ATLANTA TECHNICAL COLLEGE

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2 ATLANTA TECHNICAL COLLEGE PHILOSOPHY The strength of Atlanta rests in its citizens whose skills, values, and ethics make them a productive and competitive force. The men and women of Atlanta should be productive workers if the city and its environs are to attract new business and industry and strengthen existing companies that have enabled Atlanta to become the commercial hub of the entire Southeast. Atlanta Technical College does not discriminate on the basis of age, race, color, national origin, sex, religion, marital status, or disability. Individuals should be provided programs and services that will enable them to develop and improve their academic skills, technical competence, and work attitudes. These attributes are necessary for job acquisition, retention, and advancement in a career that is personally satisfying, socially useful, and economically beneficial. Technical College believes that opportunities in technical education must include general and technical literacy, academic skills and knowledge, technical skills, and the attitudes needed to enjoy life. To obtain employment, individuals must be competitive in today's job market, and they must possess the skills that will earn them promotions throughout their careers. Atlanta Technical College believes that the positive results of a literate and technical competent citizenry will accelerate Atlanta's continued appeal to existing, expanding, new, and emerging businesses and industries and will in turn contribute to the economic and social growth of individuals living and working in and around Atlanta. CORE VALUES The College s core values define our enduring character and are the primary reasons that Atlanta Technical College has been a strong community influence for so long. The college is proud of its reputation in the community and its traditions of academic excellence and educational success. Atlanta Technical College honors tradition yet seeks to expand it, moving forward into the future informed by traditional values that transcend time, college size, business and industry trends, management changes, or external factors. The core values are the guiding principles that direct work toward fulfilling the college mission. These values are at work across the campus and in all aspects and offices of the campus community. Service Academic Excellence Respect and Integrity Empowerment and Accountability Creativity Diversity Community Atlanta Technical College s core values complement the Technical College System of Georgia belief system. MISSION Atlanta Technical College, a unit of the Technical College System of Georgia, located in the city of Atlanta, is an accredited institution of higher education that recognizes the importance of global education. The college provides affordable lifelong learning opportunities, associate degrees, diplomas, technical certificates of credit, customized business and industry training, continuing education, and other learning services using state-of-the-art technology. The integration of academics and applied career preparation to enhance student learning is essential in meeting the workforce demands and economic development needs of people, businesses, and the communities we serve. The mission of Atlanta Technical College is composed within the philosophical framework of the Technical College System of Georgia. It is reviewed and approved annually by the faculty, staff, administration and the Board of Directors. EXPANDED STATEMENT OF PURPOSE Atlanta Technical College (ATC) is a comprehensive, urban, public, two-year community and technical College located in metropolitan Atlanta. College programs and services provide accessible, high-quality post-secondary education that prepares the traditional and non-traditional student to enter the job market. The college awards associate degrees, diplomas, and technical certificates of credit. Atlanta Technical College will seek to meet Metro Atlanta industry needs and student demands through the provision of state-of-the-art academic and career preparation, customized business and industry training, continuing education, and other learning services as outlined in the following major purposes: To provide access and awareness to technical education through its contribution to the economic prosperity, quality of life, and education culture of Atlanta's communities by increasing availability of credit and non-credit educational opportunities, strengthening community involvement, and raising public awareness of the benefits of technical and adult education. 1

3 To ensure student success through quality support services and technical programs by providing quality programs and services that promote the satisfaction, retention, and graduation of students for viable and consistent employment with local, state, national, and international companies that are equally satisfied with the quality of our graduates. To provide accountability through effective and efficient management that ensures effective, adequately supported, and efficiently managed technical education, adult education, and economic development programs and services are available for all citizens of Atlanta. To develop Atlanta Technical College's internal workforce through the assurance of a sufficient, satisfied, and qualified ATC workforce needed to meet the demands of Atlanta citizens and businesses for quality technical education, adult literacy, and economic development programs and services. To develop a high quality infrastructure for extended and enhanced services through the provision of sufficient and appropriate facilities, technology, and equipment throughout Atlanta Technical College and its service delivery area to extend and enhance programs and services. WARRANTY OF DEGREE, DIPLOMA, AND TECHNICAL CERTIFICATE OF CREDIT GRADUATES To demonstrate confidence in and commitment to quality technical programs which are relevant, current, and responsive to the stated expectations of Georgia's businesses and industries, the Technical College System of Georgia will warrant every graduate from programs offering a technical certificate of credit, diploma, or associate degree in a state technical college according to the following stipulations: 1. The warranty guarantees that the graduate has demonstrated the knowledge and skills and can perform each competency as identified in the industry-validated Standard or Program Guide, and any program graduate who is determined to lack such competence shall be retrained at no cost to the employer or graduate (for tuition or instructional fees). 2. A claim against the warranty may be filed by either an employer in conjunction with a graduate or a graduate if the graduate cannot perform one or more of the competencies contained in the industry-validated Standard or Program Guide, including failure to pass a State of Georgia required licensing examination. 3. The warranty is applicable only to graduates of any technical certificate of credit, diploma, or degree program who entered the program subsequent to the mandated standards of implementation date. 4. The warranty will remain in effect for two consecutive years immediately following the date of graduation and will be honored by any state governed technical college which offers the same program. 5. The warranty shall be issued in writing to each graduate who entered a program on or after the mandated standards implementation date for the applicable program started. Warranty information is available on the Atlanta Technical College website. The contact person is the Special Needs Coordinator who may be reached at ACCREDITATION Atlanta Technical College is accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges, 1866 Southern Lane, Decatur, GA 30033, , to award associate degrees, diplomas, and technical certificates of credit. DISCLAIMER The statements set forth in this catalog are for informational purposes only and should not be construed as the basis of a contract between students and the institution. While every effort will be made to ensure the accuracy of the material stated herein, Atlanta Technical College reserves the right to change any provision listed in the catalog, including but not limited to, the academic requirements for graduation, availability of courses, and programs of study, without actual notice to students; however, every effort will be made to keep students advised of such changes. Catalog updates will be posted on the college website. NONDISCRIMINATION POLICY As set forth in its student catalog, Atlanta Technical College does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national or ethnic origin, gender, religion, disability, age, political affiliation or belief, veteran status, or citizenship status (except in those special circumstances permitted or mandated by law). For further information regarding these laws (Title VI and IX) contact Sylvie Moses, equity/special needs coordinator, Atlanta Technical College, Cleveland Dennard Center, suite B164, To request reasonable accommodations upon enrollment (Section 504/ADA), contact Sylvie Moses, career planner/special needs, student affairs division, Cleveland Dennard Building, suite B164, Atlanta Technical College, 1560 Metropolitan Parkway, SW, Atlanta, GA Faculty and staff with questions about equity or reasonable accommodations should contact Marilyn Smith-Robinson, Director, Human Resources, Cleveland Dennard Building, Suite 217, Atlanta Technical College,1560 Metropolitan Parkway, SW, Atlanta, GA

