IDENTIFICATION OF ORGANISMS

Save this PDF as:
 WORD  PNG  TXT  JPG

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "IDENTIFICATION OF ORGANISMS"

Transcription

1 reflect Take a look at the pictures on the right. Think about what the two organisms have in common. They both need food and water to survive. They both grow and reproduce. They both have similar body organs such as lungs and a heart. Are these similarities enough to classify the organisms into the same group? If you answered yes, you are correct! Both organisms are classifi ed as animals. If you answered no, you are also correct! The organisms have differences that scientists use to further classify these animals into smaller, different groups. The elephant is classifi ed as a mammal, and the lizard is classified as a reptile. What process do scientists use to classify all forms of life? Organizing Life Forms Scientists organize living things using taxonomy, a systematic approach to categorizing organisms into a hierarchy. Taxonomy creates groups based on similarities and differences between organisms. All living things share the trait of life. The fi rst major division among living things is the Domain, which is the broadest classification group. There are three Domains: Bacteria, Archaea, and Eukarya. Organisms within the same Domain have some shared traits, or characteristics. For example, all organisms in Domains Bacteria and Archaea are prokaryotes. All organisms in Domain Eukarya are eukaryotes. Many organisms in Domain Archaea live in extreme environments (high heat, salt, acid, etc.), such as hot springs, while organisms in Domain Bacteria are found all over Earth. prokaryote: an organism lacking a nucleus eukaryote: an organism that contains genetic material within a nucleus Within each Domain, there are six smaller groups called Kingdoms. The Domain Bacteria has only one kingdom, the Kingdom Bacteria. This is also true for the Domain Archaea. Its kingdom is called Kingdom Archaea. The Domain Eukarya has four kingdoms: Protista, Plantae, Fungi, and Animalia. 1

2 Kingdom Protista includes eukaryotic organisms that are primarily unicellular ( one-celled ) and simple, multicellular ( many-celled ) organisms such as algae. Eukaryotes that get their nutrients by decomposing organic matter, such as mushrooms, are in the Kingdom Fungi. Multicellular eukaryotes that make their own food (autotrophs) are in the Kingdom Plantae. This kingdom includes mosses, trees, and flowering plants. The Kingdom Animalia includes multicellular, heterotrophic eukaryotes. Insects, reptiles, birds, and mammals are in Kingdom Animalia. heterotrophic: a characteristic of an organism; it cannot make its own food and feeds on other organisms These four kingdoms are broken down into smaller and smaller classification groups. The entire system for organizing living things from biggest to smallest groups is: Domain, Kingdom, Phylum, Class, Order, Family, Genus, and Species. The smaller the group, the more characteristics the organisms in that group have in common. For example, two organisms that belong to the same genus have more in common than two organisms that belong to the same family, but not the same genus. what do you think? Look at the chart below. It lists the taxonomic groups for three different organisms, beginning with Order. Which two organisms are most similar to one another? Explain your reasoning. Common Name Order Family Genus Species Human Primate Hominidae Homo sapiens Eastern gorilla Primate Hominidae Gorilla beringei Ring-tailed lemur Primate Lemuridae Lemur catta Dichotomous Keys Identifying an organism s taxonomic group or common name sometimes requires a dichotomous key. A dichotomous key is a key used to sort organisms. The key is based on questions about the traits and structures of the organisms. The word dichotomous means cut in two. When using a dichotomous key to identify an organism, cut in two means that a choice must be made about a characteristic at each two-fork branch in the key. 2

3 Basically you have two options, and you have to decide one way or another. The characteristics get more specific at each branch of the key. Dichotomous keys may be either written, as shown below on the left, or graphic, as shown on the right. Let s take a closer look at the graphic dichotomous key. It shows the method for identifying four different organisms by common name: duck, hen, lizard, and snake. The fi rst step of the key, at the top, refers to the question, Does the organism have feathers? If the answer is yes, move to the left side of the key; if the answer is no, move to the right side of the key. Following the left side of the key, the next branch refers to the question, Does the organism with feathers swim? If the answer is yes, the organism is a duck. If the answer is no, the organism is a hen. Following the right side of the key, the next branch refers to the question, Does the organism without feathers have legs? If the answer is yes, the organism is a lizard. If the answer is no, the organism is a snake. Any type of dichotomous key must be detailed enough in order for the user to be able to observe an organism and determine which branch choice is the best match to the organism. The dichotomous keys shown above are very basic. However, some dichotomous keys are quite complex and contain numerous questions to help identify an organism s binomial classifi cation. Binomial classification is the system of naming an organism (starting with its kingdom) by its genus and species. So many different species exist within a particular kingdom or phylum. Therefore, the best dichotomous keys focus on a specifi c bioregion. For example, a dichotomous key may be developed only for the types of organisms that live in oceans. You can see an example of binomial classifi cation for a single species on the next page. 3

