Latin American Independence Movements Grade Level:

Save this PDF as:
 WORD  PNG  TXT  JPG

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "Latin American Independence Movements Grade Level:"

Transcription

1 Latin American Independence Movements Grade Level: Written by: Length of Unit: 6 th Grade History and Geography LeAnndra Beeman, Cesar Chavez Academy, Pueblo, CO Eight lessons (approximately 13 days); one lesson = 70 minutes I. ABSTRACT This unit will examine the social issues that led to the division of European colonies into selfgoverned countries in Latin America. It will identify the causes and effects of inequality among races brought about by a strict and unfair class system. Through the study of various important people and events in Latin American history, students will gain a greater understanding of how the world around them came to be the way it is today. II. OVERVIEW A. Concept Objectives 1. Students will recognize the sanctity of life and the dignity of the individual and understand governmental policies that disregard the value of human life or condone inhuman practices. 2. Students will understand cause and effect. Historical events usually have multiple effects, come of which are not recognized until long after the event occurs. 3. Students will understand the close relationship between social and political systems. 4. Students will develop an awareness of place. B. Content from the Core Knowledge Sequence 1. 6 th Grade History and Geography: World History and Geography: Latin American Independence Movements, pg. 141 a. History i. The name Latin America comes from the Latin origin of the languages now most widely spoken (Spanish and Portuguese) ii. Haitian revolution i. Toussaint L Ouverture ii. iii. Abolition of West Indian slavery Mexican revolutions a) Miguel Hidalgo b) Jose Maria Morelos c) Santa Anna vs. the United States d) Benito Juarez e) Pancho Villa, Emiliano Zapata iv. Liberators a) Simon Bolivar b) Jose de San Martin c) Bernardo O Higgins v. New nations in Central America: Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua vi. Brazilian independence from Portugal C. Skill Objectives 1. Students will know how to use maps, globes, and other geographic tools to acquire, process, and report information from a spatial perspective. (Geography CSS 1.1) Sixth Grade, Latin American Independence Movements 2004 Colorado Unit Writing Project 1

2 2. Students will know the pattern and networks of economic interdependence. (Geography CSS 4.3) 3. Students will know how physical systems affect human systems. (Geography CSS 5.2) 4. Students will use chronology to organize historical events and people. (History CSS 1.2) 5. Students will know how various societies were affected by contacts and exchanges among diverse peoples. (History CSS 3.1) 6. Students will understand that societies are diverse and have changed over time. (History CSS 3.2) 7. Students will know how various systems of government have developed and functioned throughout history. (History CSS 5.2) 8. Students will know how political power has been acquired, maintained, used, and/or lost throughout history. (History CSS 5.3) 9. Students will know how societies have been affected by religions and philosophies. (History CSS 6.2) III. IV. BACKGROUND KNOWLEDGE A. For Teachers 1. What Your Sixth Grader Should Know Ed. E.D. Hirsch pp B. For Students None RESOURCES A. Pearson Learning History and Geography Textbook Ed. E.D. Hirsch, pp V. LESSONS Lesson One: Geography of Latin America (one 70 minute class period) Daily Objectives 1. Concept Objective(s) a. Students will develop an awareness of place. 2. Lesson Content a. The name Latin America comes from the Latin origin of the languages now most widely spoken (Spanish and Portuguese) b. New nations in Central America: Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua 3. Skill Objective(s) a. Students will know how to use maps, globes, and other geographic tools to acquire, process, and report information from a spatial perspective. b. Students will know how physical systems affect human systems. B. Materials 1. One copy for every student of appendix A: Outline map of Mexico and South America and locations to identify 2. Appendix B: Key of outline map of Mexico and South America (for teacher) 3. One copy for every student of Appendix C: Colonies in the Americas, 1700 (copies should be in color if possible; if not, display an overhead of page 1 in color and hand out an outline to the students, Appendix C page 2 and have them the outline and complete their key) 4. Pearson History and Geography Textbook (one for each student) 5. Atlas - for each student or every two Sixth Grade, Latin American Independence Movements 2004 Colorado Unit Writing Project 2

3 C. Key Vocabulary None D. Procedures/Activities 1. Ask students if they know where Latin America is located and why it is called Latin America. (Answers should include that it is Mexico, South America and surrounding islands and that it is called Latin America because of the Latin origins of the languages mostly spoken in that area Spanish and Portuguese.) 2. Provide students with the outline map of Mexico and South America and list of places to locate (Appendix A). 3. Point out that from Mexico to the tip of South America is Latin America. Ask where they think the area called Central America is located. (From Mexico to South America) Where is South America? (They should all know this since it is a continent.) 4. Ask students: Why do you think that there are so many different names for one area? (Accept any reasonable answer, but it should include that it makes it easier to identify specific areas. Example- when we re talking about Central America we know that it is the area between Mexico and South America instead of looking at all of Latin America. The more specific the location the better.) 5. Direct students to look at the list and the map that were handed out (Appendix A). Instruct students to look at the atlas and find the places that are on their list and place them on the map as close as possible to actual location. 6. When students have located the places on the map, hand out a copy of Appendix C to every student. 7. Have students compare the two maps and identify the major differences between them. Ask the following questions and discuss the answers: a. Why are many of the countries on the current map, not found on the map from 1700? (Revolutions had yet to happen causing the changes.) b. What might cause changes in the size of name of a country? (The country could have been taken over by someone who changed its name or the country itself took over another country.) c. What other ways can these changes occur? (When a revolution occurs many times a country will change its name.) 8. After discussing the questions, have students take out a piece of paper. 9. Have students think about everything that they know about Mexico and South America. Tell them to list eight (8) things that they know about Mexico s and South America s history, culture, etc., if they say they don t know anything tell them to come up with at least five (5) questions about Mexico and South America that they would like answered. (Give 3-5 minutes only to create their list.) 10. Assign the reading assignment for the next class period (pages in textbook). 11. At this time, students should put their maps and list of facts or questions in their binders for use later in the unit. E. Assessment/Evaluation 1. Completion of map, participation in discussion questions, and brainstorming of prior knowledge about Latin America. If teacher chooses to use map for a grade use Appendix B: Key to map of Latin America. (You can assign points for each item on the list.) Sixth Grade, Latin American Independence Movements 2004 Colorado Unit Writing Project 3

4 Lesson Two: Revolution in Spanish America (one 70 minute class period) A. Daily Objectives 1. Concept Objective(s) a. Students will recognize the sanctity of life and the dignity of the individual and understand governmental policies that disregard the value of human life or condone inhuman practices. b. Students will understand the close relationship between social and political systems. 2. Lesson Content a. Background information on Latin America (not in Core Knowledge Sequence) 3. Skill Objective(s) a. Students will know how various societies were affected by contacts and exchanges among diverse peoples. b. Students will understand that societies are diverse and have changed over time. c. Students will know how political power has been acquired, maintained, used, and/or lost throughout history. B. Materials 1. One copy for every student of Appendix D: Graph of Latin American Class System: 1700s 2. Colored pencils (student or teacher provided) 3. Appendix E: Key for Graph of Latin American Class System 1700s 4. Pearson History and Geography Textbook (one for each student) C. Key Vocabulary 1. Creoles people who were born in America but whose parents or ancestors had been born in Spain 2. Mestizos people who were part Indian and part Spanish 3. Plantation a large farm 4. Indians the original people of the land; made up the majority of the population 5. Slaves African who had been brought by the Spanish since the early 1500s 6. Cabildos the government of a city in Latin America; the city council D. Procedures/Activities 1. Students were to have read pages in textbook as homework. 2. Discuss the following questions based on the reading assignment. (It may be helpful to compile the answers on the board and have students keep the information as notes in their binders.) a. Explain what a class system is. (A class system is when the citizens of a country are born to a certain position in life, with little opportunity to change that classification.) b. What other societies had a social class system that played an important role in everyday life? (England, France, Japan, accept any other correct answers) c. Identify some of the problems associated with a rigid class system. (People in the lower class are unhappy and rebel to try and better their lives. While the people in the upper classes are afraid that someone will come along and take away their rights and privileges) d. How did the class system play a role in the struggles in Latin America? (The slaves and others that were in the lower classes were unhappy with their life since they had to do all of the work and had very few rights. Sixth Grade, Latin American Independence Movements 2004 Colorado Unit Writing Project 4

5 They felt that they should have more of a say and not be forced to work and not get anything out of it.) e. What were some of the causes of the American and French Revolutions? How could each of these revolutions have inspired the people of Latin America to try and gain their independence from Spain? (The Americans were not represented in the British government and since the Latin Americans were experiencing the same thing that might have given them hope. A strict class system was a major problem in France and the main cause of the French Revolution. The idea that everyone should be free and equal no matter the social class would have also been inspirational to the Latin Americans.) f. Explain why Creoles were resentful of the people in Latin America that were Spanish-born. (Many of the Creoles were wealthy and welleducated, but the best government jobs went to the individuals born in Spain.) g. Explain how the lives of the native peoples and the slaves were the same. (The native peoples and the slaves were both poor and powerless people, which was determined by the class into which they were born.) h. List some of the possible long-term effects of the rebellions. (Possible answers: Powers of ruling country are overthrown. The people of Latin America become the people in power. New countries are created. People get more rights and equality. 3. Tell students that you are now going to look at the percentage of the population that made up each of the classes in Latin America. Remind them that before the French Revolution the Three Estates made up of clergy, nobility and the peasants was very unequal. Clergy was 1% of the population, but owned 10% of the land. The Nobility was 1% of the population and owned 20% of the land, while the peasants made up 98% of the population. 4. Review the three types of graphs with students: bar, line, and circle. Remind them that a line graph charts changes over time, such as temperatures during December in Pueblo. A bar graph compares amounts, such as how many students have parents that drive a truck, car, van, or motorcycle. A circle graph shows parts of a whole. The whole always being 100%. 5. Ask students which graph is going to be the best way to graph the population of the classes. (Circle) 6. Give each student a copy of Appendix D. 7. Direct students to make sure their books are closed and to take out their colored pencils. 8. As a class read the instructions, ask if there are any questions about the assignment. 9. Have students complete the graph and assign pages in the textbook as a homework assignment. E. Assessment/Evaluation 1. Class participation and completion of class system graph. If a grade is desired use Appendix E: Key for Graph of Latin American Class System 1700s. 2. Sixth Grade, Latin American Independence Movements 2004 Colorado Unit Writing Project 5

