Activity 3 ENERGY CONTENT OF FOOD LAB ACTIVITY 3 Energy Content of Food Purpose The purpose of the activity is to measure the energy content of different kinds of food by burning the food to warm a

More information

Physical and Chemical Properties and Changes

Physical and Chemical Properties and Changes Physical and Chemical Properties and Changes An understanding of material things requires an understanding of the physical and chemical characteristics of matter. A few planned experiments can help you

More information

Evaluation copy. Energy Content of Foods. computer OBJECTIVES MATERIALS

Evaluation copy. Energy Content of Foods. computer OBJECTIVES MATERIALS Energy Content of Foods Computer 10 Energy content is an important property of food. The energy your body needs for running, talking, and thinking comes from the food you eat. Energy content is the amount

More information

Experiment 6 Coffee-cup Calorimetry

Experiment 6 Coffee-cup Calorimetry 6-1 Experiment 6 Coffee-cup Calorimetry Introduction: Chemical reactions involve the release or consumption of energy, usually in the form of heat. Heat is measured in the energy units, Joules (J), defined

More information

Recovery of Elemental Copper from Copper (II) Nitrate

Recovery of Elemental Copper from Copper (II) Nitrate Recovery of Elemental Copper from Copper (II) Nitrate Objectives: Challenge: Students should be able to - recognize evidence(s) of a chemical change - convert word equations into formula equations - perform

More information

SOLUBILITY OF A SALT IN WATER AT VARIOUS TEMPERATURES LAB

SOLUBILITY OF A SALT IN WATER AT VARIOUS TEMPERATURES LAB SOLUBILITY OF A SALT IN WATER AT VARIOUS TEMPERATURES LAB Purpose: Most ionic compounds are considered by chemists to be salts and many of these are water soluble. In this lab, you will determine the solubility,

More information

COMMON LABORATORY APPARATUS

COMMON LABORATORY APPARATUS COMMON LABORATORY APPARATUS Beakers are useful as a reaction container or to hold liquid or solid samples. They are also used to catch liquids from titrations and filtrates from filtering operations. Bunsen

More information

Chapter 3 Student Reading

Chapter 3 Student Reading Chapter 3 Student Reading If you hold a solid piece of lead or iron in your hand, it feels heavy for its size. If you hold the same size piece of balsa wood or plastic, it feels light for its size. The

More information

Chemistry of Biodiesel Production. Teacher Notes. DAY 1: Biodiesel synthesis (50 minutes)

Chemistry of Biodiesel Production. Teacher Notes. DAY 1: Biodiesel synthesis (50 minutes) Chemistry of Biodiesel Production Teacher Notes DAY 1: Biodiesel synthesis (50 minutes) NOTE: The lab preparation instructions / lab protocol assumes classes of 32 students, with 8 groups of 4 students

More information

SEPARATION OF A MIXTURE OF SUBSTANCES LAB

SEPARATION OF A MIXTURE OF SUBSTANCES LAB SEPARATION OF A MIXTURE OF SUBSTANCES LAB Purpose: Every chemical has a set of defined physical properties, and when combined they present a unique fingerprint for that chemical. When chemicals are present

More information

SUGGESTED ACTIVITIES

SUGGESTED ACTIVITIES SUGGESTED ACTIVITIES (Thermal Energy) From Invitations to Science Inquiry 2 nd Edition by Tik L. Liem: Activity Page Number Concept Warm a Bottle by Shaking 184 Heat, Friction The Confused Bottles 206

More information

Measurement and Calibration

Measurement and Calibration Adapted from: H. A. Neidig and J. N. Spencer Modular Laboratory Program in Chemistry Thompson Learning;, University of Pittsburgh Chemistry 0110 Laboratory Manual, 1998. Purpose To gain an understanding

More information

Investigation M3: Separating Mixtures into Component Parts

Investigation M3: Separating Mixtures into Component Parts Investigation M3: Separating Mixtures into Component Parts Goals: Use various methods to separate mixtures, make inferences from temperature/time graphs, and identify substances. 81 Activity M3.3: What

More information

1. The Determination of Boiling Point

1. The Determination of Boiling Point 1. The Determination of Boiling Point Objective In this experiment, you will first check your thermometer for errors by determining the temperature of two stable equilibrium systems. You will then use

More information

Worksheet #17. 2. How much heat is released when 143 g of ice is cooled from 14 C to 75 C, if the specific heat capacity of ice is 2.087 J/(g C).