4 CAMPUS DESCRIPTIONS Main Campus Metropolitan Parkway, SW, Atlanta, Georgia The main campus of Atlanta Technical College is located in the heart of Atlanta. It is approximately four miles south of Turner Field and 15 minutes north of Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport. The Center for Supply Chain and Logistics (Instructional site) Purdue Drive, Atlanta, Georgia The Center for Supply Chain and Logistics opens Fall/Winter 2013 and will house programs such as warehousing and distribution, commercial truck driving, procurement, logistics and purchasing. DIRECTIONS TO THE MAIN CAMPUS 1560 Metropolitan Parkway, SW, Atlanta, Georgia Driving From The North: Take South to the University Avenue exit. Make a right onto University Avenue. Travel 3/4 mile to Metropolitan Parkway. Make a left onto Metropolitan Parkway and travel 3/4 mile. The campus will be on the left, and you will enter at a traffic light. Driving From The South: Take 85 North to the Cleveland Avenue exit. Make a right onto Cleveland Avenue. Turn left onto Metropolitan Parkway. Continue on Metropolitan until you reach the Atlanta Tech campus. The campus will be on the right, and you will enter at a traffic light. By MARTA: Take either the special Atlanta Tech bus (to the side door of our main building) from the West End MARTA Rail Station or the 95- Hapeville bus, which stops on Metropolitan Parkway outside the main gate. 3

5 WELCOME LETTER FROM THE PRESIDENT Welcome to Atlanta Technical College! Atlanta Technical College has been a vibrant part of the Atlanta community for more than 40 years. The college has a proud legacy of educating men and women who make valuable contributions to the workforce. On the largest single-site campus in the Technical College System of Georgia, Atlanta Technical College is located near downtown Atlanta and offers an academic community that is intellectually stimulating and technically challenging. Our campus fosters lifelong learning, and we serve a diverse student body that represents all ages, cultures, and educational backgrounds. With a faculty and staff who are well-respected professionals in their respective fields, we offer more than 100 high-tech degree, diploma, and technical certificate of credit programs, ranging from studies in supply chain management and aviation maintenance to the latest in health and information technology. Additionally, there are programs in industrial and transportation technologies, health and public safety technologies, and business and public service technologies. These course offerings mirror the demands of business and industry, and we are proud of our thriving partnerships with corporate leaders. I invite you to read this catalog carefully. It will provide you with valuable information and insight. You will find everything you need to plan your educational experience. Atlanta Technical College is a place where you will discover the life-changing power of education. We will work hard to prepare you for a high-wage, high-performance career. Your success is our business, and we take our job seriously. You are a valuable asset to the Atlanta Technical College community, and your life will be transformed by your experiences here. At the same time, this college community will also be enriched because of you. We welcome your leadership, scholarship, service, creativity and involvement. Atlanta Technical College is the college for your future, and we look forward to your joining our community! With wishes for your academic success, Alvetta Peterman Thomas, Ed.D. President 4

6 TABLE OF CONTENTS Philosophy, Core Values, Mission Statement, Expanded Statement of Purpose 1 Warranty, Accreditation, Disclaimer, Nondiscrimination Policy 2 Campus descriptions and Directions to the Main Campus 3 Welcome Letter from the President 4 Table of Contents 5 College Calendar 13 About Atlanta Technical College 21 History 21 STUDENT AFFAIRS 22 General Policies 22 Admissions Procedures 23 Admission Requirements 23 Age 23 Education 23 Admissions Testing 23 Documentation of Residency and Citizenship 23 Application Deadline 23 Blood and Airborne Pathogens 24 Regular Admission 24 Provisional Admission 25 Learning Support Admission 25 Special Status Admission 25 Transient Student Admission 25 Readmission of Former Students 25 Transfer Student Admission 26 Dual Enrollment Admission 26 Joint Enrollment Admission 26 Home Schooled Applicant Guidelines 26 Advanced Placement/Transfer Credit 26 Military Training Credit 27 Credit for Courses Offered by Business 27 Credit by Standard Exam 27 Credit by Articulation 27 Institutional Exemption Exam 27 International Student Admission 27 Program/Major Change within the College 28 Residence Requirements for Degree/Diploma 28 State Residency 28 Eligibility for In-state Tuition Waiver 29 New Student Orientation 30 Services for Students with Disabilities 30 Procedures for Requesting Services 30 STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 31 Student Organizations and Activities 31 Accounting Club 31 Club Metro Collegiate DECA 31 Culinary Arts Club 31 Foundation Settlers for Future Minds 31 Georgia Occupational Award of Leadership 31 5

