II. INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS A. Required Textbook: As noted in CTC Instructional Materials website,

Save this PDF as:
 WORD  PNG  TXT  JPG

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "II. INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS A. Required Textbook: As noted in CTC Instructional Materials website, http://www.ctcd.edu/im/im_main."

Transcription

1 CENTRAL TEXAS COLLEGE SYLLABUS FOR ENVR 1401 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE Fall II Term (Oct Dec 2014) Semester Hours Credit: 4 Instructor: David P. Jones Course Hours: T/Th 5:15-7:45 Location: Rm 231, Bldg 215 Fort Riley Campus Office hours: 5:00-7:30, by appt TEL: (785) Cell: (785) I. INTRODUCTION A. Environmental science is an interdisciplinary study that draws from the physical, biological, and social sciences. It attempts to understand how life on Earth is sustained, what leads to environmental problems, and how to manage these problems. B. Prerequisite: basic math skills II. INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS A. Required Textbook: As noted in CTC Instructional Materials website, III. COURSE PARTICIPATION A. Class Participation: Students are expected to attend lecture during their scheduled time. Leaving class early will be counted as an absence, unless it has already been excused. See section VII below for information on consequences of insufficient attendance. Although excessive absences and tardies negatively affect performance and should be avoided, participation, not regular attendance, is the key to academic success. Such active involvement facilitates learning and long-term memory and is part of an efficient, effective study strategy. You may be able to attend a later lecture if your absence is excused. Otherwise, you should get the notes from another student. B. Laboratory Participation in lab is required. There may be an occasional outdoor lab exercise or field trip. Reading and discussion of articles or videos will also constitute a Laboratory exercise; participation in discussion is required. You may earn up to 50 points in laboratory activities. C. You may also earn 0 to 50 participation points depending on instructor s observations made throughout the semester of class attendance, contribution to lecture discussions, involvement in lab exercises, interactions with classmates, civility, overall attitude, etc.

2 IV. COURSE WORK Course work will be based primarily on the text plus magazine articles. Videos pertaining to each chapter will be shown will discussion time. Laboratories will be based on field trips and assigned readings/discussion. Class participation will be critical to your grade. V. SEMESTER GRADE COMPUTATIONS Letter grades are determined solely by the total number of points earned in the course. There will be quizzes or articles to read for a total of 150 or more points to be earned throughout the term. An additional 50 points will be given for class participation. A means superior (90%+), b (80% - 89%), (C (70% - 79%) D means passing (60% - 69%). You are expected to keep track of your grades as you receive them record them in the chart on the left below. Later in the semester you can calculate points earned by multiplying your percent grade by the point value (e.g. 80% of 150 points is 120 points). VI. NOTES AND ADDITIONAL INSTRUCTIONS FROM THE INSTRUCTOR A. Course Withdrawal: It is the student s responsibility to officially withdraw from a course if circumstances prevent attendance. To do so, complete and sign the Central Texas College Application for Withdrawal (CTC Form 59) any time prior to Friday the 12th week of classes during the 16-week fall and spring semesters. The deadline for withdrawal is published each semester in the Schedule Bulletin. A student may not withdraw from a class for which the instructor has previously issued the student a grade of F or FN for nonattendance. B. Administrative Withdrawal: An administrative withdrawal may be initiated when the student fails to meet College attendance requirements. An instructor may withdraw a student from a course if the student has more than 4 absences. For example, I may withdraw you from this course if you miss 2 lectures and 2 labs. Such insufficient attendance may result in a grade of FN if the deadline for withdrawal has passed. C. Incomplete Grade: If a student has made satisfactory progress in a course with the exception of a major quiz, final exam, or other project, the instructor may after reviewing documentation showing the reason for missed work grant a temporary grade of incomplete, IP. See current college catalog for more information. D. American s With Disabilities Act (ADA): Students requiring accommodations for disabilities are responsible for notifying the instructor. Reasonable accommodations will be granted in compliance with federal and state law and Central Texas College policy.

3 E. Civility: Individuals are expected to be cognizant of what a constructive educational experience is and be respectful of those participating in a learning environment. Examples of uncivil conduct in class include, but are not limited to: eating or drinking; talking; using inappropriate language; use of electronic media for communication or entertainment; tardiness, leaving class early. Note that all of these activities distract other students and disrupt their learning experience. The offending student may or may not be given a warning before a CTC Counseling and Disciplinary Referral Form is filed and may receive disciplinary action up to and including expulsion. See Student Handbook for more information. F. Cheating: It will not be tolerated and may result in a grade of zero for that assignment. You may not leave the room until your exam is turned in. The instructor will judge whether copying has occurred and determine the proper consequence. A formal charge against the student may be made to the College Disciplinary Board. G. Instructor Discretion: The instructor reserves the right of final decision in course requirements. H. Courtesy: Students are expected to discuss any course-related issue or problem with their instructor first. If the problem has not been resolved at that level, students may contact the Head of the Science Department. VII. LEARNING OUTCOMES Upon successful completion of this course, the student will: A. Understand scientific principles pertinent to environmental science. B. Understand ecology and evolution. C. Identify natural resources and ecological services. D. Identify root causes of environmental problems. E. Acquire knowledge of environmental processes and how human systems can affect them. F. Use scientific knowledge and critical thinking skills to understand and assess environmental problems. G. Elaborate on environmental issues related to population growth, land and water use, fishing and agriculture, biodiversity, air and water pollution, environmental health and toxicology, energy, and waste management. H. Define environmental sustainability and the precautionary principle. I. Work independently and cooperatively in a laboratory setting.

4 J. Develop questioning, investigating, and analyzing skills. K. Apply the scientific method. L. Convey information in a scientific, coherent and concise manner. VIII. COURSE OUTLINE A. CHAPTER ONE: INTRODUCTION TO ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE a) Define environmental science. b) Identify natural resources; distinguish among perpetually renewable, potentially renewable and nonrenewable resources. c) Describe the tragedy of the commons and identify ways to avoid it. d) Define ecological footprint and explain how and why it differs between developing and developed countries. e) Define sustainability and sustainable development. f) Describe the scientific process: the scientific method and peer review. g) Distinguish between hypothesis and theory. B. CHAPTER TWO: ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS: MATTER, ENERGY AND ECOSYSTEMS a) Define matter and describe the hierarchical organization of the natural world. b) Distinguish between ions and isotopes. c) Be able to use periodic table so: if given atom of some element (e.g.na), determine number protons or electrons; if given isotope of some element (e.g.u- 235), determine number of neutrons; if given ion (e.g.na +1), determine number of protons or electrons. d) Distinguish between acids and bases and describe the ph scale. e) Describe the law of conservation of matter. f) Define energy and differentiate between kinetic and potential energy. g) Describe the first and second laws of thermodynamics. h) Describe the feeding relationships between producers, consumers, and decomposers. i) Recognize the chemical reactions for cellular respiration and photosynthesis. j) Distinguish between gross and net primary productivity; identify factors that affect primary productivity. k) Identify terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems with high and low net primary productivity. l) Describe the flow of matter and energy through ecosystems. m) Summarize the water, carbon, and nitrogen cycles and how human activities affect them. C. CHAPTER THREE: EVOLUTION, BIODIVERSITY, AND POPULATION ECOLOGY