Worksheet #17. 2. How much heat is released when 143 g of ice is cooled from 14 C to 75 C, if the specific heat capacity of ice is 2.087 J/(g C). Worksheet #17 Calculating Heat 1. How much heat is needed to bring 12.0 g of water from 28.3 C to 43.87 C, if the specific heat capacity of water is 4.184 /(g? 2. How much heat is released when 143 g of

More information

PREPARATION FOR CHEMISTRY LAB: COMBUSTION

PREPARATION FOR CHEMISTRY LAB: COMBUSTION 1 Name: Lab Instructor: PREPARATION FOR CHEMISTRY LAB: COMBUSTION 1. What is a hydrocarbon? 2. What products form in the complete combustion of a hydrocarbon? 3. Combustion is an exothermic reaction. What

More information

Releasing Energy From Food

Releasing Energy From Food 13 LESSON Releasing Energy From Food INTRODUCTION In Lesson 12, you explored how oxygen and nutrients react chemically in your cells to release energy. But do all foods release the same amount of energy?

More information

Energy Conversions I. Unit of measure (most common one) Form Definition Example

Energy Conversions I. Unit of measure (most common one) Form Definition Example Energy Conversions I Energy can take many forms, but any one form can usually be converted into another. And no matter what form we talk about, we can use conversion factors to calculate equivalent amounts

More information

Chapter 18 Temperature, Heat, and the First Law of Thermodynamics. Problems: 8, 11, 13, 17, 21, 27, 29, 37, 39, 41, 47, 51, 57

Chapter 18 Temperature, Heat, and the First Law of Thermodynamics. Problems: 8, 11, 13, 17, 21, 27, 29, 37, 39, 41, 47, 51, 57 Chapter 18 Temperature, Heat, and the First Law of Thermodynamics Problems: 8, 11, 13, 17, 21, 27, 29, 37, 39, 41, 47, 51, 57 Thermodynamics study and application of thermal energy temperature quantity

More information

AN EXPERIMENT IN ALCHEMY: COPPER TO SILVER TO GOLD 2005, 2000, 1996 by David A. Katz. All rights reserved

AN EXPERIMENT IN ALCHEMY: COPPER TO SILVER TO GOLD 2005, 2000, 1996 by David A. Katz. All rights reserved AN EXPERIMENT IN ALCHEMY: COPPER TO SILVER TO GOLD 2005, 2000, 1996 by David A. Katz. All rights reserved INTRODUCTION One of the goals of the ancient alchemists was to convert base metals into gold. Although

More information

Reaction of Magnesium with Hydrochloric Acid (Gas Laws) Chemicals Needed:

Reaction of Magnesium with Hydrochloric Acid (Gas Laws) Chemicals Needed: Reaction of Magnesium with Hydrochloric Acid (Gas Laws) Your Name: Date: Partner(s) Names: Objectives: React magnesium metal with hydrochloric acid, collecting the hydrogen over water. Calculate the grams

More information

HEAT OF FORMATION OF AMMONIUM NITRATE

HEAT OF FORMATION OF AMMONIUM NITRATE 303 HEAT OF FORMATION OF AMMONIUM NITRATE OBJECTIVES FOR THE EXPERIMENT The student will be able to do the following: 1. Calculate the change in enthalpy (heat of reaction) using the Law of Hess. 2. Find

More information

2. Room temperature: C. Kelvin. 2. Room temperature:

2. Room temperature: C. Kelvin. 2. Room temperature: Temperature I. Temperature is the quantity that tells how hot or cold something is compared with a standard A. Temperature is directly proportional to the average kinetic energy of molecular translational

More information

The volume of a penny will be calculated from its mass and density.

