COMPETITIVE SPEECH CURRICULUM AND

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1 COMPETITIVE SPEECH CURRICULUM Communication Content Standards AND Grade/Course Concept-Based Units Teacher Instructional Guidelines Teachers are expected to teach all Communication Content Standards identified for grades Teachers are also expected to teach the concept-based units. In those concept-based units, the unit topics and conceptual lenses, enduring understandings, critical content, and critical skills must be taught as written. The guiding questions, instructional activities, and performance assessments are suggestions for teacher use. Concept-Based Units Overview Competitive Speech Unit 1: Basic Communication Conceptual Lens: Fundamentals Unit 2: Interpretation Conceptual Lens: Competition Unit 3: Platform Speaking Events Conceptual Lens: Competition Unit 4: Limited Preparation Speaking Events Conceptual Lens: Competition 2007

2 Critical Content/Concept Web Unit Topic: Basic Communication Conceptual Lens: Fundamentals Course: High School Competitive Speech Research Construction Unit Overview Competitive speech events provide an excellent opportunity to practice a wide variety of techniques to increase skills and instill belief in an audience. The basic construction, presentation, and final analysis for each have common elements and thus can have a common set of fundamentals. Unit Topic and Conceptual Lens: Fundamentals of Basic Communication Analysis Self Peer Delivery *Idaho Achievement Standards, High School Communication indicated within the parenthesis. 1

3 Grade: High School Subject: Competitive Speech Unit: Basic Communication Lens: Fundamentals Enduring Understandings 1. Language and delivery affect the mood and tone of oral communication and impact the audience. (6.1.1) Guiding Questions a. What defines language as appropriate? b. How does tone determine attitude? c. What is communication? d. What makes up communication? e. How does the human factor play a part in communication? 2. Point and purpose of a speech must be apparent to keep others attention. (6.1.2) a. What are the six steps to building a successful speech? b. How do clear thinking principles link to logos? c. As a listener, why is critical listening important? 3. Clear thinking principles will aid the listener in recognizing truth and rejecting falsehoods. 4. Attitude and confidence affect delivery and presentation. (6.1.2) a. What techniques can the speaker use to ensure the good will of the audience? b. How can a speaker s honesty benefit him/her in the goal to influence the audience? a. How can the speaker train his or her voice for best effectiveness? b. How can the speaker overcome speech delivery nervousness? c. What are clarity, quality, and coherence? d. How should a presenter be assessed? 5. Interpersonal and intrapersonal are two primary methods of communication. 6. Small and large group communications involve using all skills that basic communications teach. a. What are the forms of intrapersonal communication? b. What are the forms of interpersonal communication? a. What is the difference between a small and large group? b. When could these two types of situations occur in the real world? c. How does conflict play a role in communication? 2

4 Grade: High School Subject: Competitive Speech Unit: Basic Communication Lens: Fundamentals AC = Assessment Code: Q Quizzes P - Prompts Critical Content and Skills O Observations WS Work Samples D Dialogues SA Student Self-Assessment T - Tests Students will know AC Students will be able to AC 1. Purposeful event preparation and practice will result in a balance of ethos, pathos, and logos. (6.2.4) (6.2.10) (6.2.5) 2. Confidence increases with purposeful oral speaking preparation and practice. 3. A requirement for successful presentation is adequate rehearsal of verbal and nonverbal elements. 4. With each successful speech presentation, the speaker gains more confidence for future presentations. 5. The speaker must give the audience a speech that they can relate to and apply in some way in their own lives. 6. The speaker can plan how to give careful consideration to clear, powerful organization of ideas and support for claims. 7. A speech can be supported through the use of appropriate facts, stories, quotations, definitions, and descriptions. 8. Limiting the subject in time, space, and scope can create a manageable topic. 9. Clarity, quality, effectiveness in presentation are key. (6.1.4) 10. The speaker, audience, and message are the three elements that must work together. (6.2.1) 1. Use eye contact correctly, depending on the specific event, to fully enhance ethos. 2. Assess the interests of the audience in order to adjust to what the audience or judge wants to hear. 3. Choose topics that follow the guidelines for selecting a subject. 4. Rehearse the speech so as to deliver it in the most appropriate style of delivery for that particular purpose. 5. Self assess own presentations and set improvement goals. 6. Assess effective speaking techniques in others. 7. Use appropriate gestures, expressions and focus, within the guidelines of the rules, to enhance the presentations. 8. Assess increased personal confidence as speech opportunities arise. 9. Present using appropriate nonverbal skills and properly placed gestures and movement. 10. Drafting and constructing of speeches for different venues. 3