7 The Halle Exchange - Germany Exchange Program 31 Health Information Management Student Association 31 International Club 32 Millennium Club 32 National Technical Honor Society 32 Phi Beta Lambda 32 Skills USA 32 Student Government Association 32 Student Leadership Council 32 Visual Graphix Group 32 General Student Conduct Regulations 33 Student Appeals and Due Process 33 Student Conduct 33 Illegal Drug Statement 33 Disability-Related Complaints 34 Sexual Harassment Complaints 34 Children on Campus 34 Student Right to Know and Campus Security Act 34 Health Services 34 Electronic Devices in Classrooms and Labs 34 Student Representation in Governance 34 Student Rights and Responsibilities 34 FINANCIAL AID AND FEES 36 Federal & State Financial Aid Programs 36 Federal Pell Grant (PELL) 36 Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (FSEOG) 36 Federal Work Study (FWS) 36 Helping Outstanding Pupils Educationally (HOPE) Scholarship 37 Georgia HERO scholarship 37 Law Enforcement Personnel Grant 37 Public Safety Grant 37 Student Eligibility 37 Eligibility Criteria 38 Application Process 38 Deadline Dates 38 Satisfactory Academic Progress 38 Maintaining Financial Assistance 38 Verification Process 39 Special Circumstances 39 Financial Aid Counselors 39 Communicating with Students 39 Missing Document Letters 39 Award Letters 39 Refunds 39 Federal R2T4 Policy 39 State Refund Policy 40 Repayment Requirements 40 Veterans and Eligible Dependents Educational Benefits 40 Certify 40 Enrollment Status Changes and Withdrawals 40 Change of Program or Place of Training 40 Address Changes 40 Time Frame/Payment of Benefits 41 6

8 Satisfactory Academic Progress 41 Fee Schedule 41 Educational Costs 41 Payment of Fees 42 Explanation of Fees 42 Tuition Fee 42 Out of State Tuition 42 International Student Tuition 42 Application Fee 42 Student Activity Fee 42 Registration Fee 43 Accident Insurance Fee 43 Late Registration Fee 43 Books, Tools, Uniforms, Equipment 43 Graduation Fee 43 Senior Citizen Fees 43 Employee Fees 43 Transcript Fee 43 Replacement of Student Identification 43 Academic Credit by Departmental Examination 43 Replacement Diploma 44 Parking / Decal 44 Financial Obligations 44 Drop/Add Period 44 Withdrawal Procedures 44 Refund of Tuition and Fees 44 Cancelled Classes 44 Refund of Books and Supplies 44 ACADEMIC POLICIES 45 Good Standing 45 Academic Warning 45 Academic Probation 45 Academic Suspension 45 Readmission 45 Attendance and Withdrawal Policies 45 Make-up Work 46 Assignments Missed During Disciplinary Suspension 46 Absence Due to Military Reserve or National Guard Duty 46 Course Load 46 Full-time Definition 46 Double Majors 46 Grading System 46 Grade Point Average 47 Graduation Grade Point Average 47 Graduation Requirements 47 Honor Graduates 47 Letter Grades 47 Grade Appeal Procedures 47 Academic Dismissal Appeal Procedures 47 Grade Change Procedures 48 Repeating a Course 48 Work Ethics Grade 48 Student Records 48 7

9 Release of Student Records 49 Change of Address 50 Registration 50 Academic Advisement 50 Web Registration 50 Georgia Virtual Technical College 50 ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT 51 Quick Start 51 Certified Specialist Programs 51 Professional Assessment and Certification Center 51 American College Testing (ACT) Center 52 WorkKeys and Georgia Work Ready Programs 53 Georgia Business Expansion Support Act 53 Customized Contract Training Programs 53 Continuing Education 53 American Heart Association Training Center 53 The Dennard Conference Center at Atlanta Technical College 54 STUDENT SUPPORT SERVICES 55 Student Success Center 55 The Reading Oasis 56 Career Placement Services 56 Adult Education Department - Adult Literacy/GED Preparation 56 GED Testing 57 Atlanta Technical College Institute for Males 58 Atlanta Technical College Childcare Center 59 Atlanta Technical College Foundation 60 Scholarships 60 Hardship Loans 60 Atlanta Technical College Alumni Association 61 LIBRARY SERVICES 62 Mission, Library Hours of Operation and Staff 62 Library Operation Guidelines 63 Conduct and Responsibilities 63 Book Returns and Fines 64 Printing and Photocopying 64 ARTS & SCIENCES DIVISION 66 COLL Bilingual Services/ English as a Second Language 66 General Education 67 Research 67 Writing 67 Reading 67 Oral Communication 67 Mathematics 67 Psychosocial Behavior 67 Learning Support Department 68 Learning Support/ESL Courses 68 General Core Requirements 68 PROGRAMS OF STUDY 70 ACCOUNTING PROGRAM 71 Accounting - Associate Degree 71 Accounting - Diploma 72 Computer Accounting Specialist - Certificate 73 8

10 Office Accounting Specialist - Certificate 74 Payroll Accounting Specialist 75 AIR CONDITIONING TECHNOLOGY 76 Air Conditioning Technology - Diploma 76 Air Conditioning Technician Assistant - Certificate 77 Heating and Air Conditioning Installation Tech - Certificate 78 AUTO COLLISION REPAIR 79 Automotive Collision Repair - Diploma 79 Automotive Collision Major Repair Assistant I - Certificate 80 Automotive Collision Major Repair Assistant II - Certificate 81 AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGY 82 Automotive Technology - Diploma 82 Auto Electrical/Electronic System Technician - Certificate 83 Automotive Chassis Technician Specialist - Certificate 83 Automotive Climate Control Technician - Certificate 84 Automotive Transmission Transaxle Tech Specialist - Certificate 85 AVIATION MAINTENANCE TECHNOLOGY 86 Aviation Maintenance Technology - Diploma 86 Avionics Maintenance Technology - Diploma 88 Aviation Airframe Technician - Certificate 90 Aviation Maintenance Technician - Certificate 91 Aviation Power Plan Technician - Certificate 93 Avionics Bench Technician - Certificate 94 BARBERING 96 Barbering - Diploma 96 Barbering for Cosmetologists - Certificate 97 BIOSCIENCE TECHNOLOGY 99 Bioscience Technology - Associate Degree 99 Bioscience Environmental Laboratory Technologist - Certificate 101 Bioscience Regulatory Assurance Technologist - Certificate 102 BUSINESS ADMINISTRATIVE TECHNOLOGY 104 Business Administrative Technology - Associate Degree 104 Business Administrative Technology - Diploma 106 Administrative Support Assistant - Certificate 108 Microsoft Excel Application Professional - Certificate 109 Microsoft Office Applications Professional - Certificate 109 Microsoft Word Application Professional - Certificate 110 BUSINESS MANAGEMENT 112 Business Management - Associate Degree 112 Business Management - Diploma 115 CARPENTRY 118 Carpentry - Diploma 118 Certified Construction Worker - Certificate 119 Framing Carpenter - Certificate 121 CERTIFIED CUSTOMER SERVICE SPECIALIST 121 Certified Customer Service Specialist - Certificate 121 COMMERCIAL TRUCK DRIVING 122 Commercial Truck Driving - Certificate 122 COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS 123 Computer Information Systems (Computer Programming) - Associate Degree 123 Computer Information Systems (Database Specialist) - Associate Degree 124 Computer Information Systems (Networking Specialist) - Associate Degree 126 9

