Minnesota Comprehensive Assessments-Series III

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1 Not for student use. Minnesota Comprehensive Assessments-Series III Science Item Sampler Script Grade 8 S ARE NOT SECURE TEST MATERIALS. THIS ITEM SAMPLER SCRIPT MAY BE COPIED OR DUPLICATED.

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3 MINNESOTA COMPREHENSIVE ASSESSMENTS GRADE 8 SCIENCE SCRIPT INSTRUCTIONS CONTAINED IN THE SCRIPT REFLECT THE CONTENT OF THE ACTUAL TEST AND MAY NOT APPLY TO THE ADMINISTRATION OF THE. This script is for the Test Monitor only; it is not for students. This script is the only source a Test Monitor may use to read the Science Item Sampler test to students. This script may be used in conjunction with the grade 8 Science Item Sampler online test or the Science Item Sampler large print or braille test. For braille, Test Monitors should also refer to the Test Administrator Notes included with the braille test book. PRIOR TO TEST ADMINISTRATION IN CONJUNCTION WITH AN ONLINE TEST: ATTENTION: Prior to administering the script in conjunction with an online test, Test Monitors must confirm that the student is in a test session with the Accommodated form group type. If not in a test session with the Accommodated form group type, the student s test will not match the script. GENERAL INSTRUCTIONS. FOR TEST MONITORS: Prior to test administration, review the applicable Test Monitor Directions for detailed policy and procedure information for test administration (e.g., stopping testing for the day): o Refer to the Test Monitor Directions for MCA if using the script in conjunction with the online test. o Use the Test Monitor and Student Directions for Paper Accommodations for MCA if using the script in conjunction with the large print or braille test. Before students start the test, present or read the applicable Test Monitor Directions to students to instruct them about testing procedures: o Use the Student Directions for MCA presentation if using the script in conjunction with the online test. o Use the Test Monitor and Student Directions for Paper Accommodations for MCA if using the script in conjunction with the large print or braille test. 3

4 This script contains two sets of instructions: the first set is used for administering the script with the online test and the second set is used for administering the script in conjunction with a large print or braille test book. Use the watermark and tabs on the pages to confirm you are using the correct script; the large print instructions are used for braille test administration with a script. o Refer to pages 5-19 when using the script in conjunction with an online test. o Refer to pages when using the script in conjunction with a large print or braille test. In these sections, read aloud to students ONLY what is in BOLD TYPE. 4

5 SCRIPT FOR USE WITH THE ONLINE Say the following before you begin reading the questions on page 6. We will now begin the Science Item Sampler. Enter your name and select the Start Test Now button to start the Item Sampler. Online Section After I read each question, I will pause for as much time as you need to answer the question. Then I will read the next question. You may ask me to repeat any question as many times as you need. When you have answered the question on the screen, you must select the Blue arrow at the top to continue. Online 5

6 Online Section Title Page: How Does a Garden Grow GRADE 8 SCIENCE SCRIPT FOR USE WITH ONLINE Select the Blue arrow at the top to go on. This student is growing a garden. In her garden, she is growing many types of fruits and vegetables, including bell peppers. Question number one (1): Which factor affecting the growth of pepper plants is a living factor? Online A. The temperature of the air B. The kinds of bacteria living in the soil C. The amount of water the plants receive D. The amount of sunlight the plants receive 6

7 The student is planning an experiment to determine how the amount of light a pepper plant receives affects the amount of fruit it produces. To prepare for her experiment, she reviews photosynthesis and why it is important in making fruit. She draws a diagram of a pepper plant and all the parts of photosynthesis. Online Section Question number two (2): This diagram shows the process of photosynthesis. Identify the parts of the photosynthesis process involved in this ecosystem. Drag the words into the diagram. Beginning at the upper left corner and continuing clockwise, the diagram is labeled: From the Sun, To the air, Food produced in the leaves, Through the roots, From the air. The answer choices are titled: Words. The choices are labeled, from top to bottom: light, water, starch, oxygen, green pigment, carbon dioxide. Online The student tests how the amount of light a pepper plant receives affects the mass of the plants. She sets up nine (9) pots, each with one (1) pepper plant. The plants are divided into three (3) groups with three (3) plants in each group. The first group receives eight (8) hours of light per day. The second group receives twelve (12) hours of light per day. The third group receives eighteen (18) hours of light per day. 7

