Which month has larger and smaller day time?

Save this PDF as:
 WORD  PNG  TXT  JPG

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "Which month has larger and smaller day time?"

Transcription

1 ACTIVITY-1 Which month has larger and smaller day time? Problem: Which month has larger and smaller day time? Aim: Finding out which month has larger and smaller duration of day in the Year Format for Observation Table Tools: Wall calendar mentioning sunrise and sunset time. Procedure: To do the experiment fallow the below procedure. 1. Get the calendar which shows sunrise and sunset time for each day of the year. 2. Fill the observation table with the time of Sunrise and Sunset. Theory: There are countable reasons for larger and smaller duration of the day and night. Some of them are: (i) Earth rotate on its axis (ii) Earth s axis of rotation is not exactly vertical (iii) Earth is spherical in shape and hence observers position on the globe is not same for all etc. All these reasons give rise to the difference in length of the day and night.

2 ACTIVITY-2 Path of the Sun in the Sky Aim: Tracing out path of the Sun in the Sky. Tools: Comparatively dark room, Calendar and Watch. Procedure: To do the experiment follows the procedure below. 1. Find the room having window/door facing the sun. 2. Make the room darker by closing the doors and windows but keep a small portion of the window open through which sunlight can come. (Better through a small hole). 3. If your window is glass window then get a black paper of the size of window and make a small hole through which sunlight can come. Now paste this dark paper on the window. 4. Allow sunlight to come through the hole in the form of beam that can fall on the floor. 5. Set the time in the watch (this will remain same for all observation dates in future days, preferable time could be 1200 hrs). 6. Mark the beam position on the floor as shown in figure 1. Now repeat the procedure for all the observation dates. Theory: If you observe the sun in the sky quite frequently then you will observe that the sun s position is not same everyday. It goes on changing. Of course it is true that the sun is not moving but it is the Earth! In reality what we observe is the sun s changing position throughout the year. Observation Table Result : Draw the figure of traced marking available on the floor. Now connects all the points with free hand (smooth curve).

3 ACTIVITY-3 What are Dakshinayan and Uttarayan? Aim: Understanding the Dakshinayan (Sun s declination to South) and Uttarayan (Sun s declination to North). Tools: 1 meter stick, Calendar and Watch. Procedure: To do the experiment follows the procedure below. 1. Locate the plane surface from where you can see the Sun without any obstacle. 2. With the help of magnetic compass mark the South- North line on the ground and furthermore East- West line; crossing each other in an exact proportion. This will make 4 quadrants as shown in figure below. 3. Fix meter stick exactly at the intersection of these lines i.e. at the origin (point O). Be sure that the stick is Direction at observation location & exactly perpendicular to the plane surface. You can use Shadow length plumb line to see the exact verticalness of the stick. 4. Fix the day time observation which is to be constant for all the year. 5. Shadow of the stick will fall in any one of the quadrants made earlier. 6. Mark the tip of the shadow as a point in the quadrant. 7. Mark such points for four dates in the year. For more details look at the observation table. Theory Ayan means movement. Dakshinaya and Uttarayan indicate the Sun s movement to South and North respectively. The correct definition is the sun s declination to North or South. Since the earth s axis is tilted by 23 ½ degree, the sun appears more to the north for 6 months and to the south for rest of the 6 months in a year. This is the reason that we experience winter in the northern hemisphere and summer in the southern hemisphere at the same time e.g. Australia is cold and India is hot at same time. Sun reaches its maximum to the south (South declination) on 21 December and to the north (North declination) on 21 June. These are called Winter and Summer Solstices respectively. These dates may vary with ±1 or ±2 days. Observation Table Time of Observation: 8:00 AM (You can fix up any day time!) Result : Draw the figure similar to what you observed at your observation location.

4 ACTIVITY-4 Phases Of The Moon Aim: Understanding the phases of the Moon Tools: Notebook, pencil, eraser etc Procedure: To do the experiment follows the procedure as given below :- 1. Select the Full moon day from your calendar. 2. Start observing moon s phase in the night sky. 3. Draw the phase of the moon in observation table as you see in the night sky. 4. Go on repeating the drawing as mentioned in the observation table. 5. Complete the observation table. Theory: Moon is the natural satellite of Earth. And hence, moon revolves around the Earth. As shown in the diagram below, the new moon occurs when the moon is positioned between the earth and sun. The three objects are in approximate alignment. The entire illuminated portion of the moon is on the back side of the moon, the half that we cannot see. At a full moon, the earth, moon, and sun are in approximate alignment, just as the new moon, but the moon is on the opposite side of the earth, so the entire sunlight part of the moon is facing us. The shadowed portion is entirely hidden from view. The first quarter and third quarter moons (both often called a half moon ), happen when the moon is at a 90 degree angle with respect to the earth and sun. So we are seeing exactly half of the moon illuminated and half in shadow. Once you understand those four key moon phases, in between should be fairly easy to visualize, as the illuminated portion gradually transit between them. Observation Table Result: 1. After. days we saw the Full moon again. 2. On 15/16th day after Full Moon we saw.. Moon. (Full/Half/New) 3. The night when you could not see the Moon is called