5 a) Define evolution; Distinguish between microevolution and macroevolution and give examples of each. b) Define adaptation; Describe natural selection and list the three conditions that must be met for it to work. c) Distinguish between natural selection and artificial selection. d) Discuss speciation, extinction, and adaptive radiation. e) Define ecology; describe the five levels of organization within the realm of ecology. f) Distinguish between species and population. g) Define ecological niche; Distinguish between generalist and specialist species. h) Identify characteristics of population: size, density, age distribution, and dispersion pattern. i) Describe how births, deaths, immigration and emigration determine changes in population size. j) Predict a population s growth rate (slow, rapid, zero, negative) if given the age distribution of the current population. k) Compare and contrast exponential and logistic population growth. l) Define carrying capacity; describe effects of an overshoot or dieback. m) Distinguish between density-dependent and density-independent controls on population growth. n) List characteristics of r-selected and K-selected species, relate to biotic potential, and provide examples of each. D. CHAPTER FOUR: SPECIES INTERACTIONS AND COMMUNITY ECOLOGY a) Describe trophic levels of a food chain. Describe a food web. b) Explain why food chains have a limited number of trophic levels. c) Define keystone species. d) Describe the following interspecific interactions and recognize examples of each: competition, mutualism, commensalism, predation, parasitism, and herbivory. e) Describe competitive exclusion and resource partitioning. f) Define coevolution; identify the interspecific interactions that may result in an evolutionary arms race. g) Describe ecological succession; compare and contrast primary and secondary succession; describe how humans can influence succession. E. CHAPTER FIVE: ENVIRONMENTAL ECONOMICS AND ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY a) Describe ecosystem services. b) Identify causes of environmental problems. c) Describe the role of science in public policy. F. CHAPTER SIX: HUMAN POPULATION

6 a) Describe human global population growth b) Describe the effect the agricultural and industrial revolutions had on human population growth and carrying capacity. c) Explain the IPAT model. d) Discuss the cultural carrying capacity for the global human population. e) Distinguish between developed and developing countries in terms of age distribution, total fertility rate, birth rate, death rate, population growth rate and population size. f) Explain what has contributed to most of the world s population growth during the 20th century. g) Distinguish between replacement-level and total fertility rate. h) Describe recent and projected human population trends and describe population momentum. i) Identify factors that affect fertility rate. j) Describe the demographic transition model and characterize its four stages. k) Explain why the population problem does not only exist for developing countries. G. CHAPTER SEVEN: SOIL AND AGRICULTURE a) Describe the Agricultural Revolution. b) Distinguish between traditional and industrialized agriculture. c) Describe ways in which food production has increased during the 20th century and describe their environmental impacts. d) Describe the 3 food systems of food production - croplands, rangelands, and fisheries. e) Describe soil and the different layers found in a profile of mature soil. f) Discuss the problem of soil degradation, its causes and effects. g) Define desertification and identify its causes. h) Describe methods of soil conservation. i) Describe integrated pest management. k) Provide advantages and disadvantages of aquaculture. l) Identify the main cause of hunger and malnutrition. m) Identify challenges to future food production and describe sustainable agriculture. H. CHAPTER EIGHT: BIODIVERSITY AND CONSERVATION BIOLOGY a) Define biodiversity; describe earth s current biodiversity. b) Describe the value of biodiversity. c) Distinguish between extinction and extirpation. d) Distinguish between background extinction and mass extinction. e) Describe the current extinction rate. f) Identify and discuss the main threats to species diversity. g) Distinguish between intrinsic and instrumental value of biodiversity.

7 h) Describe ecotourism and community-based conservation. i) List the 2 criteria for the hotspot designation for an area of land. j) List characteristics that make species prone to extinction. k) Distinguish between endangered and threatened species. l) Discuss approaches to protect species, e.g. CITES and ESA. m) Describe the role of captive breeding in conservation. I. CHAPTER NINE: FORESTS, FOREST MANAGEMENT AND PROTECTED AREAS a) Identify economical and ecological services of forests. b) Describe 2 approaches to resource management: maximum sustainable yield and ecosystem-based management. c) Distinguish among tree farms, primary and secondary forests. d) Describe methods of harvesting timber and sustainable forestry. e) Identify causes and effects of deforestation. f) Distinguish between surface fires and crown fires; describe prescribed burning. g) Identify different types of public land in the US. h) Describe the purpose and organization of a biosphere reserve. i) Describe the purpose of habitat corridors. J. CHAPTER TWELVE: AQUATIC ECOSYTEMS: RESOURCE USE AND CONSERVATION a) Describe Earth s water supply: percentage of fresh and salt water, ground and surface liquid water. b) Define watershed (drainage basin), water table, and aquifer. c) Describe wetlands and the ecological services they provide. d) Identify threats to wetlands and define mitigation banking. e) Describe ecological restoration and use the example of the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan. f) Recognize ways we contribute to flooding and ways we can minimize the risks of flooding. g) Identify causes of water shortage. h) Describe water use; distinguish between consumptive and nonconsumptive use of water. i) Describe ways to obtain more water and identify advantages, disadvantages of each. j) Describe productive marine and coastal ecosystems and discuss human activities that affect them. k) Identify sources of marine pollution. l) Describe (cultural) eutrophication. m) Describe the extent of overfishing and its major causes. n) Describe evidence of overfishing. o) Describe effects of overfishing.

8 p) Describe ways to manage fisheries: exclusive economic zones, maximum sustainable yield and individual fishing quotas; also describe the purpose and effectiveness marine protected areas and marine reserves CLASS CHOICE K. CHAPTER TEN: ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH AND TOXICOLOGY a) Characterize the 4 types of environmental hazards. b) Identify leading causes of death. c) Describe the epidemiological transition. d) Explain why infectious diseases remain a challenge. e) Discuss 4 ways in which chemical hazards are assessed. f) Differentiate between chronic and acute exposure to pollutants. g) Identify factors affecting toxicity. h) Describe biomagnification and its implications. i) Characterize persistent organic pollutants. j) Identify the different types of toxins and their effects. k) Compare risk analysis and risk perception. L. CHAPTER ELEVEN: GEOLOGY, MINERALS AND MINING a) Describe Earth s internal structure and explain how plate tectonics shapes its surface b) Identify how the categories of rocks and the rock cycle shape the landscape around us and the earth beneath our feet c) List major types of geologic hazards and describe ways to reduce their impacts d) Outline types of mineral resources and how they contribute to our products and society e) Describe the major methods of mining f) Characterize the environmental and social impacts of mining g) Assess reclamation efforts and mining policy h) Evaluate ways to encourage sustainable use of mineral resources O. CHAPTER THIRTEEN: ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE AND AIR POLLUTION a) Define pollution. b) Describe the troposphere and stratosphere. c) Distinguish between natural and anthropogenic sources of air pollution, primary and secondary pollutants, and point and non-point sources. d) Distinguish between industrial and photochemical smog. e) Describe the effect of temperature inversion and the global distillation effect.