8 Question number three (3): Online Section Identify each variable that is controlled in this investigation. Select each variable you want to choose. From top to bottom, the answer choices are labeled: The hours of light per day the plants receive, The number of pots in each group. On the bottom row, from left to right, the answer choices are labeled: The number of plants per pot, The type of plant. Title Page: Properties of Matter Investigation Select the Blue arrow at the top to go on. Two students are completing an investigation on the properties of matter. They start by measuring the mass of fifty (50) milliliters of water. Question number four (4): Online Which properties of the water do not change when it is poured from the beaker into the graduated cylinder? Select the properties you want to choose. The answer choices are titled: Properties. The choices are labeled, from top to bottom: Mass, Phase, Shape, Volume. 8

9 In order to compare the effect of temperature on the dissolving rate of sugar, the students prepare three (3) beakers of water at different temperatures, one at thirty degrees Celsius (30 C), one at sixty degrees Celsius (60 C), and one at ninety degrees Celsius (90 C). Online Section The beakers in the diagram are labeled, from left to right: thirty degrees Celsius (30 C), sixty degrees Celsius (60 C), ninety degrees Celsius (90 C). Question number five (5): Which method of heat transfer is shown by the arrows? A. Conduction B. Convection C. Precipitation D. Radiation Online The students now add a sugar cube into each beaker of water, while stirring the water. The beaker in the middle is labeled: sixty degrees Celsius (60 C). 9

10 Question number six (6): Online Section As the sugar crystals disappear, what is happening to the sugar molecules? A. They combine with the water molecules. B. They enter the spaces between the water molecules. C. They evaporate into the air. D. They separate into smaller pieces called atoms. One of the beakers of sugar water is heated at a very slow rate, using a hotplate, until all of the water is gone. Notice there is a substance left in the beaker. The beakers are labeled, from left to right: Before Heating, After Heating. Question number seven (7): Which of the following statements best describes what happened to the water? Online A. The water changed into a solid. B. The water changed state from a liquid to a gas. C. The water changed into hydrogen and oxygen. D. The water changed state from a liquid to a solid. 10

11 Question number eight (8): The substance that is left in the beaker is sugar. Based on this fact, what type of change took place when the sugar dissolved in the water? Online Section A. Chemical B. Electrical C. Mechanical D. Physical The data that was recorded from dissolving sugar is shown in the table below. The table is titled: Sugar Water Experiment. The table has three columns and two rows. The columns are labeled, from left to right: Beaker one (1), Beaker two (2), Beaker three (3). The Beaker one (1) column is labeled, from top to bottom: thirty degrees Celsius (30 C), thirty seconds (30 sec). The Beaker two (2) column is labeled, from top to bottom: sixty degrees Celsius (60 C), fifteen seconds (15 sec). The Beaker three (3) column is labeled, from top to bottom: ninety degrees Celsius (90 C), five seconds (5 sec). Question number nine (9): Online The data show results of the experiment. Make a graph of this data. Drag the top of each bar to the correct height. The graph is titled: Sugar Water Experiment. The horizontal axis is labeled: Degree Celsius. The vertical axis is labeled: Seconds. 11

12 Question number ten (10): Online Section The students slowly heat a fourth beaker to one hundred degrees Celsius (100 C). Using the data they have collected the students want to predict how long it will take for the sugar to dissolve in this beaker. Predict how long it will take the sugar to dissolve, based on the student s data. Enter your answer in the box. The answer box is labeled: seconds (sec). STOP Stop when the student reaches the end of Segment 1. This is the end of Section One (1) of your science test. If you want to review your answers, you may do so now. You may ask me to repeat any question. You will not be able to come back to these questions later. To go to a question, select the number of the question. (Pause while the student reviews his or her answers.) Online When you have finished reviewing, select the Submit Section button. At the Section Exit Warning screen, select Yes button. Title Page: Weather Select the Blue arrow at the top to go on. 12