6 Lesson Three: Haiti and Its Independence (one 70 minute class period) A. Daily Objectives 1. Concept Objective(s) a. Students will recognize the sanctity of life and the dignity of the individual and understand governmental policies that disregard the value of human life or condone inhuman practices. b. Students will understand cause and effect. Historical events usually have multiple effects, come of which are not recognized until long after the event occurs. c. Students will understand the close relationship between social and political systems. 2. Lesson Content a. Haitian revolution i. Toussaint L Ouverture ii. Abolition of West Indian slavery 3. Skill Objective(s) a. Students will use chronology to organize historical events and people. b. Students will know how various societies were affected by contacts and exchanges among diverse peoples. c. Students will understand that societies are diverse and have changed over time. d. Students will know how various systems of government have developed and functioned throughout history. e. Students will know how political power has been acquired, maintained, used, and/or lost throughout history. f. Students will know how societies have been affected by religions and philosophies. B. Materials 1. One copy for every student of Appendix F: Timeline Example (teacher only) 2. One copy for every student of Appendix G: Review questions for Toussaint L Ouverture and Haiti 3. Appendix H: Haitian Revolution Leaders Chart (teacher copy only) 4. Overhead of Appendix H, page 1 C. Key Vocabulary 1. Maroons escaped slaves 2. Voodoo an ancient religion that began in Africa and was brought to the Caribbean by slaves; today it is blended with Catholicism and has both the African and Catholic spirits; followers usually attend both a Catholic church and a Voodoo temple; in the temple, a priest or priestess, through song and prayer, invoke spirits that possess the believers and cause trancelike behavior 3. Machete a large, heavy knife used for cutting down sugarcane and brush 4. Scythe a long, curving blade used for cutting grain and long grasses 5. Night of Fire 50,000 slaves killed landowners and burned their plantations; the beginning of the rebellion 6. Mulattos people of mixed race usually French fathers and black slave mothers 7. Toussaint L Ouverture born a slave, was later taught to read, write and use herbs for healing, freed by the manager of the plantation in which he lived; he led the rebellion and later helped create a separate government; later died in a prison in Switzerland Sixth Grade, Latin American Independence Movements 2004 Colorado Unit Writing Project 6

7 8. Guerilla army a group of soldiers who usually are volunteers and not highly trained, professional soldiers 9. Jean Jaques Dessalines main leader of the former slaves, gave the island the name Haiti and soon became dictator 10. Yellow Fever a deadly disease the kills 85 percent of the people infected; its symptoms are chills and fever, aches and pains, and nausea; it causes internal bleeding, which is what leads to death; in 1900, the Panama Canal could not get underway until they did something about the mosquitoes that caused Yellow Fever; the United States eliminated stagnant, standing water and destroyed the trees that mosquitoes live in; a vaccine was later developed and today Yellow Fever is very rare D. Procedures/Activities 1. Have students briefly write down they what they think about slavery in the United States. Why did the United States permit slavery? What effect did slavery have on the country? When and why was slavery forbidden? (Answers should include: slaves were necessary for the economy in the southern plantations. It was one of the causes for the Civil War. Lincoln s Emancipation Proclamation of 1863 eventually led to the slave s freedom The Fifteenth Amendment outlawed slavery completely. Answers will vary for what they think about slavery.) 2. Explain to students that in the lesson they will learn about the history of slavery in Haiti and that the United States was not the only place that faced issues dealing with slavery. 3. Have students take out the maps that they completed in the previous lesson (if they were collected for grading they must be handed back). Direct students to locate Haiti on their map. Ask them to describe the location and the type of land formation that it is. 4. How does Haiti being an island make it a perfect place for slavery to flourish? (It is an island so that makes it more difficult for the slaves to try and get away, so they have to stay and work.) 5. How was the fight against slavery, in Haiti, like the fight against slavery in the United States? Accept all reasonable answers. 6. Tell students that you are now going to break them into groups. Three or six groups will be best (since there are three revolutionary leaders), depending on the size of the class. There should be only one to two groups per revolutionary leader. 7. Put the overhead of Appendix G (pg. 1) on the projector and instruct students to take a piece of paper and draw the chart on their paper. On the left side they are to write the name of the leader of the Haitian Revolution that you have assigned their group. Next, as a group, on the right side of the chart they will discuss what they read and make a list of what that individual did to help in the struggle for independence. (Use Appendix G, pg. 2 to help guide the student s work.) 8. Give a specific amount of time to come up with their list. 10 minutes should be enough. When time is up have the group (or teacher) pick one or two spokesmen for their list. Then start with the first revolution leader and have the groups that worked on his information, present some of the information on their list (make sure that every group gets a chance to give input). Continue until a finished chart is on the overhead or board. 9. If the students missed any facts, complete the chart on the overhead so that everyone has a finished chart. Sixth Grade, Latin American Independence Movements 2004 Colorado Unit Writing Project 7

8 10. Students are to complete their individual charts for their binders. Ask students: Did any of the attempts of these three individuals make the island free? (No, they were still under someone else s rule.) 11. Tell students that you are going to discuss some of the other issues on the island when it finally became independent: (present this information) a. In 1804, When Jean Jaques Dessalines proclaimed the independence of the former French colony, the only people who could read and write were the mulattos. This made it possible for only the mulattos to hold most of the government posts. In 1805, mulattos rewrote the constitution to keep Henri Cristophe, Dessalines second in command, from taking power because he was black. 12. What are some of the reasons that blacks and mulattos had so much trouble getting along? Especially, since both were oppressed by the French and both had hoped for independence. Explain why the mulattos felt that they were better than the blacks. (History shows that people who are different from each other sometimes have a hard time getting along with others. The Mulatto were able to read and the blacks weren t causing them to feel superior. They may have had some of the same opinion as the colonial rulers and since they were considered a lower class themselves they wanted to have some other group that was still lower than they were.) 13. Ask students to take out paper, and tell them that they are going to create their own timeline for events throughout the entire unit. Have them look back at the first section and this section, then list the dates and tell what event happened on the dates listed. The completed timeline will be due at the end of the unit. (A copy of the timeline is found in Appendix F.) 14. Hand out and assign Appendix G for homework. E. Assessment/Evaluation 1. Students will complete the review questions for this section and turn in for grade. (Key on page 2 of Appendix H) Have students place in binder, after grading, for the end of unit review. Lesson Four: Mexico s Fight for Independence (one, possibly two, 70 minute class period) Daily Objectives 1. Concept Objective(s) a. Students will recognize the sanctity of life and the dignity of the individual and understand governmental policies that disregard the value of human life or condone inhuman practices. b. Students will understand cause and effect. Historical events usually have multiple effects, come of which are not recognized until long after the event occurs. c. Students will understand the close relationship between social and political systems. 2. Lesson Content a. Mexican revolutions i. Miguel Hidalgo ii. Jose Maria Morelos 3. Skill Objective(s) a. Students will use chronology to organize historical events and people. b. Students will know how various societies were affected by contacts and exchanges among diverse peoples. Sixth Grade, Latin American Independence Movements 2004 Colorado Unit Writing Project 8

9 c. Students will understand that societies are diverse and have changed over time. d. Students will know how various systems of government have developed and functioned throughout history. e. Students will know how political power has been acquired, maintained, used, and/or lost throughout history. f. Students will know how societies have been affected by religions and philosophies. B. Materials 1. Pearson History and Geography Textbook (one for each student) C. Key Vocabulary 1. Hacienda a large ranch or plantation in Latin America 2. Padre the Spanish word for father ; a traditional form of address for a Roman Catholic priest 3. Miguel Hidalgo y Castilla priest who started Mexico s fight for independence 4. Mural a large picture that is usually painted directly on the wall of a building 5. Diego Rivera one of Mexico s most famous artists 6. Jose Maria Morelos leader of a guerilla war in southern Mexico 7. September 16 Mexican Independence Day D. Procedures/Activities 1. Have students review why revolutions happen. As a class, briefly discuss what students already know about Mexico and its battle for independence. (Some schools cover this in their Spanish class, so many students will have a great knowledge base) 2. Have students take notes on the following information or provide copies for every student, if time does not allow for extensive note taking. If copies are given be sure to discuss this information as a class. (Notes adapted from Pearson History and Geography Textbook- pg ) a. The revolution in Mexico started with a group called the Literary and Social Club of Queretaro. This group was not a literary group at all, instead the members were plotting a revolution against Spain. b. Indians were not happy because they were forced to work in the big haciendas for little or no pay and they did not have enough land. c. Mestizos were also unhappy because they were very poor and did not have good jobs. In addition, they were looked down on because they were of mixed descent. d. Creoles were unhappy because they were shut out of the most powerful positions in Mexico. The Creoles owned land, were professionals and owned most of the haciendas, but the Spaniards controlled the government. e. Padre Miguel Hidalgo y Castilla was a major member of the Literary and Social Club and a priest in the village of Dolores. Hidalgo would often help the Indians make wine and sell the silk thread from the silkworm cocoons that lived on Mulberry trees. Unfortunately, it was illegal for the Indians to do this because the Spaniards wanted all of the profit for themselves. f. By 1810, Mexico had been under Spanish rule for almost 300 years. g. Hidalgo met with Ignacio Allende and Juan Aldama and they plotted the revolution. The revolution was to begin on October 2, 1810, but the plan was uncovered and several other members of the conspiracy were arrested. The three argued about what to do. Finally, Hidalgo ran outside Sixth Grade, Latin American Independence Movements 2004 Colorado Unit Writing Project 9

