LATITUDE AND LONGITUDE DRAWING THE EARTH GRID

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1 LATITUDE AND LONGITUDE A system of lines is used to find the location of any place on the surface of the Earth. Commonly called a grid system, it is made up of two sets of lines that cross each other. One set lines of latitude runs in an east-west direction. The other set lines of longitude runs in a north-south direction. Although these are only imaginary lines encircling the Earth, they can be drawn on globes and maps as if they actually existed. DRAWING THE EARTH GRID To draw the lines of the grid system on a globe or map, it is necessary to have starting points, or points of reference. There are two such points of reference on the Earth. These are the North Pole and the South Pole. The poles are the points at which the Earth's axis meets the Earth's surface. Halfway between the poles is an east-west line called the equator. It encircles the Earth and divides it into two equal parts, or hemispheres. The North Pole is in the hemisphere north of the equator the Northern Hemisphere. The South Pole is in the hemisphere south of the equator the Southern Hemisphere. One set of lines in the Earth's grid system is drawn around the globe parallel to the equator. These are east-west lines, or lines of latitude. In the basic grid there are 89 such equally spaced lines to the north of the equator, 89 to the south. Where the 90th east-west lines would be are two points the North and South poles. Each east-west line is a circle. The farther it is from the equator the shorter its length. The 60th east-west line, for example, is only half as long as the equator. East-west lines are numbered from 0 at the equator the east-west base line to 89 near the poles. The east-west lines between the equator and the North Pole are north of the equator; those between the equator and the South Pole, south of the equator. The city of New Orleans, La., is located on the 30th east-west line north of the equator. But many other places in the world are also situated on this line. That is why a second set of lines is needed to locate the exact position of New

2 Orleans or of any other place. The second set of lines in the Earth's grid system is drawn from pole to pole. These are north-south lines, or lines of longitude. One north-south line has been chosen by international agreement as the zero, or base line. It passes through Greenwich, England, a borough of London. In the basic grid there are 180 such equally spaced lines to the east of the Greenwich base line, 180 to the west. Unlike east-west lines, all north-south lines have the same length. North-south lines are numbered from 0 at the north-south base line both east and west to the 180th north-south line. The zero line and the 180th line together form a complete circle that like the equator, cuts the Earth into two hemispheres. The half west of the zero line can be called the Western Hemisphere; the half east of the zero line, the Eastern Hemisphere. The north-south lines and the east-west lines together form the global grid system used to find the exact location of any place on Earth. New Orleans, on the 30th east-west line north of the equator, is also on the 90th north-south line west of the north-south base line. Many places in the world among them, Memphis, Tenn.; East St. Louis, Ill.; and the Galapagos Islands of Ecuador are on or near the same north-south line as New Orleans. Many other places for example, Port Arthur, Tex.; St. Augustine, Fla.; and Cairo, Egypt are on or near the same east-west line as New Orleans. But only New Orleans is situated on both lines exactly where they cross each other. Likewise, each place in the world and only that place is situated at the intersection of a given east-west line and a given north-south line. PARALLELS AND MERIDIANS All east-west lines are equidistant from each other. This means that they are all parallel to the equator and to each other. Every point on a given east-west line, therefore, is the same distance from the equator, the same distance from the North Pole, and the same distance from the South Pole. For this reason east-west lines, or lines of latitude, are commonly referred to as parallels of latitude, or simply parallels. The north-south lines, or lines of longitude, also have another name. They are commonly referred to as meridians of longitude, or simply meridians. The zero meridian, or base line for numbering the north-south lines, is called the prime meridian. Each meridian goes only halfway around the Earth from pole to pole. Each has a twin on

3 the other side of the Earth. Like the prime meridian and the 180th meridian, all such pairs of meridians form circles that cut the Earth into hemispheres. These circles are known as great circles. Only one parallel, the equator, is a great circle. MEASUREMENTS OF ANGULAR DISTANCE A cutaway drawing of the Earth demonstrates how latitude is determined. It makes clear that latitude is a measure of the angle between the plane of the equator and lines projected from the center of the Earth. For example, the angle between a line drawn from New Orleans on the 30th line of latitude to the center of the Earth and a line drawn on the plane of the equator is 30 degrees (30 ). In each hemisphere the 30th line of latitude connects all points whose projections to the center of the Earth form a 30 angle with the plane of the equator. The latitude of the equator is zero degrees (0 ). Lines of latitude north and south of the equator are numbered to 90 because the angular distance from the equator to each pole is one fourth of a circle, or one fourth of 360. There is no latitude higher than 90. The North Pole is situated at 90 north latitude, or simply 90 N. The South Pole is at 90 south latitude, or 90 S. The cutaway drawing of the Earth also shows how longitude is determined. Longitude is seen to be a measure of the angle between the planes of two meridian circles, one of which is the prime meridian. For example, the plane of the 90th line of longitude, on which New Orleans is located, forms a 90 angle with the plane of the prime meridian. All places on the 90th line of longitude west of the prime meridian, therefore, are at 90 west longitude. The prime meridian is designated zero degrees (0 ) longitude. Lines of longitude are numbered east of the prime meridian from 0 to 180 east longitude and west from 0 to 180 west longitude. There is no longitude higher than 180, and the 180th meridian east and the 180th meridian west are identical. Degrees of latitude and longitude can be divided into sixtieths, or minutes ('). Any location on Earth can be described as lying at a certain number of degrees and minutes of latitude either north or south of the equator and at a certain number of degrees and minutes of longitude either east or west of the prime meridian. For example, the United States Capitol in Washington, D.C., is at 38 degrees 53 minutes north latitude (38 53' N.) and 77 degrees 0 minutes west longitude (077 00' W.). Minutes of latitude and longitude can be divided into sixtieths, or seconds ("), when more precise information on the location of a place is needed, for example, by navigators, surveyors, pilots, or map makers. A degree of latitude can easily be changed into miles. Since the circumference of the Earth is roughly 25,000 miles, the length of each degree of latitude is about 69 miles

