CHEMSITRY NOTES Chapter 13. Electrons in Atoms

Save this PDF as:
 WORD  PNG  TXT  JPG

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "CHEMSITRY NOTES Chapter 13. Electrons in Atoms"

Transcription

1 CHEMSITRY NOTES Chapter 13 Electrons in Atoms Goals : To gain an understanding of : 1. Atoms and their structure. 2. The development of the atomic theory. 3. The quantum mechanical model of the atom. 4. Electron configurations NOTES: The different historical models are described as follows: Dalton's model of the atom - solid, tiny, indivisible particles. Thomson's model - often describe as the "plum pudding" model - electrons are scattered throughout the atom. Rutherford's model - includes the solid nucleus in the center of the atom. Niels Bohr's model - electrons are in fixed orbitals, or energy levels, at certain distances from the nucleus much the way the planets orbit the sun. Quantum mechanical model - the electrons have certain probabilities of being located at certain places and their positions are described according to four quantum numbers. The circle in the diagram below shows where the electrons have a 90% probability of being within the electron cloud. The quantum mechanical model is the most accepted model today. The diagrams you are probably most familiar with are that of the Bohr model, which is useful in teaching basic electron configuration (distribution in energy levels). Quanta (s. quantum) are the discrete amounts of energy that an electron absorbs as it moves up an energy level or releases when it moves down an energy level. Energy levels are certain regions surrounding the nucleus of an atom where electrons are likely to be found. The quantum mechanical model of the atom is a mathematical model which predicts the probability of electron locations and paths in electron clouds. The positions and orbits of electrons are referred to as energy states and are described by four quantum numbers : the principle quantum number (n) - indicates the energy level the electrons are in (there are seven energy levels, therefore n may equal 1,2,3,4,5,6 or 7) the orbital quantum number - indicates the shape of the atomic orbital (region in space where there is a high probability of finding an electron). the first four orbital numbers are indicated by the letters s (has a spherical shape), p (has a dumbbell shape), d, and f (d and f have complex shapes). magnetic quantum number - indicates the position of the orbital about the x, y, and z axes spin quantum number - indicates the direction of spin of an electron - clockwise or counterclockwise

2 These quantum numbers can be summarized as follows: Principle energy level Number of sublevels Type of sublevel (number of orbitals per sublevel) Total number of sublevels (= n 2 ) Total number of electrons(= 2n 2 ) n=1 1 1s (one orbital only) 1 2 n=2 2 2s (1 orbital), 2p (3 orbitals) 4 8 n=3 3 n=4 4 3s (1 orbital), 3p (3 orbitals), 3d (5 orbitals) 4s (1 orbital), 4p (3 orbitals), 4d (5 orbitals), 4f (7 orbitals) Note : Each quantum position as described by the first three quantum numbers can be occupied by only two electrons with opposite spins. For example, if the position of a pair of electrons are described as 4px, this means they are in the fourth energy level (n=4), and have a dumbbell shaped orbital (orbital quantum number is p) around the x axis (third quantum number). These two electrons in this orbital, as stated above, would have opposite spins. Electrons must be placed in the lowest possible energy levels first. This is referred to as the ground state of an atom - the state with the lowest possible energy level. There are three rules which govern electron configuration (the arrangement of the electrons of an atom into its orbitals). Aufbau (German for "building up') Principle - electrons enter orbitals of the lowest energy levels first. The following is the aufbau help diagram. The arrows indicate the lowest energy levels which need to be filled first. The 1s is always filled first then the 2s, 2p, 3s etc.. Note the 4s is filled before the 3d. Pauli Exclusion Principle - an atomic orbital may describe at most two electrons ; electrons in the same orbital must have opposite spins. Hund's rule - when electrons occupy orbitals of the same energy level (e.g. the three 3p orbitals or the five 4d orbitals), one electron will enter each orbital with a parallel spin until all orbitals have one electron. Then and only then will a second electron be added to those orbitals. The following diagram shows four elements and their electron configurations. They are explained below.

3 Hydrogen has only one electron so it is in the lowest orbital, the 1s orbital. The upwards arrow indicates a clockwise spin. Hydrogen's electron configuration can then be described as 1s 1. This means there is one electron in the first energy level in the s orbital (spherical shape). Helium has two electrons. The first orbital will hold two electrons so its summary electron configuration is 1s 2. Note the arrows indicating opposite spins (Pauli exclusion principle). Lithium has three electrons so one has to move into the next lowest orbital, the 2s. Its summary electron configuration is 1s 2 2s 1. Nitrogen has seven electrons. The 1s and 2s fill up first (Aufbau principle). Now one electron will go into each of the 2p orbitals with the same spin according to the Hund's rule. Nitrogen's summary electron configuration is 1s 2 2s 2 2p 3. Oxygen's electron configuration is similar to nitrogen, only now there are four electrons to put into the three 2p orbitals. Is summary electron configuration is 1s 2 2s 2 3p 4. Flame tests are tests used to identify metal or metallic ions. The substance to be identified is usually put on a wire loop and then placed into a flame. The flame will then show a color which can be used to help identify the metal. The colors in fireworks are produced by metals or metallic ions added to the fireworks. The color comes from energy being released by the metallic atoms or ions. When energy is added to the atoms or ions electrons jump up energy levels as they absorb the energy. When they fall back down energy levels they release energy in the form of light of a characteristic wavelength or color for that element. For example barium gives off a pale green color and strontium gives off a brilliant red color. Spectroscopy is the study of spectra - the types of light (wavelengths) that are absorbed or emitted by elements. Spectra allow scientists to, in a sense, see into the atomic structure of matter. The colors emitted or absorbed indicate changes in the positions of electrons in their orbitals. Emission spectra are the spectra released by substances that have been excited by the addition of energy. Absorption spectra are spectra that show the wavelengths (colors) of light that are absorbed by substances. Spectroscopy is a very important tool in the hands of an analytical chemist. Qualitative data (what is present) can be determined by the wavelengths of light that are produced - much like the flame tests. Quantitative data (how much is present) can be determined by the brightness or thickness of the spectral bands that are produced.. The elements are arranged in order of increasing atomic number across the periods (horizontal rows). The periods are arranged so that the elements in the vertical columns (groups or families) have similar properties. This causes the properties of elements to change as you move horizontally from group to group across a period. Note that their are 7 periods - one for each energy level (principle quantum number). The periodic law states that when the elements are arranged according to increasing atomic number there is a periodic pattern in their physical and chemical properties. Although the periodic table is arranged by increasing atomic number (which indicates the number of protons), the electrons configuration is what really determines the physical and chemical properties of the elements. The periodic table can be divided into four groups based on electron configurations : The Noble gases (Group 0) - have their outermost s and p orbitals filled which creates a stable and non-reactive (inert) element. The representative elements - Group A elements - have their s and p orbitals being filled. These include : o Group 1A - Li, Na, K etc. - all very reactive with one electron in the outer s orbital o Group 2A - Be, Mg, Ca etc. - all quite reactive with 2 electrons filling their outer s orbital o Group 3A - Aluminum group - 3 electrons in outer energy level (2s and 1p) properties vary from metallic to metalloid

