THE STUDY OF THE EFFECT OF DRY ICE ON THE TEMPERATURE OF WATER

Save this PDF as:
 WORD  PNG  TXT  JPG

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "THE STUDY OF THE EFFECT OF DRY ICE ON THE TEMPERATURE OF WATER"

Transcription

1 THE STUDY OF THE EFFECT OF DRY ICE ON THE TEMPERATURE OF WATER Justin Tunley Cary Academy ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to find out how much the temperature of water would change over time after Dry Ice was added to it. Dry Ice is a solid form of carbon dioxide gas is extremely cold and can be used for many different purposes. To do the experiment, Dry Ice was put into a beaker with 250 (ml) of water and the temperature of the water was recorded after 1, 2, 3, and 4 (min). It found that the biggest temperature change happened between 1 (min) and 2 (min). This probably happened because as the temperature of the water got closer to the temperature of the Dry Ice, it became harder to drop so it took longer for the temperature to drop further. INTRODUCTION: Dry Ice is a solid form of carbon dioxide. It is sometimes referred to as Cardice or Card Ice. It is colorless, non-flammable, and extremely cold. Dry Ice was first observed in 1834 by a French Chemist by the name of Charles Thilorier. He was the first person to actually make a solid form of carbon dioxide, which is normally a gas. This discovery was amazing and in 1924, Dry Ice started being sold commercially. Dry Ice was soon used by many people for many different purposes. Although Dry Ice is an amazing thing to use, it can also be very dangerous to handle. There are many things that can go wrong when using Dry Ice. For example, let s say it is Halloween and somebody is using Dry Ice to make fog by putting it into water and then that person picks up the Dry Ice with their bare hands. The Dry Ice is so cold that 1

2 if it touches human skin it will burn it. A person can also get frost bite from touching Dry Ice. If someone holds Dry Ice for a long enough time, they can get frost bite and if it is really bad, they may have to get their finger amputated! Another example would be if someone is making fog on Halloween in the garage. When Dry Ice is put in water, it turns from a solid into carbon dioxide gas. If there is too much carbon dioxide gas and not enough oxygen, they would not be able to breath. This is called asphyxiation. This can lead to a serious injury, or even death. For these reasons, everyone must be very careful whenever using Dry Ice. Without the proper equipment, people can get seriously injured. 1. This is a picture of small pieces of Dry Ice Dry Ice is extremely cold. It is exactly F and C. This is colder than the average winter day in the South Pole! The South Pole is one of the coldest places on earth averaging -72 F and -58 C on a normal day. Dry Ice is so cold, that if it was put in a freezer to keep cool and left there, the freezer could break because the temperature is so cold. This is another reason Dry Ice can be very dangerous. Dry Ice can be used for many different things. This is because Dry Ice is very, very cold, allowing it to do things that most other objects can t. This is beneficial for someone who needs to keep things cold for a long period of time. If someone needs to keep 2

3 something cold for a long period of time and they don t know what to do, Dry Ice could be the solution. At the very bottom of the cooler put a layer of regular ice and on top of that a layer of Dry Ice. Next put about two or three layers of regular ice above that. Finally, put the item that needs to stay cold on the top. Now the item can last a long time, probably a couple of days, without the item getting warm. Many companies that mail fresh food use Dry Ice to keep the food cold while it is being shipped. Another thing Dry Ice can be used for is to make Dry Ice bombs. Dry Ice bombs can be used as experiments to show what happens when Dry Ice turns from a solid into a gas. Dry Ice bombs are when someone makes a water bottle explode using only a single plastic water bottle, Dry Ice, and water. One should always have the proper safety equipment such as gloves, tongs, and safety glasses. Also, one should only do it outside in a wide open space. First, a person must add a little amount of water (maybe 50 ml) to the bottle. Next, they must take a piece of Dry Ice and break it into smaller pieces with a hammer. The Dry Ice must be small enough to fit in to the hole of the bottle (the bigger the pieces are, the faster the bottle will explode). Then, the pieces of Dry Ice should be added to the bottle and the cap put on the bottle tightly. Finally, whoever is conducting the experiment should run for their life and take cover. The explosion will be very loud so don t be too close to the bomb. Also, after the bottle explodes look out so it doesn t hit anyone. It may take a few (min) to go off, so if it does not explode right away, do not walk up to it. The reason the bottle explodes is because when Dry Ice is added to the water in the bottle, the Dry Ice turns into a gas. When the Dry Ice turns into a gas it fills up the empty space in the bottle and when there is no space left in the bottle, the bottle expands and eventually explodes. Children should only try this experiment when an adult is with them. There are many other uses for Dry Ice, but those are just a few. 3

4 2. This is another photo of Dry Ice. There are both big and small pieces of Dry Ice Temperature is how cold or warm something is. Temperature is affected by many different things including the time of year. Is it sunny out? Is it cloudy out? Is it raining? These all affect the temperature. This is all because of the sun. If it is sunny out, then the sun is showing. The more the sun is showing, the more heat goes down to earth. The more heat that goes down to the earth, the warmer the temperature is. The location on earth also affects how hot or cold something is. For example, it would be warmer at the equator than the North Pole during the summer. This is because the sun shines right on the equator. The sun literally does a circle around the earth following the equator. The farther away something is from the equator, the less sunlight it gets. The less sunlight it gets, the colder it will be. A thermometer is a scientific tool used to help tell what temperature something is. There are many types of thermometers. Some thermometers (like the thermometers for telling what temperature it is outside) work just by being exposed to the air. Other thermometers only work if the end of the thermometer is stuck into the thing being measured. An example of this thermometer would be the thermometer used on Thanksgiving to tell when the turkey is done by taking its temperature. After putting the thermometer into the turkey, the red liquid inside of the thermometer will rise or fall very slowly. Once the red liquid stops rising or falling, the numbers on the side of the thermometer which line up with the red liquid is the temperature of the turkey. There 4