5 Grade: High School Subject: Competitive Speech Unit: Basic Communication Lens: Fundamentals Instructional Plan/Activities (Correlations) 1. Prepare a sample outline for an assigned topic 1-3 6,7,10 3,10 2. Complete vocabulary based activities Present a sample speech on an assigned topic Present a sample speech on a student chosen topic Recreate Toulmin s model on own paper 2,3 10 2,7 6. Define the hierarchy of needs Create a grading criteria for standard speeches ,8 8. Complete a peer evaluation Complete a self evaluation Analyze the evaluations of others ,8 11. Gather examples of written speeches that show the characteristics of a strong ,6 speech 12. Complete a rehearsal log ,5 13. Complete a activity illustrating the difference between verbal and nonverbal communication 14. Identify listening skills 1-6 9,10 2,

6 Performance Assessment Subject: Competitive Speech Grade: High School Unit Topic: Basic Communication Conceptual Lens: Fundamentals PURPOSE: Show the ability to apply the basic concepts of creating, presenting, rehearsing, and critiquing. TARGET: The speaker must follow several specific steps in order to build a successful presentation. SCENARIO/TASKS: TASK 1: Write a speech to present in class following the assigned order of topic selection, creation, and research as outlined by the instructor. TASK 2: Complete a rehearsal process and evaluate yourself as you proceed through the process. TASK 3: Present the speech to the class and review the instructor/peer evaluations of the performance. *Instructor to fill out actual IHSAA ballot* TASK 4: Prepare a self-assessment. 5

7 SELF ANALYSIS Name: Event: Date: 1. Summarize preparation and rehearsals so far in your event. 2. What areas do you feel are particularly strong? Why? 3. In what areas are you setting improvement goals? Why? 4. What score/grade do you feel you have earned so far in this project? Why? PEER ANALYSIS Name: Event: Date: 1. Summarize the topic and general main points of the speech. 2. What areas do you feel are particularly strong? Why? 3. In what areas are improvement goals needed? Why? 4. What score/grade do you feel they have earned so far in this project? Why? 6

8 Performance Assessment: Task and Rubric Subject: Competitive Speech Grade: High School Unit Topic: Basic Communication Conceptual Lens: Fundamentals Task 1: Create the speech Rubric: Criteria Exemplary (5) Proficient (3) Developing (1) Non-Participation (0) Following Directions All items match the All items match the given Not all items match the No items to turn in descriptions given by descriptions given by the description given by Inappropriate topic instructor instructor instuctor No sources or citations Topic is appropriate for the class Topic is appropriate for the class Topic may not be appropriate for all Proper number of sources Lacking number of classroom situations provided and cited sources and/or citation required Little to no sources or citation Turned in on time All items turned in on time Items turned in on time Items turned in 1-2 class No items turned in or early periods late Organized/Neatness All items typed and placed in order of developement with a table of contents Most items typed and placed in order of development Items placed in order of development No items turned in Task 2: Rehearsal process Rubric: Criteria Exemplary (5) Proficient (3) Developing (1) Non-Participation (0) Log Filled out as instruced Filled out as instructed Not filled out as instructed No turned in Proper number of rehearsals documented Lacking no more than 2 rehearsals properly documented Lacking more than 2 rehearsals properly documented 7

9 Critical Content/Concept Web Unit Topic: Interpretation Conceptual Lens: Competition Grade: High School Competitive Speech Dramatic Unit Overview Interpretive events allow a bridge to be constructed from the performing arts to those of speech presentation: both contents being valid and widely entwined. Selection, cutting, analysis, rehearsal, and presentation are all elements of this category. Unit Topic and Conceptual Lens: Competition and Interpretation Duo Humorous *Idaho Achievement Standards, High School Communication indicated within the parenthesis. 8