5 ACTIVITY-5 Distance of The Sun in Terms of Light Minutes Aim: Determining the distance of the Sun in light minutes. Tool: Pen and notebook. Theory: If somebody asks you how far is your school from your home? Then, probably you will give the answer like 1 km, 5 km or could be of 10 km or so. If you have been to other city (may be at your relatives) and somebody asks you how far is the city/ town from your place? Then, the answer could be of the order of 2 km to of 3000 km! (if you both are within the India). By chance, if you met a friend from abroad and asked how far is your city from here? Then, probably he may not give the answer in kilometers but he may say that it takes about 8 hrs by plane! For a second you may be stuck a bit! But if you know the average speed of the plane then probably you may calculate the rough estimate of the distance. In astronomy, the objects like sun, stars, galaxies etc can not be figured out in such simpler way! This is obvious, because all such objects are beyond finger countable limits. And hence it is required to use other units for measuring the distances. The basic unit in astronomy is light year. In this activity we will find the distance of Sun in light minutes. The one light year (ly) is a distance that light can travel in one year. Now question comes what is speed of light? The speed of light is 3, 00,000 KM/Sec i.e. 3 lacks kilometer per second. So let us calculate the one light year distance: 1 year will have how many seconds? => 60X60X24X365 = 3,15,36,000 seconds and hence; 1 ly =3,00,000 X 3,15,36,000= ~95,00,00,00,00,000 KM or we can write as 1 ly =9.5 X KM This implies that if the object is at 1 ly distance then it is at 9.5 X KM away from us! Vis-à-vis, if the object is at 9,500,000,000,000 KM away from us then light will take one year to reach us! Calculation: Now calculate the distance of sun in Light minutesdata given:- *The sun is at 14,95,97,900 KM *One ly is 9.5X KM * Light travels 3,00,000 KM in a second Calculate answer.

6 ACTIVITY-6 Composition of different colors in the Sunlight Objective: Understanding how many colors sunlight have. Material required: prism, pen and notebook. Procedure: 1. Arrange comparatively darker room. 2. Allow very small sunlight to pass in the room; may be through hole. 3. Put the prism across the sunlight. 4. Now look at the darker region of room. 5. You will see the different colors of sunlight. 6. Note down the colors that you have seen. Explanation: The observed sun light always look yellowish in color that is because sun emits maximum light in yellow wavelength/ frequency such light is called as white light. But actually white light is not a single wave length/ frequency in nature, it is a combination of all seven colors viz. red, orange, yellow, green, blue, indigo and violet. As shown in figure To conform this, one has to perform above experiment. One can also see the different colours of light on a Compact Disk used in computers made out of very tiny magnetic strips/ grooves whose size is in micron. When sunlight falls on the CD or on this strips/grooves sunlight is get diffracted in different wavelength/frequency and hence we see the different wavelength lights as different colors. Please remember CD can not be prism which can give large angle diffraction. Observations: 1. Write the colors that you have seen. Ans: 2. Write the colors in a sequence; as they appeared.

7 ACTIVITY-7 Observation on full moon days why we see only one side of the moon? Aim: Observation of Moon on every Full moon day. Apparatus: Telescope, calendar, drawing paper, pen/pencil Procedure: Do the following: 1. With the help of calendar, locate any approaching Full moon day. 2. Note the date of observation. 3. Point the telescope towards Moon. 4. Observe the moon thoroughly. 5. Try to draw an image of Moon in the observational table. 6. If you are good enough for taking the photographs through the telescope then capture the photograph of Moon. 7. Follow the above procedure for next few Full moon days and draw the image of Moon or take the photographs. Theory: Astronomical objects revolve around its parent object e.g. Moon revolve around Earth, Earth revolves around Sun, Sun revolves around center of galaxy etc. While most of them rotate on its axis. This holds true for Earth and Moon as well. Earth rotates around its axis and takes 24 hours to complete one rotation. The fact is true for Moon as well! i.e. Moon rotates on its axis at same rate within 24 hours. Therefore, Moon being a natural satellite revolve around the Earth, hence we see only one side of the Moon all time from Earth. The only way to see the other side of moon is to send a space probe that can fly to other side of the moon. Result: Are the images/photographs same? If yes, why? Ans: What you understood from this experiment?

8 ACTIVITY-8 How to locate your Geographical Northy?

9 Activity 9: How to make your own magnetic compass? Activity 10: How to find your longitude? Activity 11: How to find the Pole Star?

10 Activity 12: How to make your astrolabe? Activity 13: How to find the latitude of your place? Activity 14: Understanding the rising and setting of Star?

11 Activity 15: Understanding the phases of moon? Activity 16: Understanding the time of Moonrise?

12 Activity 17: Observation of Full full Moon? moon? Activity 18: Making Solar Project?

13 Activity 19: How to find the angular size of Sun and Moon? Activity 20: Understanding the angular separation? Activity 21: How to identify the constellations?

14 Transit of Venus, 6 June 2012 Measurement of apparent size of Sun and Venus from Earth Required Material and Equipment: 1. A telescope (given) 2. A Solar shade 3. A drawing board 4. A graph paper (8a) 5. Observation sheet for data (8b) 6. Pencil Solar shade Setting up the Telescope Point the telescope towards the sun and get the projected image of the Sun on the graph paper. NEVER LOOK AT THE SUN THROUGH THE TELESCOPE. The image can be made smaller or bigger, by moving the screen closer or further from the eyepiece. Adjust it such that the image of the sun just fits the circle on the graph sheet (8a).. Marking Sun and Venus on the graph paper. 1. Once Image is on the graph paper mark the outer limit of the image of the Sun with pencil. 2. Draw the image of Venus on graph sheet with pencil 3. Count the number of squares along the diameter of the Sun (use observation table). 4. Count the number of squares along the diameter of the Venus (use observation table). 5. Repeat the steps 2, 3 & 4 for at least fives times. Complete the observation table (8b) and follow the steps therein. 8

15 Transit of Venus, 6 June 2012 Graph paper for measurement of apparent size of the Venus and Sun Name of Observer:... Instrument Used (telescope):... School/Organisation: Place:... Longitude:... Latitude... Date: Time: 8a

16 Transit of Venus, 6 June 2012 Observation Table for measurement of apparent size of the Venus and Sun S No. Time Diameter of Sun in mm (Sd) Diameter of the Venus in mm (Vd) a b c d e Average diameter of Sun in mm = Sd = a+b+c+d+e = 5 Average diameter of the Venus in mm = Vd = a+b+c+d+e = 5 From Earth the relative size of Sun and Venus = Sd/Vd = Name of Observer:... Equipment... School/Organisation: Place:... Longitude:... Latitude... Date: Time: 8b

