1. When applying the process of science, which of these is tested? a. an observation b. a result c. a hypothesis d. a question e.

Save this PDF as:
Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "1. When applying the process of science, which of these is tested? a. an observation b. a result c. a hypothesis d. a question e."

Transcription

1 BCOR 11 Exam 1, 2004 MULTIPLE CHOICE. Choose the one alternative that best completes the statement or answers the question. 1. When applying the process of science, which of these is tested? a. an observation b. a result c. a hypothesis d. a question e. a prediction 2. Which four elements make up approximately 96% of living matter? a. carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen b. carbon, sodium, chlorine, magnesium c. carbon, sulfur, phosphorus, hydrogen d. carbon, oxygen, sulfur, calcium e. oxygen, hydrogen, calcium, sodium 3. The mass number of an element can be easily approximated by adding together the number of a. protons and electrons. b. neutrons and electrons. c. isotopes of the atom. d. protons and neutrons. e. electron orbitals in each energy level. 4. How do isotopes of a single element differ from each other? a. ability to form ions b. number of protons c. number of neutrons d. valence electron distribution e. number of electrons 5. The reactive properties or chemical behavior of an atom depend on the number of a. orbitals found in the atom. b. valence shells in the atom. c. electrons in each orbital in the atom. d. electrons in the outer valence shell in the atom. e. hybridized orbitals in the atom.

2 6. How many electrons would be expected in the outermost electron shell of an atom with atomic number 20? a. 4 b. 1 c. 0 d. 20 e Each phosphodiester linkage in DNA or RNA includes a phosphate joined by covalent bonds to a. two bases b. Two sugars c. Two additional phosphates d. A sugar, a base and a phosphate e. A sugar and a base 8. Which of the following represents a polar covalent bond? a. H-O b. C-C c. H-H d. O-O e. C-H 9. The ionic bond of sodium chloride is formed when a. sodium gains an electron from chlorine. b. chlorine gains an electron from sodium. c. sodium and chlorine share an electron pair. d. sodium and chlorine both lose electrons from their outer valence shells. e. chlorine gains a proton from sodium. 10. Van der Waals interactions result when a. two polar covalent bonds react. b. electrons are not symmetrically distributed in a molecule. c. hybrid orbitals overlap. d. molecules held by ionic bonds react with water. e. a hydrogen atom loses an electron. 11. Which of the following best describes chemical equilibrium? a. There are equal concentrations of reactants and products. b. Reactions continue with no net change on the concentrations of reactants and products. c. Reactions stop only when all reactants have been converted to products. d. Concentrations of products are high. e. Reactions have stopped.

3 12. In a single molecule of water, the two hydrogen atoms are bonded to a single oxygen atom by a. van der Waals interactions. b. hydrogen bonds. c. polar covalent bonds. d. nonpolar covalent bonds. e. ionic bonds. 13. Why does ice float in liquid water? a. Ice always has air bubbles that keep it afloat. b. The liquid water molecules have more energy and can push up the ice. c. Hydrogen bonds keep the molecules of ice farther apart than in liquid water. d. The crystalline lattice of ice causes it to be denser than liquid water. e. The ionic bonds between the molecules in ice prevent the ice from sinking. 14. Hydrophobic substances like vegetable oil are a. ionic substances that dissolve in water. b. ionic or polar substances that have an affinity for water. c. non-ionic or nonpolar substances that have an affinity for water. d. ionic or polar substances that repel water. e. non-ionic or nonpolar substances that repel water. 15. The molecular weight of glucose is 180g. To make a 0.5 Msolution of glucose, you should do which of the following? a. Dissolve 90 mg (milligrams) of glucose in 1 L of water. b. Dissolve 0.5 g of glucose in 1 L of water. c. Dissolve 50 g of glucose in 1 L of water. d. Dissolve 90 g of glucose in 100 ml of water. e. Dissolve 90 g of glucose in water, and then add more water until the total volume of the solution is 1 L. 16. What do cohesion, surface tension, and adhesion have in common with reference to water? a. All are produced by covalent bonding. b. All increase when temperature increases. c. All have to do with nonpolar covalent bonds. d. All are properties related to hydrogen bonding. e. Both a and c are correct.

4 17. One of the buffers that contribute to ph stability inhuman blood is carbonic acid. Carbonic acid (H 2 CO 3 ) is a weak acid that when placed in an aqueous solution dissociates into a bicarbonate ion (HCO 3 ) and a hydrogen ion ( H + ) Thus, H 2 CO 3 HCO 3 + H + If the ph of the blood increases, one would expect: a. an increase in the concentration of H 2 CO 3 and a decrease in the concentration of H 2 O b. a decrease in the concentration of HCO 3 and an increase in the concentration of both H 2 CO 3 and H 2 O c. a decrease in the concentration of HCO 3 and an increase in the concentration of H 2 O d. an increase in the concentration of HCO 3 and a decrease in the concentration of H 2 O e. a decrease in the concentration of H 2 CO 3 and an increase in the concentration of H 2 O 18. Which type of molecule would be most abundant in a typical prokaryotic or eukaryotic cell? a. hydrocarbon b. protein c. carbohydrate d. water e. lipid 19. Which property of the carbon atom gives it compatibility with a greater number of different elements than any other type of atom? a. Carbon forms ionic bonds. b. Carbon has six to eight neutrons. c. Carbon has a valence of 4. d. Only a and c are correct. e. a, b, and c are correct. 20. What type of bonds does carbon have a tendency to form? a. ionic b. non reactive carbon does not form bonds c. covalent d. Only a and c are correct. e. hydrogen

5 21. What is the reason why hydrocarbons are not soluble in water? a. They are hydrophilic. b. They are lighter than water. c. The C-H bond is nonpolar d. The C-H bond is polar e. They are large molecules. 22. The two molecules shown in Figure 1 are best described as a. structural isomers. b. geometric isomers. c. nonisotopic isomers. d. radioactive isotopes. e. enantiomers. 23. Recent research suggests that side effects from Ritalin, the drug used to treat attention deficit disorder, may be caused by contamination of enantiomers, or molecules that a. differ in the location of their double bonds. b. are mirror images of one another. c. have identical three-dimensional shapes. d. differ in their electrical charge. e. lack an asymmetric carbon.