9 f) Identify the 6 criteria pollutants for which national ambient air quality standards are set by the EPA. g) Discuss the purpose and effectiveness of the Clean Air Acts. h) Describe ways to reduce air pollution. i) Define acid deposition and describe its effects on ecosystems. j) Compare outdoor air pollution in developed and developing countries. k) Compare indoor air pollution in developed and developing countries. l) Describe the causes and effects of ozone depletion, and identify methods of mitigation and adaptation. P. CHAPTER FOURTEEN: GLOBAL CLIMATE CHANGE a) Explain how the terms global climate change and global warming are different but related. b) Describe past and present trends in climate change. c) Identify factors affecting global climate. d) Identify the concern over current global warming. e) Describe the natural greenhouse effect and the enhanced greenhouse effect. f) Identify specific human activities that have contributed to the increase of specific greenhouse gases. g) Summarize findings of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. h) Describe how global climate change is affecting natural ecosystems and human societies. i) Distinguish between mitigation and adaptation as responses to global climate change and provide examples of each. Q. CHAPTER FIFTEEN: NONRENEWABLE ENERGY SOURCES a) Describe today s sources of commercial energy in the U.S. and worldwide. b) Describe the composition and formation of fossil fuels. c) Define reserves and EROI. d) Identify main uses of coal, oil, natural gas, nuclear power; describe environmental impacts of each. e) Describe what is meant by clean coal technology. f) Compare U.S. oil consumption and supply. g) Describe the energy crisis. h) Describe oil shales and oil sands, and describe their environmental impacts. i) Summarize the debate over drilling for oil in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. j) Discuss energy efficiency and energy conservation. R. CHAPTER SIXTEEN: RENEWABLE ENERGY ALTERNATIVES a) Describe main categories of renewable sources of energy: direct solar, indirect solar, geothermal, and hydrogen. b) Describe the current and projected use of renewable energy alternatives.

10 c) Discuss specific renewable energy sources: their uses, advantages and disadvantages.

Amherst County Public Schools. AP Environmental Science Curriculum Pacing Guide. College Board AP Environmental Science Site

Amherst County Public Schools. AP Environmental Science Curriculum Pacing Guide. College Board AP Environmental Science Site Amherst County Public Schools AP Environmental Science Curriculum Pacing Guide College Board AP Environmental Science Site REV: 8/12 1 st 9 weeks AP Objectives Energy Resources and Consumption A. Energy

More information

STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY CANTON, NEW YORK COURSE OUTLINE ESCI 101 - INTRODUCTION TO ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY CANTON, NEW YORK COURSE OUTLINE ESCI 101 - INTRODUCTION TO ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY CANTON, NEW YORK COURSE OUTLINE ESCI 101 - INTRODUCTION TO ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE Prepared By: Rajiv Narula, Ph.D. SCHOOL OF SCIENCE, HEALTH, AND CRIMINAL

More information

2015 2016 Environmental Science Scope & Sequence

2015 2016 Environmental Science Scope & Sequence 2015 2016 Environmental Science Scope & Sequence The suggested time frames in this document are for a year long environmental science class with approximately 45 minute class periods. All of the material

More information

SALEM COMMUNITY COLLEGE Course Syllabus. Course Title: Environmental Science I. Course Code: BIO103. Lecture Hours: 2 Laboratory Hours: 4 Credits: 4

SALEM COMMUNITY COLLEGE Course Syllabus. Course Title: Environmental Science I. Course Code: BIO103. Lecture Hours: 2 Laboratory Hours: 4 Credits: 4 SALEM COMMUNITY COLLEGE Course Syllabus Course Title: Environmental Science I Course Code: BIO103 Lecture Hours: 2 Laboratory Hours: 4 Credits: 4 Course Description: Environmental Science I is the first

More information

AP Environmental Science Syllabus

AP Environmental Science Syllabus Course Overview The following AP Environmental Science Syllabus will comply with all of the requirements and specifications provided by College Board aimed at preparing students for the AP exam given in

More information

RUTHERFORD HIGH SCHOOL Rutherford, New Jersey COURSE OUTLINE ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

RUTHERFORD HIGH SCHOOL Rutherford, New Jersey COURSE OUTLINE ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE RUTHERFORD HIGH SCHOOL Rutherford, New Jersey COURSE OUTLINE ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE I. INTRODUCTION Environmental Science introduces students to a broad view of the biosphere and the physical parameters

More information

understand the interrelationships of the natural world and draws upon various scientific disciplines.

understand the interrelationships of the natural world and draws upon various scientific disciplines. AP Environmental Science: Sample Syllabus 3 Syllabus 886981v1 Scoring Components Page(s) SC1 The course in Earth Systems. 3 SC2 The course in Earth Resources. 3 SC3 The course in the Living World. 2 SC4

More information

Environmental Science Curriculum Dual Credit with Morrisville

Environmental Science Curriculum Dual Credit with Morrisville Environmental Science Curriculum Dual Credit with Morrisville 1. Introduction to Environmental Science (5 days) Describe the three categories into which most environmental problems fall Explain how the

More information

Environmental Science

Environmental Science Environmental Science UNIT I: Introduction to Environmental Science The student will demonstrate the ability to use scientific skills necessary to identify and analyze environmental issues. a. Define environmental

More information

CE 110 Introduction to Environmental Engineering (3)

CE 110 Introduction to Environmental Engineering (3) Lecture Class Monday and Wednesday 3:30-4:45 pm KAP 163 Discussion Class Monday 5:00-5:50 pm KAP 163 Professor Office KAP 260 Phone 213-740-0592 Email Office Hours Class Webpage Teaching Assistant Office

More information

Syllabus Example - CCU

Syllabus Example - CCU Colorado Christian University Science Department Semester/Year Class Syllabus Course Title: Course Number: Instructor: Environmental Science BIO-103 Dr. Bob Smith, Ph.D. Office location: Leprino 110 Office

More information

MADISON PUBLIC SCHOOLS ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

MADISON PUBLIC SCHOOLS ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE MADISON PUBLIC SCHOOLS ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE Authored by: Sue Monkemeier Reviewed by: Mr. Lee S. Nittel Director of Curriculum and Instruction Mr. Tom Paterson K12 Supervisor of Science and Technology

More information

AP Environmental Science Course Policies and Requirements 2012 2013

AP Environmental Science Course Policies and Requirements 2012 2013 AP Environmental Science Course Policies and Requirements 2012 2013 Mr. R.B. Conlan Office: 928 Classroom: 928 Email: Robert_Conlan@greenwich.k12.ct.us This course is designed to prepare students for the

More information

Ecology Module B, Anchor 4

Ecology Module B, Anchor 4 Ecology Module B, Anchor 4 Key Concepts: - The biological influences on organisms are called biotic factors. The physical components of an ecosystem are called abiotic factors. - Primary producers are

More information

Environmental Science : Embedded Inquiry

Environmental Science : Embedded Inquiry Environmental Science : Embedded Inquiry Conceptual Strand Understandings about scientific inquiry and the ability to conduct inquiry are essential for living in the 21 st century. Guiding Question What

More information

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE CURRICULUM for CLASS IX to X

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE CURRICULUM for CLASS IX to X ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE CURRICULUM for CLASS IX to X The Royal Society for Protection of Nature (RSPN) in collaboration with Department of Curriculum Research & Development (DCRD) of Ministry of Education

More information

AP Biology Unit I: Ecological Interactions

AP Biology Unit I: Ecological Interactions AP Biology Unit I: Ecological Interactions Essential knowledge 1.C.1: Speciation and extinction have occurred throughout the Earth s history. Species extinction rates are rapid at times of ecological stress.