10 Grade: High School Subject: Competitive Speech Unit: Interpretation Lens: Competition Enduring Understandings 1. A successful, award-winning performance in competition requires character analysis, memorization skills, and much practice and feedback. 2. Analysis of the occasion and the interests of the audience affect the success of a presentation. (6.2.4) Guided Questions a. Why is it helpful to use critiquing ballots similar to the tournament ballots when practicing? b. How do goals help to improve a performance? c. What type of goals should exist for interpretation events? d. What do you gain with each time you practice presenting the piece? a. Why might one piece work better than another? b. How does nonverbal communication apply to interpretation and audience buy-in? c. Does the opinion of the audience matter? 3. Using effective and interesting language set the scene. (6.2.5) a. Can an introduction make or break a performance? b. Do Standard English rules apply to interpretation events? c. Should the language of the piece and the language of the performers introduction match? 4. Narration can promote interest. (6.2.7) a. Does the order of presentation of the piece effect the success of the speech? Why? 5. Research helps solidify any presentation. a. How does history play a part in performance? b. Does the education of the audience affect the performance and how does that influence a performance? 9

11 Grade: High School Subject: Competitive Speech Unit: Interpretation Lens: Competition AC = Assessment Code: Q Quizzes P - Prompts Critical Content and Skills O Observations WS Work Samples D Dialogues SA Student Self-Assessment T - Tests Students will know AC Students will be able to AC 1. A careful analysis of characters and a thorough knowledge of the plot will aid the speaker in defining the characterizations. 2. IHSAA guidelines for all interpretation events. 3. People are affected in different ways by different times of pieces. 4. Choice in partners and in pieces can be equally influential. 5. Memorization creates a smoother presentation. 1. Cut a piece so as to retain the power, integrity and high point of the work. 2. Use appropriate gestures, expressions and focus, within the guidelines of the rules, to enhance the presentations. 3. Work effectively with a partner illustrating complimenting skills and abilities. 4. Self assess the quality of one s own piece, and assess quality in the work of peers so as to identify areas for improvements. 5. Present with no assistance and no verbal flaws. 6. Analyze the artistic effects of a media presentation and evaluate the techniques used to create them. (6.3.5) 10

12 Grade: High School Subject: Competitive Speech Unit: Interpretation Lens: Competition Instructional Plan/Activities (Correlations) 1. Cut a script to fit a specified time limit 2 2, Compete an author analysis ,6 3. Complete a scene analysis ,6 4. Cut a script to work as a reading for two people 2 2, Cut a poem to work as a performance piece 2 2, Cut a story to work as a performance piece 2 2, Compare/Contrast a humorous piece with a serious piece List characteristics of a strong interpretive performance ,4,5 9. Define the nonverbal skills needed for an interpretive piece ,4,5 10. Define the judging guideline for interpretation Critique a professional live performance Self-critique Review ballots/peer critique Perform for an outside of class audience Perform for a family/friend and have them complete a student provided critique Compare/contrast a multiple piece performance to a single scene performance Demonstrate the knowledge of the IHSAA event rules ,5 18. Impromptu reading 1 3,4 1,2,5 19. Reverse roles in duo Videotape review

13 Performance Assessment Subject: Competitive Speech Grade: High School Unit Topic: Interpretation Conceptual Lens: Competition PURPOSE: Illustrate the knowledge and skills necessary for presenting an interpretive piece of any of the possible categories. TARGET: TASK 1: Choose, cut, a performance piece and construct an appropriate introduction to accompany the piece while adhering to IHSAA guidelines. TASK 2: Complete a rehearsal process and evaluate yourself as you proceed through the process. TASK 3: Present the piece to the class and review the instructor/peer evaluations of the performance. *Instructor to fill out actual IHSAA ballot* TASK 4: Prepare a self-assessment. 12