13 On the way to school, students saw fog in low-lying areas. Students also noticed that the air was very calm, and there was little wind. Online Section Question number one (1): Later in the day the sun moves higher in the sky and the temperature increases. The fog cannot be seen. How does the air temperature increase during the day affect the water in the fog? A. The increasing temperature keeps the water in the atmosphere. B. The increasing temperature moves the water to local lakes. C. The increasing temperature forces the water underground. D. The increasing temperature returns the water to the ocean. Online Later that morning, students saw the flag blowing in the wind. Question number two (2): Which statement explains why winds are often weaker at night and get stronger during the day? A. Wind results from changes in the water vapor content of the air. B. Wind results when rain or snow falls from clouds. C. Wind results from unequal heating of the air. D. Wind results where skies change from cloudy to clear. 13

14 Online Section The energy that drives our weather is transferred through several processes. Question number three (3): Identify the processes of energy transport that affect Earth and its atmosphere. Title Page: Drag the processes into the diagram. Beginning at the upper left side and continuing clockwise, the diagram is labeled: Sun, Cloud, Air, Ground. The answer choices are titled: Processes. The top row of choices is labeled, from left to right: Convection, Conduction, Precipitation. The bottom row of choices is labeled, from left to right: Condensation, Radiation. Water Bottle Rocket Select the Blue arrow at the top to go on. Online Water bottle rockets are made by adding water to a bottle and pumping air into it. The flight time and height depend on the shape and the size of the water bottle rocket and the amounts of water and air you pump into the bottle. The diagram is labeled, from left to right: Water, Air Pump. 14

15 Question number four (4): Which tool best measures the volume of water put into the water bottle rocket? Online Section A. Timer B. Metric ruler C. Graduated cylinder D. Celsius thermometer Question number five (5): Six hundred fifty (650) milliliters of water is put into the water bottle. Convert six hundred fifty (650) milliliters to liters. You can use the calculator to help you answer this question. Enter your answer in the box. Six hundred fifty (650) milliliters equals (=) blank liters. Question number six (6): Online Complete the diagram to show how the space between air molecules changes as pressure increases in the bottles. Drag each of the air molecule groups into the diagram. The diagram is titled: Space Between Air Molecules. The diagram is labeled, from left to right: Pressure increases, Pressure increases. The answer choices are titled: Air Molecule Groups. 15

16 Question number seven (7): Online Section Some of the air that is pumped into the bottle dissolves in the water. What type of change happens when air dissolves in water? A. Chemical B. Color C. Molecular D. Physical To build and launch a water bottle rocket, select a bottle below. Select the amount of water in milliliters (ml) you want to add and the pressure of air in kilopascals (kpa) you want to pump into the bottle. Then select Run! The water bottle rocket will launch and data will be recorded in the table. Repeat as necessary. The column on the left reads, from top to bottom: Step one (1): Select a bottle. The bottles are labeled, from left to right: two (2) liters (L), one (1) liter (L), one (1) liter (L) wide. Step two (2): Add water. The box is labeled: milliliters (ml). Step three (3): Pump air. The box is labeled: kilopascals (kpa). The button on the bottom is labeled: Run. The table has six columns and five rows. The columns are labeled, from left to right: Trial, Bottle, Water (milliliters (ml)), Air (kilopascals (kpa)), Height (meters (m)), Flight Time (seconds (sec)). The button on the bottom of the table is labeled: Clear All. Online Question number eight (8): Gravity acts on the water bottle rocket. Identify the direction in which gravity acts on the water bottle rocket during flight. Drag the arrows into the diagram. The diagram is titled: Water Bottle Rocket Flight. The answer choices are titled: Arrows. 16