The volume of a penny will be calculated from its mass and density. Measurement and Density In science a key concern is the quantities involved in chemical processes. These amounts can be directly measured or calculated from other measurements. A measurement consists of

More information

Solids, Liquids, and Gases

Solids, Liquids, and Gases Solids, Liquids, and Gases nd Intended for Grade: 2 Grade Subject: Science Description: Activities to help students understand solids, liquids, gases, and the changes between these states. Objective: The

More information

Chapter 10: Temperature and Heat

Chapter 10: Temperature and Heat Chapter 10: Temperature and Heat 1. The temperature of a substance is A. proportional to the average kinetic energy of the molecules in a substance. B. equal to the kinetic energy of the fastest moving

More information

Name: Unit 2- Elements, Compounds and Mixtures and Physical/Chemical Properties and Changes. Elements, Compounds and Mixtures

Name: Unit 2- Elements, Compounds and Mixtures and Physical/Chemical Properties and Changes. Elements, Compounds and Mixtures Name: Unit 2- Elements, Compounds and Mixtures and Physical/Chemical Properties and Changes Day Page # Description IC/HW All 2 Warm-up IC 1 3 5 Matter Notes IC 1 6 Nuts & Bolts IC 1 7 Elements, Compounds

More information

Test Bank - Chapter 3 Multiple Choice

Test Bank - Chapter 3 Multiple Choice Test Bank - Chapter 3 The questions in the test bank cover the concepts from the lessons in Chapter 3. Select questions from any of the categories that match the content you covered with students. The

More information

Chapter 2 Measurements in Chemistry. Standard measuring device. Standard scale gram (g)

Chapter 2 Measurements in Chemistry. Standard measuring device. Standard scale gram (g) 1 Chapter 2 Measurements in Chemistry Standard measuring device Standard scale gram (g) 2 Reliability of Measurements Accuracy closeness to true value Precision reproducibility Example: 98.6 o F 98.5 o

More information

Mixtures and Pure Substances

Mixtures and Pure Substances Unit 2 Mixtures and Pure Substances Matter can be classified into two groups: mixtures and pure substances. Mixtures are the most common form of matter and consist of mixtures of pure substances. They

More information

DETERMINING THE DENSITY OF LIQUIDS & SOLIDS

DETERMINING THE DENSITY OF LIQUIDS & SOLIDS DETERMINING THE DENSITY OF LIQUIDS & SOLIDS 17 Density, like color, odor, melting point, and boiling point, is a physical property of matter. Therefore, density may be used in identifying matter. Density

More information

In this experiment, we will use three properties to identify a liquid substance: solubility, density and boiling point..

In this experiment, we will use three properties to identify a liquid substance: solubility, density and boiling point.. Identification of a Substance by Physical Properties 2009 by David A. Katz. All rights reserved. Permission for academic use provided the original copyright is included Every substance has a unique set

More information

The Empirical Formula of a Compound

The Empirical Formula of a Compound The Empirical Formula of a Compound Lab #5 Introduction A look at the mass relationships in chemistry reveals little order or sense. The ratio of the masses of the elements in a compound, while constant,

More information

UNIT (1) MEASUREMENTS IN CHEMISTRY

UNIT (1) MEASUREMENTS IN CHEMISTRY UNIT (1) MEASUREMENTS IN CHEMISTRY Measurements are part of our daily lives. We measure our weights, driving distances, and gallons of gasoline. As a health professional you might measure blood pressure,

More information

Hands-On Labs SM-1 Lab Manual

Hands-On Labs SM-1 Lab Manual EXPERIMENT 4: Separation of a Mixture of Solids Read the entire experiment and organize time, materials, and work space before beginning. Remember to review the safety sections and wear goggles when appropriate.