14 SELF ANALYSIS Name: Event: Date: 5. Summarize preparation and rehearsals so far in your event. 6. What areas do you feel are particularly strong? Why? 7. In what areas are you setting improvement goals? Why? 8. What score/grade do you feel you have earned so far in this project? Why? PEER ANALYSIS Name: Event: Date: 5. Summarize the topic and general main points of the introduction of this presentation. 6. What areas do you feel are particularly strong? Why? 7. In what areas should improvement goals be set? Why? 8. What score/grade do you feel they have earned so far in this project? Why? 13

15 Performance Assessment: Task and Rubric Subject: Competitive Speech Grade: High School Unit Topic: Interpretation Conceptual Lens: Competition Task 1: Cut the speech and Prepare an Introduction Rubric: Criteria Exemplary (5) Proficient (3) Developing (1) Non-Participation (0) Following Directions All items match the All items match the given Not all items match the No items to turn in descriptions given by descriptions given by the description given by Inappropriate topic instructor instructor instuctor No sources or citations Topic is appropriate for the class Topic is appropriate for the class Topic may not be appropriate for all Source(s) provided and Lacking source and/or classroom situations cited citation required Little to no sources or citation Turned in on time All items turned in on time Items turned in on time Items turned in 1-2 class No items turned in or early periods late Organized/Neatness All items typed and placed in order of developement with a table of contents Most items typed and placed in order of development Items placed in order of development No items turned in Task 2: Rehearsal process Rubric: Criteria Exemplary (5) Proficient (3) Developing (1) Non-Participation (0) Log Filled out as instruced Filled out as instructed Not filled out as instructed No turned in Proper number of rehearsals documented Lacking no more than 2 rehearsals properly documented Lacking more than 2 rehearsals properly documented 14

16 Critical Content/Concept Web Unit Topic: Platform Speaking Events Conceptual Lens: Competition Course: Competitive Speech ORATORICAL ANALYSIS Unit Overview The focus of this unit is familiarizing students with the criteria crucial to prepare and deliver a platform speech for competition. By learning and implementing this process students will acquire the skills necessary to present a memorized speech during any formal occasion. EXPOSITORY SPEAKING ORATORY Unit Topic and Conceptual Lens: Platform Speaking Events: Competition AFTER-DINNER SPEAKING SALES Idaho offers five different platform events, but they all fit under two major categories: informative speaking (expository and afterdinner speaking) and persuasive speaking (oratory, oratorical analysis, sales, and afterdinner speaking). NOTE: The Idaho High School Activities Association governs the rules for competitive speech in the state of Idaho. These rules may be found at Within the units this organization will be referred to hereafter as the IHSAA. *Idaho Achievement Standards, High School Communication indicated within the parenthesis. 15

17 Grade: 9-12 Subject: Competitive Speech Unit: Platform Speaking Events Lens: Competition Enduring Understandings 1. Audience analysis proves essential to establish a motivational link (6.2.4). 2. Successful persuasion requires credible support (6.2.10). 3. An effective oration provides clear organization and coherent arguments (6.2.4, ). Guiding Questions a. What criteria guide the selection of an appropriate expository topic? b. What criteria guide the selection of an appropriate oratory topic? c. What criteria guide the selection of an appropriate historical oratory worth analyzing? d. What criteria guide the selection of an appropriate sales product? e. What criteria guide the selection of an appropriate after-dinner topic? a. What types of evidence may competitors employ to support expository and after-dinner speeches? b. What types of evidence build the strongest relevance with the audience for these types of speeches? a. How does a problems-causes-solutions format persuade the audience? b. How does the Toulmin model strengthen the arguments which competitors assert? c. How do ethos, pathos, and logos strengthen the persuasive nature of oratory, sales, and after-dinner speeches? 4. The use of props and other media sources enhance presentation (6.2.3). a. How do props and media strengthen expository and sales presentations? 5. Effective orations utilize rhetorical devices and features to make them memorable (6.2.6, 6.2.9). a. What rhetorical devices do historically significant speeches magnify which make them memorable? 16