6 24. From Figure 2, which molecule is water-soluble because it has a functional group that is an alcohol? a. d and e b. a and d c. a and c d. a and c and d e. c and d 25. From Figure 2, which two molecules contain a carbonyl group? a. H C H a. b and c b. d and e c. c and d d. a and b e. a and e 26. From Figure 2, which molecule increases the concentration of I hydrogen ions in a solution and is therefore an organic acid?

7 27. Identify the asymmetric carbon in the molecule shown in Figure 3. d 28. Polymers of polysaccharides, fats, and proteins are all synthesized from monomers by a. the removal of water (dehydration reactions). b. ionic bonding of the monomers. c. the addition of water to each monomer. d. the formation of disulfide bridges between monomers. e. connecting monosaccharides together. 29. Carbohydrates normally function in animals as a. energy-storage molecules. b. the functional units of lipids. c. a component of triglycerides. d. sites of protein synthesis. e. enzymes in the regulation of metabolic processes. 30. Consider a polysaccharide consisting of 828 glucose molecules. The total hydrolysis of the polysaccharide would result in the production of a. 828 glucose molecules and 828 water molecules. b. 827 glucose molecules and 827 water molecules. c. 827 water molecules. d. 827 glucose molecules e. 828 glucose molecules and no water molecules. 31. What maintains the secondary structure of a protein? a. hydrogen bonds b. electrostatic charges c. ionic bonds d. peptide bonds e. disulfide bridges

8 32. The bonding of two amino acid molecules to form a larger molecule requires the a. release of a water molecule. b. releace c. addition of a water molecule. d. addition of a nitrogen atom. e. Both C and D are correct. 33. The R group or side chain of the amino acid serine is CH The R group or side chain of the amino acid alanine is CH Where would you expect to find these amino acids in globular protein in aqueous solution? a. Both serine and alanine would be on the exterior of the globular protein. B. b. Alanine would be in the interior, and serine would be on the exterior of the globular protein. c. Both serine and alanine would be in the interior and on the exterior of the globular protein. d. Serine would be in the interior, and alanine would be on the exterior of the globular protein. e. Both serine and alanine would be in the interior of the globular protein. 34. Which of the following statements best summarizes structural differences between DNA and RNA? a. DNA is not a polymer, but RNA is. b. DNA has different purine bases from RNA. c. DNA contains a different sugar from RNA. d. RNA is a double helix, but DNA is not. e. RNA is a protein, whereas DNA is a nucleic acid. 35. If one strand of a DNA molecule has the sequence of bases ATTGCA, the other complementary strand would have the sequence a. UAACGU. b. TLTUCGU. c. TAACGT. d. TUUGCT. e. TAAGCT. 36. A primary objective of cell fractionation is a. to view the structure of cell membranes. b. to identify the enzymes outside the organelles. c. to crack the cell wall so the cytoplasmic contents can be released. d. to separate the major organelles so their particular functions can be determined. e. to determine the size of various organelles.

9 37. Which of the following is not a part of the endomembrane system? a. rough endoplasmic reticulum b. lysosomes c. Golgi apparatus d. smooth endoplasmic reticulum e. mitochondria 38. Large numbers of ribosomes are present in cells that specialize in producing which of the following molecules? a. glucose b. starches c. lipids d. proteins e. steroids 39. Of the following, which is probably the most common route for membrane flow in the endomembrane system? a. tonoplast plasma membrane nuclear envelope smooth ER b. Golgi lysosome ER plasma membrane c. nuclear envelope lysosome Golgi plasma membrane d. ER chloroplasts mitochondrion cell membrane e. rough ER vesicles Golgi plasma membrane 40. Which of the following pairs is mismatched? a. nucleus - DNA replication b. nucleolus - ribosomal RNA c. lysosome - protein synthesis d. cytoskeleton - microtubules e. cell membrane - lipid bilayer 41. Grana, thylakoids, and stroma are all components found in a. mitochondria. b. cilia and flagella. c. nuclei. d. chloroplasts. e. lysosomes. 42. Of the following, which cell structure would most likely be visible with a light microscope? a. microtubule b. ribosome c. nuclear pore d. mitochondrion e. nucleus

10 43. All of the structures listed below are associated with movement in cells or by cells except a. dynein. b. myosin. c. flagella. d. cilia. e. peroxisomes. 44. Ions can travel directly from the cytoplasm of one animal cell to the cytoplasm of an adjacent cell through a. tight junctions. b. gap junctions. c. desmosomes. d. intermediate filaments. e. plasmodesmata. 45. Which of the following intercellular junctions are common in epithelial tissue? a. desmosomes b. plasmodesmata c. tight junctions d. both a and c e. a, b and c 46, The presence of cholesterol in the plasma membranes of some animals a. makes the animal more susceptible to circulatory disorders. b. enables the membrane to stay fluid more easily when cell temperature drops. c. enables the animal to add hydrogen atoms to unsaturated phospholipids. d. makes the membrane less flexible, so it can sustain greater pressure from within the cell. e. enables the animal to remove hydrogen atoms from saturated phospholipids. 47. According to the fluid mosaic model of cell membranes, which of the following is a true statement about membrane phospholipids? a. They have hydrophilic tails in the interior of the membrane. b. They Occur in an uninterrupted bilayer, with membrane proteins restricted to the surface of the membrane. c. They are free to depart from the membrane and dissolve in the surrounding solution. d. They frequently flip-flop from one side of the membrane to the other. e. They can move laterally along the plane of the membrane. 48. All of the following are functions of plasma membrane proteins except a. cell-cell recognition. b. intercellular joining. c. protein synthesis. d. transport. e. signal transduction.