10 and rang the bell in the church tower calling the people. A crowd gathered and Hidalgo told them that it was time to take up arms against the Spaniards and if they threw them out they would have more land and wouldn t have to work on the haciendas anymore. h. The next morning almost 800 men were gathered at Hidalgo s house, it was the morning of September 16 th. This was the beginning of the revolutionary army. i. On September 28 th, with an army of 25,000 rebels they attacked the rich mining city of Guanajuato (wahn uh HWAT oh). The leaders, soldiers, and Spanish citizens turned to the Alhondiga (ahl-ohn-dee-gah), the strongest building in town. The Spanish were well trained and well armed, but there were only a few hundred of them and soon they were no match for the rebels. Almost all of the 500 Spaniards were killed and nearly 2,000 of Hidalgo s rebels died as well. j. Unable to control the army the town was looted and the mob laid waste to the city. This obvious lack of discipline was a problem for Hidalgo. k. The rebels continued to win battles, but hidalgo was warned that the undisciplined army would not be able to defeat a large well-trained Spanish army. l. Hidalgo and his army marched toward the capital, Mexico City, in October. Hidalgo was surprised though as he advanced toward the capital when he learned that not everyone supported the rebellion and many actually disliked him and the destruction that followed his army. m. Hidalgo changed his mind and the army headed for Guadalajara. n. Soldiers started to leave, they found that army life was dull and it was time to plant crops. Without the corn that they plant to eat, the men did not know how they and their families would survive. So when Hidalgo reached Guadalajara, he only had about 7,000 soldiers. o. Here, he was treated like a hero; city leaders greeted him and bands played. p. Hidalgo, Allende, and Aldama gathered more soldiers, trained their army and made cannons and other weapons. But the Spanish army was also getting ready for battle and they soon marched on Guadalajara. q. The rebel army went to meet them. Battle was matched for six hours until a shot hit an ammunition wagon and the field caught on fire. The rebels fled and were captured in an ambush in Saltillo. r. The leaders were tried and sentenced to death. Hidalgo was shot by a firing squad on July 31, s. After Hidalgo many tried to lead the rebellion, but only one stood out, Jose Maria Morelos. t. Morelos felt that the only way to beat the Spaniards was through guerilla tactics. So he led a guerilla was in southern Mexico for five years with a strong army of 9,000 men. Unlike Hidalgo s army, his men were well equipped and well disciplined and so they controlled all of southern Mexico. He wanted the laws to be changed to only allow individuals born in Mexico to hold government offices, equal treatment of all people, and, his most revolutionary idea, that all of the hacienda owners give their land to the workers. This angered the Creoles, because they were the owners of the haciendas. The lack of support from the Creoles was the downfall and after five years of fighting he was captured on November 15, Morelos was shot. Sixth Grade, Latin American Independence Movements 2004 Colorado Unit Writing Project 10

11 u. The goal of independence had not yet been met and the people were suffering. Crops failed, farmers had left their land to fight, there were bandits, and roads were not kept up and businesses couldn t get products to sell. v. The war did continue. And in 1821, a Spanish officer joined the rebels. Agustin de Iturbine (ah goos TEEN de ee toor BEE day) was accused of misusing army funds and felt that he would be better off with the rebels. He and his army unit joined the rebels and the added strength turned the favor to that of the rebels. w. After eleven years of fighting the rebels marched into Mexico City and declared Mexico a free and independent nation on September 27, 1821, eleven years after the revolution began. 3. Ask students if there are any questions concerning the notes. E. Assessment/Evaluation 1. Ask and discuss the following questions to evaluate the students understanding of the notes that they either just wrote down or those that they discussed. a. Why do you think the Creoles played such an important role in leading the struggle for independence? (The Creoles were well-educated, aristocrats that felt they had as much right to power as the Spanish-born colonists. They were important people, unfortunately, they were denied power, but felt if they could defeat the Spanish then they would have the control.) b. After Hidalgo was executed the struggle for independence changed and the army dwindled, describe these changes and why do you think they happened? (The struggle changed because the little organization that the rebels had fell apart, but it gave them time to realize that they could not be successful in the way that they had been fighting. They started fighting small battles with bands of guerilla fighters.) c. Why did the Mexican war for independence last so long? (Neither the Spanish army nor the Mexican army was strong enough to defeat the other side.) d. Describe what happened that led to the Mexican victory. (The balance of power tipped in favor of the rebels when de Iturbine and his army joined the rebels.) Lesson Five: Simon Bolivar (one 70 minute class period) A. Daily Objectives 1. Concept Objective(s) a. Students will recognize the sanctity of life and the dignity of the individual and understand governmental policies that disregard the value of human life or condone inhuman practices. b. Students will understand the close relationship between social and political systems. 2. Lesson Content a. Liberators i. Simon Bolivar ii. Jose de San Martin 3. Skill Objective(s) a. Students will use chronology to organize historical events and people. b. Students will know how various societies were affected by contacts and exchanges among diverse peoples. Sixth Grade, Latin American Independence Movements 2004 Colorado Unit Writing Project 11

12 c. Students will understand that societies are diverse and have changed over time. d. Students will know how various systems of government have developed e. and functioned throughout history. f. Students will know how political power has been acquired, maintained, used, and/or lost throughout history. g. Students will know how societies have been affected by religions and h. philosophies. B. Materials 1. Pearson History and Geography Textbook (one for each student) C. Key Vocabulary 1. Liberator a person who frees a country from an enemy 2. Conspirators someone who secretly plans an unlawful action, such as overthrowing the government 3. Simon Bolivar became the leader of the conspirators 4. Royalist someone who supports the rule of a king or a queen 5. Jose Tomas Boves a Spaniard said to be the most bloodthirsty and ruthless leader in any of Spain s wars for independence 6. Volunteer someone who chooses freely to do something, such as joining an army 7. Campaign a series of military operations D. Procedures/Activities 1. Have students take out their maps. Locate South America. Today s focus will be on the struggle for independence in South America. Many of the same reasons that the Mexicans wanted independence and rebelled, were the same reasons that the South Americans rebelled. 2. Instruct students to take out a couple of pieces of paper and their textbook (Pearson History and Geography). Turn to page 218. In this section, instruct students look at the headings in this section. 3. After looking at the headings and making sure that students understand where the headings are found. Students are to look at the headings and write that heading as a question.. Remind students that all questions do not end in a question mark, they can write higher level Bloom s questions that ask them to explain, describe, infer, etc. You requirements for the questions should be based on you student s skill level and your expectations. (Possible questions for this section: Why did Simon Bolivar s marriage end in tragedy? Describe why the rebellion failed. Explain when and how the first Venezuelan republic formed. What made the Earth shake? Explain what War to the Death means. Describe Bolivar s daring plan. Who went on to Bogata? What was Bolivar s dream? Explain how Bolivar s dream ended.) Give only about 10 minutes for students to complete this activity. 4. As a class, go through the headings and the questions that the students have created. You can make a list on the board if you choose (this will help make sure that all students understand and that they have similar questions.) Ask students what they think is the purpose of this activity? (It sets a purpose for reading and helps them understand and retain the material.) 5. After the discussion and creation of the list of questions, instruct students take their list of questions and read the section for the first question. 6. When they have finished reading the section they are to answer their first question based on what they read. Have the students continue to read the section and then answer the question for that section. Sixth Grade, Latin American Independence Movements 2004 Colorado Unit Writing Project 12

13 7. When the students have finished all of their questions have them discuss the answers to the questions in small groups. Be sure that the students realize that if they have the wrong answer, this is their opportunity to correct it. E. Assessment/Evaluation 1. Quiz covering the first five lessons. Appendix I. Quiz should be given at the beginning of the next class period and graded using Appendix J. Lesson Six: South American Revolutions (one 70 minute class period) A. Daily Objectives 1. Concept Objective(s) a. Students will understand the close relationship between social and political systems 2. Lesson Content a. Liberators i. Jose de San Martin ii. Bernardo O Higgins 3. Skill Objective(s) a. Students will use chronology to organize historical events and people. b. Students will know how various societies were affected by contacts and exchanges among diverse peoples. c. Students will understand that societies are diverse and have changed over time. d. Students will know how various systems of government have developed and functioned throughout history. e. Students will know how political power has been acquired, maintained, used, and/or lost throughout history. f. Students will know how societies have been affected by religions and philosophies. B. Materials 1. One copy for each student of Appendix I 2. Appendix J 3. One copy for each student of Appendix K: South American Revolution Questions 4. Appendix L: Key for South American Revolution Questions 5. Topographical map of South America 6. One copy for each student of Appendix M: Research Project Homework Assignment 7. Pearson History and Geography Textbook (one for each student) C. Key Vocabulary 1. Viceroy a ruler of a colony or territory 2. Militia and army made up of civilians rather than professional soldiers 3. Jose de San Martin principal leader of the revolts against Spain in the southern parts of South America 4. Pension money that is not a salary that is paid regularly to a person who has performed some service or work D. Procedures/Activities 1. Pass out the quiz (Appendix I). Give students a specific amount of time in which to complete the quiz. About ten to fifteen minutes should be sufficient. 2. When the quiz is complete, have students take out their map of South America. You can display one on the overhead or wall if you choose. Ask students; who was the main player in previous lesson? (Simon Bolivar) Identify the countries Sixth Grade, Latin American Independence Movements 2004 Colorado Unit Writing Project 13