5 are two sets of numbers on a thermometer. On the right are degrees Fahrenheit and on the left are degrees Celsius. 3. This is the process of Sublimation. Sublimation is different from melting because unlike melting, Sublimation is when an object goes from a solid right to a gas, skipping the liquid stage. Dry Ice sublimates, not melts. 4. This a picture of a thermometer - a scientific instrument used to find the temperature of something An experiment was done earlier by Fiona Wissink of Cary Academy. Fiona did an experiment on THE STUDY OF THE WAY TEMPERATURE CHANGES WHEN BEING HELD IN DIFFERENT CUPS. The purpose of her experiment was to find out how the temperature of a liquid changed when poured into different types of cups. Warm water was poured into different types of cups to see how much the temperature would 5

6 decrease over a certain period of time. The coffee cup kept the water the warmest for the longer period of time and the Styrofoam cup kept the water warm for the shortest period of time. The Hypothesis created for this experiment is that the longer the Dry Ice is in the water, the lower the temperature of water will be at the end of the experiment. Also, the longer the Dry Ice is in the water, the slower the temperature change will be. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The materials used in the experiments were: a computer, temperature probe, hot plate, pan, water, hand, sink, Dry Ice, gloves, tongs, cooler, plastic beaker, regular ice, balloons, four Gatorade bottles, triple beam balance, safety glasses and a thermometer. The first experiment conducted was to see how much the temperature of a beaker of water would drop after adding Dry Ice. The temperature of the beaker of water was recorded after 1, 2, 3, and 4 (min). To do this, a piece of Dry Ice that weighed about 30 (g) was dropped into a beaker with 250 (ml) of water. The water was about 20 C. There was already a temperature probe inside the beaker of water. Once the Dry Ice was dropped into the water, the temperature probe started recording. The temperature probe recorded the temperature of the water after 1, 2, 3 and 4 (min). This was repeated three times and the average temperature of the water at 1, 2, 3 and 4 (min) was recorded. The second experiment conducted was to find out how long it would take different size pieces of Dry Ice to sublimate while in boiling water. To do this experiment, a pan with 50 ml of water was placed on a hot plate. Then after the water boiled for about 3 (min), a piece of Dry Ice was taken out of the cooler and smashed with a hammer until there 6

7 were pieces of Dry Ice that weighed 20 (g), 60 (g), and 80 (g). These were the sizes of Dry Ice that were used to do this experiment. The 20 (g) piece of Dry Ice was put into the boiling water and the timer was started. When the 20 (g) piece of Dry Ice was completely gone, the timer was stopped and the data was recorded. This was repeated with the 60 (g) and 80 (g) pieces of Dry Ice. The measurements were taken three times for each size piece of Dry Ice and the average time it took for the Dry Ice to sublimate was recorded. The third experiment done was to find out how long it would take a balloon to blow up to 30 (cm) in height attached to a Gatorade bottle using water in the bottle and different size pieces of Dry Ice. The pieces of Dry Ice that were used were 5 (g), 10 (g) and 20 (g). The 5 (g) piece of Dry Ice was put into the bottle with 50 (ml) of water. Immediately after the Dry Ice was added, a balloon was put on top of the cap and a timer was started. Once the balloon got to 30 (cm) high, the timer was stopped and the data was recorded. This was repeated with the 10 (g) and 20 (g) pieces of Dry Ice. The measurements were taken three times for each size piece of Dry Ice and the average time it took to blow up the balloon for each size piece of Dry Ice was recorded. The fourth and last experiment completed was to find out how big a balloon would blow up in 4 (min) using a bottle of 50 (ml) of water and different sizes of Dry Ice. The different sizes of Dry Ice used were 30 (g), 50 (g), and 60 (g). To conduct this experiment, a piece of Dry Ice was smashed with a hammer until there were pieces of Dry Ice that weighed 30 (g), 50 (g), and 60 (g). Next, the Gatorade bottle was filled up with 50 (ml) of water. The 30 (g) piece of Dry Ice was put into the Gatorade bottle and a balloon was immediately put on top of the cap. A timer was started and when the timer reached 4 (min), the height was measured in (cm). This was repeated with the 50 (g) and 60 (g) pieces of Dry Ice. The measurements were taken three times for each size piece of Dry Ice and the average size of the balloon in (cm) was recorded. 7

8 Temperature (c) RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: In the first experiment, the temperature dropped the most between one and two (min). This is shown in the graph in Fig. 1 because the distance between (min) 1 and (min) 2 is the greatest. This was expected because the longer the Dry Ice was in the water, the lower the water temperature would get. Because the water temperature was getting colder, it took longer for the Dry Ice to make the water colder. This was because the temperature of water was getting closer to the temperature of the Dry Ice. The graph in Fig. 1 shows this trend Time (min) 5. This graph shows the average water temperature every (min) for four (min), while Dry Ice was in the water. In the second experiment, it was found that the more the Dry Ice weighed, the longer it took to dissolve. This trend can be seen by looking at the graph in Fig. 5 shown below. As shown in this graph, the more the Dry Ice weighed in (g), the more time it took to dissolve. The graph shows that it took about 200 (sec) for the 20 (g) piece of Dry Ice to dissolve, about 450 (sec) for the 60 (g) piece to dissolve, and about 825 (sec) for the 80 (g) pieces to dissolve. This is because, the 80 (g) pieces of Dry Ice are bigger than the 8

9 Time (sec) 60 (g) and 40 (g) pieces. This means, it would have to dissolve more actual Dry Ice. This made it harder for the water to dissolve the Dry Ice Weight (g) 6. According to the graph, the bigger the piece of Dry Ice, the longer it took to completely dissolve In the third experiment, it was found that the bigger the piece of Dry Ice was, the faster the balloon blew up and the faster it reached 30 (cm) high. This trend can be seen in Fig. 6. The smaller the piece of Dry Ice was, the longer it took to make the balloon blow up to 30 (cm) high. This was probably because the smaller the Dry Ice was, the less gas it gave off and the gas was what made the balloon blow up. So the smaller the piece of Dry Ice was, the longer it took to the balloon to blow up to 30 (cm). 9

10 Time (sec) Sizes (g) of Dry Ice 7. According to this graph, the bigger the piece of Dry Ice, the faster the balloon blew up. In the final experiment it was found that the bigger the piece of Dry Ice was, the more it blew up in 4 (min). This trend can be seen in Fig. 7. As the pieces of Dry Ice get bigger, they start to blow up more. This probably happened because the bigger the piece of Dry Ice was, the more carbon dioxide it contained. And the more carbon dioxide it contained the more gas it had to give off. The gas that the Dry Ice was giving off was what caused the balloon to blow up in the first place. 10