11 49. What membrane-surface molecules are thought to be most important as cells recognize each other? a. glycoproteins b. phospholipids c. integral proteins d. peripheral proteins e. cholesterol 50. The kinds of molecules that pass through a lipid bilayer most easily are a. ionic. b. large polar molecules. c. small and hydrophobic. d. monosaccharides such as glucose. e. large and hydrophobic. Bonus Question 1. One of the first models for membranes was one proposed by Davson and Daneilli, the sandwich model. That model has been modified to one called a fluid mosaic. In class we discussed how the fluid mosaic model for cell membranes as been further modified to include (fill in blank).

Anatomy and Physiology Placement Exam 2 Practice with Answers at End!

Anatomy and Physiology Placement Exam 2 Practice with Answers at End! Anatomy and Physiology Placement Exam 2 Practice with Answers at End! General Chemical Principles 1. bonds are characterized by the sharing of electrons between the participating atoms. a. hydrogen b.

More information

A disaccharide is formed when a dehydration reaction joins two monosaccharides. This covalent bond is called a glycosidic linkage.

A disaccharide is formed when a dehydration reaction joins two monosaccharides. This covalent bond is called a glycosidic linkage. CH 5 Structure & Function of Large Molecules: Macromolecules Molecules of Life All living things are made up of four classes of large biological molecules: carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and nucleic

More information

Carbohydrates, proteins and lipids

Carbohydrates, proteins and lipids Carbohydrates, proteins and lipids Chapter 3 MACROMOLECULES Macromolecules: polymers with molecular weights >1,000 Functional groups THE FOUR MACROMOLECULES IN LIFE Molecules in living organisms: proteins,

More information

Chapter 2: Cell Structure and Function pg. 70-107

Chapter 2: Cell Structure and Function pg. 70-107 UNIT 1: Biochemistry Chapter 2: Cell Structure and Function pg. 70-107 Organelles are internal structures that carry out specialized functions, interacting and complementing each other. Animal and plant

More information

Keystone Review Practice Test Module A Cells and Cell Processes. 1. Which characteristic is shared by all prokaryotes and eukaryotes?

Keystone Review Practice Test Module A Cells and Cell Processes. 1. Which characteristic is shared by all prokaryotes and eukaryotes? Keystone Review Practice Test Module A Cells and Cell Processes 1. Which characteristic is shared by all prokaryotes and eukaryotes? a. Ability to store hereditary information b. Use of organelles to control

More information

CHAPTER 3 THE CHEMISTRY OF ORGANIC MOLECULES

CHAPTER 3 THE CHEMISTRY OF ORGANIC MOLECULES CHAPTER 3 THE CHEMISTRY OF ORGANIC MOLECULES 3.1 Organic Molecules The chemistry of carbon accounts for the diversity of organic molecules found in living things. Carbon has six electrons, four of which

More information

Chapter 4: A Tour of the Cell. 1. Cell Basics. Limits to Cell Size. 1. Cell Basics. 2. Prokaryotic Cells. 3. Eukaryotic Cells

Chapter 4: A Tour of the Cell. 1. Cell Basics. Limits to Cell Size. 1. Cell Basics. 2. Prokaryotic Cells. 3. Eukaryotic Cells Chapter 4: A Tour of the Cell 1. Cell Basics 2. Prokaryotic Cells 3. Eukaryotic Cells 1. Cell Basics Limits to Cell Size There are 2 main reasons why cells are so small: If cells get too large: 1) there

More information

THE HISTORY OF CELL BIOLOGY

THE HISTORY OF CELL BIOLOGY SECTION 4-1 REVIEW THE HISTORY OF CELL BIOLOGY Define the following terms. 1. cell 2. cell theory Write the correct letter in the blank. 1. One early piece of evidence supporting the cell theory was the

More information

Chemical Basis of Life Module A Anchor 2

Chemical Basis of Life Module A Anchor 2 Chemical Basis of Life Module A Anchor 2 Key Concepts: - Water is a polar molecule. Therefore, it is able to form multiple hydrogen bonds, which account for many of its special properties. - Water s polarity

More information

Lecture Overview. Hydrogen Bonds. Special Properties of Water Molecules. Universal Solvent. ph Scale Illustrated. special properties of water

Lecture Overview. Hydrogen Bonds. Special Properties of Water Molecules. Universal Solvent. ph Scale Illustrated. special properties of water Lecture Overview special properties of water > water as a solvent > ph molecules of the cell > properties of carbon > carbohydrates > lipids > proteins > nucleic acids Hydrogen Bonds polarity of water

More information

BSC 2010 - Exam I Lectures and Text Pages. The Plasma Membrane Structure and Function. Phospholipids. I. Intro to Biology (2-29) II.

BSC 2010 - Exam I Lectures and Text Pages. The Plasma Membrane Structure and Function. Phospholipids. I. Intro to Biology (2-29) II. BSC 2010 - Exam I Lectures and Text Pages I. Intro to Biology (2-29) II. Chemistry of Life Chemistry review (30-46) Water (47-57) Carbon (58-67) Macromolecules (68-91) III. Cells and Membranes Cell structure

More information

Chapter 3 Molecules of Cells

Chapter 3 Molecules of Cells Bio 100 Molecules of cells 1 Chapter 3 Molecules of Cells Compounds containing carbon are called organic compounds Molecules such as methane that are only composed of carbon and hydrogen are called hydrocarbons

More information

4. Which carbohydrate would you find as part of a molecule of RNA? a. Galactose b. Deoxyribose c. Ribose d. Glucose

4. Which carbohydrate would you find as part of a molecule of RNA? a. Galactose b. Deoxyribose c. Ribose d. Glucose 1. How is a polymer formed from multiple monomers? a. From the growth of the chain of carbon atoms b. By the removal of an OH group and a hydrogen atom c. By the addition of an OH group and a hydrogen