More information

Bangkok Christian College EIP Matayom Course Description Semester One 2011-2012

Bangkok Christian College EIP Matayom Course Description Semester One 2011-2012 Bangkok Christian College EIP Matayom Course Description Semester One 2011-2012 Subject: General Science Grade: Matayom 6 Course Description This semester the General Science course will continue covering

More information

A Correlation of Environmental Science Your World, Your Turn 2011

A Correlation of Environmental Science Your World, Your Turn 2011 A Correlation of Your World, Your Turn 2011 To Ohio s New Learning Standards for Science, 2011, High School Science Inquiry and Application Course Content INTRODUCTION This document demonstrates how Pearson,

More information

understand the interrelationships of the natural world and draws upon various scientific disciplines.

understand the interrelationships of the natural world and draws upon various scientific disciplines. AP Environmental Science: Sample Syllabus 2 Syllabus 886977v1 Scoring Components Page(s) SC1 The course in Earth Systems. 6 SC2 The course in Earth Resources. 8 SC3 The course in the Living World. 2 SC4

More information

Bio EOC Topics for Ecology, Evolution and Natural Selection:

Bio EOC Topics for Ecology, Evolution and Natural Selection: Bio EOC Topics for Ecology, Evolution and Natural Selection: UEvolutionU Difference between macroevolution and microevolution Sexual reproduction and natural selection are mechanisms of microevolution

More information

Commensalism is a symbiotic relationship in which one organism benefits and the other organism is not affected.. What they might ask:

Commensalism is a symbiotic relationship in which one organism benefits and the other organism is not affected.. What they might ask: B-6.1 Explain how the interrelationships among organisms (including predation, competition, parasitism, mutualism, and commensalism) generate stability within ecosystems. ecosystem - biotic community (all

More information

Central High School DC Angelo State University Biology 2406 Environmental Science Fall 2015/Spring 2016

Central High School DC Angelo State University Biology 2406 Environmental Science Fall 2015/Spring 2016 Central High School DC Angelo State University Biology 2406 Environmental Science Fall 2015/Spring 2016 Instructor: Shamone Minzenmayer Office Location: Central High School, Tucker 117 Office phone: 325-659-3434

More information

CHAPTER 3. A is a certain number of individuals that make up an interbreeding, reproducing group within a given area.

CHAPTER 3. A is a certain number of individuals that make up an interbreeding, reproducing group within a given area. Review Question-1 Answer CHAPTER 3 Basic Needs of Living Things A is a certain number of individuals that make up an interbreeding, reproducing group within a given area. a. species b. population c. organism

More information

CENTRAL TEXAS COLLEGE SYLLABUS FOR POFT 2312 BUSINESS CORRESPONDENCE AND COMMUNICATION Semester Hours Credit: 3 INSTRUCTOR: OFFICE HOURS:

CENTRAL TEXAS COLLEGE SYLLABUS FOR POFT 2312 BUSINESS CORRESPONDENCE AND COMMUNICATION Semester Hours Credit: 3 INSTRUCTOR: OFFICE HOURS: I. INTRODUCTION CENTRAL TEXAS COLLEGE SYLLABUS FOR POFT 2312 BUSINESS CORRESPONDENCE AND COMMUNICATION Semester Hours Credit: 3 INSTRUCTOR: OFFICE HOURS: A. Development of writing and presentation skills

More information

CENTRAL TEXAS COLLEGE SYLLABUS FOR ARTC 2488 INTERNSHIP GRAPHIC DESIGN. Semester Hours Credit: 4 Contact Hours: 304 INSTRUCTOR: OFFICE HOURS:

CENTRAL TEXAS COLLEGE SYLLABUS FOR ARTC 2488 INTERNSHIP GRAPHIC DESIGN. Semester Hours Credit: 4 Contact Hours: 304 INSTRUCTOR: OFFICE HOURS: CENTRAL TEXAS COLLEGE SYLLABUS FOR ARTC 2488 INTERNSHIP GRAPHIC DESIGN Semester Hours Credit: 4 Contact Hours: 304 I. INTRODUCTION INSTRUCTOR: OFFICE HOURS: 1. A work-based learning experience external

More information

Section 1 Quiz. Section 1 Quiz

Section 1 Quiz. Section 1 Quiz Environmental Science Independent Study Syllabus Ch 1 Section 1: Understanding Our Environment Page 8 #1-3 Case Study: Lake Washington page 13 #1-2 Section 2: The Environment and Society Map Skills: Forest

More information

Explain how the ocean regulates Earth s temperature. Discuss the factors that confine life to the biosphere.

Explain how the ocean regulates Earth s temperature. Discuss the factors that confine life to the biosphere. KANELAND HIGH SCHOOL ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE CURRICULLUM MAP Overview: Environmental Science is a two term elective course with general biology as a prerequisite. This course introduces students to the science,

More information

Climate Change: A Local Focus on a Global Issue Newfoundland and Labrador Curriculum Links 2010-2011

Climate Change: A Local Focus on a Global Issue Newfoundland and Labrador Curriculum Links 2010-2011 Climate Change: A Local Focus on a Global Issue Newfoundland and Labrador Curriculum Links 2010-2011 HEALTH Kindergarten: Grade 1: Grade 2: Know that litter can spoil the environment. Grade 3: Grade 4:

More information

PRESENTATION 2 MAJOR ENVIRONMENTAL PROBLEMS

PRESENTATION 2 MAJOR ENVIRONMENTAL PROBLEMS UNEP GLOBAL JUDGES PROGRAMME APPLICATION OF ENVIRONMENTAL LAW BY NATIONAL COURTS AND TRIBUNALS PRESENTATION 2 MAJOR ENVIRONMENTAL PROBLEMS OUTLINE OF PRESENTATION A) Major environmental issues B) Responses

More information

East Baton Rouge Parish Schools Environmental Science YID 2015-2016. Table of Contents. Unit 1: Science and the Environment...2

East Baton Rouge Parish Schools Environmental Science YID 2015-2016. Table of Contents. Unit 1: Science and the Environment...2 East Baton Rouge Parish Schools Environmental Science YID 2015-2016 Table of Contents Unit 1: Science and the Environment...2 Unit 2: Study of the Earth...5 Unit 3: Ecosystem Development, Biomes, and Biodiversity...7

More information

CENTRAL TEXAS COLLEGE SYLLABUS FOR MUSI 1306 MUSIC APPRECIATION. Semester Hours Credit: 3

CENTRAL TEXAS COLLEGE SYLLABUS FOR MUSI 1306 MUSIC APPRECIATION. Semester Hours Credit: 3 CENTRAL TEXAS COLLEGE SYLLABUS FOR MUSI 1306 MUSIC APPRECIATION Semester Hours Credit: 3 INSTRUCTOR: OFFICE HOURS: I. INTRODUCTION A. The purpose of this course is to lay the foundation for perceptive

More information

CENTRAL TEXAS COLLEGE SYLLABUS FOR COMM 2324 PRACTICUM IN ELECTRONIC MEDIA (ADVANCED AUDIO) Semester Credit Hours: 3 INSTRUCTOR:

CENTRAL TEXAS COLLEGE SYLLABUS FOR COMM 2324 PRACTICUM IN ELECTRONIC MEDIA (ADVANCED AUDIO) Semester Credit Hours: 3 INSTRUCTOR: CENTRAL TEXAS COLLEGE SYLLABUS FOR COMM 2324 PRACTICUM IN ELECTRONIC MEDIA (ADVANCED AUDIO) Semester Credit Hours: 3 INSTRUCTOR: I. INTRODUCTION A. Study and practical experience in digital audio production

More information

A.P. ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE COURSE SYLLABUS Miller Grove High School. Teacher(s): Mrs. Christy Hodges Phone Number: 678-875-1102 Room Number/s: 906