11 Height (cm) Weight (g) 8. As shown in this graph, the bigger the piece of Dry Ice was, the more it blew up in four (min) CONCLUSION: In the original experiment, it was found that the longer the Dry Ice was in the water, the colder the temperature of the water would become. These results can be important to the world if someone wanted to use Dry Ice to keep something cold. If they saw the results of this experiment, they would have an idea of how much Dry Ice to use and how long Dry Ice would keep things cold. The hypothesis for this experiment was correct that the longer the Dry Ice was in the water, the colder the water. It was also discovered that the longer the Dry Ice had been in the water for, the less the temperature changed. Experiments that could be conducted in the future are things like seeing if how long it would take a balloon to explode after it is put on top of a Gatorade bottle and the Gatorade bottle is filled with Dry Ice and water. CITATIONS: 11

12 Aardvark - Catalyst. The Gale Encyclopedia of Science Second Edition. 2nd ed Print. "About Temperature." Spark UCAR Science Education. Web. 13 Jan "Carbon Dioxide." Compton's by Britannica. Encyclopædia Britannica Online School Edition. Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc., Web. 14 Feb Dry Ice Information - All about Dry Ice. Web. 12 Jan "Dry Ice." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Web. 12 Jan Macmillan Encyclopedia of Science. New York: Macmillan, Print. "Temperature." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Web. 13 Jan The Study of the way Temperature changes when being held in different cups Fiona Wissink, Cary Academy What Is the Red Liquid in a Thermometer? - Yahoo! Answers." Yahoo! Answers - Home. Web. 13 Jan

TESTING DRY ICE IN DIFFERENT LIQUIDS. Aditya S. Cary Academy ABSTRACT

TESTING DRY ICE IN DIFFERENT LIQUIDS. Aditya S. Cary Academy ABSTRACT TESTING DRY ICE IN DIFFERENT LIQUIDS Aditya S Cary Academy ABSTRACT The purpose of this experiment was to see how dropping dry ice into different liquids affect the mass and temperature of the dry ice.

More information

1/2/3. Finding out about the Water Cycle

1/2/3. Finding out about the Water Cycle The Water Cycle 1/2/3. Finding out about the Water Cycle Aims: To enable pupils to learn and understand what happens at each stage of the Water Cycle To introduce specific vocabulary related to the Water

More information

(Walter Glogowski, Chaz Shapiro & Reid Sherman) INTRODUCTION

(Walter Glogowski, Chaz Shapiro & Reid Sherman) INTRODUCTION Convection (Walter Glogowski, Chaz Shapiro & Reid Sherman) INTRODUCTION You know from common experience that when there's a difference in temperature between two places close to each other, the temperatures

More information

Multiple Choice For questions 1-10, circle only one answer.

Multiple Choice For questions 1-10, circle only one answer. Test Bank - Chapter 1 The questions in the test bank cover the concepts from the lessons in Chapter 1. Select questions from any of the categories that match the content you covered with students. The

More information

Pressure. Curriculum for Excellence. Weather and Climate Cross-curricular project Section 2. Background Information:

Pressure. Curriculum for Excellence. Weather and Climate Cross-curricular project Section 2. Background Information: Curriculum for Excellence Weather and Climate Cross-curricular project Section 2 Pressure Background Information: Air pressure is the force exerted by air particles. The air around us pushes on us and

More information

Heat Energy FORMS OF ENERGY LESSON PLAN 2.7. Public School System Teaching Standards Covered

Heat Energy FORMS OF ENERGY LESSON PLAN 2.7. Public School System Teaching Standards Covered FORMS OF ENERGY LESSON PLAN 2.7 Heat Energy This lesson is designed for 3rd 5th grade students in a variety of school settings (public, private, STEM schools, and home schools) in the seven states served

More information

Minnesota Comprehensive Assessments-Series III

Minnesota Comprehensive Assessments-Series III Not for student use. Minnesota Comprehensive Assessments-Series III Science Item Sampler Script Grade 8 S ARE NOT SECURE TEST MATERIALS. THIS ITEM SAMPLER SCRIPT MAY BE COPIED OR DUPLICATED. MINNESOTA

More information

Heat Transfer: Conduction, Convection, and Radiation

Heat Transfer: Conduction, Convection, and Radiation Heat Transfer: Conduction, Convection, and Radiation Introduction We have learned that heat is the energy that makes molecules move. Molecules with more heat energy move faster, and molecules with less

More information

Year 10 Investigation. What Makes Ice Melt Fastest? By Rebecca Hogan

Year 10 Investigation. What Makes Ice Melt Fastest? By Rebecca Hogan Investigation What Makes Ice Melt Fastest? MY WEBSITE: http://whatsubstancemeltsicefastest.weebly.com/ Nature of Investigation: What keeps us cool on hot days? What is used in our cool, refreshing beverages?

More information

CHEMISTRY: Sublimation of Dry Ice

CHEMISTRY: Sublimation of Dry Ice CHEMISTRY: Sublimation of Dry Ice By Darby Sloss and Marianne Smith Edited by Anne Starace Abstract Chemistry is an important part of our lives. This module demonstrates sublimation. Keywords Chemical,

More information

Solids, Liquids, and Gases

Solids, Liquids, and Gases Solids, Liquids, and Gases nd Intended for Grade: 2 Grade Subject: Science Description: Activities to help students understand solids, liquids, gases, and the changes between these states. Objective: The

More information

Chapter Test A. States of Matter MULTIPLE CHOICE. a fixed amount of STAs2 a. a solid. b. a liquid. c. a gas. d. any type of matter.