Page 1. Name: Questions 1 through 4 refer to the following: Questions 5 and 6 refer to the following:

Page 1. Name: Questions 1 through 4 refer to the following: Questions 5 and 6 refer to the following: Name: 3211-1 - Page 1 Questions 1 through 4 refer to the following: Questions 5 and 6 refer to the following: The diagram below represents a plastic hemisphere upon which lines have been drawn to show

More information

CELESTIAL MOTIONS. In Charlottesville we see Polaris 38 0 above the Northern horizon. Earth. Starry Vault

CELESTIAL MOTIONS. In Charlottesville we see Polaris 38 0 above the Northern horizon. Earth. Starry Vault CELESTIAL MOTIONS Stars appear to move counterclockwise on the surface of a huge sphere the Starry Vault, in their daily motions about Earth Polaris remains stationary. In Charlottesville we see Polaris

More information

The following words and their definitions should be addressed before completion of the reading:

The following words and their definitions should be addressed before completion of the reading: Seasons Vocabulary: The following words and their definitions should be addressed before completion of the reading: sphere any round object that has a surface that is the same distance from its center

More information

Earth, Sun and Moon is a set of interactives designed to support the teaching of the QCA primary science scheme of work 5e - 'Earth, Sun and Moon'.

Earth, Sun and Moon is a set of interactives designed to support the teaching of the QCA primary science scheme of work 5e - 'Earth, Sun and Moon'. is a set of interactives designed to support the teaching of the QCA primary science scheme of work 5e - ''. Learning Connections Primary Science Interactives are teaching tools which have been created

More information

1. In the diagram below, the direct rays of the Sun are striking the Earth's surface at 23 º N. What is the date shown in the diagram?

1. In the diagram below, the direct rays of the Sun are striking the Earth's surface at 23 º N. What is the date shown in the diagram? 1. In the diagram below, the direct rays of the Sun are striking the Earth's surface at 23 º N. What is the date shown in the diagram? 5. During how many days of a calendar year is the Sun directly overhead

More information

1. How many days each year does the Sun rise due East and set due West?

1. How many days each year does the Sun rise due East and set due West? Motion of the Sun Student Page Purpose To examine the path of the Sun across the sky at different times of the year from different locations on the Earth, and study its effects at different locations.

More information

A model of the Earth and Moon

A model of the Earth and Moon A model of the Earth and Moon Background Information This activity demonstrates the relative sizes of the Earth and Moon and the distance between them. The Moon is our nearest neighbour. It orbits the

More information

Activities: The Moon is lit and unlit too

Activities: The Moon is lit and unlit too Activities: The Moon is lit and unlit too Key objectives: This activity aims to help student to: Identify the different phases of the Moon Know that the Moon does not produce its own light, but reflects

More information

Unit 2 - Quiz 2 2-D Models

Unit 2 - Quiz 2 2-D Models 2-D Models 1. If an observer on Earth views Polaris on the horizon, the observer is located at the A) Tropic of Cancer (23.5 N) B) North Pole (90 N) C) equator (0 ) D) Tropic of Capricorn (23.5 S) 2. At

More information

ESCI 110: Earth-Sun Relationships Page 4-1. Exercise 4. Earth-Sun Relationships and Determining Latitude

ESCI 110: Earth-Sun Relationships Page 4-1. Exercise 4. Earth-Sun Relationships and Determining Latitude ESCI 110: Earth-Sun Relationships Page 4-1 Introduction Exercise 4 Earth-Sun Relationships and Determining Latitude As the earth revolves around the sun, the relation of the earth to the sun affects the

More information

EDMONDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE ASTRONOMY 100 Winter Quarter 2007 Sample Test # 1

EDMONDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE ASTRONOMY 100 Winter Quarter 2007 Sample Test # 1 Instructor: L. M. Khandro EDMONDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE ASTRONOMY 100 Winter Quarter 2007 Sample Test # 1 1. An arc second is a measure of a. time interval between oscillations of a standard clock b. time

More information

Earth's Revolution and its Seasons

Earth's Revolution and its Seasons NAME PER PART 1 - Earth's Revolution: Earth's Revolution and its Seasons Examine the Figure 1 above. Answer these questions. 1. True/False: As Earth revolves around the Sun it is always tilted toward the

More information

Heat Transfer. Energy from the Sun. Introduction

Heat Transfer. Energy from the Sun. Introduction Introduction The sun rises in the east and sets in the west, but its exact path changes over the course of the year, which causes the seasons. In order to use the sun s energy in a building, we need to

More information

The diagram shows the apparent paths of the Sun in relation to a house in the northeastern United States on June 21 and December 21.

The diagram shows the apparent paths of the Sun in relation to a house in the northeastern United States on June 21 and December 21. Teacher: Mr. gerraputa Print Close Name: 1. Approximately how many hours of daylight are received at the North Pole on June 21? 1. 0 3. 18 2. 12 4. 24 2. The diagram shows the apparent paths of the Sun

More information

7th Grade Astronomy. Read and answer each question carefully. 1) When viewing a solar eclipse, what is the phase of the moon?