18 Grade: 9-12 Subject: Competitive Speech Unit: Platform Speaking Events Lens: Competition AC = Assessment Code: Q Quizzes P - Prompts Critical Content and Skills O Observations WS Work Samples D Dialogues SA Student Self-Assessment T - Tests Students will know AC Students will be able to AC 1. IHSAA Rules guide the range of topics for specific 1. List the IHSAA rules pertaining to each of the platform speaking events. (6.2.4) platform speaking events. (6.2.4) 2. Audience demographics must be taken under consideration when choosing a platform topic. (6.2.4) 3. A speech can be supported through the use of appropriate facts, stories, quotations, definitions, and descriptions. (6.2.1, 6.2.3, 6.2.8, ) 4. A persuasive speech follows a problems-causessolutions outline. (6.2.10) 5. Use of the Toulmin model strengthens the assertions in one s speech. (6.2.2, ) 6. Incorporating elements of ethos, pathos and logos into one s speech can augment positive audience reception. (6.2.4, ) 7. All props should follow minimal guidelines in order to compliment a platform speech. (6.2.3) 8. An oratorical analysis critiques the rhetorical devices utilized in historically significant speeches. (6.2.6, 6.2.9) 2. Choose an appropriate speech topic for each of the platform speeches. (6.2.4) 3. Construct an appropriate speech in one or more of the platform competition events (expository, oratory, sales, or after-dinner). (6.2.2, 6.2.5, 6.2.6, 6.2.8, 6.2.9, ) 4. Research and incorporate a variety of appropriate evidence and arguments into a platform speech. (6.2.1, 6.2.2, 6.2.5) 5. Rehearse and deliver one or more platform events with appropriate verbal and nonverbal delivery components. (6.2.4) 6. Present appropriate visual or audio aids in IHSAA events which permit props. (6.2.3) 7. Provide questions regarding a speech s organization, content, and delivery. (6.1.2, 6.1.3) 8. Evaluate speeches (self and peers), with special consideration of organization, content, and delivery. (6.1.1, 6.1.4, 6.1.5) 17

19 Grade: 9-12 Subject: Competitive Speech Unit: Platform Speaking Events Lens: Competition Instructional Plan/Activities (Correlations) 1. After demonstrating a knowledge of the IHSAA platform event rules, choose an appropriate topic for the event and tournament audience. 2. Organize and construct an expository speech using a variety of support and arguments , 6, Organize and construct an oratory speech using a variety of support and arguments Organize and construct an oratorical analysis speech using a variety of support and arguments , Organize and construct an sales speech using a variety of support and arguments Organize and construct a after-dinner speech using a variety of support and arguments. 7. Following rehearsal of the speech, deliver it in a manner suitable for competition success. 8. Peer-evaluate platform speeches in a classroom setting before entering them into a tournament. Provide feedback to help students perfect their organization, content, and delivery. 9. Self assess your own presentations, considering the following: preparation, delivery, determination of something you like best, and making a goal for further improvement

20 Performance Assessment Subject: Competitive Speech Grade: 9-12 Unit Topic: Platform Speaking Events Conceptual Lens: Competition Purpose: Assess student learning to determine if learners can apply the targeted concept. Target: Effective platform events utilize rhetorical devices and features to make them memorable. Task: Prepare and present a competition-ready platform event at a tournament. 1. After demonstrating a knowledge of the IHSAA platform event rules, choose an appropriate topic for the event and tournament audience. Acquire topic approval before proceeding to research the topic. 2. Research a specific platform event (expository, oratory, sales, oratorical analysis, sales, or after-dinner speaking). Only collect and utilize credible sources within the speech. 3. Organize the speech in the proper format. Incorporate a variety of evidence from the acquired research. 4. Rehearse the speech until mastering verbal and nonverbal delivery. 5. Deliver the speech to peers in the classroom. 6. Critique oneself and classmates on techniques to improve organization, content, and delivery. This dialogue should continue throughout the competitive season with the inclusion of tournament ballots so that the speech continually improves. 7. Perform the prepared platform event in competition. At each tournament, incorporate new feedback to improve overall performance. 19