4 The binomial classification of the animal shown here is Panthera pardus. Panthera is the genus name, and pardus is the species name. look out! Organisms have two main types of physical traits: those that are inherited and those that are not inherited. An inherited trait is a trait that is passed from a parent to its offspring during reproduction. Eye color and leaf shape are examples of inherited traits. On the other hand, a torn leaf and a scar from an injury are not inherited traits. They were not passed from a parent to offspring. It is important to only use inherited traits when using a dichotomous key to identify an organism. Many groups of organisms demonstrate unique variations and inherited traits, which have gradually changed over time as they were passed from one generation to the next. Therefore, it is also important to remember that dichotomous keys must refl ect these variations. For example, a type of mouse called a deer mouse typically has dark brown fur. physical trait: typically an external characteristic of an organism that can be observed The tear on the left side of this leaf is NOT an inherited trait. The general leaf shape and vein pattern are inherited traits. 4

5 However, in an area within the state of Nebraska, deer mouse have evolved to have a lighter, sand-colored fur. The lighter coloration helps the mice blend in with the sandy environment so they can hide from predators. This trait for light coloration has been passed from parents to offspring over many years and eventually led to an entire population of light-colored mice. Career Corner: Tropical Botanist A botanist is a scientist who studies plants. Some botanists work in education as professors or as museum instructors. Many botanists work in the field conducting research about different plants and how the plants play a role in their environment. These botanists work to protect wildlife and educate the public about the importance of conserving Earth s diverse plant-life. Tropical botanists focus on plants that grow in tropical regions, such as Costa Rica. They collect plants and use dichotomous keys to identify them. These areas Tropical areas are rich with plant-life! are so rich and diverse with plant-life that many botanists believe there are still many plant species that have yet to be discovered. Tropical botanists work to discover new plant species. With help from other scientists, new species are classified and given a species name. The new discovery is then published in various scientific journals. This is one of the reasons that dichotomous keys are always changing! 5

6 What do you know? Study the pictures of the insects at the right. Then use the dichotomous key below to identify the binomial classification of each insect. Write your answers on the line next to each insect. Ant: Butterfl y: 6

7 connecting with your child IDENTIFICATION OF ORGANISMS Creating a Dichotomous Key for Identifying Plants To help your child learn more about the identifi cation of organisms, work together to create a dichotomous key that can be used to identify various plants. For this activity, search for images of different plants on the Internet or in old magazines. Try to fi nd at least six different plants with varying characteristics (such as a pine tree, a palm tree, a strawberry plant, etc.), and print out pictures of each plant. If you are not able to print the images, have your child draw sketches of each plant. Write down at least fi ve distinguishing characteristics for each plant. Characteristics to consider include: leaf shape, leaf vein pattern, presence or absence of a trunk, habitat (land or water; jungle or desert; etc.), and any other defi ning characteristics you would use when describing the plant to another person. If possible, write down the binomial classifi cation (genus and species name) of each plant as well. If you are not able to find the binomial classification, write down the common name of each plant. Next, create a list of yes-no questions that address the characteristics identified in at least one plant. Using index cards or construction paper cut into squares, write the name (genus and species or common name) and a description of a single species on each card. Next, write the yes-no questions on another set of index cards, one question per card. It might be useful to use a different color pen for the questions. Using the yes-no questions as a guide, start sorting the piles into a branching tree. Be sure that each branch only has two options for answers. You may need to rearrange your questions until you arrive at a dichotomous key in which the questions become increasingly restrictive and the plants make up the bottom row. Once you are satisfied with your key, draw it on a piece of paper. As you perform this activity, you may wish to discuss the following questions with your child: Why are only inherited traits used to classify the plants? Look at the final dichotomous key. Did you end up grouping any plants together? If so, do these plants have any differences? How are dichotomous keys helpful to scientists when they discover what they think might be a new species? 7

CLASSIFICATION OF ORGANISMS

CLASSIFICATION OF ORGANISMS reflect Organization helps us make sense of our surroundings. Some people organize their sock drawers by color. Books in a library are often organized by topic. Food in a grocery store is organized so

More information

Unit 2: Organisms and Envrionments Exam Review

Unit 2: Organisms and Envrionments Exam Review 6.12A: Living Organisms and Cells Unit 2: Organisms and Envrionments Exam Review All living things are made of. Cells are the of living things they are the smallest part of an organism. Some organisms

More information

4. Why are common names not good to use when classifying organisms? Give an example.

4. Why are common names not good to use when classifying organisms? Give an example. 1. Define taxonomy. Classification of organisms 2. Who was first to classify organisms? Aristotle 3. Explain Aristotle s taxonomy of organisms. Patterns of nature: looked like 4. Why are common names not

More information

Break down material outside their body and then absorb the nutrients. Most are single-celled organisms Usually green. Do not have nuclei

Break down material outside their body and then absorb the nutrients. Most are single-celled organisms Usually green. Do not have nuclei Name Date Class CHAPTER 9 REINFORCEMENT WORKSHEET Keys to the Kingdom Complete this worksheet after you have finished reading Chapter 9, Section 2. Patty dropped her notes while she was studying the six

More information

3.1 Types of Living Things

3.1 Types of Living Things CHAPTER 3 CLASSIFYING LIVING THINGS 3.1 Types of Living Things Look around you. What types of living things do you see? You probably see plants and animals. What would you see if you could shrink down

More information

Name: Class: Date: Multiple Choice Identify the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question.