7th Grade Astronomy. Read and answer each question carefully. 1) When viewing a solar eclipse, what is the phase of the moon? Read and answer each question carefully. 1) When viewing a solar eclipse, what is the phase of the moon? A) Waning gibbous B) Waxing gibbous C) New moon D) Full moon 2) In the picture shown, what is the

More information

Astronomy 101 Lab: Seasons

Astronomy 101 Lab: Seasons Name: Lecture Instructor: Astronomy 101 Lab: Seasons Pre-Lab Assignment: In class, we've talked about the cause of the seasons. In this lab, you will use globes to study the relative positions of Earth

More information

Rotation of the Earth

Rotation of the Earth Earth rotates from West to East Axis of Rotation Why does the Sun appear to rise in the east and set in the west? link to animation by Barth Van Bossuyt 2011 Rotation of the Earth Rotation is the spin

More information

FIRST GRADE 1 WEEK LESSON PLANS AND ACTIVITIES

FIRST GRADE 1 WEEK LESSON PLANS AND ACTIVITIES FIRST GRADE 1 WEEK LESSON PLANS AND ACTIVITIES UNIVERSE CYCLE OVERVIEW OF FIRST GRADE UNIVERSE WEEK 1. PRE: Describing the Universe. LAB: Comparing and contrasting bodies that reflect light. POST: Exploring

More information

HELIOSTAT II - MEASURING THE SOLAR ROTATION

HELIOSTAT II - MEASURING THE SOLAR ROTATION HELIOSTAT II - MEASURING THE SOLAR ROTATION SYNOPSIS: In this lab you will map sunspots, and from the movement of the spots over several days, you will determine the rotation rate of the Sun. EQUIPMENT:

More information

The Celestial Sphere. Chapter 1 Cycles of the Sky. Models and Science. Constellations 9/26/2013

The Celestial Sphere. Chapter 1 Cycles of the Sky. Models and Science. Constellations 9/26/2013 Chapter 1 Cycles of the Sky The Celestial Sphere A useful, spherical map of the sky, with the Earth in the center of a giant celestial sphere. Stars and planets are plotted on the sphere, at the same distance.

More information

Douglas Adams The Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy

Douglas Adams The Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy There is a theory which states that if ever anybody discovers exactly what the Universe is for and why it is here, it will instantly disappear and be replaced by something even more bizarre and inexplicable.

More information

Cycles in the Sky. Teacher Guide: Cycles in the Sky Page 1 of 8 2008 Discovery Communications, LLC

Cycles in the Sky. Teacher Guide: Cycles in the Sky Page 1 of 8 2008 Discovery Communications, LLC Cycles in the Sky What is a Fun damental? Each Fun damental is designed to introduce your younger students to some of the basic ideas about one particular area of science. The activities in the Fun damental

More information

CELESTIAL CLOCK - THE SUN, THE MOON, AND THE STARS

CELESTIAL CLOCK - THE SUN, THE MOON, AND THE STARS INTRODUCTION CELESTIAL CLOCK - THE SUN, THE MOON, AND THE STARS This is a scientific presentation to provide you with knowledge you can use to understand the sky above in relation to the earth. Before

More information

Seasons (Observable Patterns)

Seasons (Observable Patterns) Seasons (Observable Patterns) E Q U I T A B L E S C I E N C E C U R R I C U L U M Lesson 3 i N T E G R A T I N G A R T S i n P U B L I C E D U C A T I O N NGSS Science Standard: 5-ESS1-2 Represent data

More information

What's Moving? Summary of Activity. Living Maya Time Website Connections. Objectives

What's Moving? Summary of Activity. Living Maya Time Website Connections. Objectives What's Moving? Summary of Activity This lesson is designed to help students make connections between the movements of the Sun in the sky, the Sun on the horizon, and how these apparent motions are caused

More information

Astrock, t he A stronomical Clock

Astrock, t he A stronomical Clock Astrock, t he A stronomical Clock The astronomical clock is unlike any other clock. At first glance you ll find it has similar functions of a standard clock, however the astronomical clock can offer much

More information

APS 1010 Astronomy Lab 63 Motions of the Moon MOTIONS OF THE MOON

APS 1010 Astronomy Lab 63 Motions of the Moon MOTIONS OF THE MOON APS 1010 Astronomy Lab 63 Motions of the Moon MOTIONS OF THE MOON SYNOPSIS: The objective of this lab is to become familiar with the motion of the Moon and its relation to the motions of the Sun and Earth.

More information

Astronomy Review. Use the following four pictures to answer questions 1-4.

Astronomy Review. Use the following four pictures to answer questions 1-4. Astronomy Review Use the following four pictures to answer questions 1-4. 1. Put an X through the pictures that are NOT possible. 2. Circle the picture that could be a lunar eclipse. 3. Triangle the picture

More information

As shown in Figure 1, each hemisphere s summer is warmer than in winter because

As shown in Figure 1, each hemisphere s summer is warmer than in winter because The Reason for the Seasons The Earth s seasons are caused by the tilt of the Earth s axis, NOT the differences in distance from the Sun, which are extremely small. The Earth s axis is tilted 23.45 degrees

More information

Solar energy and the Earth s seasons

Solar energy and the Earth s seasons Solar energy and the Earth s seasons Name: Tilt of the Earth s axis and the seasons We now understand that the tilt of Earth s axis makes it possible for different parts of the Earth to experience different

More information

Astronomy 12 Unit Test Review Charting the Sky

Astronomy 12 Unit Test Review Charting the Sky Astronomy 12 Unit Test Review Charting the Sky Astronomer: Part I- Multiple choice: Answer each question by shading the most appropriate bubble. 01. Astronomy is the study of a. the stars and planets and

More information

not to be republished NCERT MOTIONS OF THE EARTH

not to be republished NCERT MOTIONS OF THE EARTH 3 Let s Do Take a ball to represent the earth and a lighted candle to represent the sun. Mark a point on the ball to represent a town X. Place the ball in such a way that the town X is in darkness. Now

More information

Moon, Sun, and eclipses

Moon, Sun, and eclipses Moon, Sun, and eclipses The Moon orbits the Earth and returns to the same right ascension every 27.32 days. (It moves eastward against the background of stars.) This is the sidereal (si-der-e-al) period

More information

2. EARTH AND THE SEASONS

2. EARTH AND THE SEASONS 2. EARTH AND THE SEASONS EQUIPMENT 12-inch diameter globe with tilted rotation axis and hour circle 12-inch diameter ring light Ring light stand and clamp Dark-colored towel Protractor with attached string

More information

Essential Question. Enduring Understanding

Essential Question. Enduring Understanding Earth In Space Unit Diagnostic Assessment: Students complete a questionnaire answering questions about their ideas concerning a day, year, the seasons and moon phases: My Ideas About A Day, Year, Seasons

More information

Reasons for Seasons. Question: TRUE OR FALSE. Question: TRUE OR FALSE? What causes the seasons? What causes the seasons?