21 COMPETITION READINESS RUBRIC PLATFORM SPEAKING EVENTS CRITERIA COMPETITION READY! (9 10 POINTS) ORGANIZATION The speech incorporates an introduction with an attentiongetter, thesis and preview of points. The speech body includes main points appropriate to the type of platform event. Transitions clarify moves from one point to the next. The conclusion reviews the content of the speech and provides closure. CONTENT The research incorporates plenty of sources. A wide variety of evidence supports any claims made. The speech relies on credible sources. DELIVERY No assistance is given to deliver the speech. The speaker magnifies a professional demeanor through his or her verbal and nonverbal mannerisms. MOVING AHEAD! (6 8 POINTS) The speech provides a clear introduction, body and conclusion. Clear transitions follow each major point. Several sources are provided. The types of evidence to support claims varies little. Some sources are not credible research. Minimal use of note cards ensures smooth delivery of the speech. Proper variation in verbal and nonverbal elements is observable. PROGRESS LACKING! (1 5 POINTS) The speech is difficult to follow. Little or no preparation proves observable. Few or no sources are provided. Claims provide no support. A heavy reliance on notes proves necessary to deliver the speech. Displays nervous verbal and nonverbal mannerisms. 20

22 Critical Content/Concept Web Unit Topic: Conceptual Lens: Limited Preparation Speaking Events Competition Course: Competitive Speech IMPROMPTU SPEAKING EXTEMPORANEOUS SPEAKING Unit Topic and Conceptual Lens: Presentation at Limited Preparation Competition Events RETOLD STORY PANEL SPEAKING Unit Overview The focus of this unit is familiarizing students with the criteria crucial to prepare and deliver a limited preparation speech for competition. By learning and implementing the process students will acquire the skills necessary to present a speech on the spot. Idaho offers five different limited preparation events. Two of these resemble traditional platform events: impromptu and extemporaneous. The other three sit in categories of their own. Retold story involves delivering a children s story. Radio speaking resembles a segment aired from a radio station. Panel involves group problem solving to address an issue. NOTE: The specific rules for these events which are subject to change may be found at the IHSAA s website: RADIO SPEAKING *Idaho Achievement Standards, High School Communication indicated within the parenthesis. 21

23 Grade: 9-12 Subject: Competitive Speech Unit: Limited Preparation Speaking Events Lens: Competition Enduring Understandings 1. Audience analysis proves essential to establish a motivational link (6.2.4). Guiding Questions a. What criteria guide the selection of appropriate content for an impromptu or extemporaneous speech? b. What criteria guide the selection of appropriate content for a radio speech? c. What criteria guide the selection of appropriate content for a retold speech? d. What criteria guide the selection of appropriate content for a panel speech? 2. Successful persuasion requires credible support (6.2.10). 3. Speaking with limited preparation requires the orator to rely on personal experience (6.2.10). 4. An effective oration provides clear organization and coherent arguments (6.2.4, ). a. How are a notebook or evidence files useful to increase awareness of the world around us and in analyzing current events? a. How might a log of personal information increase understanding while analyzing current events? a. What tips should the speaker use to make the most of preparation time during the competition rounds? b. How does the Toulmin model strengthen the arguments which competitors assert? c. How do ethos, pathos, and logos strengthen the persuasive nature of impromptu, extemporaneous, radio, panel, and retold speaking? 22

24 Grade: 9-12 Subject: Competitive Speech Unit: Limited Preparation Speaking Events Lens: Competition AC = Assessment Code: Q Quizzes P - Prompts Critical Content and Skills O Observations WS Work Samples D Dialogues SA Student Self-Assessment T - Tests Students will know AC Students will be able to AC 1. IHSAA Rules guide the range of topics for specific limited preparation speaking events (6.2.4). 2. Audience demographics must be taken under consideration when choosing topics or content for limited preparation events (6.2.4). 1. Construct a log, notebook, or evidence files which outlines possible content to use in an impromptu, extemporaneous, or panel speech (6.2.4) 2. Construct a commercial enduring seconds to incorporate into a radio speech (6.2.10). 3. A speech can be supported through the use of appropriate facts, stories, quotations, definitions, and descriptions (6.2.1, 6.2.3, 6.2.8, ). 4. A persuasive speech uses a topical format or problems-causes-solutions order. 5. Use of the Toulmin model strengthens the assertions in one s speech. (6.2.2, ) 6. Incorporating elements of ethos, pathos and logos into one s speech can augment positive audience reception. (6.2.4, ) 3. Outline an impromptu, extemporaneous, radio, or retold story within the IHSAA time limits. 4. Outline three evidence sources to support three different claims in an impromptu or extemporaneous speech (6.2.2, ). 5. Brainstorm ways to augment ethos, pathos and logos in each of the five limited preparation events (6.2.4, ). 6. Rehearse and deliver one of the outlines for a limited preparation event with appropriate verbal and nonverbal delivery components (6.2.4). 7. Evaluate (self and others ) speeches, with special consideration of organization, content, and delivery (6.1.1, 6.1.4, 6.1.5). 23