17 Question number nine (9): The water bottle rocket experiences forces that are balanced and unbalanced. Select the points during the flight where the forces are unbalanced. Select each point you want to choose. Online Section The left side of the diagram is labeled: Before launch. The right side is labeled: After landing. Question number ten (10): What is the average speed of the water bottle rocket when it travels twenty (20) meters in five (5) seconds? You can use the calculator to help you answer this question. A. Four (4) meters per second B. Fifteen (15) meters per second C. Twenty-five (25) meters per second D. One hundred (100) meters per second Question number eleven (11): Online The diagram shows the flight of a water bottle rocket. Identify the point where potential energy is the greatest and the point where kinetic energy is the greatest. Drag the two (2) points into the diagram. The diagram is labeled, from top to bottom: Greatest Potential Energy, Greatest Kinetic Energy. The answer choices are titled: Points. 17

18 Question number twelve (12): Online Section Select the one (1) liter (L) water bottle and an air pressure of three hundred kilopascals (300 kpa). Run several trials with different amounts of water. Which statement is supported by the results of this experiment? A. As the volume of water increases, the maximum height of the rocket decreases. B. As the volume of water increases, the maximum height of the rocket stays constant. C. As the volume of water increases, the maximum height of the rocket increases and then decreases. D. As the volume of water increases, the maximum height of the rocket decreases and then increases. Online 18

19 STOP When the student gets to the last item in the online Item Sampler, read the script below to end the online Item Sampler. Online Section This is the end of the Science Item Sampler. If you want to review your answers, you may do so now. You may ask me to repeat any question. You will not be able to come back to these questions later. To go to a question, select the Review button and select a question number. (Pause while the student reviews his or her answers.) When you have finished reviewing, select the Review button and select End of Test from the bottom of the Review list to go back to the End Test screen. Select the Submit Final Answers button. You should now see your score report. You can review the report, review your answers from section two (2), or print this page. When you are finished, select the Sign out button. You should now see a screen confirming you have signed out from TestNav. Collect the test materials from the student as specified in the Test Monitor Directions for MCA. Online 19

20 SCRIPT FOR USE WITH THE LARGE PRINT Say the following before you begin reading the questions on page 21. We will now begin the Science Item Sampler. After I read each question, I will pause for as much time as you need to answer the question. Then I will read the next question. You may ask me to repeat any question as many times as you need. Large Print Section Large Print 20

21 GRADE 8 SCIENCE SCRIPT FOR USE WITH LARGE PRINT SEGMENT 1 We will now begin Segment One (1). Title Page: How Does a Garden Grow This student is growing a garden. In her garden, she is growing many types of fruits and vegetables, including bell peppers. Question number one (1): Which factor affecting the growth of pepper plants is a living factor? Large Print A. The temperature of the air B. The kinds of bacteria living in the soil C. The amount of water the plants receive D. The amount of sunlight the plants receive Large Print Section 21

22 The student is planning an experiment to determine how the amount of light a pepper plant receives affects the amount of fruit it produces. To prepare for her experiment, she reviews photosynthesis and why it is important in making fruit. She draws a diagram of a pepper plant and all the parts of photosynthesis. Question number two (2): Large Print Section This diagram shows the process of photosynthesis. Identify the parts of the photosynthesis process involved in this ecosystem. Each word is labeled A, B, C, D, E, or F. Write the letter of the correct word or words (word(s)) in each empty box. You may only use each letter one (1) time. Four (4) of the words will be used. Beginning at the upper left corner and continuing clockwise, the diagram is labeled: From the Sun, To the air, Food produced in the leaves, Through the roots, From the air. The answer choices are titled: Words. The choices are labeled, from top to bottom: light, water, starch, oxygen, green pigment, carbon dioxide. Large Print The student tests how the amount of light a pepper plant receives affects the mass of the plants. She sets up nine (9) pots, each with one (1) pepper plant. The plants are divided into three (3) groups with three (3) plants in each group. The first group receives eight (8) hours of light per day. The second group receives twelve (12) hours of light per day. The third group receives eighteen (18) hours of light per day. 22