More information

Experiment 1: Colligative Properties

Experiment 1: Colligative Properties Experiment 1: Colligative Properties Determination of the Molar Mass of a Compound by Freezing Point Depression. Objective: The objective of this experiment is to determine the molar mass of an unknown

More information

Energy Content of Fuels

Energy Content of Fuels Experiment 9 Energy content is an important property of fuels. This property helps scientists and engineers determine the usefulness of a fuel. Energy content is the amount of heat produced by the burning

More information

Austin Peay State University Department of Chemistry CHEM 1111. Empirical Formula of a Compound

Austin Peay State University Department of Chemistry CHEM 1111. Empirical Formula of a Compound Cautions Magnesium ribbon is flammable. Nitric acid (HNO 3 ) is toxic, corrosive and contact with eyes or skin may cause severe burns. Ammonia gas (NH 3 ) is toxic and harmful. Hot ceramic crucibles and

More information

Teacher s Guide for No pots. No pans. No problem!

Teacher s Guide for No pots. No pans. No problem! Teacher s Guide for No pots. No pans. No problem! Overview This heat transfer activity highlights the Native Americans use of fire-heated stones to boil water. It provides students with an interesting

More information

Remember the best arguments are based on the strongest evidence and can explain why opposing arguments are incorrect.

Remember the best arguments are based on the strongest evidence and can explain why opposing arguments are incorrect. Magnesium and carbon dioxide Student sheet Burning magnesium in carbon dioxide what will happen? Either the magnesium will go out or it will continue to burn. Which will it be? You will use the evidence

More information

Density Lab. If you get stuck or are uncertain, please ask questions and/or refer to the hints at the end of the lab. Name: Section: Due Date:

Density Lab. If you get stuck or are uncertain, please ask questions and/or refer to the hints at the end of the lab. Name: Section: Due Date: Name: Section: Due Date: Lab 01B-1 If you get stuck or are uncertain, please ask questions and/or refer to the hints at the end of the lab. Density Lab Density is an important concept in oceanography,

More information

EXPERIMENT 13: GAS STOICHIOMETRY

EXPERIMENT 13: GAS STOICHIOMETRY EXPERIMENT 13: GAS STOICHIOMETRY PURPOSE To collect a gas produced in a reaction and compare the volume actually collected to a "target volume". To discover and compensate for assumptions made in the stoichiometric

More information

Mixing Warm and Cold Water

Mixing Warm and Cold Water Mixing Warm and Cold Water A Continuing Investigation of Thermal Pollution By Kevin White 1 Context: This lesson is intended for students conducting an ongoing study of thermal pollution. Perhaps, students

More information

Specific Heat (slope and steepness)

Specific Heat (slope and steepness) 1 Specific Heat (slope and steepness) 10 pages. According to the Physical Science text book, the Specific Heat of a material is DEFINED as the following: Specific heat is the amount of heat energy required

More information

Soldering. Resources and methods for learning about these subjects (list a few here, in preparation for your research):

Soldering. Resources and methods for learning about these subjects (list a few here, in preparation for your research): Soldering This worksheet and all related files are licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, version 1.0. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/1.0/,

More information

Determination of a Chemical Formula

Determination of a Chemical Formula 1 Determination of a Chemical Formula Introduction Molar Ratios Elements combine in fixed ratios to form compounds. For example, consider the compound TiCl 4 (titanium chloride). Each molecule of TiCl

More information

Using a Pendulum to Measure Gravity s Acceleration Elizabeth B. Chesick

Using a Pendulum to Measure Gravity s Acceleration Elizabeth B. Chesick SCIENCE EXPERIMENTS ON FILE Revised Edition 6.33-1 Using a Pendulum to Measure Gravity s Acceleration Elizabeth B. Chesick Topic Motion of a pendulum; gravity Time 1 2 hour! Safety Please click on the

More information

Lab: Observing Osmosis in Gummi Bears

Lab: Observing Osmosis in Gummi Bears Name Period Date Points Lab: Observing Osmosis in Gummi Bears Haribo macht Kinder froh und Erwachsene ebenso! 1 Laboratory: Observing Osmosis in Gummy Bears (28 points) Purpose: To investigate the movement

More information

Making Biodiesel from Virgin Vegetable Oil: Teacher Manual

Making Biodiesel from Virgin Vegetable Oil: Teacher Manual Making Biodiesel from Virgin Vegetable Oil: Teacher Manual Learning Goals: Students will understand how to produce biodiesel from virgin vegetable oil. Students will understand the effect of an exothermic