Chapter Test A. States of Matter MULTIPLE CHOICE. a fixed amount of STAs2 a. a solid. b. a liquid. c. a gas. d. any type of matter. Assessment Chapter Test A States of Matter MULTIPLE CHOICE Write the letter of the correct answer in the space provided. 1. Boyle s law explains the relationship between volume and pressure for a fixed

More information

Chapter 6, Lesson 4: Temperature and the Rate of a Chemical Reaction

Chapter 6, Lesson 4: Temperature and the Rate of a Chemical Reaction Chapter 6, Lesson 4: Temperature and the Rate of a Chemical Reaction Key Concepts Reactants must be moving fast enough and hit each other hard enough for a chemical reaction to take place. Increasing the

More information

First Grade Unit A: PHYSICAL SCIENCE Chapter 1: Observing Solids, Liquids and Gases Lessons 1 to 5

First Grade Unit A: PHYSICAL SCIENCE Chapter 1: Observing Solids, Liquids and Gases Lessons 1 to 5 First Grade Unit A: PHYSICAL SCIENCE Chapter 1: Observing Solids, Liquids and Gases Lessons 1 to 5 Physical Science Overview Materials (matter) come in different forms. Water can be rain falling (liquid)

More information

TESTING WHETHER THE TEMPERATURE OF A MAGNET WILL AFFECT HOW FAR ITS MAGNETIC FIELD IS

TESTING WHETHER THE TEMPERATURE OF A MAGNET WILL AFFECT HOW FAR ITS MAGNETIC FIELD IS TESTING WHETHER THE TEMPERATURE OF A MAGNET WILL AFFECT HOW FAR ITS MAGNETIC FIELD IS Kenan Balkas Cary Academy ABSTRACT The purpose of this experiment is about testing to see what the strengths will be

More information

Classifying Matter. reflect. look out!

Classifying Matter. reflect. look out! reflect Do you know what air, water, and an apple all have in common? They are all examples of matter. Matter is a word we use a lot in science. It means stuff. All of the stuff in the world that has mass

More information

THE STUDY OF GUMMY BEARS SOAKED IN DIFFERENT LIQUIDS FOR DIFFERENT AMOUNTS OF TIME

THE STUDY OF GUMMY BEARS SOAKED IN DIFFERENT LIQUIDS FOR DIFFERENT AMOUNTS OF TIME THE STUDY OF GUMMY BEARS SOAKED IN DIFFERENT LIQUIDS FOR DIFFERENT AMOUNTS OF TIME Emily Grimm Cary Academy ABSTRACT The purpose of this study was to determine how much gummy bears grew in different liquids,

More information

Let s see what is the first sweetie inside my book (open book and point at page).

Let s see what is the first sweetie inside my book (open book and point at page). The Sweet Science Show INTRODUCTION SLIDE 1: THE SWEET SCIENCE SHOW Hello and welcome to The Sweet Science Show, the show that takes a closer look at your favourite sweetie treats. My name is Professor

More information

Dry Ice Color Show Dry Ice Demonstrations

Dry Ice Color Show Dry Ice Demonstrations elearning 2009 Introduction Dry Ice Color Show Dry Ice Demonstrations Publication No. 95016 Add a small piece of solid carbon dioxide to a colored indicator solution and watch as the solution immediately

More information

Chemical Changes. Measuring a Chemical Reaction. Name(s)

Chemical Changes. Measuring a Chemical Reaction. Name(s) Chemical Changes Name(s) In the particle model of matter, individual atoms can be bound tightly to other atoms to form molecules. For example, water molecules are made up of two hydrogen atoms bound to

More information

TEACHER BACKGROUND INFORMATION THERMAL ENERGY

TEACHER BACKGROUND INFORMATION THERMAL ENERGY TEACHER BACKGROUND INFORMATION THERMAL ENERGY In general, when an object performs work on another object, it does not transfer all of its energy to that object. Some of the energy is lost as heat due to

More information

Mixtures. reflect. How is seawater different from pure water? How is it different from rocky soil?

Mixtures. reflect. How is seawater different from pure water? How is it different from rocky soil? reflect Everything around us is made out of tiny bits of matter. These particles may combine in different ways to produce new materials. Sometimes we need to separate the parts of a material. If we know

More information

The Water Cycle Now You See It, Now You Don t

The Water Cycle Now You See It, Now You Don t The Water Cycle Now You See It, Now You Don t Unit: Salinity Patterns & the Water Cycle l Grade Level: Elementary l Time Required: Introduction - 30 min. - Activity as groups 45min Wrap Up 20 min l Content

More information

Chapter 2, Lesson 5: Changing State Melting

Chapter 2, Lesson 5: Changing State Melting Chapter 2, Lesson 5: Changing State Melting Key Concepts Melting is a process that causes a substance to change from a solid to a liquid. Melting occurs when the molecules of a solid speed up enough that

More information

HOW MUCH LIGHT IS PRODUCED WITH DIFFERENT COLORS OF GLOW STICKS IN DIFFERENT TEMPERATURES OF WATER HOW WRAPPED IN TISSUE PAPER

HOW MUCH LIGHT IS PRODUCED WITH DIFFERENT COLORS OF GLOW STICKS IN DIFFERENT TEMPERATURES OF WATER HOW WRAPPED IN TISSUE PAPER HOW MUCH LIGHT IS PRODUCED WITH DIFFERENT COLORS OF GLOW STICKS IN DIFFERENT TEMPERATURES OF WATER HOW WRAPPED IN TISSUE PAPER Colin Zhu Cary Academy ABSTRACT The purpose of this experiment was to see

More information

1. The Kinetic Theory of Matter states that all matter is composed of atoms and molecules that are in a constant state of constant random motion

1. The Kinetic Theory of Matter states that all matter is composed of atoms and molecules that are in a constant state of constant random motion Physical Science Period: Name: ANSWER KEY Date: Practice Test for Unit 3: Ch. 3, and some of 15 and 16: Kinetic Theory of Matter, States of matter, and and thermodynamics, and gas laws. 1. The Kinetic

More information

MULTIPLE CHOICE. Choose the one alternative that best completes the statement or answers the question.

MULTIPLE CHOICE. Choose the one alternative that best completes the statement or answers the question. Sample Mid-Term 3 MULTIPLE CHOICE. Choose the one alternative that best completes the statement or answers the question. 1) If you double the frequency of a vibrating object, its period A) is quartered.

More information

Chapter 3 Student Reading

Chapter 3 Student Reading Chapter 3 Student Reading If you hold a solid piece of lead or iron in your hand, it feels heavy for its size. If you hold the same size piece of balsa wood or plastic, it feels light for its size. The

More information

Test Bank - Chapter 3 Multiple Choice

Test Bank - Chapter 3 Multiple Choice Test Bank - Chapter 3 The questions in the test bank cover the concepts from the lessons in Chapter 3. Select questions from any of the categories that match the content you covered with students. The

More information

Standards A complete list of the standards covered by this lesson is included in the Appendix at the end of the lesson.