A.P. ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE COURSE SYLLABUS Miller Grove High School. Teacher(s): Mrs. Christy Hodges Phone Number: 678-875-1102 Room Number/s: 906 A.P. ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE COURSE SYLLABUS Miller Grove High School Teacher(s): Mrs. Christy Hodges Phone Number: 678-875-1102 Room Number/s: 906 Email: Christy_N_Hodges@fc.dekalb.k12.ga.us Semester: First,

More information

CENTRAL TEXAS COLLEGE ITSY 2459 SECURITY ASSESSMENT AND AUDITING. Semester Hours Credit: 4 INSTRUCTOR: OFFICE HOURS:

CENTRAL TEXAS COLLEGE ITSY 2459 SECURITY ASSESSMENT AND AUDITING. Semester Hours Credit: 4 INSTRUCTOR: OFFICE HOURS: CENTRAL TEXAS COLLEGE ITSY 2459 SECURITY ASSESSMENT AND AUDITING Semester Hours Credit: 4 INSTRUCTOR: OFFICE HOURS: I. INTRODUCTION A. Capstone experience for the security curriculum. Synthesizes technical

More information

Ecosystem Ecology. Community interacts with abiotic factors. Objectives

Ecosystem Ecology. Community interacts with abiotic factors. Objectives Ecosystem Ecology Community interacts with abiotic factors Objectives Compare the processes of energy flow and chemical cycling as they relate to ecosystem dynamics. Define and list examples of producers,

More information

Environmental Science Science Curriculum Framework. Revised 2005

Environmental Science Science Curriculum Framework. Revised 2005 Environmental Science Science Curriculum Framework Revised 2005 Course Title: Environmental Science Course/Unit Credit: 1 Course Number: 424020 Teacher Licensure: Please refer to the Course Code Management

More information

Environmental Science Overview

Environmental Science Overview Overview The standards establish the scientific inquiry skills and core content for all courses in DoDEA schools. The course of study provides students with a basic knowledge of the natural world that

More information

understand the interrelationships of the natural world and draws upon various scientific disciplines.

understand the interrelationships of the natural world and draws upon various scientific disciplines. AP Environmental Science: Sample Syllabus 4 Syllabus 886983v1 Scoring Components Page(s) SC1 The course in Earth Systems. 3 SC2 The course in Earth Resources. 3 SC3 The course in the Living World. 3 SC4

More information

A CONTENT STANDARD IS NOT MET UNLESS APPLICABLE CHARACTERISTICS OF SCIENCE ARE ALSO ADDRESSED AT THE SAME TIME.

A CONTENT STANDARD IS NOT MET UNLESS APPLICABLE CHARACTERISTICS OF SCIENCE ARE ALSO ADDRESSED AT THE SAME TIME. Environmental Science Curriculum The Georgia Performance Standards are designed to provide students with the knowledge and skills for proficiency in science. The Project 2061 s Benchmarks for Science Literacy

More information

Broken Arrow Public Schools AP Environmental Science Objectives Revised 11-19-08

Broken Arrow Public Schools AP Environmental Science Objectives Revised 11-19-08 1 st six weeks 1 Identify questions and problems that can be answered through scientific investigation. 2 Design and conduct scientific investigations to answer questions about the world by creating hypotheses;

More information

CENTRAL TEXAS COLLEGE SYLLABUS FOR CDEC 1354 CHILD GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT 12 2014 6:30-8:30 P.M. 217 RM

CENTRAL TEXAS COLLEGE SYLLABUS FOR CDEC 1354 CHILD GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT 12 2014 6:30-8:30 P.M. 217 RM CENTRAL TEXAS COLLEGE SYLLABUS FOR CDEC 1354 CHILD GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT 12 August-2 October 2014 6:30-8:30 P.M. Bldg 217 RM 209 Semester Hours Credit: 3 INSTRUCTOR: Tammy Gibbs OFFICE HOURS: By appointment

More information

12.5: Generating Current Electricity pg. 518

12.5: Generating Current Electricity pg. 518 12.5: Generating Current Electricity pg. 518 Key Concepts: 1. Electrical energy is produced by energy transformations. 2. Electrical energy is produced from renewable and non-renewable resources. 4. Electrical

More information

Environmental Science

Environmental Science Environmental Science Hill Materials needed - Textbook: Living in the Environment by Miller is a primary, not exclusive, resource. - Pens/pencils, colored pencils, ruler are recommended. - Lab Notebook,

More information

Fundamentals of Ecology

Fundamentals of Ecology Fundamentals of Ecology FIFTH EDITION Eugene P. Odum, Ph.D. Late of University of Georgia Institute of Ecology Gary W. Barrett, Ph.D. Odum Professor of Ecology, University of Georgia Institute of Ecology

More information

8 TH GRADE MATHEMATICS, OR PERMISSION OF ARHS SCIENCE DEPARTMENT HEAD

8 TH GRADE MATHEMATICS, OR PERMISSION OF ARHS SCIENCE DEPARTMENT HEAD DEPARTMENT: SCIENCE Course Title: Ecology 9 Honors/ Environmental Science 9 Honors Course Numbers: 210 & 211 PRE-REQUISITES: PRE-REQUISITES (IF ANY): SUCCESSFUL COMPLETION OF ALGEBRA I, A B OR BETTER IN

More information

BIOL-103 COURSE SYLLABUS FOR ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

BIOL-103 COURSE SYLLABUS FOR ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE Coffeyville Community College BIOL-103 COURSE SYLLABUS FOR ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE Pam Oliver Instructor COURSE NUMBER: BIOL-103 COURSE TITLE: Environmental Science CREDIT HOURS: 5 INSTRUCTOR: OFFICE LOCATION:

More information

Scope and Sequence Interactive Science grades 6-8

Scope and Sequence Interactive Science grades 6-8 Science and Technology Chapter 1. What Is Science? 1. Science and the Natural World 2.Thinking Like a Scientist 3. Scientific Inquiry Scope and Sequence Interactive Science grades 6-8 Chapter 2. Science,

More information

Central Texas College HAMG 2388 Internship Hospitality Administration and Management. Semester Hours Credit: 3 INSTRUCTOR: OFFICE HOURS:

Central Texas College HAMG 2388 Internship Hospitality Administration and Management. Semester Hours Credit: 3 INSTRUCTOR: OFFICE HOURS: Central Texas College HAMG 2388 Internship Hospitality Administration and Management Semester Hours Credit: 3 INSTRUCTOR: OFFICE HOURS: I. INTRODUCTION A. A worked-based learning experience that enables

More information

Biodiversity Concepts

Biodiversity Concepts Biodiversity Concepts WHAT IS BIODIVERSITY? Biodiversity is the variety of life on Earth. For any kind of animal or plant each individual is not exactly the same as any other; nor are species or ecosystems.

More information

ADVANCED ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE COURSE SYLLABUS

ADVANCED ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE COURSE SYLLABUS ADVANCED ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE COURSE SYLLABUS OVERVIEW OF THE COURSE: The Advanced Environmental Science course is the equivalent of a one-semester introductory college course in environmental science

More information

Three-ringed binder Composition Laboratory notebook Blue or black ink pens. Course Overview

Three-ringed binder Composition Laboratory notebook Blue or black ink pens. Course Overview Course Overview Advanced Placement Environmental Science (APES) Course Outline Monarch High School, 2015/16, Mr. Nardelli Email: adam.nardelli@browardschools.com Website: adamnardellimonarchhigh.weebly.com

More information

The size of the class averages around 31 students and meets for 55 minutes, 5 days a week.