Name: Class: Date: Multiple Choice Identify the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question. Name: Class: Date: Chapter 17 Practice Multiple Choice Identify the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question. 1. The correct order for the levels of Linnaeus's classification system,

More information

Objectives. Explain how classification schemes for kingdoms developed as greater numbers of different organisms became known.

Objectives. Explain how classification schemes for kingdoms developed as greater numbers of different organisms became known. Objectives Explain how classification schemes for kingdoms developed as greater numbers of different organisms became known. Describe each of the six kingdoms. I. What is it? A. What Is Used to Classify

More information

CHAPTER 1 A VIEW OF LIFE

CHAPTER 1 A VIEW OF LIFE CHAPTER 1 A VIEW OF LIFE 1.1 How to Define Life Living things are called organisms. Organisms are often hard to define because they are so diverse; however, they share many common characteristics: 1. Living

More information

Characteristics and classification of living organisms

Characteristics and classification of living organisms Unit 1 Characteristics and classification of living organisms Welcome to the exciting and amazing world of living things. Go outside and look around you. Look at the sky, the soil, trees, plants, people,

More information

Classification Why Things are Grouped classify Methods of Classification

Classification Why Things are Grouped classify Methods of Classification Classification What features do biologists use to group living things? You know that most plants are green and do not more around. You also know that most animals are not green and do move around. The

More information

Let s get started. So, what is science?

Let s get started. So, what is science? Let s get started So, what is science? Well Science Science is the observation of phenomena and the theoretical explanation of it. Simply, it is the state of knowing. Biology Biology is the study of life.

More information

Grade EOC Biology STAAR and STAAR-M Fall 2012 by Objective

Grade EOC Biology STAAR and STAAR-M Fall 2012 by Objective TEKS: (4) The student knows that cells are the basic structures of all living things with specialized parts that perform specific functions, and that viruses are different from cells. Objective: (A) Compare

More information

Chapter How to Define Life atoms elements cell tissues organ system organ systems population community ecosystem biosphere energy Metabolism

Chapter How to Define Life atoms elements cell tissues organ system organ systems population community ecosystem biosphere energy Metabolism Chapter 1 1.1 How to Define Life A. Living Things Are Organized 1. Organization of living systems begins with atoms, which make up basic building blocks called elements. 2. The cell is the basic structural

More information

Name Class Date. binomial nomenclature. MAIN IDEA: Linnaeus developed the scientific naming system still used today.

Name Class Date. binomial nomenclature. MAIN IDEA: Linnaeus developed the scientific naming system still used today. Section 1: The Linnaean System of Classification 17.1 Reading Guide KEY CONCEPT Organisms can be classified based on physical similarities. VOCABULARY taxonomy taxon binomial nomenclature genus MAIN IDEA:

More information

Classification of Organisms (Taxonomy)

Classification of Organisms (Taxonomy) Unit 2 Lesson 1 Classification of Organisms (Taxonomy) S8.B.1.1.2,3 1 Classification (Taxonomy) Is the process of grouping organisms by certain characteristics Carl Linnaeus - Father of Taxonomy There

More information

Biology 6 Survival Kit

Biology 6 Survival Kit Biology 6 Survival Kit Prof. Sara Huang What oes Biology 6 Cover? Chemistry Cell structure and function Genetics and molecular biology Animal structure and function Factors That Contribute to Your Success

More information

Science Standards Embedded in Beautiful Butterflies K-3

Science Standards Embedded in Beautiful Butterflies K-3 Kindergarten s Embedded in Beautiful Butterflies K-3 Living Systems 0.4.1.1.1 Observe and compare plants and animals. 0.4.1.1.2 Identify the external parts of a variety of plants and animals including

More information

Biological Evolution. Major Concepts

Biological Evolution. Major Concepts Biological Evolution Darwinian Evolution and Natural Selection 1. Linnaean Classification Major Concepts 2. Fossils 3. Radioactive Dating 4. Fossil Record and Genetic Analysis 5. Theory of Evolution Random,

More information

Three Domains of Life

Three Domains of Life Image from Scientific American blog Three Domains of Life http://www.buzzle.com/articles/three-domains-of-life.html The three-domain system, which classifies life on the planet into three different domains

More information

How Scientists Classify Living Things. on Earth. Fill the board or a large sheet of paper with the names of organisms.

How Scientists Classify Living Things. on Earth. Fill the board or a large sheet of paper with the names of organisms. How Scientists Classify Living Things 2.4 TRY THIS: CLASSIFY LIVING THINGS Skills Focus: classifying, communicating How would you classify living things? 1. As a class, brainstorm all the different types

More information

Question Bank Five Kingdom Classification

Question Bank Five Kingdom Classification Question Bank Five Kingdom Classification 1. Who proposed Five Kingdom Classification? Give the bases of classification. Ans. Whittaker in 1969 proposed five kingdom classification based on :- (i) Cell

More information

Matter and Energy in Ecosystems

Matter and Energy in Ecosystems Matter and Energy in Ecosystems The interactions that take place among biotic and abiotic factors lead to transfers of energy and matter. Every species has a particular role, or niche, in an ecosystem.