Standards A complete list of the standards covered by this lesson is included in the Appendix at the end of the lesson. Lesson 3: Albedo Time: approximately 40-50 minutes, plus 30 minutes for students to paint pop bottles Materials: Text: Albedo (from web site 1 per group) Small thermometers, at least 0ºC to 100ºC range

More information

SEPARATION OF A MIXTURE OF SUBSTANCES LAB

SEPARATION OF A MIXTURE OF SUBSTANCES LAB SEPARATION OF A MIXTURE OF SUBSTANCES LAB Purpose: Every chemical has a set of defined physical properties, and when combined they present a unique fingerprint for that chemical. When chemicals are present

More information

Density Lab. If you get stuck or are uncertain, please ask questions and/or refer to the hints at the end of the lab. Name: Section: Due Date:

Density Lab. If you get stuck or are uncertain, please ask questions and/or refer to the hints at the end of the lab. Name: Section: Due Date: Name: Section: Due Date: Lab 01B-1 If you get stuck or are uncertain, please ask questions and/or refer to the hints at the end of the lab. Density Lab Density is an important concept in oceanography,

More information

What Causes Climate? Use Target Reading Skills

What Causes Climate? Use Target Reading Skills Climate and Climate Change Name Date Class Climate and Climate Change Guided Reading and Study What Causes Climate? This section describes factors that determine climate, or the average weather conditions

More information

What Is Heat? What Is Heat?

What Is Heat? What Is Heat? What Is Heat? Paul shivered inside the wood cabin. It was cold outside, and inside the cabin it wasn t much warmer. Paul could hear the rain beating down on the roof. Every few minutes there would be a

More information

Order of the Weather Experiments

Order of the Weather Experiments Order of the Weather Experiments 1. Staying Dry Towel in bottle--student i. Magic Air Pushing the stick down-- Student ii. Air Power Water in funnel--teacher 2. Tipping the Scale Weighing air--student

More information

SUGGESTED ACTIVITIES

SUGGESTED ACTIVITIES SUGGESTED ACTIVITIES (Thermal Energy) From Invitations to Science Inquiry 2 nd Edition by Tik L. Liem: Activity Page Number Concept Warm a Bottle by Shaking 184 Heat, Friction The Confused Bottles 206

More information

UNIT 6a TEST REVIEW. 1. A weather instrument is shown below.

UNIT 6a TEST REVIEW. 1. A weather instrument is shown below. UNIT 6a TEST REVIEW 1. A weather instrument is shown below. Which weather variable is measured by this instrument? 1) wind speed 3) cloud cover 2) precipitation 4) air pressure 2. Which weather station

More information

6 th Grade Science Assessment: Weather & Water Select the best answer on the answer sheet. Please do not make any marks on this test.

6 th Grade Science Assessment: Weather & Water Select the best answer on the answer sheet. Please do not make any marks on this test. Select the be answer on the answer sheet. Please do not make any marks on this te. 1. Weather is be defined as the A. changes that occur in cloud formations from day to day. B. amount of rain or snow that

More information

Can Gases Act Like a Greenhouse?

Can Gases Act Like a Greenhouse? Can Gases Act Like a Greenhouse? Activity 1 Following a discussion that enables student to express what they already know about the greenhouse effect, students conduct a controlled experiment to confirm

More information

Heat and Temperature: Front End Evaluation Report. Joshua Gutwill. October 1999

Heat and Temperature: Front End Evaluation Report. Joshua Gutwill. October 1999 Heat and Temperature: Front End Evaluation Report Joshua Gutwill October 1999 Keywords: 1 Heat and Temperature Front End Evaluation Report October 28, 1999 Goal:

More information

VVS-branchens Uddannelsesnaevn - Højnaesvej 71 - DK, 2610 Roedovre - tel.: +45 3672 3501 Web: www.vvs-uddannelse.dk/folkeskole - E-mail:

VVS-branchens Uddannelsesnaevn - Højnaesvej 71 - DK, 2610 Roedovre - tel.: +45 3672 3501 Web: www.vvs-uddannelse.dk/folkeskole - E-mail: VVS-branchens Uddannelsesnaevn - Højnaesvej 71 - DK, 2610 Roedovre - tel.: +45 3672 3501 Web: www.vvs-uddannelse.dk/folkeskole - E-mail: folkeskole@vvsu.dk Authers: Erland Andersen and Finn Horn Case no.

More information

Mission 7: Saving Energy

Mission 7: Saving Energy Mission 7: Saving Energy How can we save energy? Converting one type of energy to another often damages the environment. For example, burning coal to make electricity causes air pollution. That s why we

More information

Balloon Inside a Bottle

Balloon Inside a Bottle Balloon Inside a Bottle What is Needed * One small party balloon * One small bottle. A 16 ounce pop bottle works well. What to Do Put approximately 1 tablespoon of water into the empty pop bottle. Then

More information

Transferring Solar Energy

Transferring Solar Energy activity 14 Transferring Solar Energy BROWARD COUNTY ELEMENTARY SCIENCE BENCHMARK PLAN Grade 4 Quarter 2 Activity 14 SC.B.1.2.2 The student recognizes various forms of energy (e.g., heat, light, and electricity).

More information

How Do Oceans Affect Weather and Climate?

How Do Oceans Affect Weather and Climate? How Do Oceans Affect Weather and Climate? In Learning Set 2, you explored how water heats up more slowly than land and also cools off more slowly than land. Weather is caused by events in the atmosphere.