Reasons for Seasons. Question: TRUE OR FALSE. Question: TRUE OR FALSE? What causes the seasons? What causes the seasons? Reasons for Seasons Question: TRUE OR FALSE? Earth is closer to the Sun in summer and farther from the Sun in winter. Question: TRUE OR FALSE? Earth is closer to the Sun in summer and farther from the

More information

Motions of the Earth. Stuff everyone should know

Motions of the Earth. Stuff everyone should know Motions of the Earth Stuff everyone should know Earth Motions E W N W Noon E Why is there day and night? OR Why do the Sun and stars appear to move through the sky? Because the Earth rotates around its

More information

8.5: Motions of Earth, the Moon, and Planets pg. 320

8.5: Motions of Earth, the Moon, and Planets pg. 320 8.5: Motions of Earth, the Moon, and Planets pg. 320 Key Concepts: 1. Careful observation of the night sky can offer clues about the motion of celestial objects. 2. Celestial objects in the Solar System

More information

Shadows, Angles, and the Seasons

Shadows, Angles, and the Seasons Shadows, Angles, and the Seasons If it's cold in winter, why is Earth closer to the Sun? This activity shows the relationship between Earth-Sun positions and the seasons. From The WSU Fairmount Center

More information

The Reasons for the Seasons

The Reasons for the Seasons Guiding Question: What causes the seasons on Earth? The Reasons for the Seasons Vocabulary astrolabe equinox rotate axis horizon solstice elliptical revolve (orbit) sundial Materials Exploration (per group)

More information

The Four Seasons. A Warm Up Exercise. A Warm Up Exercise. A Warm Up Exercise. The Moon s Phases

The Four Seasons. A Warm Up Exercise. A Warm Up Exercise. A Warm Up Exercise. The Moon s Phases The Four Seasons A Warm Up Exercise What fraction of the Moon s surface is illuminated by the Sun (except during a lunar eclipse)? a) Between zero and one-half b) The whole surface c) Always half d) Depends

More information

ASTR 1010 Astronomy of the Solar System Professor Caillault Fall 2009 Semester Exam 1 Answers

ASTR 1010 Astronomy of the Solar System Professor Caillault Fall 2009 Semester Exam 1 Answers ASTR 1010 Astronomy of the Solar System Professor Caillault Fall 2009 Semester Exam 1 Answers 1. The number of degrees in a full circle is (c) 360 2. An arcsecond is a measure of (d) angle. 3. How many

More information

Earth, Moon, and Sun Study Guide. (Test Date: )

Earth, Moon, and Sun Study Guide. (Test Date: ) Earth, Moon, and Sun Study Guide Name: (Test Date: ) Essential Question #1: How are the Earth, Moon, and Sun alike and how are they different? 1. List the Earth, Moon, and Sun, in order from LARGEST to

More information

Celestial Sphere. Celestial Coordinates. Lecture 3: Motions of the Sun and Moon. ecliptic (path of Sun) ecliptic (path of Sun)

Celestial Sphere. Celestial Coordinates. Lecture 3: Motions of the Sun and Moon. ecliptic (path of Sun) ecliptic (path of Sun) Lecture 3: Motions of the and Moon ecliptic (path of ) ecliptic (path of ) The 23.5 degree tilt of Earth s spin axis relative to its orbital axis around the causes the seasons Celestial Sphere Celestial

More information

Chapter 8, Astronomy

Chapter 8, Astronomy Chapter 8, Astronomy Model some of the ways in which scientists observe the planets. Relate evidence that Earth rotates and define revolution. Scientists use many tools to observe and study the universe.

More information

Relationship Between the Earth, Moon and Sun

Relationship Between the Earth, Moon and Sun Relationship Between the Earth, Moon and Sun Rotation A body turning on its axis The Earth rotates once every 24 hours in a counterclockwise direction. Revolution A body traveling around another The Earth

More information

Lesson 1 Earth s Motion

Lesson 1 Earth s Motion Lesson 1 Student Labs and Activities Page Launch Lab 8 Content Vocabulary 9 Lesson Outline 10 MiniLab 12 Content Practice A 13 Content Practice B 14 Math Skills 15 School to Home 16 Key Concept Builders

More information

Earth In Space Chapter 3

Earth In Space Chapter 3 Earth In Space Chapter 3 Shape of the Earth Ancient Greeks Earth casts a circular shadow on the moon during a lunar eclipse Shape of the Earth Ancient Greeks Ships were observed to disappear below the

More information

Solar System. 1. The diagram below represents a simple geocentric model. Which object is represented by the letter X?

Solar System. 1. The diagram below represents a simple geocentric model. Which object is represented by the letter X? Solar System 1. The diagram below represents a simple geocentric model. Which object is represented by the letter X? A) Earth B) Sun C) Moon D) Polaris 2. Which object orbits Earth in both the Earth-centered

More information

Chapter 2 Review Clickers. The Cosmic Perspective Seventh Edition. Discovering the Universe for Yourself Pearson Education, Inc.

Chapter 2 Review Clickers. The Cosmic Perspective Seventh Edition. Discovering the Universe for Yourself Pearson Education, Inc. Review Clickers The Cosmic Perspective Seventh Edition Discovering the Universe for Yourself The sky is divided into 88 zones called a) degrees. b) tropics. c) constellations. d) signs. The sky is divided

More information

Astron 100 Sample Exam 1 1. Solar eclipses occur only at (A) New moon (B) 1 st quarter moon (C) Full moon (D) 3 rd quarter moon (E) The equinoxes 2.