More information

Chapter 2 The Chemical Context of Life

Chapter 2 The Chemical Context of Life Chapter 2 The Chemical Context of Life Multiple-Choice Questions 1) About 25 of the 92 natural elements are known to be essential to life. Which four of these 25 elements make up approximately 96% of living

More information

Chapter 5: The Structure and Function of Large Biological Molecules

Chapter 5: The Structure and Function of Large Biological Molecules Name Period Concept 5.1 Macromolecules are polymers, built from monomers 1. The large molecules of all living things fall into just four main classes. Name them. 2. Circle the three classes that are called

More information

Carbon-organic Compounds

Carbon-organic Compounds Elements in Cells The living substance of cells is made up of cytoplasm and the structures within it. About 96% of cytoplasm and its included structures are composed of the elements carbon, hydrogen, oxygen,

More information

Disaccharides consist of two monosaccharide monomers covalently linked by a glycosidic bond. They function in sugar transport.

Disaccharides consist of two monosaccharide monomers covalently linked by a glycosidic bond. They function in sugar transport. 1. The fundamental life processes of plants and animals depend on a variety of chemical reactions that occur in specialized areas of the organism s cells. As a basis for understanding this concept: 1.

More information

2007 7.013 Problem Set 1 KEY

2007 7.013 Problem Set 1 KEY 2007 7.013 Problem Set 1 KEY Due before 5 PM on FRIDAY, February 16, 2007. Turn answers in to the box outside of 68-120. PLEASE WRITE YOUR ANSWERS ON THIS PRINTOUT. 1. Where in a eukaryotic cell do you

More information

BIOLOGICAL MOLECULES OF LIFE

BIOLOGICAL MOLECULES OF LIFE BIOLOGICAL MOLECULES OF LIFE C A R B O H Y D R A T E S, L I P I D S, P R O T E I N S, A N D N U C L E I C A C I D S The Academic Support Center @ Daytona State College (Science 115, Page 1 of 29) Carbon

More information

Cytology. Living organisms are made up of cells. Either PROKARYOTIC or EUKARYOTIC cells.

Cytology. Living organisms are made up of cells. Either PROKARYOTIC or EUKARYOTIC cells. CYTOLOGY Cytology Living organisms are made up of cells. Either PROKARYOTIC or EUKARYOTIC cells. A. two major cell types B. distinguished by structural organization See table on handout for differences.

More information

Elements in Biological Molecules

Elements in Biological Molecules Chapter 3: Biological Molecules 1. Carbohydrates 2. Lipids 3. Proteins 4. Nucleic Acids Elements in Biological Molecules Biological macromolecules are made almost entirely of just 6 elements: Carbon (C)

More information

AP Biology-Chapter #6 & 7 Review

AP Biology-Chapter #6 & 7 Review DO NOT WRITE ON THIS TEST- USE ANSWER DOCUMENT AP Biology-Chapter #6 & 7 Review Multiple Choice Identify the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question. 1. All of the following are

More information

Plasma Membrane hydrophilic polar heads

Plasma Membrane hydrophilic polar heads The Parts of the Cell 3 main parts in ALL cells: plasma membrane, cytoplasm, genetic material this is about the parts of a generic eukaryotic cell Plasma Membrane -is a fluid mosaic model membrane is fluid

More information

The Structure and Function of Macromolecules: Carbohydrates, Lipids & Phospholipids

The Structure and Function of Macromolecules: Carbohydrates, Lipids & Phospholipids The Structure and Function of Macromolecules: Carbohydrates, Lipids & Phospholipids The FOUR Classes of Large Biomolecules All living things are made up of four classes of large biological molecules: Carbohydrates

More information

Review of the Cell and Its Organelles

Review of the Cell and Its Organelles Biology Learning Centre Review of the Cell and Its Organelles Tips for most effective learning of this material: Memorize the names and structures over several days. This will help you retain what you

More information

Unit 2: Cells, Membranes and Signaling CELL MEMBRANE. Chapter 5 Hillis Textbook

Unit 2: Cells, Membranes and Signaling CELL MEMBRANE. Chapter 5 Hillis Textbook Unit 2: Cells, Membranes and Signaling CELL MEMBRANE Chapter 5 Hillis Textbook HOW DOES THE LAB RELATE TO THE NEXT CHAPTER? SURFACE AREA: the entire outer covering of a cell that enables materials pass.

More information

Preliminary MFM Quiz

Preliminary MFM Quiz Preliminary MFM Quiz 1. The major carrier of chemical energy in all cells is: A) adenosine monophosphate B) adenosine diphosphate C) adenosine trisphosphate D) guanosine trisphosphate E) carbamoyl phosphate

More information

Cell Structure & Function!

Cell Structure & Function! Cell Structure & Function! Chapter 3! The most exciting phrase to hear in science, the one that heralds new discoveries, is not 'Eureka!' but 'That's funny.! -- Isaac Asimov Animal Cell Plant Cell Cell

More information

Examination One. Biology 101. Dr. Jaeson T. Fournier

Examination One. Biology 101. Dr. Jaeson T. Fournier Examination One Biology 101 Dr. Jaeson T. Fournier Examination Instructions: Answers are to be indicated on a scantron. Keep your work protected! This helps prevent dishonesty. The instructor will not

More information

Lecture 4 Cell Membranes & Organelles

Lecture 4 Cell Membranes & Organelles Lecture 4 Cell Membranes & Organelles Structure of Animal Cells The Phospholipid Structure Phospholipid structure Encases all living cells Its basic structure is represented by the fluidmosaic model Phospholipid

More information

Bacterial (Prokaryotic) Cell. Common features of all cells. Tour of the Cell. Eukaryotic Cell. Plasma Membrane defines inside from outside

Bacterial (Prokaryotic) Cell. Common features of all cells. Tour of the Cell. Eukaryotic Cell. Plasma Membrane defines inside from outside www.denniskunkel.com Tour of the Cell www.denniskunkel.com Today s Topics Properties of all cells Prokaryotes and Eukaryotes Functions of Major Cellular Organelles Information, Synthesis&Transport,, Vesicles