25 Grade: 9-12 Subject: Competitive Speech Unit: Limited Preparation Speaking Events Lens: Competition Instructional Plan/Activities (Correlations) 1. Construct a log or notebook which outlines information gathered from media sources regarding significant current events Construct a commercial enduring seconds to incorporate into a radio speech Outline an impromptu, extemporaneous, radio, or retold speech within the IHSAA time limits. For the radio, include news, a commercial, and an editorial commentary. 4. Incorporate evidence sources to support claims while delivering limited preparation events which permit such. 5. Maintain a log of brainstormed ideas and observations on ways to augment one s ethos, pathos, and logos in the respective event(s) which one participates. 6. Following rehearsal of a limited preparation event, deliver it in a manner suitable for competition success. 7. Peer evaluate platform speeches in a classroom setting before entering them at a tournament. Provide feedback to help students perfect their organization, content, and delivery. 8. Self assess your own presentations, with consideration for areas to improve in organization, content and delivery , , ,

26 Performance Assessment Subject: Competitive Speech Grade: 9-12 Unit Topic: Platform Speaking Events Conceptual Lens: Competition Purpose: Assess student learning to determine if learners can apply the targeted concept. Target: Platform competition events emphasize the careful preparation and rehearsal of informative and persuasive speeches reflecting successful real-life presentations. Task: Prepare and present a competition-ready limited preparation event at a tournament. 1. After demonstrating a knowledge of the IHSAA platform event rules, construct a log, notebook, or evidence files which provide content for the appropriate speech. 2. Incorporate the evidence in practice speeches, which utilize the proper organization for the chosen event. 3. Rehearse a number of practice speeches until mastering verbal and nonverbal delivery. 4. Deliver the limited preparation event to peers in the classroom. 5. Critique oneself and classmates on techniques to improve organization, content, and delivery. This dialogue should continue throughout the competitive season with the inclusion of tournament ballots so that the delivery continually improves. 6. Perform the prepared platform event in competition. At each tournament, incorporate new feedback to improve overall performance. 25

27 COMPETITION READINESS RUBRIC PLATFORM SPEAKING EVENTS CRITERIA COMPETITION READY! (9 10 POINTS) ORGANIZATION The speech incorporates an introduction (or an opener or theme) with an attentiongetter, thesis and preview of points. The speech body includes main points (or content) appropriate to the type of platform event. Transitions clarify moves from one point/idea to the next. The conclusion/closure (if necessary) reviews the content of the speech and provides closure. CONTENT The research/evidence incorporates plenty of sources. A wide variety of evidence supports any claims made. The speech (when necessary) relies on credible sources. DELIVERY No assistance is given to deliver the speech. The speaker magnifies a professional demeanor through his or her verbal and nonverbal mannerisms. MOVING AHEAD! (6 8 POINTS) The speech provides a clear introduction, body and conclusion. Clear transitions follow each major point. Several sources are provided. The types of evidence to support claims varies little. Some sources are not credible research. Minimal use of note cards ensures smooth delivery of the speech. Proper variation in verbal and nonverbal elements is observable. PROGRESS LACKING! (1 5 POINTS) The speech is difficult to follow. Few or no sources (or types of evidence) are provided. Claims provide no support. A heavy reliance on notes proves necessary to deliver the speech. Displays nervous verbal and nonverbal mannerisms. 26