4 o Group 4A - Carbon group - 4 electrons in outer energy level (2s and 2p) - properties vary from nonmetallic to metalloid to metallic down the group o Group 5A - Nitrogen group - 5 electrons in outer energy level (2s and 3p) - properties vary from nonmetallic to metalloid to metallic o Group 6A - Oxygen group - 6 electrons in outer energy level (2s and 4p) - properties vary from nonmetallic to metalloid o Group 7A - Halogens - all have 7 electrons in the outer energy level (2s and 5p) - properties vary from nonmetallic to metalloid. Very reactive due to the outer energy level being almost filled. The transition metals - elements whose d orbitals are being filled - found in the "d-block." These are also called the Group B elements The Inner transition metals - These are the Lanthanide and Actinide series, element whose f orbitals are being filled. The s, p, d, and f groups can be identified on the diagram below. The f block (inner transition metals) is usually shown separated and below the rest of the table. The accepted theory which explains the origin of the elements and all matter in the universe is the Big Bang theory. It states that the universe began with an explosion of tremendous energy. This energy was converted into matter, according to Einstein's equation E=mc 2. At first all matter was in the form of quarks. As the universe expanded it cooled allowing matter to condense and form the lightest elements first and then the heavier elements. The representative groups of elements : Noble gases - Group 0, helium, neon, argon, krypton, xenon and radon o inert (unreactive) because of stable electron configuration (filled s and p orbitals) o helium is used in weather balloons o helium and neon are used to create artificial, unreactive environments (less soluble than nitrogen and therefore less likely to cause the bends o other noble gases are used to create unreactive environments in flashbulbs or aluminum welding Alkali metals - Group 1A, lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium, cesium and francium o very reactive (one electron away from a filled s and p orbital) o low density o low melting point o good electrical conductivity o react with water to form strong bases (sodium hydroxide, lithium hydroxide etc.) Alkaline earth elements - Group 2A, beryllium, magnesium, calcium, strontium, barium and radium o very reactive (2 electrons away from a filled s and p orbital) o react with water to form hydroxides o used to form metal alloys Aluminum group - Group 3A - 3 electrons in outer energy level (2s and 1p) properties vary from metallic to metalloid o aluminum is the most useful metal of this group being lightweight and strong to make boats, aircraft etc. Group 4A - Carbon group - 4 electrons in outer energy level (2s and 2p) - properties vary from nonmetallic to metalloid to metallic down the group o diamond and graphite are forms of pure carbon o silicon and germanium are semiconductors used in electronics

5 o tin and lead are useful metals Group 5A - Nitrogen group - 5 electrons in outer energy level (2s and 3p) - properties vary from nonmetallic to metalloid to metallic o nitrogen and phosphorus are elements necessary to form proteins and nucleic acids in living things Group 6A - Oxygen group - 6 electrons in outer energy level (2s and 4p) - properties vary from nonmetallic to metalloid o oxygen is the most abundant element on the earth o sulfur has many industrial uses (sulfuric acid is the most widely used industrial chemical) Group 7A - Halogens - all have 7 electrons in the outer energy level (2s and 5p) - properties vary from nonmetallic to metalloid. Very reactive due to the outer energy level being almost filled. o iodine is used as an antiseptic o chlorine is a bleaching agent and disinfecting agent o fluorine, as the fluoride ion, is used to maintain the health of our teeth o fluorine is used to make teflon The Development of a New Atomic Model I. Properties of Light A. Electromagnetic Radiation 1. Many types of EM waves a. visible light b. x-rays c. ultraviolet light d. infrared light e. radio waves 2. EM radiation are forms of energy which move through space as waves a. Move at speed of light (1) x 10 8 m/s b. Speed is equal to the frequency times the wavelength c = λν (1) Frequency (ν) is the number of waves passing a given point in one second (unit = 1/s) (2) Wavelength (λ) is the distance between peaks of adjacent waves (unit = m) c. Speed of light is a constant, so λν is also a constant (1) λ and ν must be inversely proportional B. Light and Energy - The Photoelectric Effect 1. The Photoelectric Effect a. Electrons are emitted from a metal when light shines on the metal 2. Radiant energy is transferred in units (or quanta) of energy called photons a. A photon is a particle of energy having a mass of zero and carrying a quantum of energy b. A quantum is the minimum amount of energy that can be lost or gained by an atom 3. Energy of a photon is directly proportional to the frequency of radiation a. E = hν (h is Planck s constant, x J.s )

6 4. Wave-Particle Duality a. Energy travels through space as waves, but can be thought of as a stream of particles (Einstein) II. The Hydrogen Line Spectrum A. Ground State 1. The lowest energy state of an atom B. Excited State 1. A state in which an atom has a higher potential energy than in its ground state C. Bright line spectrum 1. Light is given off by excited atoms as they return to lower energy states 2. Light is given off in very definite wavelengths 3. A spectroscope reveals lines of particular colors (with a specific wavelength and frequency) Bright line spectrum of Hydrogen III. The Bohr Model of the Atom A. Electron Orbits, or Energy Levels 1. Electrons can circle the nucleus only in allowed paths or orbits (like planets around the sun) 2. The energy of the electron is greater when it is in orbits farther from the nucleus 3. The atom achieves the ground state when atoms occupy the closest possible positions around the nucleus 4. Electromagnetic radiation is emitted when electrons move closer to the nucleus