More information

Unit 1 - Biological Diversity. Unit Test

Unit 1 - Biological Diversity. Unit Test Unit Test Student Name Class 1. Monarch butterflies and Viceroy butterflies are different species. They are alike in appearance, so much so, that it is difficult to distinguish between them. The Monarch

More information

ENVIRONMENTAL CHANGES

ENVIRONMENTAL CHANGES reflect How do you respond to environmental changes? Maybe you wear different types of clothes in different seasons. Maybe you only ride your bike during certain times of the year. What if you moved to

More information

KEY CONCEPT Organisms can be classified based on physical similarities. binomial nomenclature

KEY CONCEPT Organisms can be classified based on physical similarities. binomial nomenclature Section 17.1: The Linnaean System of Classification Unit 9 Study Guide KEY CONCEPT Organisms can be classified based on physical similarities. VOCABULARY taxonomy taxon binomial nomenclature genus MAIN

More information

Classifying Organisms

Classifying Organisms Grouping Organisms Classifying Organisms When you look for socks to wear, you probably go to your sock drawer. Your shirts might be in a different drawer. The clothes are grouped so that you can find them.

More information

2 Eras of the Geologic Time Scale

2 Eras of the Geologic Time Scale CHAPTER 8 2 Eras of the Geologic Time Scale SECTION The History of Life on Earth BEFORE YOU READ After you read this section, you should be able to answer these questions: What kinds of organisms evolved

More information

BIOL 1030 TOPIC 1 LECTURE NOTES Topic 1: Classification and the Diversity of Life (Chapters 25, 26.6)

BIOL 1030 TOPIC 1 LECTURE NOTES Topic 1: Classification and the Diversity of Life (Chapters 25, 26.6) Topic 1: Classification and the Diversity of Life (Chapters 25, 26.6) I. Background review (Biology 1020 material) A. Scientific Method 1. observations 2. scientific model explains observations makes testable

More information

Chapter 1 Active Reading Guide Introduction: Themes in the Study of Life

Chapter 1 Active Reading Guide Introduction: Themes in the Study of Life Name: Roksana Korbi AP Biology Chapter 1 Active Reading Guide Introduction: Themes in the Study of Life Begin your study of biology this year by reading Chapter 1. It will serve as a reminder about biological

More information

Kingdom Aninlalia: A look at the five major classes. Mathew Grover Alicia Sunsdahl

Kingdom Aninlalia: A look at the five major classes. Mathew Grover Alicia Sunsdahl Kingdom Aninlalia: A look at the five major classes Mathew Grover Alicia Sunsdahl Grade: Seventh Grade Biology/Life Science Objective: To understand and comprehend the five major classes in the animal

More information

Westerville City Schools Science Power Standards Safety Net Skills * Grade 7

Westerville City Schools Science Power Standards Safety Net Skills * Grade 7 Westerville City Schools Science Power Standards Safety Net Skills * Grade 7 Standard 1 Earth and Space Sciences Students will be able to describe the positions of matter and energy throughout the lithosphere,

More information

Introduction to Animals

Introduction to Animals Introduction to Animals Unity and Diversity of Life Q: What characteristics and traits define animals? 25.1 What is an animal? WHAT I KNOW SAMPLE ANSWER: Animals are different from other living things

More information

Name Period. 3. How many rounds of DNA replication and cell division occur during meiosis?

Name Period. 3. How many rounds of DNA replication and cell division occur during meiosis? Name Period GENERAL BIOLOGY Second Semester Study Guide Chapters 3, 4, 5, 6, 11, 14, 16, 17, 18 and 19. SEXUAL REPRODUCTION AND MEIOSIS 1. What is the purpose of meiosis? 2. Distinguish between diploid

More information

Georgia Performance Standards Framework for Science GRADE 7 DICHOTOMOUS KEYS AND CLASSIFICATION

Georgia Performance Standards Framework for Science GRADE 7 DICHOTOMOUS KEYS AND CLASSIFICATION The following instructional plan is part of a GaDOE collection of Unit Frameworks, Performance Tasks, examples of Student Work, and Teacher Commentary. Many more GaDOE approved instructional plans are

More information

Name: Period : Jaguar Review: Life Science

Name: Period : Jaguar Review: Life Science Name: Period : Life Sciences-Benchmark A, B, C and D Jaguar Review: Life Science 1. What is the role of the mitochondrion in cells? A. It converts sunlight to energy. B. It controls all functions of the

More information

Lesson Title: Constructing a Dichotomous Key and Exploring Its Relationship to Evolutionary Patterns

Lesson Title: Constructing a Dichotomous Key and Exploring Its Relationship to Evolutionary Patterns Lesson Title: Constructing a Dichotomous Key and Exploring Its Relationship to Evolutionary Patterns NSF GK-12 Fellow: Tommy Detmer Grade Level: 4 th and 5 th grade Type of Lesson: STEM Objectives: The

More information

Ch. 1. Microscopes, Prepared Slides, Pond Water. Ch. 1

Ch. 1. Microscopes, Prepared Slides, Pond Water. Ch. 1 Current Mrs. Jamie Duff Staff Course 8th Grade Life Science Textbook: McDougal Littell Life Science Unit/ Length Unit Objectives/ Big Ideas Basic Outline/ Structure Materials/ Text Cells Unicellular vs