14 that he and his army liberated. (Venezuela, Columbia, Ecuador, Bolivia, and Peru) 3. Have students put their fingers on Chile on the map of South America. Make sure that all of the students know where this country is. 4. Pass out a copy of Appendix K to each student. Read pgs in History and Geography textbook. Depending on the time that you want to allow for the reading, students can read independently, as a class, or for more efficient reading and understanding have students divide into pairs (or teacher pairs them up). Starting with the first person in the pair (students decide), each member of the pair reads a paragraph while the other member of the pair reads along and listens. Students then switch back and forth until they have found the answer to the first question on their set of questions (Appendix K). Students then discuss the information that they just read and develop a thorough answer. Every student must complete their own set of questions for a grade. Make sure that students are aware that their answers do not always have to be the same as their partners. If they think they have a better answer let them know that they should feel free to write that answer. 5. After they have answered the first question, they are to resume reading as pairs, switching off at the beginning of each new paragraph and answering the questions as they go. 6. The pair reading is usually faster than students reading independently and since they are switching back and forth after each paragraph and are responsible for their own answers, they tend to stay more focused than reading as a class. 7. After students have finished reading and answering their questions, complete the following class discussion section. 8. Tell students: a. In 1806, British warships arrived in Buenos Aires, the Spanish viceroy departed, and the people of Buenos Aires mounted a brave defense against the British. How did these events convince the people of La Plata (which is now Argentina, Uruguay, Paraguay and Bolivia) to strive for independence? (They felt that since they had defeated the British without the help of Spain that they felt more confident in going against Spain.) 9. After the defeat of the British the Spanish king sent another viceroy to enforce trade rules and deprive the people of their income and make their desire for independence even stronger. Ask: What is your opinion of the Spanish actions? Do you believe that the king was right to enforce trade rules? (Make sure that the students understand what trade rules are.) Should he have let the people of La Plata trade with the British? (Answers will vary. Yes answers should include that relaxed trade rules would discourage rebellion and increase disrespect for Spain. No answers should mention that Spain needed the money and if the colonies traded with the competition why bother having colonies.) 10. Have students look at a topographical map of South America and call on students to create a list of the physical features found between Chile and Peru. After creating the list ask students; what would have been the easiest path for San Martin to take to invade Peru? (By the sea) Now address one of the questions on their worksheet: Explain how San Martin invaded Peru. Why did he choose that path? (Answer can be found in Appendix L.) 11. On the overhead or board write the following events: a. Moreno convinces the city council to remove the king s viceroy. (3) b. Peru declares independence. (6) Sixth Grade, Latin American Independence Movements 2004 Colorado Unit Writing Project 14

15 c. The Spanish viceroy flees. (2) d. San Martin returns to Europe for good. (7) e. Ten British warships anchor in the bay at Buenos Aires. (1) f. Chile declares independence. (5) g. San Martin returns from Spain to help La Plata. (4) 12. Have students talk in their pairs and put the list in the order in which they happened. As a class, number the events 1-7 in the correct order. 13. Discuss the questions, if there is time. Make sure that all students have completed the assignment and understand the main ideas in this section. 14. Pass out the homework assignment (Appendix M). Assign students to groups (size of the group will depend on class size), give the groups an opportunity to discuss what each member is going to research. 15. As a class, go over the expectations for the project and provide a due date. E. Assessment/Evaluation 1. Students will complete questions from Appendix K these will be graded using Appendix L. Lesson Seven: Brazil (three - four 70 minute class periods) A. Daily Objectives 1. Concept Objective(s) a. Students will recognize the sanctity of life and the dignity of the individual and understand governmental policies that disregard the value of human life or condone inhuman practices. b. Students will understand the close relationship between social and political systems. 2. Lesson Content a. Brazilian independence from Portugal 3. Skill Objective(s) a. Students will use chronology to organize historical events and people. b. Students will know how various societies were affected by contacts and exchanges among diverse peoples. c. Students will understand that societies are diverse and have changed over time. d. Students will know how various systems of government have developed and functioned throughout history. e. Students will know how political power has been acquired, maintained, used, and/or lost throughout history. f. Students will know how societies have been affected by religions and philosophies. B. Materials 1. Appendix M: Research Project Assignment 2. Pearson History and Geography Textbook (one for each student) C. Key Vocabulary 1. Alliance a group of countries that join together to accomplish some goal 2. Joao the prince of Portugal 3. Export something that is sent out of a country 4. Import something that is brought into a country 5. Republic a nation without a king, where elected officials govern 6. Pedro I son of King Joao of Portugal, ruled Brazil from 1821 to 1831 Sixth Grade, Latin American Independence Movements 2004 Colorado Unit Writing Project 15

16 D. Procedures/Activities 1. Due date and time spent on the research project are at the teacher s discretion. A thorough project should take a couple of days to a week. If there is not time to spend on this in class, make it primarily homework, except for one class period in which the students will need to meet with their groups to put their poster boards together. 2. The next class period, after the students have compiled their information on a poster board, have the groups present the information that they have gathered. 3. After presentations are complete assign the following pages for students to read as homework. Read pages in History and Geography textbook. 4. At the beginning of the final class period for this lesson start with a discussion over the reading assignment. 5. Ask students to describe some of the different things that countries had to do to become independent. (Answers should include; rebels organized themselves against the European countries. Liberators of the country came from inside or outside of the country fighting for independence. The amount of time that it took for a country to become independent varied. It could come quickly or take a very long time. The amount of violence also varied depending on the rebellion.) 6. Why did Prince Joao of Portugal move to Brazil? ( Napoleon demanded that Portugal break off ties with Great Britain, take their property and arrest all British citizens. Joao did not want to do this because Britain was more powerful than Napoleon. Napoleon was not happy with Joao only closing the ports, co he decided to invade Portugal. Joao did not want to follow Napoleon s orders, so he boarded a British ship for South America.) 7. What caused King Joao to return to Portugal? (King Joao loved Brazil and did not want to leave, he had made it the South American center of Portugal, but the people in Portugal wanted to write a new constitution and Joao was in danger of losing his crown if he did not return to Portugal immediately.) 8. Why so you think that Prince Joao loved Brazil so much and what had he done for them? Remind students to think about what they learned from their research that would why tell why Joao loved Brazil. (Joao probably loved the weather in Brazil and since there was more open space it was not as crowded as Portugal. Joao had learned from his experience how bad trade restrictions were for the economy, so he lifted those restrictions in Brazil which helped the Brazilian economy and also encouraged them to develop industry and agriculture.) 9. Why do you think that Joao told Pedro If Brazil demands independence, proclaim it yourself and put the crowd on your own head. (Joao wanted his son to be king and to preserve Brazil the way that he left it. Joao knew that other countries had broken apart when they became independent and he did not want this to happen.) 10. How was the way that Brazil became independent different from the other countries that we have discussed? (Pedro simply tore the Portuguese flag off his uniform and declared Brazil and independent country. Unlike the other struggles for independence there was very little bloodshed, except for a few Portuguese soldiers that tries to keep Brazil for Portugal.) 11. Do you think that this was the best thing to happen to Brazil? Why or why not? (Answers will vary.) 12. Have students take out their list of facts or questions about Mexico and South America. Tell them to look back over their information. Give them the time to make changes to their facts or to answer questions that they wrote down. 13. Assign pages , for students to read for next class period. Sixth Grade, Latin American Independence Movements 2004 Colorado Unit Writing Project 16

17 E. Assessment/Evaluation 1. Based on reading, discussion and research project, have students write an answer to the following question, using details from this lesson: a. Explain, in detail, why Europeans felt that Brazil was such a desirable place to settle. (Explanation must include at least four pieces of information from the research project) Lesson Eight: Mexico, After Independence (two 70 minute class periods) A. Daily Objectives 1. Concept Objective(s) a. Students will recognize the sanctity of life and the dignity of the individual and understand governmental policies that disregard the value of human life or condone inhuman practices. b. Students will understand cause and effect. Historical events usually have multiple effects, come of which are not recognized until long after the event occurs. c. Students will understand the close relationship between social and political systems. 2. Lesson Content a. Mexican Revolutions i. Santa Anna vs. the United States ii. Benito Juarez iii. Pancho Villa, Emiliano Zapata 3. Skill Objective(s) a. Students will use chronology to organize historical events and people. b. Students will know how various societies were affected by contacts and exchanges among diverse peoples. c. Students will understand that societies are diverse and have changed over time. d. Students will know how various systems of government have developed and functioned throughout history. e. Students will know how political power has been acquired, maintained, used, and/or lost throughout history. f. Students will know how societies have been affected by religions and philosophies. B. Materials 1. One copy for each student of Appendix N: The Alamo C. Key Vocabulary 1. Caudillo a military dictator in Latin American countries D. Procedures/Activities 1. Students will have read about the situation in Mexico after its Independence, and the trouble that it faced trying to get the country organized and under the control of one government. 2. As a class discuss the following questions: a. Does overthrowing a ruler solve problems or does it cause new problems? (Some will say no, but they all should realize that with new leaders come new and different problems. Many times the main problem that people have with a ruler is solved, but the change in ruler brings a new and different problem) b. What type of problems did the Mexicans face that were because of the rulers of the country? (Students many list several problems. They should Sixth Grade, Latin American Independence Movements 2004 Colorado Unit Writing Project 17