7 B. Energy transitions 1. Energies of atoms are fixed with definite quantities 2. Energy transitions occur in jumps of discrete amounts of energy 3. Electrons only lose energy when they move to a lower energy state C. Shortcomings of the Bohr Model 1. Doesn't work for atoms larger than hydrogen (with more than one electron) 2. Doesn't explain chemical behavior The Quantum Model of the Atom I. Electrons as Waves and Particles A. Louis debroglie (1924) 1. Electrons have wavelike properties 2. Consider the electron as a wave confined to a space that can have only certain frequencies B. The Heisenbery Uncertainty Principle (Werner Heisenberg ) 1. "It is impossible to determine simultaneously both the position and velocity of an electron a. Electrons are located by their interactions with photons b. Electrons and photons have similar energies c. Interaction between a photon and an electron knocks the electron off of its course C. The Schrodinger Wave Equation 1. Proved quantization of electron energies and is the basis for Quantum Theory a. Quantum theory describes mathematically the wave properties of electrons 2. Electrons do not move around the nucleus in "planetary orbits" 3. Electrons exist in regions called orbitals a. An orbital is a three-dimensional region around the nucleus that indicates the probable location of an electron (a 90% probability of finding an electron) II. Atomic Orbitals and Quantum Numbers Quantum Numbers specify the properties of atomic orbitals and the properties of the electrons in orbitals A. Principal Quantum Number (n) 1. Indicates the main energy levels occupied by the electron (distance from the nucleus) (size) 2. Values of n are positive integers a. n=1 is closest to the nucleus, and lowest in energy 3. The number of orbitals possible per energy level (or "shell") is equal to n 2 B. Angular Momentum Quantum Number (l) 1. Indicates the shape of the orbital 2. Number of orbital shapes = n a. Shapes are designated s, p, d, f (sublevels)

8 C. Magnetic Quantum Number (m) 1. The orientation of the orbital around the nucleus a. s orbitals have only one possible orientation b. p orbitals have three, d have five and f have 7 possible orientations D. Spin Quantum Number 1. Indicates the fundamental spin states of an electron in an orbital 2. Two possible values for spin, +1/2, -1/2 or 3. A single orbital can contain only two electrons, which must have opposite spins

9 Electron Configurations I. Writing Electrons Configurations A. Rules 1. Aufbau Principle a. An electron occupies the lowest-energy orbitals first 2. Pauli Exclusion Principle a. No two electrons in the same atom can have the same set of four quantum numbers (opposite spins) 3. Hund's Rule a. Orbitals of equal energy are each occupied by one electron before any orbital is occupied by a second electron, and all electrons in singly occupied orbitals must have the same spin B. Orbital Notation 1. Unoccupied orbitals are represented by a line, (or a box or circle) a. Lines are labeled with the principal quantum number and the sublevel letter 2. Arrows are used to represent electrons a. Arrows pointing up and down indicate opposite spins C. Electron Configuration Notation 1. The number of electrons in a sublevel is indicated by adding a superscript to the sublevel designation Hydrogen = 1s 1 Helium = 1s 2 Lithium = 1s 2 2s 1 II. Survey of the Periodic Table A. Elements of the Second and Third Periods 1. Highest occupied energy level a. The electron containing energy level with the highest principal quantum number 2. Inner shell electrons a. Electrons that are not in the highest energy level 3. Octet a. Highest energy level s and p electrons are filled (8 electrons) b. Characteristic of noble gases, Group Noble gas configuration a. Outer main energy level fully occupied, usually (except for He) by eight electrons b. This configuration has extra stability B. Elements of the Fourth Period 1. Irregularity of Copper a. Expected: [Ar] 4s 2 3d 9 b. Actual: [Ar] 4s 1 3d Several transition and rare-earth elements borrow from smaller sublevels in order to half fill larger d sublevels. Half filled and fully filled sublevels are particularly stable.

Atomic Structure: Chapter Problems

Atomic Structure: Chapter Problems Atomic Structure: Chapter Problems Bohr Model Class Work 1. Describe the nuclear model of the atom. 2. Explain the problems with the nuclear model of the atom. 3. According to Niels Bohr, what does n stand

More information

Name Date Class ELECTRONS IN ATOMS. Standard Curriculum Core content Extension topics

Name Date Class ELECTRONS IN ATOMS. Standard Curriculum Core content Extension topics 13 ELECTRONS IN ATOMS Conceptual Curriculum Concrete concepts More abstract concepts or math/problem-solving Standard Curriculum Core content Extension topics Honors Curriculum Core honors content Options

More information

WAVES AND ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION

WAVES AND ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION WAVES AND ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION All waves are characterized by their wavelength, frequency and speed. Wavelength (lambda, ): the distance between any 2 successive crests or troughs. Frequency (nu,):

More information

Chapter 10. Modern Atomic Theory and the Periodic Table

Chapter 10. Modern Atomic Theory and the Periodic Table Chapter 10 Modern Atomic Theory and the Periodic Table 1 10.1 A brief history 10.1 A brief history atoms proposed by Greek philosopher Dalton s model of atom Thomson s model Rutherford s model there remain

More information

Electrons in Atoms & Periodic Table Chapter 13 & 14 Assignment & Problem Set

Electrons in Atoms & Periodic Table Chapter 13 & 14 Assignment & Problem Set Electrons in Atoms & Periodic Table Name Warm-Ups (Show your work for credit) Date 1. Date 2. Date 3. Date 4. Date 5. Date 6. Date 7. Date 8. Electrons in Atoms & Periodic Table 2 Study Guide: Things You

More information

Chapter 11 Atoms, Energy and Electron Configurations Objectives

Chapter 11 Atoms, Energy and Electron Configurations Objectives Objectives 1. To review Rutherford s model of the atom 2. To explore the nature of electromagnetic radiation 3. To see how atoms emit light A. Rutherford s Atom.but there is a problem here!! Using Rutherford

More information

The idea of arranging the elements in the periodic table according to their chemical and physical properties is attributed to. d) Ramsay.

