Chapter 4 Practice Quiz

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1 Chapter 4 Practice Quiz 1. Label each box with the appropriate state of matter. A) I: Gas II: Liquid III: Solid B) I: Liquid II: Solid III: Gas C) I: Solid II: Liquid III: Gas D) I: Gas II: Solid III: Liquid E) I: Solid II: Gas III: Liquid Use the following to answer questions 2-3. Below are six descriptions of the kinetic and potential energy of objects. I. Water moving a waterwheel II. The chemical bonds in the water of a running river III. The dispersion forces between two nonpolar molecules IV. The blades of a fan turning V. Hot water molecules moving rapidly in a cup of tea VI. A parachutist ready to jump out of a plane Page 1

2 2. Which of the above is a description of kinetic energy? A) I only B) I and IV C) II, III, and V D) I, IV, and V E) I, II, IV, and V 3. Which of the above is a description of potential energy? A) VI only B) II, III, IV, and VI C) I, IV, and V D) II, III, and V E) II, III, and VI 4. When measuring the temperature of gases, Kelvin is often used because it is a function of the kinetic energy of a gas. If a gas is 121 C, what is its temperature in Kelvin? A) 322 K B) 152 K C) 242 K D) 394 K E) 250 K 5. Which statement best describes how heat energy is involved in changing water into steam? A) Heat energy breaks the intermolecular forces holding molecules of water together. B) Heat energy is released from intermolecular forces as the molecules of water break apart. C) Heat energy breaks the covalent bonds holding molecules of water together. D) Heat energy is released from covalent bonds as the molecules of water break apart. E) Heat energy is not involved in this change. 6. Which process requires more energy per gram: melting ice or boiling water? A) They both require the same amount of energy because both processes involve breaking intermolecular forces. B) Melting ice takes more energy because more intermolecular forces are broken. C) Boiling water takes more energy because more intermolecular forces are broken. D) Melting ice takes more energy because it occurs at 0 C instead of 100 C. E) The energy of these processes has never been compared. Page 2

3 Use the following to answer questions 7-9. Refer to the following heating curve to answer the question(s) below. 7. A liquid has temperature A as shown on the heating curve. What will happen to the temperature of the liquid if heat is added to it? A) The temperature will stay the same. B) The temperature will decrease. C) The temperature will increase and then decrease. D) The temperature will increase. E) It is not possible to determine what will happen to the temperature of the liquid by looking at the chart. 8. What change of phase is represented by B? A) boiling B) freezing C) sublimating D) melting E) It is not possible to determine what will happen to the temperature of the liquid by looking at the chart. Page 3

4 9. When heat energy is added to a solid and liquid mix at the melting point, the temperature does not increase, as illustrated by horizontal line C. Which of the statements below best describes what happens to the heat energy added to the solid and liquid? A) It increases the kinetic energy of the molecules. B) It decreases the kinetic energy of the molecules. C) It breaks the intermolecular forces between the molecules. D) It makes new intermolecular forces between molecules. E) It just passes through the solid and liquid, which is why the temperature does not increase. Use the following to answer question 10. Refer to the following illustration of two beakers to answer the question(s) below. 10. The two beakers above each have added to them the same amount of heat energy. Which statement best describes what would happen to the temperatures of the two beakers? A) The temperature of the two beakers will remain the same. B) The temperatures of the two beakers will increase by the same amount. C) The temperature of Beaker 1 will increase more than that of Beaker 2. D) The temperature of Beaker 2 will increase more than that of Beaker 1. E) It is not possible to predict how the temperature of the beakers will change. Page 4

5 11. You have a 25-g sample of a metal and you would like to identify it. You are certain that the metal is either copper (specific heat = cal/g C), lead (specific heat = cal/ g C) or aluminum (specific heat = 0.22 cal/g C). You run an experiment in which you find that the metal absorbs 6.2 calories of heat when it increases in temperature from 25 C to 33 C. Which metal is it? A) copper B) lead C) iron D) a mixture of copper and lead E) It's not any of these metals. 12. Which of the following statements best describes pressure? A) Pressure is heat energy applied to a given volume. B) Pressure is heat energy applied to a given area. C) Pressure is force applied to a given volume. D) Pressure is force applied to a given area. E) Pressure is heat energy or force applied to a substance. 13. Atmospheric pressure at sea level is. At elevations higher than sea level, atmospheric pressure is. A) less than 1 atm; 1 atm B) 1 atm; less than 1 atm C) greater than 1 atm; 1 atm D) 1 atm; greater than 1 atm E) 1 atm; impossible to predict 14. The atmospheric pressure in Denver is 0.85 atm. What is the atmospheric pressure in torr? A) torr B) 890 torr C) 650 torr D) 12 torr E) torr 15. Which of the following statements best describes vapor pressure? A) Vapor pressure is the pressure of a gas at room temperature. B) Vapor pressure is the pressure of a liquid at room temperature. C) Vapor pressure is a measure of the strength of a substance's odor. D) Vapor pressure is a measure of a material's boiling point. E) Vapor pressure is the pressure of the vapor above a liquid or solid. Page 5

6 16. A scuba diver dives down to 15 m, where the pressure is 2.5 atm. The scuba diver then inhales 500. ml of air and holds his breath while ascending to the water surface where the pressure is 1 atm. What is the volume of the air in the diver's lungs at the surface? A) ml B) 0.20 ml C) 5.0 ml D) 200 ml E) 1250 ml 17. A sample of gaseous neon has a volume of 68.2 L at STP. How many moles of neon are in the sample? A) moles B) 3.04 moles C) 68.2 moles D) 1530 moles E) moles Use the following to answer question 18. The temperature of a gas at 1.00 atm and 8.00 C is increased to 20.0 C, resulting in a change of pressure. 18. Using the proper equation, the new calculated pressure is: A) atm B) atm C) 1.00 atm D) 1.04 atm E) 2.50 atm 19. Air is primarily composed of nitrogen (594 torr) and oxygen (160 torr). There is also carbon dioxide and water vapor in the air. Assuming that atmospheric pressure is 760 torr, what is the partial pressure of carbon dioxide and water vapor combined? A) 1514 torr B) 754 torr C) 500 torr D) 166 torr E) 6 torr Page 6

7 20. 1 mol of gas is taken from STP to 500 K and 15 atm. What is the volume of the gas? A) L B) 2.74 L C) 15.7 L D) There is not enough information Page 7

8 Answer Key - Chapter 4 Practice Quiz 1. E 2. D 3. E 4. D 5. A 6. C 7. D 8. A 9. C 10. C 11. B 12. D 13. B 14. C 15. E 16. E 17. B 18. D 19. E 20. B Page 8

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