18 include: lack of unit; trouble forming a stable trustworthy government; the caudillos fought amongst themselves; the Creoles took the place of the Spanish and often refused to treat the mestizos and Indians as equals; rulers spent the country s money and bribery and corruption became a problem; the country ran out of money; the old class system still caused problems.) c. Cuba and Puerto Rico were the only countries still under Spanish rule after 1826, so why did Latin American countries still have terrible problems? (Freedom had yet to be established and justice was based on the class system. One ruling group had been replaced by another causing different problems while not solving problems.) d. Think about Benito Juarez, Pancho Villa, Emiliano Zapata, and Santa Ana; which were concerned with average Mexicans and their way of life and which were more concerned with themselves and the problems of the wealthy? 1. (Benito Juarez wanted to protect everyone by creating a Mexican constitution. Pancho Villa wanted to protect the poor. Emiliano Zapata fought to give land to the poor Indians. Santa Ana wanted to make himself wealthy and powerful and was dishonest.) e. Explain why Villa and Zapata were successful in what they did? (Villa and Zapata were successful because they worked and fought hard for the land, freedom, and justice for the poor. They were fighting to get the poor what they deserved. Often the two were seen as the heirs of the revolution that was started by Miguel Hidalgo.) f. What were several of the events that occurred during this time period that led to many changes? (The Alamo, Mexican-American War, The Mexican War, creation of the Mexican constitution, Cinco de Mayo.) 3. Give each student a copy of Appendix N: The Alamo. 4. As a class, read the description. 5. Have students take out a piece of paper and quietly re-read the description of what happened at the Alamo. 6. Give directions for the task: a. You are going to re-write history. You have just read what happened at the Alamo, now we are going to switch it around. b. You are telling the story of the Alamo, imagining that the Texans won the battle. Of course, since that did not actually happen you will have to make up the description of what happened. c. When you describe what happened you must remember that the Texans won and the Mexicans lost. The description must be detailed enough so that the reader can see what is happening. d. In addition to the description of what happened, be sure to explain, at the end, what happened to Mexico and Texas after the battle of the Alamo. E. Assessment/Evaluation 1. Students will complete the class discussion and writing an alternate ending to the Battle of the Alamo. VI. CULMINATING ACTIVITY A. Latin America Final Assessment-Appendix P B. Students are to take out their list of facts about Latin America. Have them look the list over and make changes where necessary and add information that they have learned. Sixth Grade, Latin American Independence Movements 2004 Colorado Unit Writing Project 18

19 1. Tell students to take their completed list and write a brief essay explain what they learned about Latin America and how their opinions and information changed from the original list. Be sure to have them include their original thoughts and what they know now. 2. Have students pull out their timelines. Use Appendix F to go over the timelines as a class. Have students make sure that they have the most important dates. Discuss why many of the dates in the textbook are on their timelines and why many other dates are not. (If you choose to grade this task, focus on the dates that you feel are most important and whether or not the dates are in chronological order.) VII. VIII. HANDOUTS/WORKSHEETS A. Appendix A: Outline Map of Mexico and South America (Lesson One) B. Appendix B: Key of Outline Map of Mexico and South America (Lesson One) C. Appendix C: Colonies in the Americas, 1700 (Lesson One) D. Appendix D: Graph of Latin American Class System: 1700s (Lesson Two) E. Appendix E: Key for Graph of Latin American Class System 1700s (Lesson Two) F. Appendix F: Timeline Example (Lesson Three) G. Appendix G: Review questions for Toussaint L Ouverture and Haiti (Lesson Three) H. Appendix H: Haitian Revolution Leaders Chart (teacher copy only) (Lesson Three) I. Appendix I: Quiz (over Lessons One-Five) (Lesson Six) J. Appendix J: Key: Quiz (Lessons One-Five) (Lesson Six) K. Appendix K: Questions: South American Revolutions (Lesson Six) L. Appendix L: Key: South American Revolutions Questions (Lesson Six) M. Appendix M: Research Project: BRAZIL (Lessons Six and Seven) N. Appendix N: The Alamo (Lesson Eight) O. Appendix O: Unit Vocabulary (used throughout entire unit) P. Appendix P: Final Assessment: Latin American Independence Movements Q. Appendix Q: KEY: Final Assessment: Latin American Independence Movements BIBLIOGRAPHY A. Bell, Madison Smart Master of the Crossroads. New York: Pantheon Books, B. Bell, Madison Smart All Soul s Rising. New York: Pantheon Books, C. Caruso, John A. Liberators of Mexico. P. Smith, 1954 AA-C8377 D. Devarona, Frank Simon Bolivar: Latin American Liberator. Brookfield, Conn: Millbrook Press, E. Gleiter, Jan. Simon Bolivar. Milwaukee: Raintree Publishers, F. Greene, Carol Simon Bolivar, South American Liberator. Chicago: Children s Press, G. Hobbler, Thomas Toussaint L Ouverture. New York: Chelsea House, H. Hamill, Hugh M. Hidalgo Revolt: Prelude to Mexican Independence. University Florida, 1966 AAC-2033 I. Myers, Walter Dean Toussaint L Ouverture: the Fight for Haiti s Independence. New York: Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers, J.. Mexican War for Independence. San Diego: Lucent Book, K. Rouverol, Jean Pancho Villa: a Biography. Garden City, N.Y.: Doubleday, L. Syme, Ronald Juarez, the Founder of Modern Mexico. New York: Morrow, Sixth Grade, Latin American Independence Movements 2004 Colorado Unit Writing Project 19

20 M. Streissguth, Tom Brazil in Pictures. Minneapolis, MN, U.S.A.: Lerner Publications, N. Tebbel, John William South by Southwest; the Mexican-American and His Heritage. Garden City, N.Y.: Doubleday, 1969 DCBN #AAE 5601 O. Wepman, Dennis Simon Bolivar. New York: Chelsea House Publishers, Sixth Grade, Latin American Independence Movements 2004 Colorado Unit Writing Project 20

Liberación!: Independence in Latin America

Liberación!: Independence in Latin America Liberación!: Independence in Latin America Grade Level: Grade 6 Presented by: Terri Littlejohn, Washington Elementary, Rochester, MN Length of Unit: 15 days I. ABSTRACT The revolutions in the United States

More information

The Haitian Revolution What was the Haitian Revolution? Who was Toussaint L'Ouverture? What role did race play in the Revolution?

The Haitian Revolution What was the Haitian Revolution? Who was Toussaint L'Ouverture? What role did race play in the Revolution? The Haitian Revolution What was the Haitian Revolution? Who was Toussaint L'Ouverture? What role did race play in the Revolution? What was the Haitian Revolution?! The Haitian Revolution was a political

More information

Chapter 6 Major Battles of the Texas Revolution

Chapter 6 Major Battles of the Texas Revolution Chapter 6 Major Battles of the Texas Revolution Lesson1: The Battle of Gonzalez Lesson 2: The Battle of the Alamo Lesson 3: The Battle of San Jacinto Lesson 1: Revolution Begins Pages 170-176 Reasons

More information

H THE STORY OF TEXAS EDUCATOR GUIDE H. Student Objectives TEKS. Guiding Questions. Materials

H THE STORY OF TEXAS EDUCATOR GUIDE H. Student Objectives TEKS. Guiding Questions. Materials H C H A P T E R S I X H THE ROAD TO INDEPENDENCE Overview Chapter 6: The Road to Independence encompasses the main battles of the Texas Revolution interpreted in the story of Texas independence: Gonzales,

More information

Fry Instant Word List

Fry Instant Word List First 100 Instant Words the had out than of by many first and words then water a but them been to not these called in what so who is all some oil you were her sit that we would now it when make find he

More information

Remember the Alamo. The Changing Border of the Southwest

Remember the Alamo. The Changing Border of the Southwest Remember the Alamo The Changing Border of the Southwest Interact: What do you think this picture shows? In the year 1820, the new country of the United States and the newer country of Mexico had a lot

More information

Fry Instant Words High Frequency Words

Fry Instant Words High Frequency Words Fry Instant Words High Frequency Words The Fry list of 600 words are the most frequently used words for reading and writing. The words are listed in rank order. First Hundred Group 1 Group 2 Group 3 Group

More information

Latin American Peoples Win Independence

Latin American Peoples Win Independence 1 Latin American Peoples Win Independence MAIN IDEA WHY IT MATTERS NOW TERMS & NAMES REVOLUTION Spurred by discontent and Enlightenment ideas, peoples in Latin America fought colonial rule. Sixteen of

More information

Declaration of Independence Lesson Plan. Central Historical Question: Why did the Founders write the Declaration of Independence?