More information

Marine Invertebrate Zoology

Marine Invertebrate Zoology Marine Invertebrate Zoology Invertebrate Classification and 1 The Meek Will Inherit the Earth Why Study Invertebrates? 3 Many diseases that effect humans and the animals we depend on are caused by invertebrates

More information

Grade 6 Life Posttest

Grade 6 Life Posttest Grade 6 Life Posttest Select the best answer to each question. 1. Eugene is studying the levels of structural organization of an animal s body. Which level would describe a dog s eye? A. organ B. tissue

More information

Practice Questions 1: Evolution

Practice Questions 1: Evolution Practice Questions 1: Evolution 1. Which concept is best illustrated in the flowchart below? A. natural selection B. genetic manipulation C. dynamic equilibrium D. material cycles 2. The diagram below

More information

Biology 101 Section 1 The Scientific Study of Life. Biology = the study of living things and their interactions. Bio life logy study of

Biology 101 Section 1 The Scientific Study of Life. Biology = the study of living things and their interactions. Bio life logy study of Biology 101 Section 1 The Scientific Study of Life Biology = the study of living things and their interactions. Bio life logy study of What is life? Consider the meaning of what is alive. Organization

More information

The Cell. The cell is the basic unit of living things Microscopes allow us to see inside the cell. 15.2

The Cell. The cell is the basic unit of living things Microscopes allow us to see inside the cell. 15.2 The Cell NEW the BIG idea All living things are made up of cells. 15.1 The cell is the basic unit of living things. 15.2 Microscopes allow us to see inside the cell. 15.3 Different cells perform various

More information

4 th Grade Science Unit B: Life Sciences Chapter 3: Flow of Energy and Matter Lesson 1: How does energy flow?

4 th Grade Science Unit B: Life Sciences Chapter 3: Flow of Energy and Matter Lesson 1: How does energy flow? 4 th Grade Science Unit B: Life Sciences Chapter 3: Flow of Energy and Matter Lesson 1: How does energy flow? ecosystem Ecosystem is the living and nonliving things and the way they interact in an environment.

More information

Chapter 01 Biology: The Science of Life

Chapter 01 Biology: The Science of Life Chapter 01 Biology: The Science of Life Multiple Choice Questions 1. The circulatory system of a whale is considered an organ system because it is composed of different A. cells. B. tissues. C. organs.

More information

Unit 1 Scientific Inquiry. Learning Goal: Students will use the Scientific inquiry process to identify, and solve problems.

Unit 1 Scientific Inquiry. Learning Goal: Students will use the Scientific inquiry process to identify, and solve problems. Unit 1 Scientific Inquiry Learning Goal: Students will use the Scientific inquiry process to identify, and solve problems. 4 Student can use the scientific inquiry process to evaluate the validity of other

More information

THE INTERESTING HISTORY OF CELLS STUDENT HANDOUT. There are two basic types of cells, prokaryotic cells and eukaryotic cells.

THE INTERESTING HISTORY OF CELLS STUDENT HANDOUT. There are two basic types of cells, prokaryotic cells and eukaryotic cells. THE INTERESTING HISTORY OF CELLS STUDENT HANDOUT There are two basic types of cells, prokaryotic cells and eukaryotic cells. Figure 1. A PROKARYOTIC CELL The prokaryotes are very small singlecelled organisms

More information

*** Kindergarten Science ***

*** Kindergarten Science *** *** Kindergarten Science *** Standard 2 Organisms can be described and sorted by their physical characteristics. Essential Question 1 What do living things have in common? Understanding Deer - Students

More information

Biological Science, 5e (Freeman) Chapter 1 Biology and the Tree of Life

Biological Science, 5e (Freeman) Chapter 1 Biology and the Tree of Life Biological Science, 5e (Freeman) Chapter 1 Biology and the Tree of Life 1) Pasteur s experiments proved that A) Cells cannot survive in swan necked flasks B) In order to grow, cells need to be supplied

More information

Title: Create A New Animal. Grade Level: 3 rd -5 th. Subject: Biology. Time: 60-90 minutes

Title: Create A New Animal. Grade Level: 3 rd -5 th. Subject: Biology. Time: 60-90 minutes Title: Create A New Animal Grade Level: 3 rd -5 th Subject: Biology Time: 60-90 minutes Objective: Students will better understand physical adaptations of certain animals, and how those adaptations increase

More information

download instant at

download instant at Campbell Biology: Concepts and Connections, 8e (Reece et al.) Chapter 1 Biology: Exploring Life 1.1 Multiple-Choice Questions 1) Which of the following statements about the properties of life is false?

More information

Ecology 1 Star. 1. Missing from the diagram of this ecosystem are the

Ecology 1 Star. 1. Missing from the diagram of this ecosystem are the Name: ate: 1. Missing from the diagram of this ecosystem are the 5. ase your answer(s) to the following question(s) on the diagram below and on your knowledge of biology.. biotic factors and decomposers.

More information

Classification and Evolution

Classification and Evolution Classification and Evolution Starter: How many different ways could I split these objects into 2 groups? Classification All living things can also be grouped how do we decide which groups to put them into?