11 Computer Information Systems (Computer Programming) - Diploma 127 Computer Information Systems (Database Specialist) - Diploma 128 Computer Information Systems (Networking Specialist) - Diploma 129 C++ Programmer - Certificate 131 CISCO Network Specialist - Certificate 131 Computer Hardware and Network Technician - Certificate 132 Database Administrator - Certificate 133 JAVA Programmer - Certificate 133 Linux/Unix Administrator - Certificate 134 Microsoft Network Administrator - Certificate 135 CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT 136 Construction Manager - Certificate 136 COSMETOLOGY 137 Cosmetology - Diploma 137 Shampoo Technician - Certificate 138 CRIMINAL JUSTICE 140 Criminal Justice Technology - Associate Degree 140 Criminal Justice Technology - Diploma 141 Criminal Justice Technology Specialist - Certificate 142 Criminal Investigation Specialist - Certificate 143 CULINARY ARTS 145 Culinary Arts - Associate Degree 145 Culinary Arts - Diploma 146 Culinary Nutrition Assistant - Certificate 148 Culinary Nutrition Manager - Certificate 148 Prep Cook - Certificate 149 DENTAL ASSISTING 151 Dental Assisting - Diploma 151 Basic Dental Assisting - Certificate 152 DENTAL HYGIENE 154 Dental Hygiene - Associates Degree 154 DENTAL LABORATORY TECHNOLOGY 158 Dental Laboratory Technology - Diploma 158 DESIGN AND MEDIA PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGY 160 Design and Media Production Technology - Associate Degree 160 Design and Media Production Technology - Diploma 163 Advertising Layout Specialist Certificate 165 Design and Media Production Specialist Certificate 166 Digital Illustration Specialist - Certificate 167 Graphic Design and Prepress Technician - Certificate 167 Motion Graphics Certificate 168 Photographer - Certificate 169 DIESEL EQUIPMENT TECHNOLOGY 170 Diesel Equipment Technology - Diploma 170 Diesel Electrical/Electronics Systems Technician - Certificate 171 Diesel Engine Service Tech - Certificate 171 Diesel Truck Maintenance Technician - Certificate 172 DISTRIBUTION-MATERIALS MANAGEMENT 173 Procurement - Associate Degree 173 Supply Chain Management - Associate Degree 176 Supply Chain Management - Diploma 178 Certified Warehousing and Distribution Specialist - Certificate

12 Supply Chain Manager - Certificate 180 DRAFTING 182 Drafting Technology - Diploma 182 CAD Operator - Certificate 183 EARLY CHILDHOOD CARE AND EDUCATION 184 Early Childhood Care and Education - Associate Degree 184 Early Childhood Care and Education - Diploma 185 Early Childhood Exceptionalities - Certificate 187 Early Childhood Program Administration - Certificate 188 Infant and Toddler Child Care Specialist - Certificate 191 ELECTRICAL CONSTRUCTION AND MAINTENANCE 191 Electrical Systems Technology - Diploma 192 Commercial Wiring - Certificate 192 Industrial Electrical Controls Technician - Certificate 193 Residential Wiring Technician 195 ELECTRONICS AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS 195 Electronics Fundamentals - Diploma 196 Electronics Technology - Diploma 198 FIRE SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY 198 Fire Science Technology - Associate Degree 198 Fire Science Technology - Diploma 199 Fire Fighter I - Certificate 200 Fire Fighter II - Certificate 201 HEALTH CARE SCIENCE 203 Healthcare Science Certificate 203 Healthcare Assistant - Certificate 205 HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY 206 Health Information Technology - Associate Degree 206 Health Information Coding Technology - Diploma 209 Medical Billing Clerk 210 HOTEL-RESTAURANT-TRAVEL MANAGEMENT 212 Hotel/Restaurant/Tourism Management - Associate Degree 212 Hotel/Restaurant/Tourism Management - Diploma 213 Hotel Management Specialist - Certificate 214 Food and Beverage Director - Certificate 215 Event Coordinator - Certificate 216 Travel Agency Operations Specialist - Certificate 217 Front Office Manager 217 Restaurant Manager 218 HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT SPECIALIST 219 Human Resource Management Specialist - Certificate 219 INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING AND SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGY 220 Industrial Engineering Technology Associate Degree 220 Industrial Systems Technology - Associate Degree 223 MARKETING MANAGEMENT 225 Marketing Management - Associate Degree 225 Marketing Management - Diploma 226 Small Business Marketing Manager - Certificate 227 MEDICAL ASSISTING 229 Medical Assisting - Diploma 229 MEDICAL LABORATORY TECHNOLOGY 232 Phlebotomy Technician - Certificate