More information

Freezing Point Depression: Why Don t Oceans Freeze? Teacher Advanced Version

Freezing Point Depression: Why Don t Oceans Freeze? Teacher Advanced Version Freezing Point Depression: Why Don t Oceans Freeze? Teacher Advanced Version Freezing point depression describes the process where the temperature at which a liquid freezes is lowered by adding another

More information

EXPERIMENT 7 Electrochemical Cells: A Discovery Exercise 1. Introduction. Discussion

EXPERIMENT 7 Electrochemical Cells: A Discovery Exercise 1. Introduction. Discussion EXPERIMENT 7 Electrochemical Cells: A Discovery Exercise 1 Introduction This lab is designed for you to discover the properties of electrochemical cells. It requires little previous knowledge of electrochemical

More information

Chem 100 Lab Experiment #9 - ACID/BASE INDICATORS

Chem 100 Lab Experiment #9 - ACID/BASE INDICATORS Lab #9 Chem 100 Lab Experiment #9 - ACID/BASE INDICATORS Name: Purpose: In this laboratory we will investigate how indicators can be used to test for the presence of acids or bases in a number of common

More information

Experiment 12- Classification of Matter Experiment

Experiment 12- Classification of Matter Experiment Experiment 12- Classification of Matter Experiment Matter can be classified into two groups: mixtures and pure substances. Mixtures are the most common form of matter and consist of mixtures of pure substances.

More information

Pre-Lab Notebook Content: Your notebook should include the title, date, purpose, procedure; data tables.

Pre-Lab Notebook Content: Your notebook should include the title, date, purpose, procedure; data tables. Determination of Molar Mass by Freezing Point Depression M. Burkart & M. Kim Experimental Notes: Students work in pairs. Safety: Goggles and closed shoes must be worn. Dispose of all chemical in the plastic

More information

Sugar or Salt? Ionic and Covalent Bonds

Sugar or Salt? Ionic and Covalent Bonds Lab 11 Sugar or Salt? Ionic and Covalent Bonds TN Standard 2.1: The student will investigate chemical bonding. Have you ever accidentally used salt instead of sugar? D rinking tea that has been sweetened

More information

Laboratory Exercise: Smelting of Lead

Laboratory Exercise: Smelting of Lead CHEM 109 Introduction to Chemistry Revision 1.0 Laboratory Exercise: Smelting of Lead In this laboratory exercise we will carry out a pyrometallurgical conversion of Lead Oxide into elemental Lead. This

More information

Respiration and Photosynthesis

Respiration and Photosynthesis Respiration and Photosynthesis Topic Plants and animals carry out cellular respiration, but only plants conduct photosynthesis. Introduction Cellular respiration is the process in which a cell uses oxygen

More information

EXPERIMENT 15: Ideal Gas Law: Molecular Weight of a Vapor

EXPERIMENT 15: Ideal Gas Law: Molecular Weight of a Vapor EXPERIMENT 15: Ideal Gas Law: Molecular Weight of a Vapor Purpose: In this experiment you will use the ideal gas law to calculate the molecular weight of a volatile liquid compound by measuring the mass,

More information

experiment5 Understanding and applying the concept of limiting reagents. Learning how to perform a vacuum filtration.

experiment5 Understanding and applying the concept of limiting reagents. Learning how to perform a vacuum filtration. 81 experiment5 LECTURE AND LAB SKILLS EMPHASIZED Synthesizing an organic substance. Understanding and applying the concept of limiting reagents. Determining percent yield. Learning how to perform a vacuum

More information

UNIT 6a TEST REVIEW. 1. A weather instrument is shown below.