Astron 100 Sample Exam 1 1. Solar eclipses occur only at (A) New moon (B) 1 st quarter moon (C) Full moon (D) 3 rd quarter moon (E) The equinoxes 2. Astron 100 Sample Exam 1 1. Solar eclipses occur only at (A) New moon (B) 1 st quarter moon (C) Full moon (D) 3 rd quarter moon (E) The equinoxes 2. If the Moon is at first quarter tonight in Amherst,

More information

Topic: Day 1 The Day/Night Cycle and Apparent Motion of the Sun

Topic: Day 1 The Day/Night Cycle and Apparent Motion of the Sun Topic: Day 1 The Day/Night Cycle and Apparent Motion of the Sun Grade Level: Third Grade Subject: Science Prepared by: Julia Plummer & Cyndie Slagle Materials: - Signs around the room that say North, South,

More information

Phases of the Moon. Objective. Materials. Procedure. Name Date Score /20

Phases of the Moon. Objective. Materials. Procedure. Name Date Score /20 Name Date Score /20 Phases of the Moon Objective Working with models for the Earth-Moon-Sun system, the student will simulate the phases the Moon passes through each month. Upon completion of this exercise,

More information

CELESTIAL EVENTS CALENDAR APRIL 2014 TO MARCH 2015

CELESTIAL EVENTS CALENDAR APRIL 2014 TO MARCH 2015 CELESTIAL EVENTS CALENDAR APRIL 2014 TO MARCH 2015 *** Must See Event 2014 ***April 8 - Mars at Opposition. The red planet will be at its closest approach to Earth and its face will be fully illuminated

More information

Grade 6 Science Space Unit Test

Grade 6 Science Space Unit Test Name: Grade 6 Science Space Unit Test 1. The Earth s axis in tilted 23.5 Section C Short Answer (Use complete sentences, and diagrams to help) 1. Explain the difference between the rotation and revolution.

More information

Noon Sun Angle = 90 Arc Distance

Noon Sun Angle = 90 Arc Distance Noon Sun Angle Worksheet Name Name Date Subsolar Point (Latitude where the sun is overhead at noon) Equinox March 22 nd 0 o Equinox September 22 nd 0 o Solstice June 22 nd 23.5 N Solstice December 22 nd

More information

APS 1030 Laboratory 1 Motions of the Moon MOTIONS OF THE MOON

APS 1030 Laboratory 1 Motions of the Moon MOTIONS OF THE MOON APS 1030 Laboratory 1 Motions of the Moon MOTIONS OF THE MOON SYNOPSIS: The objective of this lab is to become familiar with the motion of the Moon and its relation to the motions of the Sun and Earth.

More information

What are the intervals (in degrees) for lines of latitude on your globe? 15 o

What are the intervals (in degrees) for lines of latitude on your globe? 15 o Where in the World. THE GLOBE Since the times of the ancient Greeks, people knew the earth was round. In 150 BCE the Greek geometer Crates of Mallus built a world globe ten feet in diameter. Thus for centuries,

More information

LAB 2 EARTH AND THE SEASONS. Due: Fri Oct :00 PM EDT Question 1. Instructions Lab 2: Earth and the Seasons (Globe Version)

LAB 2 EARTH AND THE SEASONS. Due: Fri Oct :00 PM EDT Question 1. Instructions Lab 2: Earth and the Seasons (Globe Version) Lab G: Earth and the Seasons (T) (5079) Due: Fri Oct 10 01 1:00 PM EDT Question 1 Instructions Lab : Earth and the Seasons (Globe Version) Read the lab before attending lab. You might find it easier to

More information

Scientists use special equipment and filters to study the Sun.

Scientists use special equipment and filters to study the Sun. SKY SCIENCE STUDY NOTES Also use your class notes and tests. I CAN observe, describe and interpret the movement of objects in the sky; and explain pattern and order in these movements. Stars are like non-stop

More information

Where on Earth are the daily solar altitudes higher and lower than Endicott?

Where on Earth are the daily solar altitudes higher and lower than Endicott? Where on Earth are the daily solar altitudes higher and lower than Endicott? In your notebooks, write RELATIONSHIPS between variables we tested CAUSE FIRST EFFECT SECOND EVIDENCE As you increase the time

More information

Seasons. The Earth is Tilted

Seasons. The Earth is Tilted Seasons 1 Name Seasons Most places on Earth experience four seasons every year. These are spring, summer, fall (or autumn) and winter. In these investigations we are going to find out why we have different

More information

Answers. Sun, Earth, Moon. Year 7 Science Chapter 10

Answers. Sun, Earth, Moon. Year 7 Science Chapter 10 Answers Sun, Earth, Moon Year 7 Science Chapter 10 p216 1 Geocentric indicates a model in which Earth is the centre of the universe. 2 Pythagoras reasoning was that the sphere is the perfect shape and

More information

Modeling Moon Phases. Activity A3. What s This Activity About? What Will Students Do? Tips and Suggestions. What Will Students Learn?

Modeling Moon Phases. Activity A3. What s This Activity About? What Will Students Do? Tips and Suggestions. What Will Students Learn? The Moon and Its s A3 Modeling Moon s Activity A3 Grade Level: 4 12 Source: Reprinted with permission from Astro Adventures, by Dennis Schatz, Paul Allan, and Doug Cooper. Copyright 2003 by The Pacific

More information

Modeling the sky with the Farquhar Globe

Modeling the sky with the Farquhar Globe Modeling the sky with the Farquhar Globe Learning Goals: Learn to use a model to visualize motions in the sky and understand relative apparent positions of Sun and stars. Evaluate the usefulness of the

More information

Activity 1: What is latitude and longitude?