More information

Microscopes. Eukaryotes Eukaryotic cells are characterized by having: DNA in a nucleus that is bounded by a membranous nuclear envelope

Microscopes. Eukaryotes Eukaryotic cells are characterized by having: DNA in a nucleus that is bounded by a membranous nuclear envelope CH 6 The Cell Microscopy Scientists use microscopes to visualize cells too small to see with the naked eye. In a light microscope (LM), visible light is passed through a specimen and then through glass

More information

3120-1 - Page 1. Name:

3120-1 - Page 1. Name: Name: 1) Which series is arranged in correct order according to decreasing size of structures? A) DNA, nucleus, chromosome, nucleotide, nitrogenous base B) chromosome, nucleus, nitrogenous base, nucleotide,

More information

1.1.2. thebiotutor. AS Biology OCR. Unit F211: Cells, Exchange & Transport. Module 1.2 Cell Membranes. Notes & Questions.

1.1.2. thebiotutor. AS Biology OCR. Unit F211: Cells, Exchange & Transport. Module 1.2 Cell Membranes. Notes & Questions. thebiotutor AS Biology OCR Unit F211: Cells, Exchange & Transport Module 1.2 Cell Membranes Notes & Questions Andy Todd 1 Outline the roles of membranes within cells and at the surface of cells. The main

More information

Biochemistry of Cells

Biochemistry of Cells Biochemistry of Cells 1 Carbon-based Molecules Although a cell is mostly water, the rest of the cell consists mostly of carbon-based molecules Organic chemistry is the study of carbon compounds Carbon

More information

Chapter 5. The Structure and Function of Macromolecule s

Chapter 5. The Structure and Function of Macromolecule s Chapter 5 The Structure and Function of Macromolecule s Most Macromolecules are polymers: Polymer: (poly: many; mer: part) Large molecules consisting of many identical or similar subunits connected together.

More information

BIOLOGICAL MEMBRANES: FUNCTIONS, STRUCTURES & TRANSPORT

BIOLOGICAL MEMBRANES: FUNCTIONS, STRUCTURES & TRANSPORT BIOLOGICAL MEMBRANES: FUNCTIONS, STRUCTURES & TRANSPORT UNIVERSITY OF PNG SCHOOL OF MEDICINE AND HEALTH SCIENCES DISCIPLINE OF BIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY BMLS II / B Pharm II / BDS II VJ Temple

More information

The Cell: Organelle Diagrams

The Cell: Organelle Diagrams The Cell: Organelle Diagrams Fig 7-4. A prokaryotic cell. Lacking a true nucleus and the other membrane-enclosed organelles of the eukaryotic cell, the prokaryotic cell is much simpler in structure. Only

More information

7.2 Cell Structure. Lesson Objectives. Lesson Summary. Cell Organization Eukaryotic cells contain a nucleus and many specialized structures.

7.2 Cell Structure. Lesson Objectives. Lesson Summary. Cell Organization Eukaryotic cells contain a nucleus and many specialized structures. 7.2 Cell Structure Lesson Objectives Describe the structure and function of the cell nucleus. Describe the role of vacuoles, lysosomes, and the cytoskeleton. Identify the role of ribosomes, endoplasmic

More information

CELLS: PLANT CELLS 20 FEBRUARY 2013

CELLS: PLANT CELLS 20 FEBRUARY 2013 CELLS: PLANT CELLS 20 FEBRUARY 2013 Lesson Description In this lesson we will discuss the following: The Cell Theory Terminology Parts of Plant Cells: Organelles Difference between plant and animal cells

More information

Molecular Cell Biology

Molecular Cell Biology Harvey Lodish Arnold Berk Paul Matsudaira Chris A. Kaiser Monty Krieger Matthew P. Scott Lawrence Zipursky James Darnell Molecular Cell Biology Fifth Edition Chapter 2: Chemical Foundations Copyright 2004

More information

Quick Hit Activity Using UIL Science Contests For Formative and Summative Assessments of Pre-AP and AP Biology Students

Quick Hit Activity Using UIL Science Contests For Formative and Summative Assessments of Pre-AP and AP Biology Students Quick Hit Activity Using UIL Science Contests For Formative and Summative Assessments of Pre-AP and AP Biology Students Activity Title: Quick Hit Goal of Activity: To perform formative and summative assessments

More information

Cells & Cell Organelles

Cells & Cell Organelles Cells & Cell Organelles The Building Blocks of Life H Biology Types of cells bacteria cells Prokaryote - no organelles Eukaryotes - organelles animal cells plant cells Cell size comparison Animal cell

More information

Chapter 2 Chemical Principles

Chapter 2 Chemical Principles Chapter 2 Chemical Principles I. Chemistry. [Students should read this section on their own]. a. Chemistry is the study of the interactions between atoms and molecules. b. The atom is the smallest unit

More information

The Molecules of Cells

The Molecules of Cells The Molecules of Cells I. Introduction A. Most of the world s population cannot digest milk-based foods. 1. These people are lactose intolerant because they lack the enzyme lactase. 2. This illustrates

More information

Chapter 3: Biological Molecules. 1. Carbohydrates 2. Lipids 3. Proteins 4. Nucleic Acids

Chapter 3: Biological Molecules. 1. Carbohydrates 2. Lipids 3. Proteins 4. Nucleic Acids Chapter 3: Biological Molecules 1. Carbohydrates 2. Lipids 3. Proteins 4. Nucleic Acids Elements in Biological Molecules Biological macromolecules are made almost entirely of just 6 elements: Carbon (C)

More information

ATOMS AND BONDS. Bonds

ATOMS AND BONDS. Bonds ATOMS AND BONDS Atoms of elements are the simplest units of organization in the natural world. Atoms consist of protons (positive charge), neutrons (neutral charge) and electrons (negative charge). The