UNIT 6a TEST REVIEW. 1. A weather instrument is shown below. UNIT 6a TEST REVIEW 1. A weather instrument is shown below. Which weather variable is measured by this instrument? 1) wind speed 3) cloud cover 2) precipitation 4) air pressure 2. Which weather station

More information

SUPPLEMENTARY MATERIAL

SUPPLEMENTARY MATERIAL SUPPLEMENTARY MATERIAL (Student Instructions) Determination of the Formula of a Hydrate A Greener Approach Objectives To experimentally determine the formula of a hydrate salt. To learn to think in terms

More information

Determination of the Empirical Formula of Magnesium Oxide

Determination of the Empirical Formula of Magnesium Oxide Determination of the Empirical Formula of Magnesium Oxide GOAL AND OVERVIEW The quantitative stoichiometric relationships governing mass and amount will be studied using the combustion reaction of magnesium

More information

Percentage of Water in Popcorn

Percentage of Water in Popcorn Skills Practice DATASHEET FOR IN-TEXT LAB Percentage of Water in Popcorn Popcorn pops because of the natural moisture inside each kernel. When the internal water is heated above 100 C, the liquid water

More information

CSUS Department of Chemistry Experiment 8 Chem.1A

CSUS Department of Chemistry Experiment 8 Chem.1A EXPERIMENT #8 Name: PRE-LABORATORY ASSIGNMENT: Lab Section 1. The alkali metals are so reactive that they react directly with water in the absence of acid. For example, potassium reacts with water as follows:

More information

Determination of the Percentage Oxygen in Air

Determination of the Percentage Oxygen in Air CHEM 121L General Chemistry Laboratory Revision 1.1 Determination of the Percentage Oxygen in Air In this laboratory exercise we will determine the percentage by volume of Oxygen in Air. We will do this

More information

Determining Equivalent Weight by Copper Electrolysis

Determining Equivalent Weight by Copper Electrolysis Purpose The purpose of this experiment is to determine the equivalent mass of copper based on change in the mass of a copper electrode and the volume of hydrogen gas generated during an electrolysis reaction.

More information

PREPARATION AND PROPERTIES OF A SOAP

PREPARATION AND PROPERTIES OF A SOAP (adapted from Blackburn et al., Laboratory Manual to Accompany World of Chemistry, 2 nd ed., (1996) Saunders College Publishing: Fort Worth) Purpose: To prepare a sample of soap and to examine its properties.

More information

SORTING PLASTICS FOR RECYCLING INTRODUCTION

SORTING PLASTICS FOR RECYCLING INTRODUCTION SORTING PLASTICS FOR RECYCLING INTRODUCTION Description Students use the difference in densities of polymers and flame tests as a basis for the development of a scheme to separate plastics. Goals for This

More information

Chapter 4: Transfer of Thermal Energy

Chapter 4: Transfer of Thermal Energy Chapter 4: Transfer of Thermal Energy Goals of Period 4 Section 4.1: To define temperature and thermal energy Section 4.2: To discuss three methods of thermal energy transfer. Section 4.3: To describe

More information

Mission 7: Saving Energy

Mission 7: Saving Energy Mission 7: Saving Energy How can we save energy? Converting one type of energy to another often damages the environment. For example, burning coal to make electricity causes air pollution. That s why we

More information

Chapter 4 Practice Quiz

Chapter 4 Practice Quiz Chapter 4 Practice Quiz 1. Label each box with the appropriate state of matter. A) I: Gas II: Liquid III: Solid B) I: Liquid II: Solid III: Gas C) I: Solid II: Liquid III: Gas D) I: Gas II: Solid III:

More information

Partner: Jack 17 November 2011. Determination of the Molar Mass of Volatile Liquids

Partner: Jack 17 November 2011. Determination of the Molar Mass of Volatile Liquids Partner: Jack 17 November 2011 Determination of the Molar Mass of Volatile Liquids Purpose: The purpose of this experiment is to determine the molar mass of three volatile liquids. The liquid is vaporized

More information

Experiment 1: Measurement and Density

Experiment 1: Measurement and Density Experiment 1: Measurement and Density Chemistry 140 Learning Objectives Become familiar with laboratory equipment and glassware Begin to see the link between measurement and chemical knowledge Begin to

More information

Heat and Temperature: Teacher s Guide

Heat and Temperature: Teacher s Guide Heat and Temperature: Teacher s Guide Grade Level: 6-8 Curriculum Focus: Physical Science Lesson Duration: Two class periods Program Description Humans have always been feverish about temperature. But

More information

DETERMINING THE ENTHALPY OF FORMATION OF CaCO 3

DETERMINING THE ENTHALPY OF FORMATION OF CaCO 3 DETERMINING THE ENTHALPY OF FORMATION OF CaCO 3 Standard Enthalpy Change Standard Enthalpy Change for a reaction, symbolized as H 0 298, is defined as The enthalpy change when the molar quantities of reactants

More information

What Is Heat? What Is Heat?