13 NURSING AND RELATED PROGRAMS 234 Associate Degree Nursing 234 Hemodialysis Patient Care Specialist - Certificate 236 Patient Care Assistant - Certificate 237 PARALEGAL STUDIES 239 Paralegal Studies - Associate Degree 239 PARAMEDIC TECHNOLOGY 242 Paramedecine - Diploma 242 Advanced Emergency Medical Technician - Certificate 244 Emergency Medical Technician - Certificate 245 PHARMACY TECHNOLOGY 247 Pharmacy Technology - Associate Degree 247 Pharmacy Technology - Diploma 249 Pharmacy Assistant - Certificate 251 PHYSICAL THERAPIST ASSISTANT 252 Physical Therapist Assistant - Associate Degree 252 PLUMBING 257 Plumbing - Diploma 257 Plumbing Service and Systems Specialist - Certificate 258 Residential/Commercial Plumbing Technician - Certificate 258 RADIOLOGIC TECHNOLOGY 260 Radiologic Technology - Associate Degree 260 SIX SIGMA 262 Six Sigma Quality Assurance Specialist - Coming soon 262 Six Sigma Quality Assurance Professional 263 SURGICAL TECHNOLOGY 264 Surgical Technology - Associate Degree 264 TECHNICAL COMMUNICATIONS 267 Technical Specialist - Certificate 267 WELDING AND JOINING TECHNOLOGY 269 Welding and Joining Technology - Diploma 269 COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 271 ADMINISTRATION AND FACULTY 381 DIRECTORY OF FREQUENTLY CALLED NUMBERS

14 Campus Calendar - Fall Term 2013 Dates are subject to change. Please see our website at for changes. June 15, 2013 Financial Aid Application Deadline Fall 2013 July 1, 2013-July 17, 2013 July 1, 2013 July 4, 2013 July 5, 2013 Advisement/Registration Fall 2013 (Current Students) Returning Student Registration Begins Holiday-Campus Closed No Classes July 15, 2013 Financial Aid Documentation Deadline Fall 2013 July 17, 2013 July 18, 2013 Last Day for Advisement/Registration Fall 2013 (Current Students) New Student Orientation & Registration Fall 2013 (Business & Public Service Technologies) July 18, 2013 New Student/Re-entry Application Deadline Fall 2013 July 18, 2013 July 22, 2013 July 23, 2013 Program Change Deadline Fall 2013 (Current Student) New Student Orientation & Registration Fall 2013 (Arts & Sciences/Health & Public Safety Technologies) New Student Orientation & Registration Fall 2013 (Industrial & Transportation Technologies) July 26, 2013 Admissions Transcript & Document Deadline Fall 2013 July 26, 2013 Fee Payment Deadline (6pm Business Office /11:59pm Online) July 27, 2013 Last Day for Compass Testing Fall 2013 July 29, st Purge Fall 2013 July 31, 2013 Advisement/Registration Learning Support Fall 2013 (Current Students) August 7, 2013 Financial Aid Confirmation Deadline Fall 2013 August 7, 2013 Fee Payment Deadline (6pm Business Office/11:59pm Online) August 8, nd Purge Fall 2013 August 9, 2013 Final Registration Fall 2013 August 16, 2013 August 17, 2013 Fee Payment Deadline (6pm Business Office/11:59pm Online) Late registration fee applies beginning at 12 am August 19, rd Purge Fall 2013 August 20, 2013 Fall Classes Begin (Term 1 & 2) August 21, 2013 August 20-22, 2013 August 22, 2013 Angel Orientation 11 am, 2 pm, 5 pm Drop/Add Angel Orientation 11am, 2pm, 5pm 13

15 August 22, 2013 August 22, 2013 August 23, 2013 Last day for withdrawal without Financial Penalty (6 pm Registrar s Office/11:59 pm Online) Angel Orientation 11am, 2pm, 5pm Fee Payment Deadline (6pm Business Office/11:59pm Online) August 26, th Purge Fall 2013 August 26, 2013 September 2, 2013 No Shows Due Holiday-Campus Closed Campus Calendar - Spring Term 2014 Dates are subject to change. Please see our website at for changes. November 15, 2013 Financial Aid Application & Documentation Deadline Spring 2014 October 14 November 8, 2013 November 8, 2013 Advisement/Registration Spring 2014 (Current Students) 1st Fee Payment Deadline-Current Students (12noon Business Office /11:59pm Online) November 11, st Purge Spring 2014 November 12, 2013 November 13, 2013 November 14, 2013 New Student Orientation & Registration Spring 2014 (Industrial & Transportation Technologies) New Student Orientation & Registration Spring 2014(Business & Public Service Technologies) New Student Orientation & Registration Spring 2014(Arts & Sciences/Health & Public Safety Technologies) November 25, 2013 New Student/Re-entry Application Deadline Spring 2014 November 25, 2013 November 28, 2013 December 5, 2013 Program Change Deadline Spring 2014 (Current Student) Campus Closed Advisement/Registration Learning Support Spring 2014 (Current Students) December 6, 2013 Admissions Transcript & Document Deadline Spring 2014 December 7, 2013 Last Day for Compass Testing Spring 2014 December 9, nd Fee Payment Deadline-New Student Registration (6pm Business Office/11:59pm Online) December 12, nd Purge Spring 2014 December 17, 2013 Final Registration Spring 2014 December 18, rd Fee Payment Deadline-Final Registration (6pm Business Office/11:59pm Online) December 19, rd Purge Spring 2014 January 6, 2014 Spring Classes Begin (Term 1 & 2) January 6-8, 2014 January 8, 2014 Drop/Add Withdrawal without Financial Penalty 14