More information

Six major functions of membrane proteins: Transport Enzymatic activity

Six major functions of membrane proteins: Transport Enzymatic activity CH 7 Membranes Cellular Membranes Phospholipids are the most abundant lipid in the plasma membrane. Phospholipids are amphipathic molecules, containing hydrophobic and hydrophilic regions. The fluid mosaic

More information

Biological cell membranes

Biological cell membranes Unit 14: Cell biology. 14 2 Biological cell membranes The cell surface membrane surrounds the cell and acts as a barrier between the cell s contents and the environment. The cell membrane has multiple

More information

Biology 101 Chapter 4 Cells as the Basic Unit of Life. The Cell Theory Major Contributors: Galileo = first observations made with a microscope

Biology 101 Chapter 4 Cells as the Basic Unit of Life. The Cell Theory Major Contributors: Galileo = first observations made with a microscope Biology 101 Chapter 4 Cells as the Basic Unit of Life The Cell Theory Major Contributors: Galileo = first observations made with a microscope Robert Hooke = first to observe small compartments in dead

More information

Proteins and Nucleic Acids

Proteins and Nucleic Acids Proteins and Nucleic Acids Chapter 5 Macromolecules: Proteins Proteins Most structurally & functionally diverse group of biomolecules. : o Involved in almost everything o Enzymes o Structure (keratin,

More information

Name: Hour: Elements & Macromolecules in Organisms

Name: Hour: Elements & Macromolecules in Organisms Name: Hour: Elements & Macromolecules in Organisms Most common elements in living things are carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, and oxygen. These four elements constitute about 95% of your body weight. All compounds

More information

I. Chapter 5 Summary. II. Nucleotides & Nucleic Acids. III. Lipids

I. Chapter 5 Summary. II. Nucleotides & Nucleic Acids. III. Lipids I. Chapter 5 Summary A. Simple Sugars (CH 2 O) n : 1. One C contains a carbonyl (C=O) rest contain - 2. Classification by functional group: aldoses & ketoses 3. Classification by number of C's: trioses,

More information

Biological molecules:

Biological molecules: Biological molecules: All are organic (based on carbon). Monomers vs. polymers: Monomers refer to the subunits that, when polymerized, make up a larger polymer. Monomers may function on their own in some

More information

Chapter 3. Cellular Structure and Function Worksheets. 39 www.ck12.org

Chapter 3. Cellular Structure and Function Worksheets. 39 www.ck12.org Chapter 3 Cellular Structure and Function Worksheets (Opening image copyright by Sebastian Kaulitzki, 2010. Used under license from Shutterstock.com.) Lesson 3.1: Introduction to Cells Lesson 3.2: Cell

More information

Lab 3 Organic Molecules of Biological Importance

Lab 3 Organic Molecules of Biological Importance Name Biology 3 ID Number Lab 3 Organic Molecules of Biological Importance Section 1 - Organic Molecules Section 2 - Functional Groups Section 3 - From Building Blocks to Macromolecules Section 4 - Carbohydrates

More information

Date: Student Name: Teacher Name: Jared George. Score: 1) A cell with 1% solute concentration is placed in a beaker with a 5% solute concentration.

Date: Student Name: Teacher Name: Jared George. Score: 1) A cell with 1% solute concentration is placed in a beaker with a 5% solute concentration. Biology Keystone (PA Core) Quiz Homeostasis and Transport - (BIO.A.4.1.1 ) Plasma Membrane, (BIO.A.4.1.2 ) Transport Mechanisms, (BIO.A.4.1.3 ) Transport Facilitation Student Name: Teacher Name: Jared

More information

Organelles and Their Functions

Organelles and Their Functions Organelles and Their Functions The study of cell organelles and their functions is a fascinating part of biology. The current article provides a brief description of the structure of organelles and their

More information

Cell Structure and Function

Cell Structure and Function Bio 100 - Cells 1 Cell Structure and Function Tenets of Cell Theory 1. All living things are made up of one or more cells 2. Cells are the basic living units within organisms, and the chemical reactions

More information

Name Date Period. 2. When a molecule of double-stranded DNA undergoes replication, it results in

Name Date Period. 2. When a molecule of double-stranded DNA undergoes replication, it results in DNA, RNA, Protein Synthesis Keystone 1. During the process shown above, the two strands of one DNA molecule are unwound. Then, DNA polymerases add complementary nucleotides to each strand which results

More information

The Cell Interior and Function

The Cell Interior and Function The Cell Interior and Function 5 5.0 CHAPTER PREVIEW Investigate and understand the organization and function of the cell interior. Define the differences between eukaryotic and prokaryotic cell structure.

More information

Organic Compounds. Essential Questions: What is Organic? What are the 4 major Organic Compounds? How are they made? What are they used for?

Organic Compounds. Essential Questions: What is Organic? What are the 4 major Organic Compounds? How are they made? What are they used for? Organic Compounds Essential Questions: What is Organic? What are the 4 major Organic Compounds? How are they made? What are they used for? Aristotle: Francesco Redi: What do we already know? Spontaneous

More information

cells - relatively simple cells - lack nuclear membrane and many organelles - bacteria and their relatives are all prokaryotic

cells - relatively simple cells - lack nuclear membrane and many organelles - bacteria and their relatives are all prokaryotic Cell Biology A cell is chemical system that is able to maintain its structure and reproduce. Cells are the fundamental unit of life. All living things are cells or composed of cells. 1 The interior contents

More information

Organic Molecules of Life - Exercise 2

Organic Molecules of Life - Exercise 2 Organic Molecules of Life - Exercise 2 Objectives -Know the difference between a reducing sugar and a non-reducing sugar. -Distinguish Monosaccharides from Disaccharides and Polysaccharides -Understand

More information

Cells. Structure, Function and Homeostasis

Cells. Structure, Function and Homeostasis Cells Structure, Function and Homeostasis Characteristics of Cells Basic unit of life anything alive is made of cells Plasma membrane (skin) that separates them from the environment. Skeletonsfor protection