What Is Heat? What Is Heat? What Is Heat? Paul shivered inside the wood cabin. It was cold outside, and inside the cabin it wasn t much warmer. Paul could hear the rain beating down on the roof. Every few minutes there would be a

More information

Conservation of Momentum Greg Kifer

Conservation of Momentum Greg Kifer SCIENCE EXPERIMENTS ON FILE Revised Edition 6.7-1 Conservation of Momentum Greg Kifer Topic Conservation of momentum Time 1 hour! Safety Please click on the safety icon to view the safety precautions.

More information

POPCORN 2005, 2004, 1997 by David A. Katz. All rights reserved. Reproduction permitted for education use provided original copyright is included.

POPCORN 2005, 2004, 1997 by David A. Katz. All rights reserved. Reproduction permitted for education use provided original copyright is included. POPCORN 2005, 2004, 1997 by David A. Katz. All rights reserved. Reproduction permitted for education use provided original copyright is included. According to The Popcorn Board, Americans today consume

More information

Physics 181- Summer 2011 - Experiment #8 1 Experiment #8, Measurement of Density and Archimedes' Principle

Physics 181- Summer 2011 - Experiment #8 1 Experiment #8, Measurement of Density and Archimedes' Principle Physics 181- Summer 2011 - Experiment #8 1 Experiment #8, Measurement of Density and Archimedes' Principle 1 Purpose 1. To determine the density of a fluid, such as water, by measurement of its mass when

More information

Paper Chromatography: Separation and Identification of Five Metal Cations

Paper Chromatography: Separation and Identification of Five Metal Cations Paper Chromatography: Separation and Identification of Five Metal Cations Objectives Known and unknown solutions of the metal ions Ag +, Fe 3+, Co 2+, Cu 2+ and Hg 2+ will be analyzed using paper chromatography.

More information

Electrochemical Half Cells and Reactions

Electrochemical Half Cells and Reactions Suggested reading: Chang text pages 81 89 Cautions Heavy metals, such as lead, and solutions of heavy metals may be toxic and an irritant. Purpose To determine the cell potential (E cell ) for various

More information

(Walter Glogowski, Chaz Shapiro & Reid Sherman) INTRODUCTION

(Walter Glogowski, Chaz Shapiro & Reid Sherman) INTRODUCTION Convection (Walter Glogowski, Chaz Shapiro & Reid Sherman) INTRODUCTION You know from common experience that when there's a difference in temperature between two places close to each other, the temperatures

More information

Molar Mass of Butane

Molar Mass of Butane Cautions Butane is toxic and flammable. No OPEN Flames should be used in this experiment. Purpose The purpose of this experiment is to determine the molar mass of butane using Dalton s Law of Partial Pressures

More information

Parallel Circuits Charles Lang

Parallel Circuits Charles Lang SCIENCE EXPERIMENTS ON FILE Revised Edition 6.20-1 Parallel Circuits Charles Lang Topic Parallel circuits Time 1 1 2 hours! Safety Adult supervision is required. Please click on the safety icon to view

More information

PENNY IN A CUP: DEMONSTRATING THE LAW OF INERTIA

PENNY IN A CUP: DEMONSTRATING THE LAW OF INERTIA PENNY IN A CUP: DEMONSTRATING THE LAW OF INERTIA Introduction Newton s (Sir Isaac Newton, English physicist, 1642 1727) First Law of Motion states that: An object at rest tends to stay at rest, and an

More information

Sample Questions Chapter 2. Stoker

Sample Questions Chapter 2. Stoker Sample Questions Chapter 2. Stoker 1. The mathematical meaning associated with the metric system prefixes centi, milli, and micro is, respectively, A) 2, 4, and 6. B) 2, 3, and 6. C) 3, 6, and 9. D) 3,