The idea of arranging the elements in the periodic table according to their chemical and physical properties is attributed to. d) Ramsay. Chemistry I PERIODIC TABLE PRACTICE QUIZ Mr. Scott Select the best answer. 1) The idea of arranging the elements in the periodic table according to their chemical and physical properties is attributed

More information

Atomic Structure Ron Robertson

Atomic Structure Ron Robertson Atomic Structure Ron Robertson r2 n:\files\courses\1110-20\2010 possible slides for web\atomicstructuretrans.doc I. What is Light? Debate in 1600's: Since waves or particles can transfer energy, what is

More information

MODERN ATOMIC THEORY AND THE PERIODIC TABLE

MODERN ATOMIC THEORY AND THE PERIODIC TABLE CHAPTER 10 MODERN ATOMIC THEORY AND THE PERIODIC TABLE SOLUTIONS TO REVIEW QUESTIONS 1. Wavelength is defined as the distance between consecutive peaks in a wave. It is generally symbolized by the Greek

More information

Chapter 7. Electron Structure of the Atom. Chapter 7 Topics

Chapter 7. Electron Structure of the Atom. Chapter 7 Topics Chapter 7 Electron Structure of the Atom Copyright The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for reproduction or display. 1 Chapter 7 Topics 1. Electromagnetic radiation 2. The Bohr model of

More information

Copyright The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for reproduction or display. Chapter 2 - Cont. 30 January 2014

Copyright The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for reproduction or display. Chapter 2 - Cont. 30 January 2014 Copyright The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for reproduction or display. Chapter 2 - Cont. 30 January 2014 The Structure of the Atom and the Periodic Table Element Information in the

More information

AP CHEMISTRY CHAPTER REVIEW CHAPTER 6: ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE AND THE PERIODIC TABLE

AP CHEMISTRY CHAPTER REVIEW CHAPTER 6: ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE AND THE PERIODIC TABLE AP CHEMISTRY CHAPTER REVIEW CHAPTER 6: ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE AND THE PERIODIC TABLE You should be familiar with the wavelike properties of light: frequency ( ), wavelength ( ), and energy (E) as well as

More information

AP Chemistry A. Allan Chapter 7 Notes - Atomic Structure and Periodicity

AP Chemistry A. Allan Chapter 7 Notes - Atomic Structure and Periodicity AP Chemistry A. Allan Chapter 7 Notes - Atomic Structure and Periodicity 7.1 Electromagnetic Radiation A. Types of EM Radiation (wavelengths in meters) 10-1 10-10 10-8 4 to 7x10-7 10-4 10-1 10 10 4 gamma

More information

Name: Period: Date: Unit 3 Practice Review (the questions on the test are NOT the same as the review questions)

Name: Period: Date: Unit 3 Practice Review (the questions on the test are NOT the same as the review questions) Name: Period: Date: Unit 3 Review: things you will need to know 1. Atomic Theories: Know all the scientists in order. What did they discover? What experiment did they use? 2. Development of the periodic

More information

Review- The Periodic Table

Review- The Periodic Table Review- The Periodic Table Name Date Block Matching: Match the description in with the correct term in. Write the letter in the blank provided. Each term matches with only one description, so be sure to

More information

Arrangement of Electrons in Atoms

Arrangement of Electrons in Atoms CHAPTER 4 PRE-TEST Arrangement of Electrons in Atoms In the space provided, write the letter of the term that best completes each sentence or best answers each question. 1. Which of the following orbital

More information

Unit 6 The periodic table

Unit 6 The periodic table Unit 6 The periodic table How to group elements together? Elements of similar properties would be group together for convenience. The periodic table Chemists group elements with similar chemical properties

More information

Electron Configurations

Electron Configurations SECTION 4.3 Electron Configurations Bohr s model of the atom described the possible energy states of the electron in a hydrogen atom. The energy states were deduced from observations of hydrogen s emissionline

More information

PERIODIC TABLE OF ELEMENTS., a Russian scientist is credited with creating the periodic table.

PERIODIC TABLE OF ELEMENTS., a Russian scientist is credited with creating the periodic table. PERIODIC TABLE OF ELEMENTS, a Russian scientist is credited with creating the periodic table. Periods tell us how many are in the atoms of each element. Groups help us to know how many electrons are in

More information

P. Table & E Configuration Practice TEST

P. Table & E Configuration Practice TEST P. Table & E Configuration Practice TEST Multiple Choice Identify the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question. 1. A line spectrum is produced when an electron moves from one energy

More information

Electron Arrangements

Electron Arrangements Section 3.4 Electron Arrangements Objectives Express the arrangement of electrons in atoms using electron configurations and Lewis valence electron dot structures New Vocabulary Heisenberg uncertainty

More information

THE PERIODIC TABLE & ELECTRON CONFIGURATION. Chapters 5 & 6

THE PERIODIC TABLE & ELECTRON CONFIGURATION. Chapters 5 & 6 THE PERIODIC TABLE & ELECTRON CONFIGURATION Chapters 5 & 6 Dimitri Mendeleev Do Not Copy Invented periodic table Organized elements by properties Arranged elements by atomic mass Predicted existence of

More information

Chapter 7: The Quantum-Mechanical Model of the Atom

Chapter 7: The Quantum-Mechanical Model of the Atom C h e m i s t r y 1 A : C h a p t e r 7 P a g e 1 Chapter 7: The Quantum-Mechanical Model of the Atom Homework: Read Chapter 7. Work out sample/practice exercises Suggested Chapter 7 Problems: 37, 39,

More information

Answers and Solutions to Text Problems

Answers and Solutions to Text Problems Atoms and Elements 2 Answers and Solutions to Text Problems 2.1 a. Cu b. Si c. K d. N e. Fe f. Ba g. Pb h. Sr 2.2 a. O b. Li c. S d. Al e. H f. Ne g. Sn h. Au 2.3 a. carbon b. chlorine c. iodine d. mercury

More information

Unit 2: Atomic Theory Practice Packet

Unit 2: Atomic Theory Practice Packet Unit 2: Atomic Theory Practice Packet 1 Name History of Atomic Theory Period Fill in the missing information in the chart below: Name of Researcher Equipment Sketch of Model Major Idea/Discovery N/A All

More information

Lesson Outline for Teaching

Lesson Outline for Teaching Lesson Outline for Teaching Lesson 1: Using the Periodic Table A. What is the periodic table? 1. The periodic table is a chart of the elements arranged into rows and columns according to their chemical

More information

CHAPTER 10 MODERN ATOMIC THEORY AND THE PERIODIC TABLE SOLUTIONS TO REVIEW QUESTIONS

CHAPTER 10 MODERN ATOMIC THEORY AND THE PERIODIC TABLE SOLUTIONS TO REVIEW QUESTIONS HEINS10-118-128v4.qxd 12/30/06 2:05 PM Page 118 CHAPTER 10 MODERN ATOMIC THEORY AND THE PERIODIC TABLE SOLUTIONS TO REVIEW QUESTIONS 1. An electron orbital is a region in space around the nucleus of an

More information

Atomic Structure & the Periodic Table CHAPTERS 4 & 5

Atomic Structure & the Periodic Table CHAPTERS 4 & 5 Atomic Structure & the Periodic Table CHAPTERS 4 & 5 Objectives Understandings: Chemical structure determines the properties of matter The identity and properties of individual elements is determined by

More information

Electron Configuration Worksheet (and Lots More!!)