More information

Cell Structure and Function. Eukaryotic Cell: Neuron

Cell Structure and Function. Eukaryotic Cell: Neuron Cell Structure and Function Eukaryotic Cell: Neuron Cell Structure and Function Eukaryotic Cells: Blood Cells Cell Structure and Function Prokaryotic Cells: Bacteria Cell Structure and Function All living

More information

AP BIOLOGY 2006 SCORING GUIDELINES. Question 1

AP BIOLOGY 2006 SCORING GUIDELINES. Question 1 AP BIOLOGY 2006 SCORING GUIDELINES Question 1 A major distinction between prokaryotes and eukaryotes is the presence of membrane-bound organelles in eukaryotes. (a) Describe the structure and function

More information

Ch. 8 - The Cell Membrane

Ch. 8 - The Cell Membrane Ch. 8 - The Cell Membrane 2007-2008 Phospholipids Phosphate head hydrophilic Fatty acid tails hydrophobic Arranged as a bilayer Phosphate attracted to water Fatty acid repelled by water Aaaah, one of those

More information

-1- BIOS 100 - Fall, 2009 Exam I, 18 Sept, 2008 Michael Muller, Instructor

-1- BIOS 100 - Fall, 2009 Exam I, 18 Sept, 2008 Michael Muller, Instructor BIOS 100 - Fall, 2009 Exam I, 18 Sept, 2008 Michael Muller, Instructor Name: TA: This exam consists of 42 questions over 7 pages (the last page of which has the periodic table and Bloom s hierarchy). Please

More information

Molecular Models in Biology

Molecular Models in Biology Molecular Models in Biology Objectives: After this lab a student will be able to: 1) Understand the properties of atoms that give rise to bonds. 2) Understand how and why atoms form ions. 3) Model covalent,

More information

Eukaryotes. www.njctl.org PSI Biology Eukaryotes & Gene Expression

Eukaryotes. www.njctl.org PSI Biology Eukaryotes & Gene Expression Eukaryotes The Eukaryotic Cell Classwork 1. Identify two characteristics that are shared by all cells. 2. Suppose you are investigating a cell that contains a nucleus. Would you categorize this cell as

More information

The Lipid Bilayer Is a Two-Dimensional Fluid

The Lipid Bilayer Is a Two-Dimensional Fluid The Lipid Bilayer Is a Two-Dimensional Fluid The aqueous environment inside and outside a cell prevents membrane lipids from escaping from bilayer, but nothing stops these molecules from moving about and

More information

Chapter 2 Polar Covalent Bonds; Acids and Bases

Chapter 2 Polar Covalent Bonds; Acids and Bases John E. McMurry http://www.cengage.com/chemistry/mcmurry Chapter 2 Polar Covalent Bonds; Acids and Bases Javier E. Horta, M.D., Ph.D. University of Massachusetts Lowell Polar Covalent Bonds: Electronegativity

More information

4. Biology of the Cell

4. Biology of the Cell 4. Biology of the Cell Our primary focus in this chapter will be the plasma membrane and movement of materials across the plasma membrane. You should already be familiar with the basic structures and roles

More information

3.1 AS Unit: Cells, Exchange and Transport

3.1 AS Unit: Cells, Exchange and Transport 3.1 AS Unit: Cells, Exchange and Transport Module 1: Cells 1.1.1 Cell Structure Candidates should be able to: (a) state the resolution and magnification that can be achieved by a light microscope, a transmission

More information

Elements & Macromolecules in Organisms

Elements & Macromolecules in Organisms Name: Date: Per: Table # Elements & Macromolecules in rganisms Most common elements in living things are carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, and oxygen. These four elements constitute about 95% of your body weight.

More information

Cellular Energy. 1. Photosynthesis is carried out by which of the following?

Cellular Energy. 1. Photosynthesis is carried out by which of the following? Cellular Energy 1. Photosynthesis is carried out by which of the following? A. plants, but not animals B. animals, but not plants C. bacteria, but neither animals nor plants D. all living organisms 2.

More information

Chapter 2. The Chemistry of Life Worksheets

Chapter 2. The Chemistry of Life Worksheets Chapter 2 The Chemistry of Life Worksheets (Opening image courtesy of David Iberri, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/file:camkii.png, and under the Creative Commons license CC-BY-SA 3.0.) Lesson 2.1: Matter

More information

Membrane Structure and Function

Membrane Structure and Function Membrane Structure and Function -plasma membrane acts as a barrier between cells and the surrounding. -plasma membrane is selective permeable -consist of lipids, proteins and carbohydrates -major lipids

More information

1. The diagram below represents a biological process

1. The diagram below represents a biological process 1. The diagram below represents a biological process 5. The chart below indicates the elements contained in four different molecules and the number of atoms of each element in those molecules. Which set

More information

NO CALCULATORS OR CELL PHONES ALLOWED

NO CALCULATORS OR CELL PHONES ALLOWED Biol 205 Exam 1 TEST FORM A Spring 2008 NAME Fill out both sides of the Scantron Sheet. On Side 2 be sure to indicate that you have TEST FORM A The answers to Part I should be placed on the SCANTRON SHEET.