More information

1.2 Investigations and Experiments

1.2 Investigations and Experiments Science is about figuring out cause and effect relationships. If we do something, what happens? If we make a ramp steeper, how much faster will a car roll down? This is an easy question. However, the process

More information

THE GROWTH OF GUMMY WORMS IN LIQUID FOR DIFFERENT AMOUNTS OF TIME

THE GROWTH OF GUMMY WORMS IN LIQUID FOR DIFFERENT AMOUNTS OF TIME THE GROWTH OF GUMMY WORMS IN LIQUID FOR DIFFERENT AMOUNTS OF TIME Cole Hoffman Cary Academy ABSTRACT The purpose of this study was to determine how gummy worms grow when in water. Traditional gummy worms

More information

Chapter 10: Temperature and Heat

Chapter 10: Temperature and Heat Chapter 10: Temperature and Heat 1. The temperature of a substance is A. proportional to the average kinetic energy of the molecules in a substance. B. equal to the kinetic energy of the fastest moving

More information

Heat and Temperature: Teacher s Guide

Heat and Temperature: Teacher s Guide Heat and Temperature: Teacher s Guide Grade Level: 6-8 Curriculum Focus: Physical Science Lesson Duration: Two class periods Program Description Humans have always been feverish about temperature. But

More information

Grade 4 Standard 1 Unit Test Water Cycle. Multiple Choice. 1. Where is most water found on Earth? A. in glaciers B. in lakes C. in rivers D.

Grade 4 Standard 1 Unit Test Water Cycle. Multiple Choice. 1. Where is most water found on Earth? A. in glaciers B. in lakes C. in rivers D. Grade 4 Standard 1 Unit Test Water Cycle Multiple Choice 1. Where is most water found on Earth? A. in glaciers B. in lakes C. in rivers D. in oceans 2. What source of energy evaporates the most water from

More information

ES 106 Laboratory # 2 HEAT AND TEMPERATURE

ES 106 Laboratory # 2 HEAT AND TEMPERATURE ES 106 Laboratory # 2 HEAT AND TEMPERATURE Introduction Heat transfer is the movement of heat energy from one place to another. Heat energy can be transferred by three different mechanisms: convection,

More information

Unit 1 - Pure Substances and Mixtures Chapter 2: Solutions

Unit 1 - Pure Substances and Mixtures Chapter 2: Solutions 2.1 Solutes & Solvents Vocabulary: Unit 1 - Pure Substances and Mixtures Chapter 2: Solutions solvent the larger part of a solution - the part of a solution into which the solutes dissolve solute the smaller

More information

Weather Under Pressure

Weather Under Pressure Primary Subject Integrated Subjects Grade Level Length of Unit Research Sources Science Math 5th 10 days Elementary Science with Vernier Book BrainPop www.areasonfor.com/site/1/docs/science_level_f_swt_lesson_20.pdf

More information

Hot Leaks. See how the temperature of liquids changes the way they flow.

Hot Leaks. See how the temperature of liquids changes the way they flow. P h y s i c s Q u e s t A c t i v i t i e s Activity 2 1 Hot Leaks See how the temperature of liquids changes the way they flow. Safety: This experiment requires using the hot water tap and straight pins.

More information

1. At which temperature would a source radiate the least amount of electromagnetic energy? 1) 273 K 3) 32 K 2) 212 K 4) 5 K

1. At which temperature would a source radiate the least amount of electromagnetic energy? 1) 273 K 3) 32 K 2) 212 K 4) 5 K 1. At which temperature would a source radiate the least amount of electromagnetic energy? 1) 273 K 3) 32 K 2) 212 K 4) 5 K 2. How does the amount of heat energy reflected by a smooth, dark-colored concrete

More information

Odyssey of the Mind Technology Fair. Simple Electronics

Odyssey of the Mind Technology Fair. Simple Electronics Simple Electronics 1. Terms volts, amps, ohms, watts, positive, negative, AC, DC 2. Matching voltages a. Series vs. parallel 3. Battery capacity 4. Simple electronic circuit light bulb 5. Chose the right

More information

Chapter 4: Transfer of Thermal Energy

Chapter 4: Transfer of Thermal Energy Chapter 4: Transfer of Thermal Energy Goals of Period 4 Section 4.1: To define temperature and thermal energy Section 4.2: To discuss three methods of thermal energy transfer. Section 4.3: To describe

More information

Chapter 18 Temperature, Heat, and the First Law of Thermodynamics. Problems: 8, 11, 13, 17, 21, 27, 29, 37, 39, 41, 47, 51, 57

Chapter 18 Temperature, Heat, and the First Law of Thermodynamics. Problems: 8, 11, 13, 17, 21, 27, 29, 37, 39, 41, 47, 51, 57 Chapter 18 Temperature, Heat, and the First Law of Thermodynamics Problems: 8, 11, 13, 17, 21, 27, 29, 37, 39, 41, 47, 51, 57 Thermodynamics study and application of thermal energy temperature quantity

More information

Partnerships Implementing Engineering Education Worcester Polytechnic Institute Worcester Public Schools

Partnerships Implementing Engineering Education Worcester Polytechnic Institute Worcester Public Schools Partnerships Implementing Engineering Education Worcester Polytechnic Institute Worcester Public Schools Supported by: National Science Foundation Weather: 4.H.3 Weather and Classical Instruments Grade

More information

TEACHER ACTIVITY GUIDE

TEACHER ACTIVITY GUIDE Page 1/5 EXPECTED OUTCOMES TEACHER ACTIVITY GUIDE ROOT BEER PRODUCTION Taken from IFT Experiments in Food Science Series This activity will allow student an opportunity to explore yeast fermentation by

More information

Chemical Formulas, Equations, and Reactions Test Pre-AP Write all answers on your answer document.

Chemical Formulas, Equations, and Reactions Test Pre-AP Write all answers on your answer document. Name: Period: Chemical Formulas, Equations, and Reactions Test Pre-AP Write all answers on your answer document. 1. Which of the following is a NOT a physical property of hydrogen? A. It is gas C. It is

More information

Oxygen Give and Take. Correlation to National Science Education Standards

Oxygen Give and Take. Correlation to National Science Education Standards Chemistry and Environmental Sciences Oxygen Give and Take Summary This is a series of three activities followed by a worksheet. The concepts taught include gas production (O 2 and CO 2 ), chemical reactions,

More information

BLOWING UP BALLOONS, chemically

BLOWING UP BALLOONS, chemically BLOWING UP BALLOONS, chemically PRE LAB DISCUSSION: Today we will be using a closed system. A closed system does not permit matter to enter or exit the apparatus. Lavoisier's classic 12-day experiment,

More information

States of Matter and the Kinetic Molecular Theory - Gr10 [CAPS]

States of Matter and the Kinetic Molecular Theory - Gr10 [CAPS] OpenStax-CNX module: m38210 1 States of Matter and the Kinetic Molecular Theory - Gr10 [CAPS] Free High School Science Texts Project This work is produced by OpenStax-CNX and licensed under the Creative

More information

Temperature affects water in the air.