16 January 10, 2014 No Shows Due January 14, th Final Purge Spring 2014 January 17, 2014 January 20, 2014 January 31, 2014 January 29-31, 2014 January 31, 2014 January 31, 2014 Financial Aid Posted to Students Accounts Holiday-Campus Closed Refund to Student Accounts Spring 2014 Term 2-Midterm Exams Spring 2014 Term 2-Midterm Spring 2014 Term 2-Midterm Grades Due February 17, 2014 Graduation Application Due to Registrar Office (Spring 2014) February 20-25, 2014 February 26, 2014 February 26, 2014 February 26, 2014 February 28, 2014 March 3-21, 2014 March 21, 2014 March 21-25, 2014 Spring 2014 Term 1-Midterm Exams Spring 2014 Term 2-Classes End Spring 2014 Term 1-Midterm Spring 2014 Term 1-Midterm Grades Due Spring 2014 Term 3-Classes Begin Advisement Registration Spring 2014 (Current Students) 1st Fee Payment Deadline-Current Students (12noon Business Office/11:59pm Online) Spring 2014 Term 3-Midterm Exams March 24, st Purge Summer 2014 March 25, 2014 March 25, 2014 March 25, 2014 March 26, 2014 March 27, 2014 April 4, 2014 April 4, 2014 April 7-11, 2014 Spring 2014 Term 3-Midterm Grades Due Spring 2014 Term 3-Midterm New Student Orientation & Registration Spring 2014 (Arts & Sciences/Health & Public Safety Technologies) New Student Orientation & Registration Spring 2014 (Industrial & Transportation Technologies) New Student Orientation & Registration Spring 2014(Business & Public Service Technologies) No Classes Faculty Workday Spring Break April 10, 2014 April 18, 2014 April 21, nd Purge Summer 2014 Program Change Deadline Summer 2014 (Current Students) 2 nd Fee Payment Deadline-New Students (12noon Business Office/11:59pm Online) April 24, 2014 Advisement/Registration Learning Support Summer 2014 (Current Students) 15

17 April 29, 2014 April 30, 2014 April 30-May 6, 2014 May 7, 2014 May 12, 2014 May 16, 2014 Spring 2014 Term 1-Classes End Spring 2014 Term 3-Classes End Final Exams Grade Due to Registrar Grades Posted to Student Account Graduation Campus Calendar - Summer Term 2014 Dates are subject to change. Please see our website at for changes. March 15, 2014 Financial Aid Application & Documentation Deadline Summer 2014 March 3-21, 2014 March 21, 2014 March 24, st Purge Summer 2014 March 25, 2014 March 26, 2014 March 27, 2014 Advisement/Registration Summer 2014 (Current Students) 1 st Fee Payment Deadline-Current Students (12noon Business Office /11:59pm Online) New Student Orientation & Registration Summer 2014 (Arts & Sciences/Health & Public Safety Technologies) New Student Orientation & Registration Summer 2014 (Industrial & Transportation Technologies) New Student Orientation & Registration Summer 2014(Business & Public Service Technologies) April 10, 2014 Admissions Transcript & Document Deadline Summer 2014 April 10, 2014 New Student/Re-entry Application Deadline Summer 2014 April 10, 2014 April 18, 2014 Program Change Deadline Summer 2014 (Current Student) 2 nd Fee Payment Deadline-New Students (12noon Business Office/11:59pm Online) April 19, 2014 Last Day for Compass Testing Summer 2014 April 21, nd Purge Summer 2014 April 24, 2014 Advisement/Registration Learning Support Summer 2014 (Current Students) May 13, 2014 Final Registration Summer 2014 May 14, rd Fee Payment Deadline-Final Registration (6pm Business Office/11:59pm Online) May 15, rd Purge Summer 2014 May 21, 2014 May 21-23, 2014 May 23, 2014 Summer Classes Begin Drop/Add Withdrawal without Financial Penalty May 27, th Final Purge Summer

18 May 28, 2014 June 3, 2014 June 17, 2014 May 18-23, 2014 May 24, 2014 May 24, 2014 No Shows Due Financial Aid Posted to Students Accounts Refund to Student Accounts Summer 2014 Midterm Exams Summer 2014 Midterm Summer 2014 Midterm Grades Due June 9, 2014 Graduation Application Due to Registrar Office (Summer 2014) July 1-16, 2014 Advisement Registration Fall 2014 (Current Students) July 4, 2014 July 17, 2014 July 21, 2014 July 22, 2014 July 17, 2014 July 25, 2014 Campus Closed July 28, st Purge Fall 2014 New Student Orientation & Registration Fall 2014 (Business & Public Service Technologies New Student Orientation & Registration Fall 2014) (Arts & Sciences/Health & Public Safety Technologies) New Student Orientation & Registration Fall 2014 (Industrial & Transportation Technologies) Program Change Deadline Fall 2014 (Current Students) 1 st Fee Payment Deadline Current & New Students (12noon - Business Office/11:59pm Online) July 30, 2014 July 31, 2014 August 1-7, 2014 August 8, 2014 Advisement/Registration Learning Support Fall 2014 (Current Students) Summer 2014 Classes End Final Exams Grade Due to Registrar August 8, 2014 Final Registration Fall 2014 August 13, 2014 Grades Posted to Student Accounts Campus Calendar - Fall Term 2014 Dates are subject to change. Please see our website at for changes. June 15, 2014 Financial Aid Application Deadline Fall 2014 July 1-16, 2014 July 4, 2014 Advisement/Registration Fall 2014 (Current Students) Holiday-Campus Closed July 17, 2014 New Student/Re-entry Application Deadline Fall 2014 July 17, 2014 Program Change Deadline Fall 2014 (Current Student) July 17, 2014 Admissions Transcript & Document Deadline Fall