23 Question number three (3): After ten (10) weeks, the student measures the mass of each plant and averages the results for each group. She notices that the more light her pepper plants received, the more mass they had. On the graph, draw a line to connect two (2) points to show the trend for her results. The title of the graph is: Pepper Growth Experiment. The horizontal axis is titled: Hours of Light per Day. The vertical axis is titled: Mean Mass of Plant. Question number four (4): Title Page: Which variables in this investigation are controlled? On the diagram, circle each of the variables you want to select. From left to right the figures in the top row are labeled: The hours of light per day the plants receive, The number of pots in each group. From left to right the figures in the bottom row are labeled: The number of plants per pot, The type of plant. Properties of Matter Investigation Large Print Large Print Section Two students are completing an investigation on the properties of matter. They start by measuring the mass of fifty (50) milliliters of water. 23

24 Question number five (5): Which properties of the water do not change when it is poured from the beaker into the graduated cylinder? On the diagram, circle each of the properties you want to select. The title of the figure is: Properties. From top to bottom the figure is labeled: Mass, Phase, Shape, Volume. Large Print Section In order to compare the effect of temperature on the dissolving rate of sugar, the students prepare three (3) beakers of water at different temperatures, one at thirty degrees Celsius (30 C), one at sixty degrees Celsius (60 C), and one at ninety degrees Celsius (90 C). The figure is labeled from left to right: thirty degrees Celsius (30 C), sixty degrees Celsius (60 C), ninety degrees Celsius (90 C). Question number six (6): Which method of heat transfer is shown by the arrows? Large Print A. Conduction B. Convection C. Precipitation D. Radiation 24

25 The students now add a sugar cube into each beaker of water, while stirring the water. The beaker in the middle is labeled sixty degrees celsius. Question number seven (7): As the sugar crystals disappear, what is happening to the sugar molecules? A. They combine with the water molecules. B. They enter the spaces between the water molecules. C. They evaporate into the air. D. They separate into smaller pieces called atoms. One of the beakers of sugar water is heated at a very slow rate, using a hotplate, until all of the water is gone. Notice there is a substance left in the beaker. Large Print From left to right, the figures are labeled: Before Heating, After Heating. Large Print Section 25

26 Question number eight (8): Which of the following statements best describes what happened to the water? A. The water changed into a solid. B. The water changed state from a liquid to a gas. C. The water changed into hydrogen and oxygen. D. The water changed state from a liquid to a solid. Large Print Section Question number nine (9): The substance that is left in the beaker is sugar. Based on this fact, what type of change took place when the sugar dissolved in the water? A. Chemical B. Electrical C. Mechanical D. Physical Large Print The data that was recorded from dissolving sugar is shown in the table below. The title of the table is: Sugar Water Experiment. The table has two (2) rows and three (3) columns. The column headings are labeled from left to right: Beaker one (1), Beaker two (2), Beaker three (3). From left to right, row one (1) is labeled: thirty degrees Celsius (30 C), sixty degrees Celsius (60 C), ninety degrees Celsius (90 C). From left to right, row two (2) is labeled: thirty seconds (30 sec), fifteen seconds (15 sec), five seconds (5 sec). 26

27 Question number ten (10): The data show results of the experiment. Make a graph of this data. Write a plus sign ( + ) above each bar where the top of the bar should be. The title of the graph is: Sugar Water Experiment. The horizontal axis is titled: Degree Celsius. The vertical axis is titled: Seconds. Question number eleven (11): The students slowly heat a fourth beaker to one hundred degrees Celsius (100 C). Using the data they have collected the students want to predict how long it will take for the sugar to dissolve in this beaker. Predict how long it will take the sugar to dissolve, based on the student s data. Write your answer in the box. You may use up to five (5) numbers. The box is labeled: seconds (sec). STOP Stop when the student reaches the end of Segment 1. Large Print This is the end of Segment One (1) of your Science Item Sampler. Large Print Section If you want to review your answers, you may do so now. You may ask me to repeat any question. You will not be able to come back to these questions later. (Pause while the student reviews his or her answers.) After you have reviewed your answers, seal this segment of your test book. 27