Activity 1: What is latitude and longitude? Activity 1: What is latitude and longitude? Background information The voyages of European navigators about 500 years ago led to the establishment of shipping routes and the need for accurate maps and

More information

Lab Activity on the Causes of the Seasons

Lab Activity on the Causes of the Seasons Lab Activity on the Causes of the Seasons 2002 Ann Bykerk-Kauffman, Dept. of Geological and Environmental Sciences, California State University, Chico * Objectives When you have completed this lab you

More information

Earth-Sun Geometry. Introduction: Earth-Sun Geometry

Earth-Sun Geometry. Introduction: Earth-Sun Geometry Earth-Sun Geometry Readings: A&B: Ch. 2 (p. 42-50) CD Tutorial: Earth-Sun Geometry www: 2. Earth- Sun Geometry Topics 1. Introduction 2. Orbital Geometry a) Rotation b) revolution 3. Seasons a) Solstices

More information

Geometry and Geography

Geometry and Geography Geometry and Geography Tom Davis tomrdavis@earthlink.net http://www.geometer.org/mathcircles March 12, 2011 1 Pedagogical Advice I have been leading mathematical circles using this topic for many years,

More information

Earth in the Solar System

Earth in the Solar System Copyright 2011 Study Island - All rights reserved. Directions: Challenge yourself! Print out the quiz or get a pen/pencil and paper and record your answers to the questions below. Check your answers with

More information

4 3 Astronomy Recall that Earth is one of the many planets in the solar system that orbit the Sun.

4 3 Astronomy Recall that Earth is one of the many planets in the solar system that orbit the Sun. 4 3 Astronomy 4 3.1 Recall that Earth is one of the many planets in the solar system that orbit the Sun. Essential Question: What is in our solar system? Textbook Pages: 208 209 Sun central star in our

More information

The Seasons on a Planet like Earth

The Seasons on a Planet like Earth The Seasons on a Planet like Earth As the Earth travels around the Sun, it moves in a giant circle 300 million kilometers across. (Well, it is actually a giant ellipse but the shape is so close to that

More information

Reasons for the seasons on Earth

Reasons for the seasons on Earth Reasons for the seasons on Earth Background information The Earth orbits the Sun in a slightly elliptical path. This means that sometimes the Earth is slightly closer to the Sun than other times but this

More information

The Electromagnetic Spectrum

The Electromagnetic Spectrum The Electromagnetic Spectrum 1 Look around you. What do you see? You might say "people, desks, and papers." What you really see is light bouncing off people, desks, and papers. You can only see objects

More information

Exploring Solar Energy Variations on Earth: Changes in the Length of Day and Solar Insolation Through the Year

Exploring Solar Energy Variations on Earth: Changes in the Length of Day and Solar Insolation Through the Year Exploring Solar Energy Variations on Earth: Changes in the Length of Day and Solar Insolation Through the Year Purpose To help students understand how solar radiation varies (duration and intensity) during

More information

8. Mercury, the planet nearest to the Sun, has extreme surface temperatures, ranging from 465 C in sunlight to 180 C in darkness.

8. Mercury, the planet nearest to the Sun, has extreme surface temperatures, ranging from 465 C in sunlight to 180 C in darkness. 6.E.1 Unit Test DO NOT WRITE ON THIS QUIZ!!! 1. The largest body in our solar system is Earth. the Sun. Jupiter. the Moon. 4. What do the four planets closest to the Sun have in common? Their solid, rocky

More information

Mystery Class Planning Packet #2 Discovering Time Clues

Mystery Class Planning Packet #2 Discovering Time Clues Mystery Class Planning Packet #2 Discovering Time Clues 1 Teacher s Practice Packet #2: Discovering Time Clues Includes: Overview and Essential Question Page 2 Teacher Background Information The Science

More information

T he Earth orbits around the sun. It takes the Earth days one year to

T he Earth orbits around the sun. It takes the Earth days one year to Follow the Earth as it orbits the sun to learn what causes the changing seasons. Materials Reproducible pages 18 20 Scissors Tape Brad (paper fastener) Crayons, colored pencils, or markers (optional) Weather

More information

The Size & Shape of the Galaxy

The Size & Shape of the Galaxy name The Size & Shape of the Galaxy The whole lab consists of plotting two graphs. What s the catch? Aha visualizing and understanding what you have plotted of course! Form the Earth Science Picture of

More information

FOSS Sun Moon and Planets Unit Plan

FOSS Sun Moon and Planets Unit Plan FOSS Sun Moon and Planets Unit Plan Desired Results BVSD Standard(s)/Grade Level Expectations Fourth Grade Science GLE3.1. Earth is part of the Solar System, which includes the Sun, Moon, and other bodies

More information

Astronomy 2 Laboratory Number 2. Solar Rotation and Saturn s Rotation

Astronomy 2 Laboratory Number 2. Solar Rotation and Saturn s Rotation Astronomy 2 Laboratory Number 2 Solar Rotation and Saturn s Rotation I. Introduction This astronomy laboratory shows how we can measure astronomical rotations and velocities and is in three parts: 1. In

More information

Use WITH Investigation 4, Part 2, Step 2

Use WITH Investigation 4, Part 2, Step 2 INVESTIGATION 4 : The Sundial Project Use WITH Investigation 4, Part 2, Step 2 EALR 4: Earth and Space Science Big Idea: Earth in Space (ES1) Projects: Tether Ball Pole Sundial Globe and a Light Indoors

More information

Renewable Energy. Solar Power. Courseware Sample 86352-F0

Renewable Energy. Solar Power. Courseware Sample 86352-F0 Renewable Energy Solar Power Courseware Sample 86352-F0 A RENEWABLE ENERGY SOLAR POWER Courseware Sample by the staff of Lab-Volt Ltd. Copyright 2009 Lab-Volt Ltd. All rights reserved. No part of this

More information

The ecliptic - Earth s orbital plane

The ecliptic - Earth s orbital plane The ecliptic - Earth s orbital plane The line of nodes descending node The Moon s orbital plane Moon s orbit inclination 5.45º ascending node celestial declination Zero longitude in the ecliptic The orbit

More information

1-2. What is the name given to the path of the Sun as seen from Earth? a.) Equinox b.) Celestial equator c.) Solstice d.