More information

Unit: Plants & Animals (Grade 2)

Unit: Plants & Animals (Grade 2) Unit: Plants & Animals (Grade 2) Content Area: Science Course(s): Science Time Period: 8 weeks Length: Weeks Status: Published Unit Overview Students will determine the life cycles of plants and animals

More information

Eubacteria: Known as the true bacteria, they are unicellular and do not have a nucleus

Eubacteria: Known as the true bacteria, they are unicellular and do not have a nucleus Name: Section: Date: Ms. Mallon CDW Key vocabulary to know: Classification: Grouping similar things together Kingdom: Large groups Eubacteria: Known as the true bacteria, they are unicellular and do not

More information

A. attract a mate B. reproduce C. sleep D. hunt for prey

A. attract a mate B. reproduce C. sleep D. hunt for prey 2. Fill in the blank. A crocodile's eyes are on top of its head, and its nostrils are on top of its snout. Having its eyes and nostrils in special places help the crocodile.. A. attract a mate B. reproduce

More information

Principles of Ecology

Principles of Ecology Principles of Ecology Chapter 2. pp. 33-61 Flexbook. pp. 709-746 Principles of Ecology Ecology the study of interactions that take place between organisms and their environments Living things are affected

More information

D.U.C. Assist. Lec. Faculty of Dentistry Medical Biology Ihsan Dhari. Kingdoms of life

D.U.C. Assist. Lec. Faculty of Dentistry Medical Biology Ihsan Dhari. Kingdoms of life Kingdoms of life The earliest classification system recognized only two kingdoms : plants and animals but the use of microscope led to discovery of microorganisms, so the two kingdoms system was no longer

More information

SEA OTTER EVOLUTION Miocene Pliocene predators forage

SEA OTTER EVOLUTION Miocene Pliocene predators forage SEA OTTER EVOLUTION No one knows exactly how sea otters evolved, but it is believed that they arose from primitive, fish-eating otter mammals about 5 to 7 million years ago during the late Miocene and

More information

Name Class Date WHAT I KNOW. many different body forms and ways of living. and reproduce in a similar way to bacteria.

Name Class Date WHAT I KNOW. many different body forms and ways of living. and reproduce in a similar way to bacteria. Protists and Fungi Interdependence in Nature Q: How do protists and fungi affect the homeostasis of other organisms and ecosystems? 21.1 Why are protists difficult to classify? WHAT I KNOW SAMPLE ANSWER:

More information

Activity Sheet A - Getting Sorted (Cont) Diet (in the wild) Herbivore Carnivore Omnivore Habitat Terrestrial/ground dwelling Arboreal/tree living Aqua

Activity Sheet A - Getting Sorted (Cont) Diet (in the wild) Herbivore Carnivore Omnivore Habitat Terrestrial/ground dwelling Arboreal/tree living Aqua Activity Sheet A - Getting Sorted Duration: 45 minutes Locate the animals listed below and find out their scientific name. Remember that the scientific name is usually written in italics or is underlined.

More information

1 Everything Is Connected

1 Everything Is Connected CHAPTER 1 1 Everything Is Connected SECTION Interactions of Living Things BEFORE YOU READ After you read this section, you should be able to answer these questions: What do organisms in an ecosystem depend

More information

ENVIRONMENTAL INTERACTIONS AND EFFECTS

ENVIRONMENTAL INTERACTIONS AND EFFECTS reflect Try opening a jar, turning a doorknob, or writing a sentence without using your thumb. All of a sudden, it is not easy to do these simple tasks. The thumb is one of the most important parts of

More information

Principles of Ecology

Principles of Ecology Principles of Ecology Before You Read Use the What I Know column to list the things you know about ecology. Then list the questions you have about ecology in the What I Want to Find Out column. K W L What

More information

Single-celled organisms have all the characteristics of living things.

Single-celled organisms have all the characteristics of living things. Page 1 of 6 KEY ONEPT Single-celled organisms have all the characteristics of living things. BEFORE, you learned All living things are made of cells Organisms respond to their environment Species change

More information

Unit 5: Structure of the ecosystems

Unit 5: Structure of the ecosystems Unit 5: Structure of the ecosystems 1. Ecosystems 2. The physical environment 3. Living beings relationships 4. Trophic structure of the ecosystem 5. Matter and energy in ecosystems 6. Ecological niche

More information

Dichotomous Keys. Introduction

Dichotomous Keys. Introduction Dichotomous Keys Introduction Taxonomic systems can be used to help identify unknown organisms. A taxonomist, working on a particular group of organisms, will devise and publish a taxonomic key to aid

More information

Lab 2/Phylogenetics/September 16, 2002 1 PHYLOGENETICS

Lab 2/Phylogenetics/September 16, 2002 1 PHYLOGENETICS Lab 2/Phylogenetics/September 16, 2002 1 Read: Tudge Chapter 2 PHYLOGENETICS Objective of the Lab: To understand how DNA and protein sequence information can be used to make comparisons and assess evolutionary

More information

Contrast the flow of energy and chemicals in ecosystems. Explain how trophic levels relate to food chains and food webs.