Temperature affects water in the air. KEY CONCEPT Most clouds form as air rises and cools. BEFORE, you learned Water vapor circulates from Earth to the atmosphere Warm air is less dense than cool air and tends to rise NOW, you will learn How

More information

DETERMINING WHICH COLOR UV BEAD CHANGES COLORS THE FASTEST

DETERMINING WHICH COLOR UV BEAD CHANGES COLORS THE FASTEST DETERMINING WHICH COLOR UV BEAD CHANGES COLORS THE FASTEST Helen C Cary Academy ABSTRACT The purpose of this experiment was to determine which color UV bead changes colors the fastest. The bead colors

More information

Sample Liver Enzyme Lab

Sample Liver Enzyme Lab Sample Liver Enzyme Lab Design Aspect 1: Research Question This lab will be driven by the research question, Do changes in temperature have an effect on the activity of the enzyme catalase? Pearson Baccalaureate:

More information

Hands-On Labs SM-1 Lab Manual

Hands-On Labs SM-1 Lab Manual EXPERIMENT 4: Separation of a Mixture of Solids Read the entire experiment and organize time, materials, and work space before beginning. Remember to review the safety sections and wear goggles when appropriate.

More information

Ice Cream Lab- A Tasty Phase Change!

Ice Cream Lab- A Tasty Phase Change! Ice Cream Lab- A Tasty! Name Date EN Class Purpose: To investigate the effects of heat transfer on phase changes. To investigate the effects of temperature changes on physical changes. Materials: ½ cup

More information

Chapter 1 Student Reading

Chapter 1 Student Reading Chapter 1 Student Reading Chemistry is the study of matter You could say that chemistry is the science that studies all the stuff in the entire world. A more scientific term for stuff is matter. So chemistry

More information

Melting ice Student sheet

Melting ice Student sheet Melting ice Student sheet Predict Which ice cube will melt first? Observe Describe what you saw happen. Why? (Give a scientific explanation) Questions to think about: Why does ice melt? Why might one ice

More information

Climate Change is Underway Lesson Plan

Climate Change is Underway Lesson Plan Climate Change is Underway Lesson Plan For Teachers: The following is a lesson plan designed to be used with section of the Climate Change material entitled Climate Change is Underway from the After Earth

More information

Learning outcomes. Students will be able to:

Learning outcomes. Students will be able to: Learning structure of the lesson The big picture This lesson is designed to exemplify an argumentation approach to practical work, using a predict-observe-explain framework. Students often think that some

More information

Chemical versus Physical Changes

Chemical versus Physical Changes Chemical versus Physical Changes Permission to Copy - This document may be reproduced for non-commercial educational purposes Copyright 2009 General Electric Company What are physical and chemical changes?

More information

Lesson 4. Temperature change

Lesson 4. Temperature change 54 Lesson 4 Temperature change T E A C H E R G U I D E Lesson summary Students meet scientist Jason Williams, an industrial chemist who designs the materials and processes for making solar cells. He explains

More information

Understanding Basic Concepts demonstrate an awareness of air as a substance that surrounds us and takes up space, and whose movement we feel as wind

Understanding Basic Concepts demonstrate an awareness of air as a substance that surrounds us and takes up space, and whose movement we feel as wind Designation: Ontario Curriculum: Science and Technology Earth and Space Systems: Grade 2 Air and Water in the Environment Written by: Andrea Schultz-Allison, Department of Earth Sciences, The University

More information

Bottle Rockets. Vanderbilt Student Volunteers for Science. Fall 2008

Bottle Rockets. Vanderbilt Student Volunteers for Science. Fall 2008 Bottle Rockets Vanderbilt Student Volunteers for Science Fall 2008 I. Introduction: History of Rockets Explain to the students that rockets are more than two thousand years old. Give the students a BRIEF

More information

Get Ready For The One Tonne Action Challenge!

Get Ready For The One Tonne Action Challenge! Get Ready For The One Tonne Action Challenge! Read through the four elements of the one-tonne challenge - making a difference is easier than you think!! Watt's It All About? As our demand for electricity

More information

Name: Class: Date: 10. Some substances, when exposed to visible light, absorb more energy as heat than other substances absorb.

Name: Class: Date: 10. Some substances, when exposed to visible light, absorb more energy as heat than other substances absorb. Name: Class: Date: ID: A PS Chapter 13 Review Modified True/False Indicate whether the statement is true or false. If false, change the identified word or phrase to make the statement true. 1. In all cooling

More information

A Teaching Unit for Years 3 6 children

A Teaching Unit for Years 3 6 children A Teaching Unit for Years 3 6 children 1 SEREAD and ARGO: Concept Overview for Years 3-6 Teaching Programme This is the overview for the first part of the SEREAD programme link with ARGO. The overview

More information

ENGLISH PLACEMENT TEST

ENGLISH PLACEMENT TEST ENGLISH PLACEMENT TEST NAME: Look at these examples. The correct answers are underlined. a) In warm climates people like / likes / are liking sitting outside in the sun. b) If it is very hot, they sit

More information

Peasouper Operator s Manual

Peasouper Operator s Manual Peasouper Operator s Manual Contact Information Le Maitre Special Effects, Inc. Canada 1960 Blue Heron Drive, London, ON. N6H 5L9 Phone Direct: (519) 659.7972 Phone Toll Free Direct: (800) 388.0617 Fax:

More information

Why hot water freezes faster than cold water

Why hot water freezes faster than cold water Why hot water freezes faster than cold water By Daniel Muthukrishna Undergraduate Engineering/Physics Student at the University of Queensland Images also produced by Daniel Muthukrishna Some of the main

More information

Kindergarten Seasons and Weather Assessment

Kindergarten Seasons and Weather Assessment Kindergarten Seasons and Weather Assessment 1a. Circle the pictures that represent the four seasons: snowman going to a teacher harvest fruits colorful flowers the beach 1b. Write the name of the season

More information

It's Cool: The Shape of Change

It's Cool: The Shape of Change It's Cool: The hape of Change The text of Lesson 4: It's Cool From the books The hape of Change and The hape of Change: tocks and Flows By Rob Quaden and Alan Ticotsky With Debra Lyneis Illustrated by

More information

[4] SA1.2 The student demonstrates an understanding of the processes of science by observing,

[4] SA1.2 The student demonstrates an understanding of the processes of science by observing, Frost Depth Levels Overview: In this lesson, students explore the active layer above permafrost and begin a long-term investigation of frost depth. (NOTE: This lesson requires a frost tube in your community.