28 GRADE 8 SCIENCE SCRIPT FOR USE WITH LARGE PRINT SEGMENT 2 We will now begin Segment Two (2). Title Page: Weather Large Print Section On the way to school, students saw fog in low-lying areas. Students also noticed that the air was very calm, and there was little wind. Question number twelve (12): Later in the day the sun moves higher in the sky and the temperature increases. The fog cannot be seen. How does the air temperature increase during the day affect the water in the fog? Large Print A. The increasing temperature keeps the water in the atmosphere. B. The increasing temperature moves the water to local lakes. C. The increasing temperature forces the water underground. D. The increasing temperature returns the water to the ocean. Later that morning, students saw the flag blowing in the wind. 28

29 Question number thirteen (13): Which statement explains why winds are often weaker at night and get stronger during the day? A. Wind results from changes in the water vapor content of the air. B. Wind results when rain or snow falls from clouds. C. Wind results from unequal heating of the air. D. Wind results where skies change from cloudy to clear. The energy that drives our weather is transferred through several processes. Clockwise from the top left, the figure is labeled: Sun, Cloud, Air, Ground. Question number fourteen (14): What is the principal external energy source which drives the weather on Earth? Write your answer in the box. You may use up to ten (10) letters. Large Print Large Print Section 29

30 Question number fifteen (15): Identify the processes of energy transport that affect Earth and its atmosphere. Each process is labeled A, B, C, D, or E. Write the letter of the correct process in each empty box. You may only use each letter one (1) time. Two (2) of the processes will be used. From top to bottom, the diagram reads: Sun, Cloud, Air, Ground. The figure below the diagram is titled: Processes. From top to bottom, the figure reads: A., Convection, B., Conduction, C., Precipitation, D., Condensation, E., Radiation. Large Print Section Title Page: Water Bottle Rockets Water bottle rockets are made by adding water to a bottle and pumping air into it. The flight time and height depend on the shape and the size of the water bottle rocket and the amounts of water and air you pump into the bottle. From left to right, the figure is labeled: Water, Air Pump. Large Print 30

31 Question number sixteen (16): Which tool best measures the volume of water put into the water bottle rocket? A. Timer B. Metric ruler C. Graduated cylinder D. Celsius thermometer Question number seventeen (17): Six hundred fifty (650) milliliters of water is put into the water bottle. Convert six hundred fifty (650) milliliters to liters. You can use the calculator to help you answer this question. Write your answer in the box. You may use up to ten (10) numbers. Six hundred fifty (650) milliliters equals (=). The box is labeled: liters. Question number eighteen (18): Large Print Complete the diagram to show how the space between air molecules changes as pressure increases in the bottle. Large Print Section Each air molecule group is labeled A, B, or C. Write the letter of the air molecule group in the correct bottle. You may only use each letter one (1) time. The title of the diagram on the top is: Space Between Air Molecules. From left to right the diagram is labeled: Pressure increases, Pressure increases. The figure along the bottom is labeled: Air Molecule Groups. From left to right, the figure is labeled: A., B., C. 31

32 Question number nineteen (19): Some of the air that is pumped into the bottle dissolves in the water. What type of change happens when air dissolves in water? A. Chemical B. Color C. Molecular D. Physical Large Print Section This is the end of the Science Item Sampler. STOP If you want to review your answers, you may do so now. You may ask me to repeat any question. You will not be able to come back to these questions later. (Pause while the student reviews his or her answers.) After you have reviewed your answers, seal this segment of your test book. Collect the test materials from the student as specified in the Test Monitor and Student Directions for Paper Accommodations for MCA. Large Print 32

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