19 July 17, 2014 July 21, 2014 July 22, 2014 July 16, 2013 New Student Orientation & Registration Fall 2014 (Business & Public Service Technologies) New Student Orientation & Registration Fall 2014 (Arts & Sciences/Health & Public Safety Technologies) New Student Orientation & Registration Fall 2014 (Industrial & Transportation Technologies) 1 st Fee Payment Deadline Current-Students (6pm Business Office /11:59pm Online) July 17, st Purge Fall 2014 July 26, 2014 Last Day for Compass Testing Fall 2014 July 30, 2014 July 25, 2013 Advisement/Registration Learning Support Fall 2014 (Current Students) 2 nd Fee Payment Deadline New Students (12noon Business Office/11:59pm Online) July 28, nd Purge Fall 2014 August 8, 2014 Final Registration Fall 2014 August 11, rd Fee Payment Deadline Final Registration (6pm Business Office/11:59pm Online) August 12, rd Purge Fall 2014 August 19, 2014 Fall Classes Begin (Term 1 & 2) August 19-21, 2014 August 21, 2014 August 25, 2014 September 1, 2014 Drop/Add Withdrawal without Financial Penalty No Shows Due Holiday-Campus Closed September 3, th Purge Fall 2014 September 3, 2014 September 10-12, 2014 September 12, 2014 September 12, 2014 September 17, 2014 Financial Aid Posted to Students Accounts Fall 2014 Term 2-Midterm Exams Fall 2014 Term 2-Midterm Fall 2014 Term 2-Midterm Grades Due Refund to Student Accounts October 3, 2014 Graduation Application Due to Registrar Office (Fall 2014) October 4-8, 2014 October 9, 2014 October 9, 2014 October 9, 2014 October 13, 2014 October 13-31, 2014 Fall 2014 Term 1-Midterm Exams Fall 2014 Term 1-Midterm Fall 2014 Term 1-Midterm Grades Due Fall 2014 Term 2-Classes End Fall 2014 Term 3-Classes Begin Advisement Registration Spring 2015 (Current Students) 18

20 October 31, 2014 November 3, st Purge Spring st Fee Payment Deadline Current Students (12noon Business Office/11:59pm Online) November 3-5, 2014 November 6, 2014 November 6, 2014 November 6, 2014 November 4, 2014 November 5, 2014 November 6, 2014 November 26, 2014 November 26, 2014 November 27-28, 2014 December 1, 2014 Fall 2014 Term 3-Midterm Exams Fall 2014 Term 3-Midterm Fall 2014 Term 3-Midterm Grades Due Program Change Deadline Spring 2015 (Current Students) New Student Orientation & Registration Spring 2015 (Industrial & Transportation Technologies) New Student Orientation & Registration Spring 2015 (Business & Public Service Technologies) New Student Orientation & Registration Spring 2015 (Arts & Sciences/Health & Public Safety Technologies) Faculty Workday No Classes Holiday Break-Campus Closed 2 nd Fee Payment Deadline New Students (6pm Business Office/11:59pm Online) December 3, nd Purge Spring 2015 December 4, 2014 December 8-11, 2014 December 5, 2014 December 8, 2014 December 12, 2014 Advisement/Registration Learning Support Spring 2015 (Current Students) Final Exams Fall 2014 Term 1-Classes End Fall 2014 Term 3-Classes End Grade Due to Registrar December 12, 2014 Final Registration Spring 2015 December 13, 2014 December 17, 2014 December 17, 2014 Late Registration Fee Applies Grades Posted to Student Account 3 rd Fee Payment Deadline Final Registration (6pm Business Office/11:59pm Online) December 19, rd Purge Spring

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22 ABOUT ATLANTA TECHNICAL COLLEGE Atlanta Technical College is a postsecondary college under the governance of the Technical College System of Georgia (TCSG). As one of 25 technical colleges in the state, Atlanta Technical College adheres to the policies and requirements set forth by the TCSG. Atlanta Technical College prepares students for the world of work. The Community The location of Atlanta Technical College, in the southwestern corner of the city of Atlanta, places the college on an excellent site to provide maximum involvement in the city's exciting and progressive business, industrial, cultural, and educational communities. Atlanta is the corporate headquarters for many well-known companies such as AGL, AT&T Mobility LLC, CNN, Coca-Cola, the Southern Company, Delta Air Lines, and Turner Broadcasting Company. Host of the 1996 Centennial Olympic Games, Atlanta is home to the Atlanta Braves baseball team, the Atlanta Hawks and Atlanta Dream basketball teams, and the Atlanta Falcons football team. Facilities The largest single-site campus in the Technical College System of Georgia, Atlanta Technical College occupies a 46-acre campus on Metropolitan Parkway. Quality technical education requires laboratory facilities comparable to workplaces in business and industry. An annual budget of more than $24 million keeps the educational environment current with state-of-the-art technology. Budget expenditures have been generously supplemented with donations of equipment and technical advice from corporations committed to technical education. These business partnerships foster a new level of cooperation to enhance technical education. History Tracing its origin through six decades, Atlanta Technical College has grown from fairly modest beginnings. Atlanta Technical College was established as Smith-Hughes Vocational School at 232 Pryor Street, and first enrolled adults in vocational education in 1945 following World War II. The school was moved in 1964 to Smith High School at 535 Hill Street and renamed Hoke Smith Technical Institute. At that time, about 24 occupational programs were offered. Federal funding for vocational education in the late 1960s promoted the concept of area vocational technical schools. In 1953, the Northside extension campus, Tuxedo Center, was opened at 4191 Northside Drive in northwest Atlanta. In 1967, the school was reorganized as Atlanta Area Technical School and was moved to its current southwest campus, enrolling its first students in the new facilities in January The Child Care Center and Ferguson Hall Annex were completed the same year. In 1997, the school's name was changed to Atlanta Technical Institute, and the institution became part of the Georgia Department of Technical and Adult Education. Dr. Brenda Watts Jones was tapped to become president, making her the first African-American woman in Georgia to lead a technical institution. She served the college until 2007, and Dr. Alvetta Peterman Thomas was named president in In June 1999, Atlanta Technical Institute completed a $1.3 million renovation of its south entrance facade. The renovation provided covered walks and outdoor seating plazas. On July 1, 2000, the name was changed to Atlanta Technical College. In 2007, the college acquired use of the property at 1520 Metropolitan Parkway, adjacent to main campus, through the Atlanta Technical College Foundation, Inc. The facility at that location currently houses the Atlanta Technical College Institute for Males. The $14 million Brenda Watts Jones Allied Health and Technology Complex opened in the fall of In August 2012, the college completed a $4.8 million renovation of a new 36,000 square foot state-of-the-art library, testing center, and facility department hub. Accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS) and with an average semester enrollment of 4,800 students, Atlanta Tech offers associate degrees, diploma programs, technical certificates of credit, and continuing education short-term courses. In addition to day and evening class schedules, hybrid schedules and online courses are also offered. Additionally, Atlanta Technical College, through its Economic Development Division, develops customized courses for business and industry. Atlanta Technical College has produced seven state GOAL (Georgia Occupational Award of Leadership) winners and four state PRIDE (Performance Recognition Indicating Demonstrated Excellence) winners. GOAL is the highest award given to outstanding technical students in Georgia. In addition to having an excellent track record in producing winners in state competitions, Atlanta Technical College is proud of the students who also excel in regional and national competitions representing student associations and organizations. In 2007, Washington Monthly magazine named Atlanta Technical College America s Best Community College and the college was recognized by the Technical College System of Georgia with the Perdue Award for Technical College of the Year in Atlanta Technical College provides an exceptional education to a diverse group of students, representing ethnic groups from around the world, younger and older people, high school and college graduates, persons with special needs, and persons with varied backgrounds, academic requirements, and interests. Women are enrolled in nontraditional programs such as automotive technology, aviation maintenance technology, carpentry, and welding and joining technology. 21