Declaration of Independence Lesson Plan. Central Historical Question: Why did the Founders write the Declaration of Independence? Lesson Plan Central Historical Question: Why did the Founders write the? Materials: Copies of Two Historians Interpretations Copies of Declaration Preamble worksheet Copies of Declaration of Independece

More information

Slavery, the Civil War & Reconstruction The Emancipation Proclamation

Slavery, the Civil War & Reconstruction The Emancipation Proclamation Non- fiction: The Civil War - The Emancipation Proclamation Slavery, the Civil War & Reconstruction The Emancipation Proclamation On September 22, 1862, President Lincoln declared that all slaves in the

More information

Chapter 3: The English Colonies

Chapter 3: The English Colonies Chapter 3: The English Colonies Section 1: The Southern Colonies Settlement in Jamestown In 1605 a company of English merchants asked King James I for the right to found, or establish, a settlement. In

More information

Overview. Mission Gate, ca. late 1700s Courtesy Texas Archeological Research Labs. Photo by Hunt Wellborn

Overview. Mission Gate, ca. late 1700s Courtesy Texas Archeological Research Labs. Photo by Hunt Wellborn H C H A P T E R t h r e e H immigration Overview Chapter 3: Immigration covers many groups involved in the early colonization of Texas: farmers, ranchers, soldiers, missionaries, and slaves. Exhibits in

More information

Facts About Central America and the Caribbean

Facts About Central America and the Caribbean Facts About Central America and the Caribbean Section 1 Workbook 14 Directions: Circle the word(s) in parentheses that best complete(s) each sentence. 1) In the north, Central America borders (Colombia,

More information

The Declaration of the Rights of Man and its Impact on the Nation of Haiti

The Declaration of the Rights of Man and its Impact on the Nation of Haiti Department of History Xavier University Essay Contest 2011 The Declaration of the Rights of Man and its Impact on the Nation of Haiti American citizens live in a world that continuously discusses the need

More information

1. What is the purpose for starting another colony in North America after the

1. What is the purpose for starting another colony in North America after the Jamestowne Colony Sixteen years after the mysterious disappearance of the colonists from Roanoke Island, King James 1 of England gave a charter to the Virginia Company. The goal was to try to begin another

More information

The Making of a Nation: The French and Indian War

The Making of a Nation: The French and Indian War The Making of a Nation: The French and Indian War During the eighteenth century, Spain, France, and Britain controlled land in North America. Spain controlled Florida. France was powerful in the northern

More information

Unit 4 Lesson 8 The Qin and Han Dynasties

Unit 4 Lesson 8 The Qin and Han Dynasties Unit 4 Lesson 8 The Qin and Han Dynasties Directions Read the False statements below. Replace each underlined word with one from the word bank that makes each sentence True. Word Bank Ying Zheng army copper

More information

THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION American Strengths and Weaknesses Patriotism Help from French George Washington Small army and short of soldiers Few trained for battle Army plagued by shortage of guns, gunpowder,

More information

Colonization and the Revolutionary War Introduction to the Revolutionary War

Colonization and the Revolutionary War Introduction to the Revolutionary War Colonization and the Revolutionary War Introduction to the Revolutionary War As the colonies took root, they grew used to mostly governing themselves. Great Britain decided it wanted more control. It began

More information

Grade 4: Module 3B: Unit 1: Lesson 3 Explaining What Happened and Why: Rereading Revolutionary War

Grade 4: Module 3B: Unit 1: Lesson 3 Explaining What Happened and Why: Rereading Revolutionary War Grade 4: Module 3B: Unit 1: Lesson 3 Explaining What Happened and Why: Rereading Revolutionary War This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

More information

Fight for North America: The Emergence of Colonial and Native Societies ( )

Fight for North America: The Emergence of Colonial and Native Societies ( ) Fight for North America: The Emergence of Colonial and Native Societies (1607-1754) Essential Question #1 If the goal of colonization was to create new empires for the European powers, why did the Europeans

More information

South Carolinians in the Revolution

South Carolinians in the Revolution Historical Background The perspectives and roles of different South Carolinians during the American Revolution led to a civil war within South Carolina and ultimately impacted the success of the Patriot

More information

Superstars Building Fry List Fluency

Superstars Building Fry List Fluency Sight Word Superstars Building Fry List Fluency By Jennifer Bates http://finallyinfirst.blogspot.com/ How I use this program I developed this program because I noticed many of my students were still trying

More information

I DO, WE DO, YOU DO: Siege at the Alamo. WE DO-READERS THEATRE: Enrique Esparza and the Battle of the Alamo

I DO, WE DO, YOU DO: Siege at the Alamo. WE DO-READERS THEATRE: Enrique Esparza and the Battle of the Alamo Name Date Page # I DO, WE DO, YOU DO: Siege at the Alamo WE DO-READERS THEATRE: Enrique Esparza and the Battle of the Alamo Characters: Narrator #1 Narrator #2 Enrique Esparza: an eight-year old boy living

More information

I. The Italian Peninsula shares much of its weather with. a. Surrounded by water from the, and. b. North is blocked by. Italy is divided in half by

I. The Italian Peninsula shares much of its weather with. a. Surrounded by water from the, and. b. North is blocked by. Italy is divided in half by Ancient Rome Geography I. The Italian Peninsula shares much of its weather with Like Greece, Italy is a a. Surrounded by water from the, and b. North is blocked by I Italy is divided in half by IV. Area

More information

Slavery, The Quakers and Abolition

Slavery, The Quakers and Abolition Slavery, The Quakers and Abolition The United States was not always a free country for everyone. The United States was built on the backs of slaves. Slaves worked in fields and in houses so the plantation

More information

Built across Panama Allows ships to travel from Atlantic to Pacific Lake Titicaca (worlds highest navigable lake) Lake Maracaibo in Venezuela

Built across Panama Allows ships to travel from Atlantic to Pacific Lake Titicaca (worlds highest navigable lake) Lake Maracaibo in Venezuela Built across Panama Allows ships to travel from Atlantic to Pacific Lake Titicaca (worlds highest navigable lake) Lake Maracaibo in Venezuela Major oil & natural gas deposits in Mexico & Venezuela Gold

More information

Sam Houston, 1793-1863: An Early Leader of Texas

Sam Houston, 1793-1863: An Early Leader of Texas 12 November 2011 voaspecialenglish.com Sam Houston, 1793-1863: An Early Leader of Texas Cavalry soldiers line up at Fort Sam Houston, Texas loc.gov (You can download an MP3 of this story at voaspecialenglish.com)

More information

Closing: QUIZ on 2.1 and 2.2

Closing: QUIZ on 2.1 and 2.2 USHC 2.2: Explain how the Monroe Doctrine and the concept of Manifest Destiny affected the United States relationships with foreign powers, including the role of the United States in the Texan Revolution

More information

Second Grade Civil War Assessment

Second Grade Civil War Assessment Second Grade Civil War Assessment 1a. Who fought in the Civil War? a. The British and the Americans b. The North and the South of the United States 1b. Who fought in the Civil War? a. The British and the

More information

H THE STORY OF TEXAS EDUCATOR GUIDE H. Student Objectives TEKS. Guiding Questions. Materials

H THE STORY OF TEXAS EDUCATOR GUIDE H. Student Objectives TEKS. Guiding Questions. Materials H C H A P T E R S E V E N H THE REPUBLIC OF TEXAS AND EARLY STATEHOOD Overview Chapter 7: The Republic of Texas and Early Statehood spans the period of the Republic of Texas through its early years as

More information

Why did the Battle of Gonzales take place?

Why did the Battle of Gonzales take place? Texas Revolution Why did the Battle of Gonzales take place? Battle of Gonzales Mexican government wanted a cannon returned. Texans refused- made a flag- Come and Take It Known as the Lexington of the Texas

More information

GEORGE AND GEORGE: EXPLORING TWO SIDES OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION By Donna Coffin Adapted from a lesson written by Christy Hodge of Nevada

GEORGE AND GEORGE: EXPLORING TWO SIDES OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION By Donna Coffin Adapted from a lesson written by Christy Hodge of Nevada SCHOOL VIOLENCE PREVENTION DEMONSTRATION PROGRAM GEORGE AND GEORGE: EXPLORING TWO SIDES OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION By Donna Coffin Adapted from a lesson written by Christy Hodge of Nevada Teacher s Guide

More information

Hear Ye! Hear Ye! Summative Assessment A for Independent- To Be or Not To Be?

Hear Ye! Hear Ye! Summative Assessment A for Independent- To Be or Not To Be? Hear Ye! Hear Ye! Summative Assessment A for Independent- To Be or Not To Be? Table of Contents Item Page Description of Summative Activity 2 Teacher Directions 2 The following day Student Directions 3

More information

1700 s French society is divided into 3 estates: 1) Roman Catholic Clergy 1% 2) Nobility 2% 3) The Rest (bourgeoisie) 97%

1700 s French society is divided into 3 estates: 1) Roman Catholic Clergy 1% 2) Nobility 2% 3) The Rest (bourgeoisie) 97% Phase I 1700 s French society is divided into 3 estates: 1) Roman Catholic Clergy 1% 2) Nobility 2% 3) The Rest (bourgeoisie) 97% 1774 Louis XVI takes the throne; France has tremendous debts from war and

More information

The 13 American Colonies Part 1: Coming to America

The 13 American Colonies  Part 1: Coming to America The 13 American Colonies Name: http://www.socialstudiesforkids.com/articles/ushistory/13colonies3.htm Part 1: Coming to America The first colonies in North America were along the eastern coast. Settlers

More information

The 13 Colonies. Lesson 1. Standards. Lesson Topic. Big Idea

The 13 Colonies. Lesson 1. Standards. Lesson Topic. Big Idea The 13 Colonies Big Idea What factors contributed to the establishment of the 13 colonies? Lesson 1 Standards Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills, Social Studies Grade 8 (2)(B) compare political, economic,

More information

Conquistadors The Slave Trade & The Columbian Exchange World History 9

Conquistadors The Slave Trade & The Columbian Exchange World History 9 Conquistadors The Slave Trade & The Columbian Exchange World History 9 Objective: To examine the conquests of Hernando Cortes and Francisco Pizarro. Hernando Cortes Francisco Pizarro Hernando Cortes and

More information

Manifest Destiny. Chapter 13

Manifest Destiny. Chapter 13 Manifest Destiny Chapter 13 Mountain Men Rough and tough men who braved the wilderness to trap and capture furs, animals, etc First Americans to move beyond the Rocky Mountains Western Land Americans believed

More information

Latin American Political Revolution Practice Questions

Latin American Political Revolution Practice Questions 1. With which event are Porfirio Díaz, Francisco "Pancho" Villa, and Emiliano Zapata associated? A) Conquest of the Incas B) Argentinian Dirty War C) Mexican Revolution D) Haitian coup d'état 2. Which

More information

the Native American Indians. Crockett served as a scout and a hunter for the army.

the Native American Indians. Crockett served as a scout and a hunter for the army. www.k5learning.com Objective sight words (motto, scout, politician, legislature, autobiography, narrative, Bowie knife, folk hero, feud, incident, pneumonia, confined); concepts (the destiny of three influential

More information

PUSD High Frequency Word List

PUSD High Frequency Word List PUSD High Frequency Word List For Reading and Spelling Grades K-5 High Frequency or instant words are important because: 1. You can t read a sentence or a paragraph without knowing at least the most common.