28 IDAHO CONTENT STANDARDS GRADE 9-12 SPEECH Students are expected to know content and apply skills from previous grades. Standard 1: Reading Process No goals or objectives in Speech. Standard 2: Comprehension/Interpretation No goals or objectives in Speech. Standard 3: Writing Process No goals or objectives in Speech. Standard 4: Writing Applications No goals or objectives in Speech. Standard 5: Writing Components No goals or objectives in Speech. Standard 6: Communication Students apply their knowledge of communication to determine the intent and effectiveness of a message delivered by a speaker or the media. Students deliver focused and coherent presentations of their own that convey clear and distinct perspectives and solid reasoning. Students deliver polished presentations that combine the traditional speech strategies of narration, exposition, and persuasion. Students use gestures, tone, and vocabulary appropriate to their audience and purpose. Goal 6.1: Acquire Listening Skills Objective(s): By the end of High School, the student will be able to: 9-12.Spch Assess how language and delivery affect the mood and tone of oral communication and make an impact on the audience. ( a; a) 9-12.Spch Summarize a speaker s purpose and point of view and ask questions concerning the speaker s content, delivery, and attitude toward the subject. ( b; a) 9-12.Spch Draw conclusions about the ideas under discussion and support those conclusions with convincing evidence. ( a) 9-12.Spch Evaluate the clarity, quality, effectiveness, and general coherence of a speaker s important points, arguments, evidence, organization of ideas, delivery, choice of words, and use of language. ( a) 9-12.Spch Analyze the types of arguments used by a speaker (e.g., argument by causation, analogy, authority, emotion, and logic). ( a) Idaho Content Standards/Grade 9-12/Speech/ Page 1

29 Goal 6.2: Acquire Speaking Skills Objective(s): By the end of High School, the student will be able to: 9-12.Spch Choose appropriate techniques for developing the introduction and conclusion in a speech, including the use of literary quotations, anecdotes, and references to authoritative sources. ( b) 9-12.Spch Identify and use elements of classical speech forms (e.g., the introduction, transitions, body, conclusion) in formulating rational arguments and applying the art of persuasion and debate. ( b) 9-12.Spch Use props, visual aids, graphs, and electronic media to enhance the appeal and accuracy of presentations. ( b) 9-12.Spch Analyze the occasion and the interests of the audience and choose effective verbal and nonverbal techniques (e.g., voice, gestures, eye contact) for presentations. ( c) 9-12.Spch Use effective and interesting language, including formal expressions for effect, standard English for clarity, and technical language for specificity. ( a) 9-12.Spch Analyze historically significant speeches to find the rhetorical devices and features that make them memorable Spch Deliver narrative presentations that narrate a sequence of events and communicate their significance to the audience. ( b; c) 9-12.Spch Deliver expository presentations that provide evidence in support of a thesis. Include related claims and include information on all relevant perspectives. ( b; c) 9-12.Spch Deliver oral responses to literature that advance a judgment and/or demonstrate a comprehensive understanding of the significant ideas of a work or passage. Support important ideas and viewpoints through accurate and detailed references to the text and to other works. ( a) 9-12.Spch Deliver persuasive arguments (e.g., evaluation and analysis of problems and solutions, causes and effects) that structure ideas and arguments in a coherent, logical fashion. ( a; b; c) 9-12.Spch Deliver multimedia presentations that incorporate information from a wide range of media. ( b) Goal 6.3: Acquire Viewing Skills Objective(s): By the end of High School, the student will be able to: 9-12.Spch Analyze strategies used by the media to inform, persuade, entertain, and transmit culture (e.g., advertising; stereotyping; visual representations, special effects, language). ( b; a; a) 9-12.Spch Analyze the impact of the media on the democratic process (e.g., exerting influence on elections, creating images of leaders, shaping attitudes) at the local, state, and national levels. ( a) 9-12.Spch Analyze the techniques used in media messages for a particular audience and evaluate their effectiveness. ( a) 9-12.Spch Compare and contrast the ways in which media genres (e.g., televised news, news magazines and documentaries, and online information) cover the same event. ( a) 9-12.Spch Identify the aesthetic appeal of a media presentation and evaluate the techniques used to create the effects. ( a) Idaho Content Standards/Grade 9-12/Speech/ Page 2

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