More information

Humidity, Condensation, Clouds, and Fog. Water in the Atmosphere

Humidity, Condensation, Clouds, and Fog. Water in the Atmosphere Humidity, Condensation, Clouds, and Fog or Water in the Atmosphere The Hydrologic Cycle Where the Water Exists on Earth Evaporation From the Oceans and Land The Source of Water Vapor for the Atmosphere

More information

Ocean in Motion 2: What Causes Ocean Currents and How Do We Measure Them?

Ocean in Motion 2: What Causes Ocean Currents and How Do We Measure Them? Ocean in Motion 2: What Causes Ocean Currents and How Do We Measure Them? A. Overview 1. The Ocean in Motion -- Circulation In this program, students will learn about the driving forces responsible for

More information

Lab Activity on Air Pressure, Wind and Air Circulation Caused by Heating of the Atmosphere

Lab Activity on Air Pressure, Wind and Air Circulation Caused by Heating of the Atmosphere Lab Activity on Air Pressure, Wind and Air Circulation Caused by Heating of the Atmosphere 2002 Ann Bykerk-Kauffman, Dept. of Geological and Environmental Sciences, California State University, Chico *

More information

Danielle Abrahamson and Susan Michalek, Academy of Charter Schools, Denver, Colorado Four lessons over a period of five to seven days

Danielle Abrahamson and Susan Michalek, Academy of Charter Schools, Denver, Colorado Four lessons over a period of five to seven days MATTER: Grade Level: Presented by: Length of Unit: ITS STATES AND PROPERTIES First Grade Danielle Abrahamson and Susan Michalek, Academy of Charter Schools, Denver, Colorado Four lessons over a period

More information

Practical Applications of Freezing by Boiling Process

Practical Applications of Freezing by Boiling Process Practical Applications of Freezing by Boiling Process Kenny Gotlieb, Sasha Mitchell and Daniel Walsh Physics Department, Harvard-Westlake School 37 Coldwater Canyon, N. Hollywood, CA 9164 Introduction

More information

Partnerships Implementing Engineering Education Worcester Polytechnic Institute Worcester Public Schools Supported by: National Science Foundation

Partnerships Implementing Engineering Education Worcester Polytechnic Institute Worcester Public Schools Supported by: National Science Foundation Temperature: 6.D.3 Temperature and Heat Transfer Grade Level 6 Sessions Seasonality Instructional Mode(s) Team Size WPS Benchmarks MA Frameworks Key Words 1 Approximately 1.5 hours (10 minutes for cleanup)

More information

SAM Teachers Guide Heat and Temperature

SAM Teachers Guide Heat and Temperature SAM Teachers Guide Heat and Temperature Overview Students learn that temperature measures average kinetic energy, and heat is the transfer of energy from hot systems to cold systems. They consider what

More information

Sugar Makers. Real-world Connection: Energy harnessed by photosynthesis powers ecosystems, machines, and even our own bodies.

Sugar Makers. Real-world Connection: Energy harnessed by photosynthesis powers ecosystems, machines, and even our own bodies. Sugar Makers Principle of Plant Biology #1 Plants contain the same biological processes and biochemistry as microbes and animals. However, plants are unique in that they have the ability to use energy

More information

Photosynthesis Lesson Plan 1. Introduction to Photosynthesis (grade 4) Objectives:

Photosynthesis Lesson Plan 1. Introduction to Photosynthesis (grade 4) Objectives: Photosynthesis Lesson Plan 1 Introduction to Photosynthesis (grade 4) Identify types of living things that use photosynthesis. Understand the concept of photosynthesis. Observe how flowers are grown. First

More information

Wet Dry Ice Lab Phase Changes and Phase Diagrams

Wet Dry Ice Lab Phase Changes and Phase Diagrams elearning 2009 Introduction Wet Dry Ice Lab Phase Changes and Phase Diagrams Publication No. 9639 As dry ice sublimes in a closed system, its three phases are clearly viewed and its phase diagram takes

More information

Station 1 Dry Ice Experiments / Producing CO 2 in a reaction

Station 1 Dry Ice Experiments / Producing CO 2 in a reaction Station 1 Dry Ice Experiments / Producing CO 2 in a reaction 1. WHAT IS DRY ICE Put a flat chunk of dry ice on the counter and see how easy it "floats" on top of the counter when you give it a small push.

More information

Thermodynamics. Thermodynamics 1

Thermodynamics. Thermodynamics 1 Thermodynamics 1 Thermodynamics Some Important Topics First Law of Thermodynamics Internal Energy U ( or E) Enthalpy H Second Law of Thermodynamics Entropy S Third law of Thermodynamics Absolute Entropy

More information

PREPARATION FOR CHEMISTRY LAB: COMBUSTION

PREPARATION FOR CHEMISTRY LAB: COMBUSTION 1 Name: Lab Instructor: PREPARATION FOR CHEMISTRY LAB: COMBUSTION 1. What is a hydrocarbon? 2. What products form in the complete combustion of a hydrocarbon? 3. Combustion is an exothermic reaction. What

More information

THE NEWCASTLE UPON TYNE HOSPITALS NHS FOUNDATION TRUST SAFE USE AND STORAGE OF LIQUID NITROGEN AND SOLID CARBON DIOXIDE (DRY ICE)

THE NEWCASTLE UPON TYNE HOSPITALS NHS FOUNDATION TRUST SAFE USE AND STORAGE OF LIQUID NITROGEN AND SOLID CARBON DIOXIDE (DRY ICE) THE NEWCASTLE UPON TYNE HOSPITALS NHS FOUNDATION TRUST SAFE USE AND STORAGE OF LIQUID NITROGEN AND SOLID CARBON DIOXIDE (DRY ICE) GUIDANCE AND INFORMATION Effective: February 2007 Review February 2010

More information