Contrast the flow of energy and chemicals in ecosystems. Explain how trophic levels relate to food chains and food webs. Objectives Contrast the flow of energy and chemicals in ecosystems. Explain how trophic levels relate to food chains and food webs. Key Terms producer consumer decomposer trophic level food chain herbivore

More information

The Magic of Monarchs Student Worksheet

The Magic of Monarchs Student Worksheet Name: The Magic of Monarchs Student Worksheet 1. Label the monarch using the words below. antennae abdomen forewings head hind wings thorax 2. All insects have legs. 4 6 8 3. What do you think Lepidoptera

More information

Station #1: Taxonomy

Station #1: Taxonomy Station #1: Taxonomy Examine the table showing the classification of four organisms. The answer the questions. Taxon Green Frog Mountain Lion Domestic Dog Human Kingdom Phylum Class Order Family Genus

More information

Biology 164 Laboratory PHYLOGENETIC SYSTEMATICS

Biology 164 Laboratory PHYLOGENETIC SYSTEMATICS Biology 164 Laboratory PHYLOGENETIC SYSTEMATICS Objectives 1. To become familiar with the cladistic approach to reconstruction of phylogenies. 2. To construct a character matrix and phylogeny for a group

More information

Materials and Resources:

Materials and Resources: Keywords: class classification family genus invertebrates kingdom order phylum species 1. Engage: Introduction: Students investigate different questioning techniques through a classification game. Materials

More information

4THE UNIVERSITY OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK

4THE UNIVERSITY OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 4THE UNIVERSITY OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK GRADE 4 ELEMENTARY-LEVEL SCIENCE TEST WRITTEN TEST JUNE 6, 2011 Student Name School Name Print your name and the name of your school on the lines above. The test

More information

Dichotomous Keys. Lab Exercise. Contents. Objectives. Introduction

Dichotomous Keys. Lab Exercise. Contents. Objectives. Introduction Lab Exercise Dichotomous Keys Contents Objectives 1 Introduction 1 Activity.1 Key to the Animal Kingdom 4 Activity.2 Creating a Key 6 Resutls Section 7 Objectives - Understand the concept of classification

More information

The Single Cell versus Colonial Algae

The Single Cell versus Colonial Algae The Single Cell versus Colonial Algae Before plants were made up of many cells, or multi-cellular, they were singlecelled organisms similar to algae that lived in the water. Algae evolved from single-celled

More information

FOR THOUSANDS of years, people have sought to

FOR THOUSANDS of years, people have sought to Classifying Animals FOR THOUSANDS of years, people have sought to classify living creatures into general categories. An ongoing process, classification aids in research, education, and communication about

More information

Ohio Plants & Animals

Ohio Plants & Animals Ohio Plants & Animals GOAL: To study and observe local plants and animals in various life stages and habitats. Small Group Procedures Concept: A field experience is enhanced when students are able to focus

More information

7.1 What Are Cells? You are made of cells. A cell is the basic unit of structure and function in a living thing. CHAPTER 7

7.1 What Are Cells? You are made of cells. A cell is the basic unit of structure and function in a living thing. CHAPTER 7 CELL STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION 7.1 What Are Cells? Look closely at the skin on your arm. Can you see that it is made of cells? Of course not! Your skin cells are much too small to see with your eyes. Now

More information

WINGS OF IMAGINATION A Standards-based Butterfly Curriculum For Grades K-6 Preliminary Outline 4_16_12

WINGS OF IMAGINATION A Standards-based Butterfly Curriculum For Grades K-6 Preliminary Outline 4_16_12 WINGS OF IMAGINATION A Standards-based Butterfly Curriculum For Grades K-6 Preliminary Outline 4_16_12 Note: The science standards in this curriculum are drawn from Content Knowledge: A Compendium of Standards

More information

TEACHER BACKGROUND INFORMATION LIVING ORGANISMS

TEACHER BACKGROUND INFORMATION LIVING ORGANISMS TEACHER BACKGROUND INFORMATION LIVING ORGANISMS CHAPTER S BIG IDEAS All living organisms have common characteristics: o Cellular organization o Response to environment o Reproduction and heredity o Growth

More information

The Ecosystem of the Forest

The Ecosystem of the Forest The Ecosystem of the Forest The Ecosystem of the Forest Even if it doesn t look like it, all living things constantly interact with their environment. For instance, every time you take a breath, you get

More information

Grouping animals - Classification Teacher Notes/ Activity/Worksheets

Grouping animals - Classification Teacher Notes/ Activity/Worksheets Grouping animals - Classification Teacher Notes/ Activity/Worksheets What can we offer At Hamilton Zoo we can provide educational opportunities for students of all levels. This programme gives students

More information

ECOSYSTEM RESPONSES. reflect

ECOSYSTEM RESPONSES. reflect reflect There is a saying, No man is an island, which means that people need one another in order to survive. Everyone on Earth is interconnected in some way. This is not only true of human beings, but

More information

FOOD CHAINS, FOOD WEBS AND ECOLOGICAL PYRAMIDS

FOOD CHAINS, FOOD WEBS AND ECOLOGICAL PYRAMIDS FOOD CHAINS, FOOD WEBS AND ECOLOGICAL PYRAMIDS SECTION 1 In an ecosystem, plants capture the sun's energy and use it to convert inorganic compounds into energy-rich organic compounds. This process of using