Electron Configuration Worksheet (and Lots More!!) Electron Configuration Worksheet (and Lots More!!) Brief Instructions An electron configuration is a method of indicating the arrangement of electrons about a nucleus. A typical electron configuration

More information

Sample Exercise 6.1 Concepts of Wavelength and Frequency

Sample Exercise 6.1 Concepts of Wavelength and Frequency Sample Exercise 6.1 Concepts of Wavelength and Frequency Two electromagnetic waves are represented in the margin. (a) Which wave has the higher frequency? (b) If one wave represents visible light and the

More information

Practice questions for Ch. 7

Practice questions for Ch. 7 Name: Class: Date: ID: A Practice questions for Ch. 7 Multiple Choice Identify the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question. 1. When ignited, a uranium compound burns with a green

More information

47374_04_p25-32.qxd 2/9/07 7:50 AM Page 25. 4 Atoms and Elements

47374_04_p25-32.qxd 2/9/07 7:50 AM Page 25. 4 Atoms and Elements 47374_04_p25-32.qxd 2/9/07 7:50 AM Page 25 4 Atoms and Elements 4.1 a. Cu b. Si c. K d. N e. Fe f. Ba g. Pb h. Sr 4.2 a. O b. Li c. S d. Al e. H f. Ne g. Sn h. Au 4.3 a. carbon b. chlorine c. iodine d.

More information

Name: Class: Date: Chapter 4 & 5 Review

Name: Class: Date: Chapter 4 & 5 Review Name: Class: Date: Chapter 4 & 5 Review 1. Unlike Democritus, Aristotle did not believe that matter was composed of tiny, indivisible. 2. The results of Rutherford s gold foil experiment demonstrated that

More information

AP Chemistry Chapter 6 Lecture Notes- Electrons! 6.1 The Wave Nature of Light. 6.2 Quantized Energy and Photons. Chapter 6 Homework

AP Chemistry Chapter 6 Lecture Notes- Electrons! 6.1 The Wave Nature of Light. 6.2 Quantized Energy and Photons. Chapter 6 Homework AP Chemistry Chapter 6 Lecture Notes- Electrons! Chapter 6 Homework 6.1 The Wave Nature of Light pg 253 #3, 4, 13, 15, 17, 19, 21, 25, 29 The electronic structure of an atom refers to the arrangement of

More information

SCPS Chemistry Worksheet Periodicity A. Periodic table 1. Which are metals? Circle your answers: C, Na, F, Cs, Ba, Ni

SCPS Chemistry Worksheet Periodicity A. Periodic table 1. Which are metals? Circle your answers: C, Na, F, Cs, Ba, Ni SCPS Chemistry Worksheet Periodicity A. Periodic table 1. Which are metals? Circle your answers: C, Na, F, Cs, Ba, Ni Which metal in the list above has the most metallic character? Explain. Cesium as the

More information

SAI. Protons Electrons Neutrons Isotope Name. Isotope Symbol 131i S3 1. Atomic Number. Mass Number

SAI. Protons Electrons Neutrons Isotope Name. Isotope Symbol 131i S3 1. Atomic Number. Mass Number ATOMIC STRUCTURE AND THE PERIODIC TABLE CHAPTER 4 WORKSHEET PART A Given the following isotopes, determine the atomic number, the mass number, the number of protons, electrons and neutrons. Isotope Symbol

More information

Directions: Multiple Choice For each of the following questions, choose the answer that best answers the question and place it on your answer sheet.

Directions: Multiple Choice For each of the following questions, choose the answer that best answers the question and place it on your answer sheet. CHEMISTRY TEST: THE PERIODIC TABLE Directions: Multiple Choice For each of the following questions, choose the answer that best answers the question and place it on your answer sheet. 1. Which of the following

More information

Untitled Document. 1. Which of the following best describes an atom? 4. Which statement best describes the density of an atom s nucleus?

Untitled Document. 1. Which of the following best describes an atom? 4. Which statement best describes the density of an atom s nucleus? Name: Date: 1. Which of the following best describes an atom? A. protons and electrons grouped together in a random pattern B. protons and electrons grouped together in an alternating pattern C. a core

More information

Chapter 29: Atomic Structure. What will we learn in this chapter?

Chapter 29: Atomic Structure. What will we learn in this chapter? Chapter 29: Atomic Structure What will we learn in this chapter? Contents: Electrons in atoms Wave functions Electron spin Pauli exclusion principle Atomic structure Periodic table W. Pauli & N. Bohr Both

More information

Sample Exercise 6.1 Concepts of Wavelength and Frequency

Sample Exercise 6.1 Concepts of Wavelength and Frequency Sample Exercise 6.1 Concepts of Wavelength and Frequency Two electromagnetic waves are represented below. (a) Which wave has the higher frequency? (b) If one wave represents visible light and the other

More information

UNIT (2) ATOMS AND ELEMENTS

UNIT (2) ATOMS AND ELEMENTS UNIT (2) ATOMS AND ELEMENTS 2.1 Elements An element is a fundamental substance that cannot be broken down by chemical means into simpler substances. Each element is represented by an abbreviation called

More information

CHAPTER 5: MODELS OF THE ATOM

CHAPTER 5: MODELS OF THE ATOM CHAPTER 5: MODELS OF THE ATOM Problems: 1, 5, 7,11,13,15,17,19,21,25, 37,39,41,61,67,69,71,73, 77ab,79ab,81,83,87,89 1981 - STM (scanning tunneling microscope) used to "see" atoms STM Images - Web sites:

More information

2. John Dalton did his research work in which of the following countries? a. France b. Greece c. Russia d. England

2. John Dalton did his research work in which of the following countries? a. France b. Greece c. Russia d. England CHAPTER 3 1. Which combination of individual and contribution is not correct? a. Antoine Lavoisier - clarified confusion over cause of burning b. John Dalton - proposed atomic theory c. Marie Curie - discovered

More information

Outline. Chapter 6 Electronic Structure and the Periodic Table. Review. Arranging Electrons in Atoms. Fireworks. Atomic Spectra