4 (1/360 of 25,000 miles). Degrees of latitude vary a little in length the variation between the shortest and the longest is less than a mile because the Earth is not a perfect sphere but is flattened slightly toward the poles and bulges slightly around the equator. The length of a degree of longitude, however, varies from about 69 miles at the equator to zero at the poles, where the meridians come together. FINDING LATITUDE AND LONGITUDE The navigator of a ship or an airplane can determine the latitude of his position by using an instrument called a sextant. With it he measures the altitude (angle above the horizon) of the sun as the sun transits, or crosses, his meridian (longitude). He then calculates his latitude by combining the observed altitude with information from an almanac a book of data about the movement of the sun and stars. In the evening, latitude may similarly be found by observing stars. Longitude is more difficult to determine than latitude because the sextant and the almanac together do not yield enough information. To calculate his longitude, a navigator must also know the exact time at which he is making his observations. The time is needed because the sun and stars, as they appear to move across the sky, look the same at all places in a given latitude at some time during each day. The invention of clocks during the Renaissance was the first step toward the reliable calculation of longitude. The clocks of that era, however, were too inaccurate for use in navigation. In 1714 the British Board of Longitude offered a large cash prize to anyone who could build a clock that would meet certain standards of accuracy throughout long ocean voyages. By 1735 John Harrison, a British clockmaker, had submitted the first of several clocks, the last of which won the prize for him. They were called chronometers. In 1766 Pierre Le Roy, a Frenchman, built a chronometer more accurate than Harrison's. From that time on, sailors have been able to determine longitude accurately by comparing local time with Greenwich mean time (GMT). Shipboard chronometers are set to show GMT. Because of the speed and direction of the Earth's rotation, local time at a given place will be one hour behind GMT for every 15 degrees west of the prime meridian and one hour ahead of GMT for every 15 degrees east of the prime meridian. For example, if a ship's chronometer reads 0300 (3:00 AM) and the ship's local time is 0800 (8:00 AM), the ship is 75 degrees east of Greenwich, or at 75 E. Special radio time signals allow navigators to check the accuracy of their chronometers. HOW THE PRIME MERIDIAN WAS SELECTED Before a prime meridian was agreed upon, map makers usually began numbering the lines of longitude on their maps at whichever meridian passed through the site of their

5 national observatory. In the United States, for example, this was the Naval Observatory at Washington, D.C.; in France, the Paris Observatory; and in Great Britain, the Royal Greenwich Observatory, at Greenwich. Since Britain was a world leader in exploration and map making, navigators of other nations often used British maps. As a result, in 1884 the meridian of Greenwich was adoped throughout most of the world as the prime meridian. In the 1950s the royal Greenwich Observatory was moved about 60 miles southeast of Greenwich. The Greenwich meridian, however, remained the prime meridian. There was still another reason for the selection of the Greenwich meridian as 0 longitude. Travelers must change time by an entire day when they cross the 180th meridian. If this meridian crossed a large country, timekeeping and the establishment of calendar dates would be difficult. But with the Greenwich meridian set at zero, the 180th meridian is near the middle of the Pacific Ocean. It crosses only a small land area in northeastern Asia and divides some island groups in the Pacific. To avoid differing dates in those areas, the nations of the world established a special line across which dates change. It swerves from the 180th meridian whenever convenient. This line is called the International Date Line. SPECIAL LINES OF LATITUDE AND LONGITUDE Several lines of latitude have special significance. One of these is the equator. Two other special lines of latitude are the 30th parallels. The area between them, straddling the equator, is commonly referred to as the low latitudes. The low latitudes are generally warm lands. The two 60th parallels are also special lines of latitude. The areas north and south of the 60th parallels, which center on the North and South poles, are commonly referred to as the high latitudes. The high latitudes are generally cold lands. The areas between the 30th and 60th parallels in both hemispheres are commonly referred to as the middle latitudes. Generally, middle-latitude lands have four seasons fall, winter, spring, and summer. The latitude of a place, accordingly, is a clue of its climate. The yearly average of insolation, or heat energy received from the sun, depends in large measure on the angle or slant of the sun's rays. This angle varies with distance from the equator (latitude). Regions in high latitudes, both north and south, get less insolation and are therefore usually colder than regions in low latitudes. Four other special lines of latitude are the Tropic of Cancer (23 30'' N.), the Tropic of Capricorn (23 30'' S.), the Arctic Circle (66 30'' N.), and the Antarctic Circle (66 30'' S.). These lines relate to the tilt of the Earth's axis as the Earth revolves around the sun. The

6 Tropics of Cancer and Capricorn mark the limits of the zone astride the equator in which the sun appears directly overhead at some time during the year. The Arctic and Antarctic circles mark the limits of the areas around each pole in which the sun at some time during the year does not rise or set for a period of 24 hours or more. The only special line of longitude is the prime meridian. Time zone boundaries and the international date line are based on certain lines of longitude but do not follow them exactly.

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