More information

Catalase. ***You will be working with hot water, acids and bases in this laboratory*** ****Use Extreme Caution!!!****

Catalase. ***You will be working with hot water, acids and bases in this laboratory*** ****Use Extreme Caution!!!**** AP BIOLOGY BIOCHEMISTRY ACTIVITY #9 NAME DATE HOUR CATALASE LAB INTRODUCTION Hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) is a poisonous byproduct of metabolism that can damage cells if it is not removed. Catalase is

More information

EXPERIMENT 7 Reaction Stoichiometry and Percent Yield

EXPERIMENT 7 Reaction Stoichiometry and Percent Yield EXPERIMENT 7 Reaction Stoichiometry and Percent Yield INTRODUCTION Stoichiometry calculations are about calculating the amounts of substances that react and form in a chemical reaction. The word stoichiometry

More information

Dry Ice Color Show Dry Ice Demonstrations

Dry Ice Color Show Dry Ice Demonstrations elearning 2009 Introduction Dry Ice Color Show Dry Ice Demonstrations Publication No. 95016 Add a small piece of solid carbon dioxide to a colored indicator solution and watch as the solution immediately

More information

Order of the Weather Experiments

Order of the Weather Experiments Order of the Weather Experiments 1. Staying Dry Towel in bottle--student i. Magic Air Pushing the stick down-- Student ii. Air Power Water in funnel--teacher 2. Tipping the Scale Weighing air--student

More information

Heat Energy FORMS OF ENERGY LESSON PLAN 2.7. Public School System Teaching Standards Covered

Heat Energy FORMS OF ENERGY LESSON PLAN 2.7. Public School System Teaching Standards Covered FORMS OF ENERGY LESSON PLAN 2.7 Heat Energy This lesson is designed for 3rd 5th grade students in a variety of school settings (public, private, STEM schools, and home schools) in the seven states served

More information

Heat of Solution. Purpose To calculate the heat of solution for sodium hydroxide (NaOH) and ammonium nitrate (NH 4 NO 3 )

Heat of Solution. Purpose To calculate the heat of solution for sodium hydroxide (NaOH) and ammonium nitrate (NH 4 NO 3 ) Heat of Solution Purpose To calculate the heat of solution for sodium hydroxide (NaOH) and ammonium nitrate (NH 4 NO 3 ) Background For a given solute, the heat of solution is the change in enerrgy that

More information

San josé OWNER S MANUAL

San josé OWNER S MANUAL San josé OWNER S MANUAL Assembling & operating manual San josé 30 mbar - PORTABLE GAS BARBECUE 1. 2. 3. Improper installation, adjustment, alteration, service or maintenance can injury or property damage.

More information

Partnerships Implementing Engineering Education Worcester Polytechnic Institute Worcester Public Schools Supported by: National Science Foundation

Partnerships Implementing Engineering Education Worcester Polytechnic Institute Worcester Public Schools Supported by: National Science Foundation Temperature: 6.D.3 Temperature and Heat Transfer Grade Level 6 Sessions Seasonality Instructional Mode(s) Team Size WPS Benchmarks MA Frameworks Key Words 1 Approximately 1.5 hours (10 minutes for cleanup)

More information

THE ACTIVITY OF LACTASE

THE ACTIVITY OF LACTASE THE ACTIVITY OF LACTASE Lab VIS-8 From Juniata College Science in Motion Enzymes are protein molecules which act to catalyze the chemical reactions in living things. These chemical reactions make up the

More information

Taking Apart the Pieces

Taking Apart the Pieces Lab 4 Taking Apart the Pieces How does starting your morning out right relate to relief from a headache? I t is a lazy Saturday morning and you ve just awakened to your favorite cereal Morning Trails and

More information

Experiment 8 Preparation of Cyclohexanone by Hypochlorite Oxidation

Experiment 8 Preparation of Cyclohexanone by Hypochlorite Oxidation Experiment 8 Preparation of Cyclohexanone by ypochlorite xidation In this experiment we will prepare cyclohexanone from cyclohexanol using hypochlorite oxidation. We will use common household bleach that

More information