The size of the class averages around 31 students and meets for 55 minutes, 5 days a week. AP Environmental Science Course Syllabus Course Objective: The goal of this course is to provide students with the scientific background needed to understand how the Earth works and how we, as human beings,

More information

Ecosystems. The two main ecosystem processes: Energy flow and Chemical cycling

Ecosystems. The two main ecosystem processes: Energy flow and Chemical cycling Ecosystems THE REALM OF ECOLOGY Biosphere An island ecosystem A desert spring ecosystem Biosphere Ecosystem Ecology: Interactions between the species in a given habitat and their physical environment.

More information

CENTRAL TEXAS COLLEGE SYLLABUS FOR CRIJ 2314 CRIMINAL INVESTIGATION. Semester Hours Credit: 3

CENTRAL TEXAS COLLEGE SYLLABUS FOR CRIJ 2314 CRIMINAL INVESTIGATION. Semester Hours Credit: 3 CENTRAL TEXAS COLLEGE SYLLABUS FOR CRIJ 2314 CRIMINAL INVESTIGATION INSTRUCTOR: OFFICE HOURS: Semester Hours Credit: 3 I. Introduction A. This course covers the fundamentals of criminal investigations

More information

CENTRAL TEXAS COLLEGE SYLLABUS FOR POFT 1319 RECORDS AND INFORMATION MANAGEMENT Semester Hours Credit: 3 INSTRUCTOR: OFFICE HOURS:

CENTRAL TEXAS COLLEGE SYLLABUS FOR POFT 1319 RECORDS AND INFORMATION MANAGEMENT Semester Hours Credit: 3 INSTRUCTOR: OFFICE HOURS: I. INTRODUCTION CENTRAL TEXAS COLLEGE SYLLABUS FOR POFT 1319 RECORDS AND INFORMATION MANAGEMENT Semester Hours Credit: 3 INSTRUCTOR: OFFICE HOURS: A. Introduction to basic records and information management

More information

CENTRAL TEXAS COLLEGE SYLLABUS FOR SPCH 1318 INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATION. Semester Hours Credit: 3 INSTRUCTOR: OFFICE HOURS:

CENTRAL TEXAS COLLEGE SYLLABUS FOR SPCH 1318 INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATION. Semester Hours Credit: 3 INSTRUCTOR: OFFICE HOURS: CENTRAL TEXAS COLLEGE SYLLABUS FOR SPCH 1318 INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATION Semester Hours Credit: 3 INSTRUCTOR: OFFICE HOURS: I. INTRODUCTION A. The purpose of this course is to study the process used to

More information

Instructor: Ms. Jennifer Gidley E-mail: gidleyj@ltisdschools.org LTHS Phone: (512) 533-6100 LTHS Fax:

Instructor: Ms. Jennifer Gidley E-mail: gidleyj@ltisdschools.org LTHS Phone: (512) 533-6100 LTHS Fax: AP Environmental Science Syllabus Instructor: Ms. Jennifer Gidley E-mail: gidleyj@ltisdschools.org LTHS Phone: (512) 533-6100 LTHS Fax: (512) 533-6101 Classroom Phone: (512) 533-5907 Conference period:

More information

ES 1010 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE: ENERGY RESOURCES AND POLLUTION 3/1½/4 LEVEL 4 -UK CREDITS: 20 (Updated Fall 2010)

ES 1010 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE: ENERGY RESOURCES AND POLLUTION 3/1½/4 LEVEL 4 -UK CREDITS: 20 (Updated Fall 2010) DEREE COLLEGE SYLLABUS FOR: ES 1010 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE: ENERGY RESOURCES AND POLLUTION 3/1½/4 LEVEL 4 -UK CREDITS: 20 (Updated Fall 2010) PREREQUISITES: CATALOG DESCRIPTION: None Principles of environmental

More information

EVR 1001 U01 Introduction to Environmental Science & Sustainability Spring 2014

EVR 1001 U01 Introduction to Environmental Science & Sustainability Spring 2014 EVR 1001 U01 Introduction to Environmental Science & Sustainability Spring 2014 Course Meeting Times: Monday, Wednesday, Friday 10:00 10:50 am in GC 140 Instructor: Prof. Patricia Houle, M.S. Office Hours:

More information

Sunshine State Standard Benchmarks

Sunshine State Standard Benchmarks National Science Education Standards (9-12) Physical Science - Structure of atoms - Structure and properties of matter - Chemical reactions - Motions and forces - Conversation of energy and increase in

More information

Geology 110 Sect.1 Syllabus; Fall, 2015. GEOL110 Section 3 (3 credits) Fall, 2015 Physical Geology

Geology 110 Sect.1 Syllabus; Fall, 2015. GEOL110 Section 3 (3 credits) Fall, 2015 Physical Geology Geology 110 Sect.1 Syllabus; Fall, 2015 GEOL110 Section 3 (3 credits) Fall, 2015 Physical Geology Dr. Scott Werts Office: Sims 212A Course Classroom: Sims 201 Meeting Time: TTh 12:30-1:45 Email: wertss@winthrop.edu

More information

Essential Study Partner/ ESP: http://highered.mcgraw-hill.com/sites/0072970480/student_view0/essential_study_partner.html

Essential Study Partner/ ESP: http://highered.mcgraw-hill.com/sites/0072970480/student_view0/essential_study_partner.html Course: Environmental Science Course Number: 2001340 Title: Environmental Science: A Study of Interrelationships, 10 th edition Authors: Enger, Smith Publisher: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Copyright: 2006 Online

More information

Grade 7. Objective. Students will be able to:

Grade 7. Objective. Students will be able to: Grade 7 Objective Students will be able to: Describe the carbon cycle in more detail: o Learn about the importance of carbon and the role it plays in photosynthesis and cellular respiration, Identify elements

More information

CENTRAL TEXAS COLLEGE SYLLABUS FOR DSMA 0306 INTRODUCTORY ALGEBRA. Semester Hours Credit: 3

CENTRAL TEXAS COLLEGE SYLLABUS FOR DSMA 0306 INTRODUCTORY ALGEBRA. Semester Hours Credit: 3 CENTRAL TEXAS COLLEGE SYLLABUS FOR DSMA 0306 INTRODUCTORY ALGEBRA Semester Hours Credit: 3 (This course is equivalent to DSMA 0301. The difference being that this course is offered only on those campuses

More information

WATER: ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE Syllabus

WATER: ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE Syllabus WATER: ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE Syllabus Course Title Water: Environmental Science Course Description Central to all ecosystems, water is essential to life as we know it. It shapes our planet on every level,

More information

AP biology self study guide for unit 9: Population & community ecology and. Unit 10: Ecosystems, the biosphere, and conservation

AP biology self study guide for unit 9: Population & community ecology and. Unit 10: Ecosystems, the biosphere, and conservation AP biology self study guide for unit 9: Population & community ecology and Unit 10: Ecosystems, the biosphere, and conservation Enduring understanding 2.A: Growth, reproduction and maintenance of the organization

More information

CENTRAL TEXAS COLLEGE SYLLABUS FOR ACCT 2301 PRINCIPLES OF FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING. Semester Hours Credit: 3 INSTRUCTOR: OFFICE HOURS:

CENTRAL TEXAS COLLEGE SYLLABUS FOR ACCT 2301 PRINCIPLES OF FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING. Semester Hours Credit: 3 INSTRUCTOR: OFFICE HOURS: CENTRAL TEXAS COLLEGE SYLLABUS FOR ACCT 2301 PRINCIPLES OF FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING Semester Hours Credit: 3 INSTRUCTOR: OFFICE HOURS: I. INTRODUCTION A. An introduction to accounting with emphasis on the

More information

Effective June 2008 All indicators in Standard B-6 1 / 16

Effective June 2008 All indicators in Standard B-6 1 / 16 B-6.1 Explain how the interrelationships among organisms (including predation, competition, parasitism, mutualism, and commensalism) generate stability within ecosystems. Taxonomy Level: 2.7-B Understand

More information

Birmingham City University / Students Union Aspects and Impacts Register. Waste. Impacts description

Birmingham City University / Students Union Aspects and Impacts Register. Waste. Impacts description Birmingham City University / Students Union and Impacts Register Waste Production of non - hazardous waste Production of hazardous waste Storage of non - hazardous waste Potential for waste to be disposed

More information

CENTRAL TEXAS COLLEGE ITNW 1316 NETWORK ADMINISTRATION. Semester Hours Credit: 3

CENTRAL TEXAS COLLEGE ITNW 1316 NETWORK ADMINISTRATION. Semester Hours Credit: 3 CENTRAL TEXAS COLLEGE ITNW 1316 NETWORK ADMINISTRATION INSTRUCTOR: Semester Hours Credit: 3 OFFICE HOURS: I. INTRODUCTION A. An introduction to the basic concepts of network administration, this course

More information

HUMANPOPULATIONGROWTHANDNATURAL RESOURCES Study Guide. As the human population grows, the demand for Earth s resources increases.

HUMANPOPULATIONGROWTHANDNATURAL RESOURCES Study Guide. As the human population grows, the demand for Earth s resources increases. SECTION 16.1 HUMANPOPULATIONGROWTHANDNATURAL RESOURCES Study Guide KEY CONCEPT As the human population grows, the demand for Earth s resources increases. VOCABULARY nonrenewable resource renewable resource

More information

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE (877)

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE (877) ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE (877) Aims: 1. To help the student appreciate man's place in the natural systems. 2. To provide a wide understanding of knowledge resources relevant to environment protection and

More information

NATURAL RESOURCES DEGREES AND CERTIFICATES. Environmental Conservation A.S. Degree (formerly Natural Resources)

NATURAL RESOURCES DEGREES AND CERTIFICATES. Environmental Conservation A.S. Degree (formerly Natural Resources) Area: Science and Engineering Dean: Dr. Rina Roy Phone: (916) 484-8107 Counseling: (916) 484-8572 DEGREES AND CERTIFICATES Environmental Conservation A.S. Degree (formerly Natural Resources) Environmental

More information

Pinecrest Preparatory Middle-high Home of the Crocs

Pinecrest Preparatory Middle-high Home of the Crocs Betty Nuñez Principal ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE 2015-2016 Amelia Estrada Assistant Principal Jennifer Kairalla Assistant Principal Instructor: Mrs. Wasilewski Room Number: 1212 Email: swasilewski@ppmhcharterschool.org

More information

CENTRAL TEXAS COLLEGE SYLLABUS FOR RELE 1325 REAL ESTATE MATH. Semester Hours Credit: 3 INSTRUCTOR: OFFICE HOURS:

CENTRAL TEXAS COLLEGE SYLLABUS FOR RELE 1325 REAL ESTATE MATH. Semester Hours Credit: 3 INSTRUCTOR: OFFICE HOURS: SPRING 2000 CENTRAL TEXAS COLLEGE SYLLABUS FOR REAL ESTATE MATH Semester Hours Credit: 3 INSTRUCTOR: OFFICE HOURS: I. INTRODUCTION A. Includes mathematical logic, basic arithmetic skills, percentages,

More information

Ecosystem Ecology. Trophic levels energy flow through ecosystems. Productivity and energy. Autotrophs: primary producers Heterotrophs: consumers

Ecosystem Ecology. Trophic levels energy flow through ecosystems. Productivity and energy. Autotrophs: primary producers Heterotrophs: consumers Ecosystem Ecology 1. Overview of material and energy flows in ecosystems 2. Primary production 3. Secondary production and trophic efficiency 4. Ecological Pyramids Trophic levels energy flow through ecosystems

More information

Policy & Management Applications of Blue Carbon. fact SHEET

Policy & Management Applications of Blue Carbon. fact SHEET Policy & Management Applications of Blue Carbon fact SHEET Policy & Management Applications of Blue Carbon Coastal Blue Carbon - An Important Wetland Ecosystem Service Coastal Blue Carbon refers to the

More information

Chapter 36: Population Growth. Population Concepts. Population: Carrying Capacity: Critical Number: Growth Rate: Growth rate = Birth rate - Death rate

Chapter 36: Population Growth. Population Concepts. Population: Carrying Capacity: Critical Number: Growth Rate: Growth rate = Birth rate - Death rate Chapter 36: Population Growth Population: Population Concepts interbreeding group of same species Carrying Capacity: maximum population size an ecosystem can sustainably support Critical Number: minimum

More information

CENTRAL TEXAS COLLEGE ITSE 2459 ADVANCED COMPUTER PROGRAMMING C# Semester Hours Credit: 4 INSTRUCTOR: OFFICE HOURS:

CENTRAL TEXAS COLLEGE ITSE 2459 ADVANCED COMPUTER PROGRAMMING C# Semester Hours Credit: 4 INSTRUCTOR: OFFICE HOURS: CENTRAL TEXAS COLLEGE ITSE 2459 ADVANCED COMPUTER PROGRAMMING C# Semester Hours Credit: 4 INSTRUCTOR: OFFICE HOURS: I. INTRODUCTION A. This course presents advanced programming techniques including file

More information

CENTRAL TEXAS COLLEGE SYLLABUS FOR POFT 2386 INTERNSHIP ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT AND SECRETARIAL SCIENCE, GENERAL. Semester Hours Credit: 3

CENTRAL TEXAS COLLEGE SYLLABUS FOR POFT 2386 INTERNSHIP ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT AND SECRETARIAL SCIENCE, GENERAL. Semester Hours Credit: 3 I. INTRODUCTION CENTRAL TEXAS COLLEGE SYLLABUS FOR POFT 2386 INTERNSHIP ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT AND SECRETARIAL SCIENCE, GENERAL Semester Hours Credit: 3 INSTRUCTOR: OFFICE HOURS: A. A work-based learning

More information

Chapter 1 Key Themes in Environmental Science

Chapter 1 Key Themes in Environmental Science Key Themes in Environmental Science Case Study: Shrimp, Mangroves, and Pickup Trucks This case study highlights the plight of a small farmer in Thailand in the shrimp farming business. He makes his living

More information

Natural Resources. Air and Water Resources

Natural Resources. Air and Water Resources Natural Resources Key Concepts Why is it important to manage air and water resources wisely? How can individuals help manage air and water resources wisely? Air and Water Resources What do you think? Read

More information

BIODIVERSITY AND ECONOMIC GROWTH

BIODIVERSITY AND ECONOMIC GROWTH World Environment Day June 2010 111 BIODIVERSITY AND ECONOMIC GROWTH By: Shahid Saleem Biodiversity loss and other environmental problems that the world is facing today are the products of hundreds of