Outline. Chapter 6 Electronic Structure and the Periodic Table. Review. Arranging Electrons in Atoms. Fireworks. Atomic Spectra Outline William L Masterton Cecile N. Hurley Edward J. Neth cengage.com/chemistry/masterton Chapter 6 Electronic Structure and the Periodic Table Light, photon energies and atomic spectra The hydrogen

More information

Chapter 6 The Periodic Table

Chapter 6 The Periodic Table Chapter 6 The Periodic Table Organizing the Periodic Table In a grocery store, the products are grouped according to similar characteristics. With a logical classification system, finding and comparing

More information

ATOMS AND THE PERIODIC TABLE

ATOMS AND THE PERIODIC TABLE ATOMS AND THE PERIODIC TABLE Physical Science 2nd Semester NAME: CLASS PERIOD: TEACHER: ASSIGNMENT/PAGE NUMBERS DUE DATE POINTS EARNED Periodic Table of Elements pg. 1 Atomic Structure Learning Targets

More information

Chapter 6 Electronic Structure of Atoms

Chapter 6 Electronic Structure of Atoms Chapter 6 Electronic Structure of Atoms 1. Electromagnetic radiation travels through vacuum at a speed of m/s. (a). 6.626 x 26 (b). 4186 (c). 3.00 x 8 (d). It depends on wavelength Explanation: The speed

More information

Chapter 6 Electromagnetic Radiation and the Electronic Structure of the Atom

Chapter 6 Electromagnetic Radiation and the Electronic Structure of the Atom Chapter 6 In This Chapter Physical and chemical properties of compounds are influenced by the structure of the molecules that they consist of. Chemical structure depends, in turn, on how electrons are

More information

Part I: Principal Energy Levels and Sublevels

Part I: Principal Energy Levels and Sublevels Part I: Principal Energy Levels and Sublevels As you already know, all atoms are made of subatomic particles, including protons, neutrons, and electrons. Positive protons and neutral neutrons are found

More information

Chapter 5 TEST: The Periodic Table name

Chapter 5 TEST: The Periodic Table name Chapter 5 TEST: The Periodic Table name HPS # date: Multiple Choice Identify the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question. 1. The order of elements in the periodic table is based

More information

Chapter 5. Mendeleev s Periodic Table

Chapter 5. Mendeleev s Periodic Table Chapter 5 Perodicity and Atomic Structure Mendeleev s Periodic Table In the 1869, Dmitri Mendeleev proposed that the properties of the chemical elements repeat at regular intervals when arranged in order

More information

CHEM 1411 Chapter 5 Homework Answers

CHEM 1411 Chapter 5 Homework Answers 1 CHEM 1411 Chapter 5 Homework Answers 1. Which statement regarding the gold foil experiment is false? (a) It was performed by Rutherford and his research group early in the 20 th century. (b) Most of

More information

The Periodic Table: Chapter Problems Periodic Table Class Work Homework Special Groups Class Work Homework Periodic Families Class Work

The Periodic Table: Chapter Problems Periodic Table Class Work Homework Special Groups Class Work Homework Periodic Families Class Work The Periodic Table: Chapter Problems Periodic Table 1. As you move from left to right across the periodic table, how does atomic number change? 2. What element is located in period 3, group 13? 3. What

More information

Test 2: Atomic Structure Review

Test 2: Atomic Structure Review Name: Monday, October 15, 2007 Test 2: Atomic Structure Review 1. Figure 1 The diagram shows the characteristic spectral line patterns of four elements. Also shown are spectral lines produced by an unknown

More information

7.4. Using the Bohr Theory KNOW? Using the Bohr Theory to Describe Atoms and Ions

7.4. Using the Bohr Theory KNOW? Using the Bohr Theory to Describe Atoms and Ions 7.4 Using the Bohr Theory LEARNING TIP Models such as Figures 1 to 4, on pages 218 and 219, help you visualize scientific explanations. As you examine Figures 1 to 4, look back and forth between the diagrams

More information

Chapter 2 Atoms, Ions, and the Periodic Table

Chapter 2 Atoms, Ions, and the Periodic Table Chapter 2 Atoms, Ions, and the Periodic Table 2.1 (a) neutron; (b) law of conservation of mass; (c) proton; (d) main-group element; (e) relative atomic mass; (f) mass number; (g) isotope; (h) cation; (i)

More information

Chapter 7. Quantum Theory and Atomic Structure

Chapter 7. Quantum Theory and Atomic Structure Chapter 7. Quantum Theory and Atomic Structure A problem arose in Rutherford s nuclear model. A nucleus and electron attract each other; to remain apart the electron must move. The energy of the electron

More information

Elements may combine in more than one proportion to form more than one compound. Examples...

Elements may combine in more than one proportion to form more than one compound. Examples... 1 UNIT 5 - ATOMIC THEORY: THE NUCLEAR MODEL OF THE ATOM 2 3 Dalton s Atomic Theory 1) Each element is made up of tiny, individual particles called atoms. 2) Atoms are indivisible; they cannot be created

More information

Electrons In Atoms Mr. O Brien (SFHS) Chapter 5 Standard 1D

Electrons In Atoms Mr. O Brien (SFHS) Chapter 5 Standard 1D Electrons In Atoms Mr. O Brien (SFHS) Chapter 5 Standard 1D Electrons in Atoms (std.1d) What are Bohr Models? planetary model in which the negatively-charged electrons orbit a small, positively-charged

More information

Unit 3 Study Guide: Electron Configuration & The Periodic Table

Unit 3 Study Guide: Electron Configuration & The Periodic Table Name: Teacher s Name: Class: Block: Date: Unit 3 Study Guide: Electron Configuration & The Periodic Table 1. For each of the following elements, state whether the element is radioactive, synthetic or both.

More information

Chapter 3 Atoms and Elements

Chapter 3 Atoms and Elements Chapter 3 Atoms and Elements 1 Elements Elements are pure substances that cannot be separated into simpler substances by ordinary laboratory processes the building blocks of matter listed on the inside

More information

3 Modern Atomic Theory

3 Modern Atomic Theory CHAPTER 4 3 Modern Atomic Theory SECTION Atoms KEY IDEAS As you read this section, keep these questions in mind: How are electrons organized in an atom? Can the exact location of an electron be determined?

More information

Periodic Table. The periodic table organises the elements in a particular way.