1-2. What is the name given to the path of the Sun as seen from Earth? a.) Equinox b.) Celestial equator c.) Solstice d. Chapter 1 1-1. How long does it take the Earth to orbit the Sun? a.) one sidereal day b.) one month c.) one year X d.) one hour 1-2. What is the name given to the path of the Sun as seen from Earth? a.)

More information

Kinesthetic Astronomy: Longer Days, Shorter Nights

Kinesthetic Astronomy: Longer Days, Shorter Nights GRADE LEVEL 3 rd -8 th ; California Content Standards for 3 rd, 5 th, 6 th 8 th SUBJECTS Earth & Space Science, Using Models DURATION Preparation: 20 minutes Activity: 60 minutes SETTING Classroom Objectives

More information

ASTR 1030 Astronomy Lab 65 Celestial Motions CELESTIAL MOTIONS

ASTR 1030 Astronomy Lab 65 Celestial Motions CELESTIAL MOTIONS ASTR 1030 Astronomy Lab 65 Celestial Motions CELESTIAL MOTIONS SYNOPSIS: The objective of this lab is to become familiar with the apparent motions of the Sun, Moon, and stars in the Boulder sky. EQUIPMENT:

More information

AS101: Planetary Motions Page 1 PLANETARY MOTIONS

AS101: Planetary Motions Page 1 PLANETARY MOTIONS AS101: Planetary Motions Page 1 PLANETARY MOTIONS Goals: To develop a 3-D sense of the locations and motions of the planets in the solar system To recognize how solar illumination of planetary bodies and

More information

Celestial Coordinates I

Celestial Coordinates I Equipment: Star Charts, Planisphere. Celestial Coordinates I Objective: To become acquainted with basic navigation of the night sky. Discussion: From our vantage point on Earth, the night sky has the appearance

More information

UCCS PES 1620 Solar Energy Lab Seasons Lab Fall 2014 name:

UCCS PES 1620 Solar Energy Lab Seasons Lab Fall 2014 name: UCCS PES 1620 Solar Energy Lab Seasons Lab Fall 2014 name: 1. During the winter in the Northern Hemisphere, the "land of the midnight sun" would be found a. at high latitudes. b. at middle latitudes. c.

More information

radio telescopes satellites visible light space probes rockets reflecting telescopes space shuttles refracting telescopes

radio telescopes satellites visible light space probes rockets reflecting telescopes space shuttles refracting telescopes Name Date Class BOOK Review Packet Astronomy Overview Exploring Space Directions:Complete the concept map the terms in the list below. radio telescopes satellites visible light space probes rockets reflecting

More information

Today. Appearance of the Sky. Orientation. Motion of sky. Seasons. Precession. Phases of the Moon

Today. Appearance of the Sky. Orientation. Motion of sky. Seasons. Precession. Phases of the Moon Today Appearance of the Sky Orientation Motion of sky Seasons Precession Phases of the Moon The Appearance of the Sky The Local Sky An object s altitude (above horizon) and direction (along horizon) specify

More information

Stellarium a valuable resource for teaching astronomy in the classroom and beyond

Stellarium a valuable resource for teaching astronomy in the classroom and beyond Stellarium 1 Stellarium a valuable resource for teaching astronomy in the classroom and beyond Stephen Hughes Department of Physical and Chemical Sciences, Queensland University of Technology, Gardens

More information

The Celestial Sphere. Questions for Today. The Celestial Sphere 1/18/10

The Celestial Sphere. Questions for Today. The Celestial Sphere 1/18/10 Lecture 3: Constellations and the Distances to the Stars Astro 2010 Prof. Tom Megeath Questions for Today How do the stars move in the sky? What causes the phases of the moon? What causes the seasons?

More information

Announcements. Due Monday, 11:59pm, Sept 9th. Can submit answers (and see score) more than once: persistence pays off!

Announcements. Due Monday, 11:59pm, Sept 9th. Can submit answers (and see score) more than once: persistence pays off! Announcements Homework 1 posted on Compass Due Monday, 11:59pm, Sept 9th. Can submit answers (and see score) more than once: persistence pays off! Register those iclickers! link on course site Venus/Saturn

More information

Coordinate Systems. Orbits and Rotation

Coordinate Systems. Orbits and Rotation Coordinate Systems Orbits and Rotation Earth orbit. The earth s orbit around the sun is nearly circular but not quite. It s actually an ellipse whose average distance from the sun is one AU (150 million

More information

Whither does the Sun rove?

Whither does the Sun rove? Whither does the Sun rove? Alejandro Gangui, IAFE/Conicet and University of Buenos Aires, Argentina If one asked some friends where on the horizon they should expect to see the sunrise, half of the answers

More information

Answers for the Study Guide: Sun, Earth and Moon Relationship Test

Answers for the Study Guide: Sun, Earth and Moon Relationship Test Answers for the Study Guide: Sun, Earth and Moon Relationship Test 1) It takes one day for the Earth to make one complete on its axis. a. Rotation 2) It takes one year for the Earth to make one around

More information

Science Standard 4 Earth in Space Grade Level Expectations

Science Standard 4 Earth in Space Grade Level Expectations Science Standard 4 Earth in Space Grade Level Expectations Science Standard 4 Earth in Space Our Solar System is a collection of gravitationally interacting bodies that include Earth and the Moon. Universal

More information

Solar Angles and Latitude

Solar Angles and Latitude Solar Angles and Latitude Objectives The student will understand that the sun is not directly overhead at noon in most latitudes. The student will research and discover the latitude ir classroom and calculate

More information