More information

CENTRAL TEXAS COLLEGE INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY DEPARTMENT SYLLABUS FOR ARTC 1327 TYPOGRAPHY

CENTRAL TEXAS COLLEGE INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY DEPARTMENT SYLLABUS FOR ARTC 1327 TYPOGRAPHY I. INTRODUCTION CENTRAL TEXAS COLLEGE INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY DEPARTMENT SYLLABUS FOR ARTC 1327 TYPOGRAPHY SEMESTER HOURS CREDIT: 3 CONTRACT HOURS: 96 INSTRUCTOR: OFFICE HOURS: A. A study of letterforms

More information

HOUSTON COMMUNITY COLLEGE SOUTHWEST SYLLABUS FOR ENVR 1301 Environmental Science Fall 2013, Second Start Class Number 64432 DISTANCE EDUCATION

HOUSTON COMMUNITY COLLEGE SOUTHWEST SYLLABUS FOR ENVR 1301 Environmental Science Fall 2013, Second Start Class Number 64432 DISTANCE EDUCATION HOUSTON COMMUNITY COLLEGE SOUTHWEST SYLLABUS FOR ENVR 1301 Environmental Science Fall 2013, Second Start Class Number 64432 DISTANCE EDUCATION Instructor contact information Karen Blair Yip karen.yip@hccs.edu

More information

Environmental Science - EVS 3000, Section 8666, Spring 2015 T 4-5 (10:40-12:35) & R 5 (11:45-12:35), Black Hall, Room 315.

Environmental Science - EVS 3000, Section 8666, Spring 2015 T 4-5 (10:40-12:35) & R 5 (11:45-12:35), Black Hall, Room 315. Environmental Science - EVS 3000, Section 8666, Spring 2015 T 4-5 (10:40-12:35) & R 5 (11:45-12:35), Black Hall, Room 315 Syllabus Instructor: Danny Coenen E-mail: dcoenen@ufl.edu Office: Phelps 001 (basement)

More information

Syllabus. EVR 1001: Introduction to Environmental Science and Sustainability Florida International University, Spring 2016

Syllabus. EVR 1001: Introduction to Environmental Science and Sustainability Florida International University, Spring 2016 Syllabus EVR 1001: Introduction to Environmental Science and Sustainability Florida International University, Spring 2016 Professor: Dr. Jeff Onsted Phone: (305) 348-1693 Office: AHC5 395 Office hours:

More information

ENGR 670: Geology of Geothermal Energy Resources

ENGR 670: Geology of Geothermal Energy Resources ENGR 670: Geology of Geothermal Energy Resources Instructor: Dave R. Boden, Ph.D. Truckee Meadows Community College Email: Please use the WebCampus Messages tool for the course. If WebCampus system is

More information

STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY CANTON, NEW YORK COURSE OUTLINE CHEM 150 - COLLEGE CHEMISTRY I

STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY CANTON, NEW YORK COURSE OUTLINE CHEM 150 - COLLEGE CHEMISTRY I STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY CANTON, NEW YORK COURSE OUTLINE CHEM 150 - COLLEGE CHEMISTRY I PREPARED BY: NICOLE HELDT SCHOOL OF SCIENCE, HEALTH, AND PROFESSIONAL STUDIES SCIENCE DEPARTMENT

More information

RENEWABLE RESOURCES. Kinds of renewable resources. 1. Solar energy

RENEWABLE RESOURCES. Kinds of renewable resources. 1. Solar energy RENEWABLE RESOURCES Natural resources (also called land or raw materials) occur naturally within environments that exist relatively undisturbed by mankind, in a natural form. Natural resources are derived

More information

Greater Nanticoke Area School District Science/Technology Standards 5 th Grade

Greater Nanticoke Area School District Science/Technology Standards 5 th Grade Greater Nanticoke Area School District Science/Technology Standards 5 th Grade Standard 3.1 Unifying Themes CS 3.1.7A Explain the parts of a simple system and their relationship to each other 1. Describe

More information

II. LEARNING OUTCOMES A. Upon successful completion of this course, Introduction to Early Childhood Education, the student will be able to:

II. LEARNING OUTCOMES A. Upon successful completion of this course, Introduction to Early Childhood Education, the student will be able to: I. INTRODUCTION A. An introduction to the profession of early childhood education, focusing on developmentally appropriate practices, types of programs, historical perspectives, ethics, and current issues.

More information

IMPORTANT NOTE REGARDING FEEDBACK AND RESPONSIBILITY FOR LEARNING

IMPORTANT NOTE REGARDING FEEDBACK AND RESPONSIBILITY FOR LEARNING CENTRAL TEXAS COLLEGE SYLLABUS BUSINESS 1301 BUSINESS PRINCIPLES Semester Hours Credit: 3 BUSINESS: The Engine That Drives America! I. COURSE DESCRIPTION This course provides a survey of economic systems,

More information

CENTRAL TEXAS COLLEGE SYLLABUS FOR ENGL 1302 COMPOSITION II. Semester Credit Hours: 3 INSTRUCTOR: OFFICE HOURS:

CENTRAL TEXAS COLLEGE SYLLABUS FOR ENGL 1302 COMPOSITION II. Semester Credit Hours: 3 INSTRUCTOR: OFFICE HOURS: CENTRAL TEXAS COLLEGE SYLLABUS FOR ENGL 1302 COMPOSITION II Semester Credit Hours: 3 INSTRUCTOR: OFFICE HOURS: I. INTRODUCTION A. English 1302 is a continuation of English 1301, with primary emphasis on

More information

Minimum credits required for graduation is 120. Core Degree Requirements (57 credits)

Minimum credits required for graduation is 120. Core Degree Requirements (57 credits) COLLEGE OF NATURAL RESOURCES AND ENVIRONMENT B.S. Degree in Water: Resources, Policy, and Management Major: Water: Resources, Policy, and Management For Students Graduating in Calendar Year 2016 Department

More information

Advanced Treatment of Hazardous Wastes(1) Advanced Treatment of Hazardous Wastes(2) Advanced Environmental Chemistry. Design of Solid Waste Landfill

Advanced Treatment of Hazardous Wastes(1) Advanced Treatment of Hazardous Wastes(2) Advanced Environmental Chemistry. Design of Solid Waste Landfill Course Description (전체 개설 교과목 개요) Advanced Treatment of Hazardous Wastes(1) This course is concerned with the management of hazardous materials and wastes in depth. We will deal with the physico-chemical

More information

Activities of Qatar Statistics Authority

Activities of Qatar Statistics Authority Activities of Qatar Statistics Authority Official Statistics for Better Climate Change Information Doha, 5 December 2012 Page 1 Qatari Environment Statistics Vision Provide the foundation for evidence-based

More information

Science 7 th Grade. Core Concepts:

Science 7 th Grade. Core Concepts: Core Concepts: 1) All living things share common characteristics and are classified based upon similarities and differences of major physical characteristics. 2) The Earth itself and the life forms on

More information

The Nitrogen Cycle. What is Nitrogen? Human Alteration of the Global Nitrogen Cycle. How does the nitrogen cycle work?

The Nitrogen Cycle. What is Nitrogen? Human Alteration of the Global Nitrogen Cycle. How does the nitrogen cycle work? Human Alteration of the Global Nitrogen Cycle Heather McGraw, Mandy Williams, Suzanne Heinzel, and Cristen Whorl, Give SIUE Permission to Put Our Presentation on E-reserve at Lovejoy Library. What is Nitrogen?

More information