More information

Introduction, Noncovalent Bonds, and Properties of Water

Introduction, Noncovalent Bonds, and Properties of Water Lecture 1 Introduction, Noncovalent Bonds, and Properties of Water Reading: Berg, Tymoczko & Stryer: Chapter 1 problems in textbook: chapter 1, pp. 23-24, #1,2,3,6,7,8,9, 10,11; practice problems at end

More information

2. Which type of macromolecule contains high-energy bonds and is used for long-term energy storage?

2. Which type of macromolecule contains high-energy bonds and is used for long-term energy storage? Energy Transport Study Island 1. During the process of photosynthesis, plants use energy from the Sun to convert carbon dioxide and water into glucose and oxygen. These products are, in turn, used by the

More information

Compartmentalization of the Cell. Objectives. Recommended Reading. Professor Alfred Cuschieri. Department of Anatomy University of Malta

Compartmentalization of the Cell. Objectives. Recommended Reading. Professor Alfred Cuschieri. Department of Anatomy University of Malta Compartmentalization of the Cell Professor Alfred Cuschieri Department of Anatomy University of Malta Objectives By the end of this session the student should be able to: 1. Identify the different organelles

More information

Macromolecules 1 Carbohydrates, Lipids & Nucleic Acids

Macromolecules 1 Carbohydrates, Lipids & Nucleic Acids VEA Bringing Learning to Life Program Support Notes Macromolecules 1 Carbohydrates, Lipids & Nucleic Acids Grades 10 - College 25mins Teacher Notes by Sue Wright, B. Sc., Dip. Ed. Produced by VEA Pty Ltd

More information

Membrane Structure and Function

Membrane Structure and Function Membrane Structure and Function Part A Multiple Choice 1. The fluid mosaic model describes membranes as having A. a set of protein channels separated by phospholipids. B. a bilayer of phospholipids in

More information

Comparing Plant And Animal Cells

Comparing Plant And Animal Cells Comparing Plant And Animal Cells http://khanacademy.org/video?v=hmwvj9x4gny Plant Cells shape - most plant cells are squarish or rectangular in shape. amyloplast (starch storage organelle)- an organelle

More information

FIGURE 2.18. A. The phosphate end of the molecule is polar (charged) and hydrophilic (attracted to water).

FIGURE 2.18. A. The phosphate end of the molecule is polar (charged) and hydrophilic (attracted to water). PLASMA MEMBRANE 1. The plasma membrane is the outermost part of a cell. 2. The main component of the plasma membrane is phospholipids. FIGURE 2.18 A. The phosphate end of the molecule is polar (charged)

More information

THE LIVING CELL. Cells also have variety of shapes. Plant cells are often rectangular or polygonal, while egg cells are usually spherical.

THE LIVING CELL. Cells also have variety of shapes. Plant cells are often rectangular or polygonal, while egg cells are usually spherical. THE LIVING CELL A Tour of the cell The cell is the smallest and the basic unit of structure of all organisms. There are two main types or categories of cells: prokaryotic cells and eukaryotic cells. Prokaryotic

More information

Lesson Aim To explain the human body at a microscopic level, including the structure and function of cells, tissues and membranes.

Lesson Aim To explain the human body at a microscopic level, including the structure and function of cells, tissues and membranes. LESSON 1. CELLS & TISSUES Lesson Aim To explain the human body at a microscopic level, including the structure and function of cells, tissues and membranes. THE CELL All living matter is composed of functional

More information

Chapter 2: The Chemical Context of Life

Chapter 2: The Chemical Context of Life Chapter 2: The Chemical Context of Life Name Period This chapter covers the basics that you may have learned in your chemistry class. Whether your teacher goes over this chapter, or assigns it for you

More information

Parts of the Nerve Cell and Their Functions

Parts of the Nerve Cell and Their Functions Parts of the Nerve Cell and Their Functions Silvia Helena Cardoso, PhD [ 1. Cell body] [2. Neuronal membrane] [3. Dendrites] [4. Axon] [5. Nerve ending] 1. Cell body The cell body (soma) is the factory

More information

Homeostasis and Transport Module A Anchor 4

Homeostasis and Transport Module A Anchor 4 Homeostasis and Transport Module A Anchor 4 Key Concepts: - Buffers play an important role in maintaining homeostasis in organisms. - To maintain homeostasis, unicellular organisms grow, respond to the

More information

Chapter 5: The Structure and Function of Large Biological Molecules

Chapter 5: The Structure and Function of Large Biological Molecules Name Period Chapter 5: The Structure and Function of Large Biological Molecules Concept 5.1 Macromolecules are polymers, built from monomers 1. The large molecules of all living things fall into just four

More information

RAD 223. Radiography physiology. Lecture Notes. First lecture: Cell and Tissue

RAD 223. Radiography physiology. Lecture Notes. First lecture: Cell and Tissue RAD 223 Radiography physiology Lecture Notes First lecture: Cell and Tissue Physiology: the word physiology derived from a Greek word for study of nature. It is the study of how the body and its part work

More information

The Molecules of Life - Overview. The Molecules of Life. The Molecules of Life. The Molecules of Life

The Molecules of Life - Overview. The Molecules of Life. The Molecules of Life. The Molecules of Life The Molecules of Life - Overview The Molecules of Life The Importance of Carbon Organic Polymers / Monomers Functions of Organic Molecules Origin of Organic Molecules The Molecules of Life Water is the

More information

Chemistry Diagnostic Questions

Chemistry Diagnostic Questions Chemistry Diagnostic Questions Answer these 40 multiple choice questions and then check your answers, located at the end of this document. If you correctly answered less than 25 questions, you need to

More information

List the 3 main types of subatomic particles and indicate the mass and electrical charge of each.

List the 3 main types of subatomic particles and indicate the mass and electrical charge of each. Basic Chemistry Why do we study chemistry in a biology course? All living organisms are composed of chemicals. To understand life, we must understand the structure, function, and properties of the chemicals

More information

Given these characteristics of life, which of the following objects is considered a living organism? W. X. Y. Z.

Given these characteristics of life, which of the following objects is considered a living organism? W. X. Y. Z. Cell Structure and Organization 1. All living things must possess certain characteristics. They are all composed of one or more cells. They can grow, reproduce, and pass their genes on to their offspring.

More information

pathway that involves taking in heat from the environment at each step. C.

pathway that involves taking in heat from the environment at each step. C. Study Island Cell Energy Keystone Review 1. Cells obtain energy by either capturing light energy through photosynthesis or by breaking down carbohydrates through cellular respiration. In both photosynthesis

More information