More information

YEAR 11 ASSESSMENT TASK COVER SHEET Biology

YEAR 11 ASSESSMENT TASK COVER SHEET Biology YEAR 11 ASSESSMENT TASK COVER SHEET Biology UNIT: LIFE ON EARTH AND EVOLUTION OF AUSTRALIAN BIOTA TEACHER: Ms Illuzzi DATE OF ISSUE: 1 st June 011 DUE DATE: 1 st August 011 TASK NUMBER: WEIGHTING: 5% PROCEDURE

More information

The Art of the Tree of Life. Catherine Ibes & Priscilla Spears March 2012

The Art of the Tree of Life. Catherine Ibes & Priscilla Spears March 2012 The Art of the Tree of Life Catherine Ibes & Priscilla Spears March 2012 from so simple a beginning endless forms most beautiful and most wonderful have been, and are being, evolved. Charles Darwin, The

More information

PROKARYOTIC AND EUKARYOTIC CELLS

PROKARYOTIC AND EUKARYOTIC CELLS reflect Think for a moment about all the living things on Earth. There is great diversity among organisms, from microscopic bacteria to massive blue whales, the largest animals on the planet. Despite the

More information

Biological Classification Worksheet

Biological Classification Worksheet Name Score Five-Kingdom System Biological Classification Worksheet Animal Kingdom Invertebrates (without backbones) and vertebrates (with backbones), multicellular, no cell walls, obtain energy through

More information

5.1 Ecosystems, Energy, and Nutrients

5.1 Ecosystems, Energy, and Nutrients CHAPTER 5 ECOSYSTEMS 5.1 Ecosystems, Energy, and Nutrients Did anyone ever ask you the question: Where do you get your energy? Energy enters our world from the Sun but how does the Sun s energy become

More information

The Origin of Life. The Origin of Life. Reconstructing the history of life: What features define living systems?

The Origin of Life. The Origin of Life. Reconstructing the history of life: What features define living systems? The Origin of Life I. Introduction: What is life? II. The Primitive Earth III. Evidence of Life s Beginning on Earth A. Fossil Record: a point in time B. Requirements for Chemical and Cellular Evolution:

More information

Animal Adaptations Investigation (K-3)

Animal Adaptations Investigation (K-3) Animal Adaptations Investigation (K-3) At a glance Students explore the Zoo in search of animals that fit certain categories and discover their adaptations. Time requirement One Zoo visit of at least 60

More information

Prokaryotic and Eukaryotic Cells

Prokaryotic and Eukaryotic Cells Have you ever wondered how people are similar to bacteria? It may seem like a silly question. After all, humans and bacteria are very different in size and complexity. Yet scientists have learned that

More information

Bio EOC Topics for Ecology, Evolution and Natural Selection:

Bio EOC Topics for Ecology, Evolution and Natural Selection: Bio EOC Topics for Ecology, Evolution and Natural Selection: UEvolutionU Difference between macroevolution and microevolution Sexual reproduction and natural selection are mechanisms of microevolution

More information

Ecology- an ecosystem: a Biome: o They are either terrestrial or aquatic. rainforests, deserts, coral reefs

Ecology- an ecosystem: a Biome: o They are either terrestrial or aquatic. rainforests, deserts, coral reefs Topic 17: Ecology Ecology- The environment is an organism s surroundings o It includes:! biotic factors: Ecosystems! abiotic factors: an ecosystem: In order for an ecosystem to maintain life it must: -

More information

The variety of living organisms

The variety of living organisms v4 033380368X.Text.qxd 2/19/09 2:00 PM Page 1 1 The variety of living organisms By the end of this chapter you should be able to: understand why there exists a range of living organisms on Earth; list

More information

Pre-lab homework Lab 4: The Cell

Pre-lab homework Lab 4: The Cell Pre-lab homework Lab 4: The Cell Lab Section: Name: After reading over the lab and chapter 5 in your textbook, answer these questions to be turned in at the beginning of the lab! 1. Define organelle 2.

More information

OAT Practice 5 th Grade Science Life Science. Brought to you by:

OAT Practice 5 th Grade Science Life Science. Brought to you by: OAT Practice 5 th Grade Science Life Science Brought to you by: Many plants and animals live in and around the pond. One year the pond dried up. 1) Which organism in the pond ecosystem was still able to

More information

Name Class Date. Adapting to the Environment Adaptations and Survival

Name Class Date. Adapting to the Environment Adaptations and Survival CHAPTER 3 4 SECTIN Adapting to the Environment Adaptations and Survival EFRE YU READ After you read this section, you should be able to answer these questions: What adaptations help animals survive? What

More information

Animal Classification K-4

Animal Classification K-4 Animal Classification K-4 Introduction: The theme of this self-guided experience is classification of animals. Students will learn to use body coverings as an aid to classification. As the group tours

More information

The History of Geology and Life on Earth. Early Earth History. Name. Date

The History of Geology and Life on Earth. Early Earth History. Name. Date Name Date Use the TIMELINE OF LIFE ON EARTH in the Islands of Evolution exhibit to learn about the history of life on Earth. Then, continue to the Earthquake exhibit to answer questions on the geologic

More information