More information

THE FORGIVING FATHER

THE FORGIVING FATHER BOOK 1, PART 3, LESSON 4 THE FORGIVING FATHER THE BIBLE: Luke 15:11-32 THEME: We can discover what Jesus wants us to do and be by hearing the parables Jesus told. PREPARING FOR THE LESSON MAIN IDEA: Jesus

More information

Table of Contents. Part One: Social Studies Curriculum

Table of Contents. Part One: Social Studies Curriculum Table of Contents Part One: Social Studies Curriculum Chapter I: Social Studies Essay Questions and Prewriting Activities 1. Western Political Thought 1 2. The Age of Revolution 6 3. The Age of Napoleon

More information

Watch the video Write a short (2 minute-)commentary on the clip giving the reason stated by the songwriter why Latin Americans (and Caribbean people)

Watch the video Write a short (2 minute-)commentary on the clip giving the reason stated by the songwriter why Latin Americans (and Caribbean people) 1776-1870 Watch the video Write a short (2 minute-)commentary on the clip giving the reason stated by the songwriter why Latin Americans (and Caribbean people) often oppose US intervention. State whether

More information

The First Continental Congress and the Suffolk Resolves

The First Continental Congress and the Suffolk Resolves Chapter 6: The Revolutionary War The Final Steps Toward Independence A Review of the Intolerable Acts Britain tries to take rights away from colonists The Intolerable Acts mainly affected the Massachusetts

More information

Chapter 9: The Policies of Alexander Hamilton and Thomas Jefferson

Chapter 9: The Policies of Alexander Hamilton and Thomas Jefferson Chapter 9: The Policies of Alexander Hamilton and Thomas Jefferson Department of State, Department of Treasury, Department of War, Attorney General, Postmaster General : 5 government departments established

More information

Off To War! Author s Note: Personally, discovering that the Swamp Fox used tactics that were once used on him, is amazing. Fascinating really!

Off To War! Author s Note: Personally, discovering that the Swamp Fox used tactics that were once used on him, is amazing. Fascinating really! SM Francis Marion was born in 1732 in Berkeley County, South Carolina. His family owned a plantation in Berkeley County, and Francis was the youngest of the children. At age 15, young Francis Marion joined

More information

Inequality in Latin America

Inequality in Latin America Inequality in Latin America In this lesson students read about how colonialism in Latin America, and in particular in Guatemala, resulted in economic and social inequalities that are still reflected in

More information

Grade 4: Module 3B: Unit 3: Lesson 2 Reading Opinion Pieces, Part II: How Authors Support Their Opinions with Reasons and Evidence

Grade 4: Module 3B: Unit 3: Lesson 2 Reading Opinion Pieces, Part II: How Authors Support Their Opinions with Reasons and Evidence Grade 4: Module 3B: Unit 3: Lesson 2 How Authors Support Their Opinions with Reasons and Evidence This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

More information

The Gettysburg Address. Politics and Slavery, part 7

The Gettysburg Address. Politics and Slavery, part 7 The Gettysburg Address Politics and Slavery, part 7 Abraham Lincoln gives a speech on November 19, 1863 that is shocking and surprising. The speech is called the Gettysburg Address. It happens four months

More information

Problems After the War

Problems After the War Problems After the War War increased tensions between British & the Colonists. 1. England becomes more involved in the running of the colonies. 2. Proclamation Line of 1763 3. Standing Army 4. How to pay

More information

Immigration. The United States of America has long been the world s chief receiving

Immigration. The United States of America has long been the world s chief receiving Non-fiction: Immigration Immigration The United States of America has long been the world s chief receiving nation for immigrants. An immigrant is a person who leaves his/her country to settle and remain

More information

EXAMPLE: "Reading Passages" from: EDU108 - "Alamo Chocolate Pot" Art InHistory's Lesson Plans all feature thematic reading passages which contain

EXAMPLE: Reading Passages from: EDU108 - Alamo Chocolate Pot Art InHistory's Lesson Plans all feature thematic reading passages which contain EXAMPLE: "Reading Passages" from: EDU108 - "Alamo Chocolate Pot" Art InHistory's Lesson Plans all feature thematic reading passages which contain content on the time period, key people, historical events,

More information

Name Date CHRISTOPHER COLUMBUS AND THE NEW WORLD Pre-Test. 1. Christopher Columbus crossed the Atlantic Ocean to try to find North and South America.

Name Date CHRISTOPHER COLUMBUS AND THE NEW WORLD Pre-Test. 1. Christopher Columbus crossed the Atlantic Ocean to try to find North and South America. 1 Pre-Test Directions: Label each statement with a T if true or F if false. 1. Christopher Columbus crossed the Atlantic Ocean to try to find North and South America. 2. Christopher Columbus founded the

More information

Liberty! How the Revolutionary War Began By Lucille Recht Penner ISBN: 0-375-82200-3

Liberty! How the Revolutionary War Began By Lucille Recht Penner ISBN: 0-375-82200-3 American Revolution Liberty! How the Revolutionary War Began By Lucille Recht Penner ISBN: 0-375-82200-3 Teacher: Karen Ours Unit Topic: Events Leading to Revolutionary War Grade: 5 th - Special Ed- MIMR

More information

2º ESO GEOGRAPHY AND HISTORY: Guide for language assistant. Elena García Marín

2º ESO GEOGRAPHY AND HISTORY: Guide for language assistant. Elena García Marín was born in Genoa,Italy. He was the oldest of five children in his family. His father was a wool weaver. He helped his father with the weaving, but he always wanted to sail the seas. He didn't get to go

More information

Please connect the symbols with the date of the holiday they represent. December 25. February 14. 1st Monday in September.

Please connect the symbols with the date of the holiday they represent. December 25. February 14. 1st Monday in September. HOLIDAYS - PAGE 1 Please connect the symbols with the date of the holiday they represent. A Sunday between March 22nd and April 25. December 25 February 14 1st Monday in September Late November - late

More information

How appealing is the idea of packing up all of your belongings and moving to a new area?

How appealing is the idea of packing up all of your belongings and moving to a new area? How appealing is the idea of packing up all of your belongings and moving to a new area? A. Very appealing B. Somewhat appealing C. Somewhat unappealing D. Very unappealing A. A B. B C. C D. D Chapter

More information

1. How did the Native Americans make it into the Americas? 2. What were the religious beliefs of most Native American tribes?

1. How did the Native Americans make it into the Americas? 2. What were the religious beliefs of most Native American tribes? Social Studies Standard 2 Test Review Native Americans, Explorers, & Colonization 1. How did the Native Americans make it into the Americas? The Native Americans crossed over the Land Bridge (Bering Strait)

More information

This activity will work best with children in kindergarten through fourth grade.

This activity will work best with children in kindergarten through fourth grade. ACTIVITY SUMMARY Reading Guide, page 1 of 3 During this activity, you and your child will actively read Martin s Big Words, using the suggested reading strategies. WHY Through this activity, your child

More information

Chapter 5: The Road to the Revolutionary War. The major powers of Europe: Britain, France, and Spain

Chapter 5: The Road to the Revolutionary War. The major powers of Europe: Britain, France, and Spain Chapter 5: The Road to the Revolutionary War British Domination through Trade Laws Trade Laws The major powers of Europe: Britain, France, and Spain In order to make sure that Britain had more money coming

More information

Writing in First Person about the Atlantic Slave Trade Lesson Plan

Writing in First Person about the Atlantic Slave Trade Lesson Plan Writing in First Person about the Atlantic Slave Trade Grade Level: 6-8 Curriculum Focus: Grammar and Composition Lesson Duration: Three class periods Student Objectives Materials Discuss general information

More information

Caesar continued on his way, but Brutus stayed behind to speak with Caius Cassius.

Caesar continued on his way, but Brutus stayed behind to speak with Caius Cassius. Julius Caesar by William Shakespeare Caesar continued on his way, but Brutus stayed behind to speak with Caius Cassius. Cassius felt that Caesar was unworthy to rule. He hoped Brutus, one of Rome s most

More information

The Consolidation of Latin America,

The Consolidation of Latin America, CHAPTER 25 The Consolidation of Latin America, 1830 1920 From Colonies to Nations Latin American creoles were increasingly critical of the policies of their home countries. Criticism was also voiced by

More information

Battles Leading up to the Alamo: Gonzales and Goliad. 1. Students will learn about the importance of two battles in propelling the Texas Revolution.

Battles Leading up to the Alamo: Gonzales and Goliad. 1. Students will learn about the importance of two battles in propelling the Texas Revolution. The Texas Revolution Lesson 2 Battles Leading up to the Alamo: Gonzales and Goliad Big idea of chapter: The people involved in the Texas Revolution: What were they fighting for? Was their cause just? Main

More information

Creating America (Survey)

Creating America (Survey) Creating America (Survey) Chapter 17: The Tide of War Turns, 1863-1865 Section 1: The Emancipation Proclamation Main Idea: In 1863, President Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation, which helped

More information

The Civil War 1861 1863

The Civil War 1861 1863 The Civil War 1861 1863 The Civil War was a fight between the United States of America (the North) and the Confederate States of America (the South). It began after the 1860 Presidential Election. The

More information

War for the Union and for Freedom! : Recruitment of Civil War Volunteer Regiments. Seventh Grade M-18

War for the Union and for Freedom! : Recruitment of Civil War Volunteer Regiments. Seventh Grade M-18 Read Kansas! Seventh Grade M-18 Overview War for the Union and for Freedom! : Recruitment of Civil War Volunteer Regiments This lesson examines the recruitment of volunteer regiments in Kansas at the beginning

More information

Assessment: From Republic to Empire

Assessment: From Republic to Empire Name Date Mastering the Content Circle the letter next to the best answer. Assessment: From Republic to Empire 1. Which of the following did Rome do during the first period of expansion, before 264 B.C.E.?