Periodic Table. The periodic table organises the elements in a particular way. A quick guide... Periodic Table n The periodic table organises the elements in a particular way. n A great deal of information about an element can be gathered from its position in the periodic table.

More information

2 Grouping the Elements

2 Grouping the Elements CHAPTER 5 2 Grouping the Elements SECTION The Periodic Table BEFORE YOU READ After you read this section, you should be able to answer these questions: Why do elements in a group have similar properties?

More information

Atomic Theory. Unit 3 Development of the Atomic Theory. H. Cannon, C. Clapper and T. Guillot Klein High School

Atomic Theory. Unit 3 Development of the Atomic Theory. H. Cannon, C. Clapper and T. Guillot Klein High School Atomic Theory Unit 3 Development of the Atomic Theory 1. Where is the mass of the atom concentrated? In the nucleus 2. What is located in the nucleus? Neutrons and protons 3. What is the negative particle

More information

Science and technology 404

Science and technology 404 Name Date STUDY GUIDE CHAPTER 1 ATOMS AND ELEMENTS 1) DESCRIBE THE RUTHERFORD-BOHR ATOMIC MODEL All matter is made of small particles called atoms. An atom is the smallest unit of matter that retains the

More information

Chapter 2 Atoms and the Periodic Table

Chapter 2 Atoms and the Periodic Table Chapter 2 1 Chapter 2 Atoms and the Periodic Table Solutions to In-Chapter Problems 2.1 Each element is identified by a one- or two-letter symbol. Use the periodic table to find the symbol for each element.

More information

3. What would you predict for the intensity and binding energy for the 3p orbital for that of sulfur?

3. What would you predict for the intensity and binding energy for the 3p orbital for that of sulfur? PSI AP Chemistry Periodic Trends MC Review Name Periodic Law and the Quantum Model Use the PES spectrum of Phosphorus below to answer questions 1-3. 1. Which peak corresponds to the 1s orbital? (A) 1.06

More information

The Periodic Table. Name: Class: Date: ID: A. Multiple Choice Identify the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question:

The Periodic Table. Name: Class: Date: ID: A. Multiple Choice Identify the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question: Name: Class: Date:, ID: A The Periodic Table Multiple Choice Identify the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question: 1. What are the elements with atomic numbers from 58 to 71 called?

More information

PSI AP Chemistry Unit 1: The Atom Free Response CW/HW

PSI AP Chemistry Unit 1: The Atom Free Response CW/HW PSI AP Chemistry Unit 1: The Atom Free Response CW/HW Name Laws of Multiple and Definite Proportions and Conservation of Mass Classwork: 1. Exactly twice as much oxygen is required to react with 1 gram

More information

Unit 3.2: The Periodic Table and Periodic Trends Notes

Unit 3.2: The Periodic Table and Periodic Trends Notes Unit 3.2: The Periodic Table and Periodic Trends Notes The Organization of the Periodic Table Dmitri Mendeleev was the first to organize the elements by their periodic properties. In 1871 he arranged the

More information

Periodic Table Questions

Periodic Table Questions Periodic Table Questions 1. The elements characterized as nonmetals are located in the periodic table at the (1) far left; (2) bottom; (3) center; (4) top right. 2. An element that is a liquid at STP is

More information

Student Exploration: Electron Configuration

Student Exploration: Electron Configuration Name: Date: Student Exploration: Electron Configuration Vocabulary: atomic number, atomic radius, Aufbau principle, chemical family, diagonal rule, electron configuration, Hund s rule, orbital, Pauli exclusion

More information

Composition and Structure of the Atom. Protons: Positively charged, high mass particle. Neutrons: Neutral (no) charge, high mass

Composition and Structure of the Atom. Protons: Positively charged, high mass particle. Neutrons: Neutral (no) charge, high mass Composition and Structure of the Atom Atom: basic unit of an element; smallest unit that retains chemical properties of an element Subatomic particles: Small particles that are the building blocks from

More information

Flame Tests & Electron Configuration

Flame Tests & Electron Configuration Flame Tests & Electron Configuration INTRODUCTION Many elements produce colors in the flame when heated. The origin of this phenomenon lies in the arrangement, or configuration of the electrons in the

More information

Unit 7 Review. Name: Class: Date: Multiple Choice Identify the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question.

Unit 7 Review. Name: Class: Date: Multiple Choice Identify the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question. Name: Class: Date: ID: A Unit 7 Review Multiple Choice Identify the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question. 1) In which set of elements would all members be expected to have very

More information

EXPERIMENT 4: Electron Configuration of elements

EXPERIMENT 4: Electron Configuration of elements Material: laboratory display of the elements and a wall periodic table is required. Objective: To learn the use of periodic table for writing electron configuration of elements. INTRODUCTION Basic building

More information

ELECTRONIC CONFIGURATIONS

ELECTRONIC CONFIGURATIONS ELECTRONIC CONFIGURATIONS ELECTRONIC CONFIGURATIONS CONTENTS The Bohr Atom Levels and sub-levels Rules and principles Orbitals Rules for filling orbitals. The Aufbau principle Electronic configurations

More information

Chemistry - Elements Electron Configurations The Periodic Table. Ron Robertson

Chemistry - Elements Electron Configurations The Periodic Table. Ron Robertson Chemistry - Elements Electron Configurations The Periodic Table Ron Robertson History of Chemistry Before 16 th Century Alchemy Attempts (scientific or otherwise) to change cheap metals into gold no real

More information

Families and Periods of the Periodic Table

Families and Periods of the Periodic Table Families and Periods of the Periodic Table CK12 Editor Say Thanks to the Authors Click http://www.ck12.org/saythanks (No sign in required) To access a customizable version of this book, as well as other

More information

Elements in the periodic table are indicated by SYMBOLS. To the left of the symbol we find the atomic mass (A) at the upper corner, and the atomic num

Elements in the periodic table are indicated by SYMBOLS. To the left of the symbol we find the atomic mass (A) at the upper corner, and the atomic num . ATOMIC STRUCTURE FUNDAMENTALS LEARNING OBJECTIVES To review the basics concepts of atomic structure that have direct relevance to the fundamental concepts of organic chemistry. This material is essential

More information

History of Atomic Theory

History of Atomic Theory History of Atomic Theory Alchemy ~ Before 400 B.C. Experiment: Pseudoscience concerned with: Changing metal to gold Finding an eternal life elixir Aristotle Beliefs: All matter was made up of a combination

More information

IPS Unit 8 Periodic Table Review Worksheet

IPS Unit 8 Periodic Table Review Worksheet Name: Period: IPS Unit 8 Periodic Table Review Worksheet Directions: Use the terms below to correctly complete the statements. Write the terms in the blanks to the left. Then find and circle each term

More information

1. Structure and Properties of the Atom

1. Structure and Properties of the Atom SACE Stage 1 Chemistry - The Essentials 1. Structure and Properties of the Atom 1.1 Atoms: A simple definition of the atom is that it is the smallest particle that contains the properties of that element.