More information

Chapter 8 C E N T R A L A M E R I C A A N D T H E C A R I B B E A N

Chapter 8 C E N T R A L A M E R I C A A N D T H E C A R I B B E A N Chapter 8 C E N T R A L A M E R I C A A N D T H E C A R I B B E A N Dictator A ruler who has complete power over the government Communist In a communist economy the government owns all large businesses

More information

The Protestant Reformation Chapter I. Unsatisfied with the Roman Catholic Church, religious reformers broke away to form their own churches.

The Protestant Reformation Chapter I. Unsatisfied with the Roman Catholic Church, religious reformers broke away to form their own churches. The Protestant Reformation Chapter 12.1 I. Unsatisfied with the Roman Catholic Church, religious reformers broke away to form their own churches. A. The Catholic Church faced challengers who were upset

More information

Emiliano Zapata. Prologue. Hero or Bandit? 1879? 1919

Emiliano Zapata. Prologue. Hero or Bandit? 1879? 1919 Emiliano Zapata Hero or Bandit? 1879? 1919 Prologue In Mexico, some call Emiliano Zapata a bandit. Some call him a hero. During the Mexican Revolution of 1910, he formed an army and took land from landowners.

More information

September 15th TEACHER BIBLE STUDY. The Northern Kingdom Was Destroyed

September 15th TEACHER BIBLE STUDY. The Northern Kingdom Was Destroyed Big Picture Question: Why did God scatter His people? God s people sinned against Him. Bible Passage: 2 Kings 17:1-23 Christ Connection: The prophets called God s people to repentance as Christ calls people

More information

EUROPEAN EXPLORATION AND COLONIZATION OF AMERICA

EUROPEAN EXPLORATION AND COLONIZATION OF AMERICA EUROPEAN EXPLORATION AND COLONIZATION OF AMERICA Country Reasons for Exploration Areas Explored (Areas of Greatest Influence) Negative Consequences Positive and Lasting Contributions to American Life Spain

More information

The Spread of Roman Power

The Spread of Roman Power The Spread of the Roman Republic The Spread of Roman Power Roman legions fight to expand the empire Controlled central Italy by 390 BC Were defeated an had Rome destroyed by the Gauls They rebuilt and

More information

Guided Reading Level J

Guided Reading Level J America's First President Guided Reading Level J No part of this publication may be reproduced in whole or in part, or stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic,

More information

In the feudal system, people pledged loyalty to a lord a ruler or powerful landholder. In return, they received protection from that lord.

In the feudal system, people pledged loyalty to a lord a ruler or powerful landholder. In return, they received protection from that lord. The fall of the Roman Empire in 476 C.E. marks the beginning of the period in Europe known as the Middle Ages. In this chapter, you will learn about a political and economic system that developed during

More information

Ball games have a very long history. Young men and women

Ball games have a very long history. Young men and women 1 Early Ball Games Ball games have a very long history. Young men and women have been getting together to play them for thousands of years. The earliest games were played in Mexico, South America, at least

More information

Slavery in New France

Slavery in New France Teachers Notes Slavery in New France This MysteryQuest examines selected documents to study the lives of slaves and commoners in New France in the early 1700s. Students learn to identify relevant evidence

More information

World History: Ancient Civilizations Through the Renaissance

World History: Ancient Civilizations Through the Renaissance Geography and the Rise of Rome The Big Idea Main Ideas Rome s location and government helped it become a major power in the ancient world. The geography of Italy made land travel difficult but helped the

More information

A DESPERATE CRY TO GOD FOR HEALING

A DESPERATE CRY TO GOD FOR HEALING Explanatory Notes: A DESPERATE CRY TO GOD FOR HEALING Bible verses: Psalm 6 NIrV Introduction: Are you in good health today? Most people greet each other with the question, How are you? We are happy when

More information

Copyright 2014 Edmentum - All rights reserved. World History Cultural Interactions and Changes Blizzard Bag

Copyright 2014 Edmentum - All rights reserved. World History Cultural Interactions and Changes Blizzard Bag Copyright 2014 Edmentum - All rights reserved. World History Cultural Interactions and Changes Blizzard Bag 2014-2015 Vasco da Gama was a Portuguese explorer famous for sailing around the Cape of Good

More information

Civil War Lesson #1: The Road to War

Civil War Lesson #1: The Road to War Civil War Lesson #1: The Road to War Major Topics: Slavery States Rights Sectional Differences How did slavery cause the Civil War? This first lesson centers on one of the most significant and contested

More information

Visiting the Missions Along California's Coast

Visiting the Missions Along California's Coast 06 December 2010 voaspecialenglish.com Visiting the Missions Along California's Coast Mission San Diego de Alcala (You can download an MP3 of this story at voaspecialenglish.com) FAITH LAPIDUS: I'm Faith

More information

4. After all groups have finished, have the groups share and explain their answers.

4. After all groups have finished, have the groups share and explain their answers. Title: Patriot, Loyalist, or Neutral? You Decide By Lynne Fuller, Carusi Middle School Historical Background: During the American Revolution, the American colonists had to decide to support the War for

More information

Lesson 1: Trouble over Taxes

Lesson 1: Trouble over Taxes Lesson 1 Summary Lesson 1: Trouble over Taxes Use with pages 268 273. Vocabulary Parliament Britain s law-making assembly Stamp Act law that placed a tax on printed materials in the colonies repeal cancel

More information

Race. Social Change. The Social Construction of Reality 10/18/2016. If [people] define situations as real, they are real in their consequences.

Race. Social Change. The Social Construction of Reality 10/18/2016. If [people] define situations as real, they are real in their consequences. If [people] define situations as real, they are real in their consequences. Social Change Race -W. I. Thomas (1928) The Social Construction of Reality Micro-level Social interactions The process through

More information

JESUS CALLED LEVI (Matthew)

JESUS CALLED LEVI (Matthew) BOOK 2, PART 1, LESSON 7 JESUS CALLED LEVI (Matthew) THE BIBLE: Luke 5:27-32 THEME: Jesus lived as God s obedient son. His life of love, compassion and healing shows what children of God are called to

More information

Second Grade The War of 1812 Assessment

Second Grade The War of 1812 Assessment Second Grade The War of 1812 Assessment 1a. Who was president during the War of 1812? a. George Washington b. James Madison 1b. Who was president during the War of 1812? a. George Washington b. James Madison

More information

Creating America (Survey)

Creating America (Survey) Creating America (Survey) Chapter 7: The American Revolution, 1776-1783 Section 1: The Early Years of the War Main Idea: The American desire to gain rights and liberties led them to fight for independence

More information

Masonry and the Independence of Brazil. Erlo Roth, M.M.

Masonry and the Independence of Brazil. Erlo Roth, M.M. Masonry and the Independence of Brazil Erlo Roth, M.M. Brazil - 1 With nearly 200 million people, Brazil is the largest country in Latin America It has about one half of the area and population of South

More information

Name Date. American Revolution

Name Date. American Revolution Name Date Mastering the Content Circle the letter next to the best answer. American Revolution 1. Before 1760, which statement best describes the colonies? A. The colonies had assemblies that passed laws.

More information

Grade 7 History (Part II)

Grade 7 History (Part II) Grade 7 History (Part II) British North America after the Fall of New France Royal Proclamation of 1763 Quebec Act of 1774 The American Revolution/War of Independence The Loyalists War of 1812 Expectations

More information

RELATE: THE STORY SLAVERY. SLAVERY By the end of the 18th century the Army had become the single biggest purchaser of slaves.

RELATE: THE STORY SLAVERY. SLAVERY By the end of the 18th century the Army had become the single biggest purchaser of slaves. By the end of the 18th century the Army had become the single biggest purchaser of slaves. Slave account, 1801. NAM 1975-08-55-3 War with Revolutionary and Napoleonic France spread to the Caribbean, and

More information

Battling Beyond U.S. Borders

Battling Beyond U.S. Borders Teacher s Guide Grade Level: 6 8 Curriculum Focus: U.S. History Lesson Duration: Two class periods Program Description Witness how a small group of Texan defenders bravely fought against the Mexican army

More information

Chapter 8: Central America and the Caribbean. Unit 3

Chapter 8: Central America and the Caribbean. Unit 3 Chapter 8: Central America and the Caribbean Unit 3 Section 1: Physical Geography Landforms Pacific Lowlands Guatemala to Panama Caribbean Lowlands Nicaragua and Honduras Central Highlands Mountains Volcanoes

More information

The Road to Change. From the Declaration of Independence to the Constitution

The Road to Change. From the Declaration of Independence to the Constitution The Road to Change From the Declaration of Independence to the Constitution From the Declaration of Independence to the Constitution 1776: Colonists sign the Declaration of Independence 1783: Colonists

More information

The American Colonies Declare Independence

The American Colonies Declare Independence The American Colonies Declare Independence Copy the notes in red. Write the notes in blue in your own words. The words in black are for your information. As taken from: mrkash.com/activities/independence.ppt

More information

BEFORE THE ROOSTER CROWS

BEFORE THE ROOSTER CROWS BOOK 3, PART I, LESSON 5 BEFORE THE ROOSTER CROWS THE BIBLE: Luke 22:54-62 THEME: We remember that Jesus taught about love and showed love in everything he did. During Lent and Easter we remember and celebrate

More information