More information

The Advanced Placement Examination in Chemistry. Part I Multiple Choice Questions Part II Free Response Questions Selected Questions from1970 to 2010

The Advanced Placement Examination in Chemistry. Part I Multiple Choice Questions Part II Free Response Questions Selected Questions from1970 to 2010 The Advanced Placement Examination in Chemistry Part I Multiple Choice Questions Part II Free Response Questions Selected Questions from1970 to 2010 Atomic Theory and Periodicity Part I 1984 1. Which of

More information

1301 TEST 1 REVIEW SHEET. You need to read chapters 1 through 4 All is fair game unless I announce otherwise on Wednesday before the test.

1301 TEST 1 REVIEW SHEET. You need to read chapters 1 through 4 All is fair game unless I announce otherwise on Wednesday before the test. 1301 TEST 1 REVIEW SHEET You need to read chapters 1 through 4 All is fair game unless I announce otherwise on Wednesday before the test. Introductory Stuff Scientific Method Atoms and Molecules; Dalton

More information

Valence Electrons. Everything that is underlined should get filled in on your notes!

Valence Electrons. Everything that is underlined should get filled in on your notes! Valence Electrons Everything that is underlined should get filled in on your notes! Valence Electrons Valence electrons the electrons that are in the highest (outermost) energy level that level is also

More information

b. How is the modern periodic table arranged? In order of increasing atomic number

b. How is the modern periodic table arranged? In order of increasing atomic number Unit 3 Review Chapters 4 (Atomic Structure) & 6 (Periodic Table) Part 1: Answer the following questions. 1. a. Which scientist created the first modern atomic theory? John Dalton b. What was his theory?

More information

Chemistry 2 Chapter 13: Electrons in Atoms Please do not write on the test Use an answer sheet! 1 point/problem 45 points total

Chemistry 2 Chapter 13: Electrons in Atoms Please do not write on the test Use an answer sheet! 1 point/problem 45 points total Chemistry 2 Chapter 13: Electrons in Atoms Please do not write on the test Use an answer sheet! 1 point/problem 45 points total 1. Calculate the energy in joules of a photon of red light that has a frequency

More information

Name Class Date ELECTRONS AND THE STRUCTURE OF ATOMS

Name Class Date ELECTRONS AND THE STRUCTURE OF ATOMS Name Class Date The Periodic Table ELECTRONS AND THE STRUCTURE OF ATOMS 6.1 Organizing the Elements Essential Understanding Although Dmitri Mendeleev is often credited as the father of the periodic table,

More information

2. What is the wavelength of light that has a frequency of 4.22 x Hz? 3. What is the energy of light that has a frequency of 1.30 x Hz?

2. What is the wavelength of light that has a frequency of 4.22 x Hz? 3. What is the energy of light that has a frequency of 1.30 x Hz? Skill Practice 10 1. Define the terms ground state and excited state. Ground state: the normal energy level that an electron occupies. Excited state: when an electron has absorbed energy to occupy a higher

More information

Question Bank Periodic Table and Periodic Properties

Question Bank Periodic Table and Periodic Properties Question Bank Periodic Table and Periodic Properties 1. Name the following with reference to the elements of Modern Periodic Table. (1 26) (a) An alkali metal in period 2. Ans. Lithium (b) A halogen in

More information

The Periodic Table: Periodic trends

The Periodic Table: Periodic trends Unit 1 The Periodic Table: Periodic trends There are over one hundred different chemical elements. Some of these elements are familiar to you such as hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen and carbon. Each one has

More information

Chapter 9: ELECTRONS IN ATOMS AND THE PERIODIC TABLE

Chapter 9: ELECTRONS IN ATOMS AND THE PERIODIC TABLE Chapter 9: ELECTRONS IN ATOMS AND THE PERIODIC TABLE Problems: 1-3, 13-15, 19, 23-25, 31-32, 43, 45-46, 49c, 50a, 50b, 57c, 58 (b,c,d), 61-62, 69, 71-74, 77-88, 91-94 9.5 LIGHT: Electromagnetic Radiation

More information

1. Structure and Properties of the Atom

1. Structure and Properties of the Atom 1. Structure and Properties of the Atom 1.1 Atoms: A simple definition of the atom is that it is the smallest particle that contains the properties of that element. The idea of atoms was first suggested

More information

Section 1: Arranging the Elements Pages 106-112

Section 1: Arranging the Elements Pages 106-112 Study Guide Chapter 5 Periodic Table Section 1: Arranging the Elements Pages 106-112 DISCOVERING A PATTERN 1. How did Mendeleev arrange the elements? a. by increasing density b. by increasing melting point

More information

Chapter 5. Chapter 5. Objectives. Table of Contents. Chapter 5. Chapter 5. Mendeleev and Chemical Periodicity

Chapter 5. Chapter 5. Objectives. Table of Contents. Chapter 5. Chapter 5. Mendeleev and Chemical Periodicity The Periodic Law of Contents and Periodic Properties Objectives Explain the roles of Mendeleev and Moseley in the development of the periodic table. Describe the modern periodic table. Explain how the

More information

Chapter 5. Chapter 5. Table of Contents. Objectives. Chapter 5. Chapter 5. Mendeleev and Chemical Periodicity

Chapter 5. Chapter 5. Table of Contents. Objectives. Chapter 5. Chapter 5. Mendeleev and Chemical Periodicity The Periodic Law of Contents and Periodic Properties Objectives Explain the roles of Mendeleev and Moseley in the development of the periodic table. Describe the modern periodic table. Explain how the

More information

Chapter 11 Modern Atomic Theory

Chapter 11 Modern Atomic Theory Chapter 11 Modern Atomic Theory Rutherford s Atom The concept of a nuclear atom (charged electrons moving around the nucleus) resulted from Ernest Rutherford s experiments. Question left unanswered: how

More information