23 Student Affairs Student Affairs Division The Student Affairs Division is designed to create an environment that will serve the total development of students. The division is a multifaceted unit, which includes admissions, orientation, recruitment, career guidance, student activities, Career Placement Services, and assistance to students with special needs. The purposes of these activities are: To ensure that admissions and other Student Affairs are approached from the perspective of students. To ensure that the policies, procedures, and programs affecting students provide them with opportunities to reach their technical and career goals, both curricular and co-curricular. The accomplishment of this mission promises to produce citizens who are able to live meaningful and productive lives, and who are prepared to compete in a global market. General Policies Atlanta Technical College is open to all persons who are eligible for admission and is committed to serving the educational needs of all who apply, without regard to age, race, color, national origin, sex, religion, marital status, disability, political affiliation or belief. Admission to a Technical College System of Georgia (TCSG) college is a multi-step process which consists of the evaluation of prior academic experience and an assessment for postsecondary readiness of eligible applicants. Admission to specific programs requires that applicants demonstrate potential for success as measured by satisfactory placement test scores and completion of all Applicants whose test scores indicate that additional educational preparation is needed will be required to satisfactorily complete appropriate learning support courses to prepare for their programs. Learning support services such as English as a Second Language (ESL), tutorial labs, and individualized tutorials also help prepare students for program success. Applicants who submit misleading information will be subject to denial or dismissal without a refund. All credentials submitted become and remain the property of Atlanta Technical College and will not be returned to the applicant, duplicated, nor transferred to another institution. Graduates of non-accredited or non-state approved schools are assessed on a case-by-case basis. Applicants with an incomplete file or application received after the deadline may choose to be processed for special admission status. 22

24 ADMISSION PROCEDURES Admission Requirements It is the mission of the college to assist students in achieving their personal goals. It is the responsibility of the student to complete the requirements for admission. Age Applicants for admission must be at least sixteen (16) years of age. Applicants for Cosmetology and Allied Health programs must be seventeen (17) years of age or older. Education Educational requirements are determined by the Technical College System of Georgia and the College. Requirements vary according to the program of study. A high school diploma or the equivalent (GED) is desirable but is not an entrance requirement for all programs. All applicants must have graduated from high school or completed the GED requirements prior to graduation from any program. Applicants who have completed (courses with grade C or better) a minimum of 30 earned semester or 45 earned quarter hours at the degree level, may submit official college transcripts in lieu of high school transcript or GED transcript. Home-schooled student documents will be accepted according to Technical College System of Georgia policy. Admissions Testing Applicants must take the required COMPASS or ASSET placement test or submit satisfactory SAT I or ACT test scores. Test scores will be considered valid for a period of five years. Documentation of Residency and Citizenship Applicants for admission must provide two forms of proof to support a claim for in-state residency, permanent resident citizenship status, and refugee status. If you are under 24 years of age and are a claimed dependent of a parent/guardian, we will need two forms of proof from your parent(s) or legal guardian as outlined in the Petition for Georgia Residency. This information must be received if you are seeking Georgia residency. A listing of specific acceptable documentation is available in the admissions office. A listing of specific acceptable documentation is available at and in the admissions office. Application Deadline Applicants for admission to degree, diploma, and technical certificate of credit programs must have all documents (transcripts, test scores, etc.) on file in the Admissions Office according to the deadline dates, published in the school calendar. Applicants with an incomplete file or application received after the deadline may choose to be processed for special admission status or another term. 23

25 Blood and Airborne Pathogens: Students enrolled in Category I and II programs at Atlanta Technical College will be performing tasks in which there is a normal occurrence for exposure to blood, other potentially infectious body materials, and airborne pathogens. These tasks will be performed in the classroom, laboratory, and clinical activities for each occupational training program/course. Students will be required to present documentation of Hepatitis B and Tuberculosis immunizations as a result of potential occupational exposure. Students should contact their program directors for more information. CATEGORY I STUDENT OCCUPATIONAL TRAINING PROGRAMS/COURSES INVOLVED: The technical college student occupational programs or courses involved in the performance of Category I tasks are: 1. BARBERING 2. COSMETOLOGY 3. DENTAL ASSISTING 4. DENTAL LABORATORY TECHNOLOGY 5. EARLY CHILDHOOD CARE & EDUCATION 6. EMERGENCY MEDICAL TECHNICIAN / FIREFIGHTER 7. HEMODIALYSIS PATIENT CARE TECHNICIAN 8. MEDICAL ASSISTING 9. PARAMEDICINE 10. PATIENT CARE ASSISTING 11. PHARMACY ASSISTANT 12. PHARMACY TECHNOLOGY 13. PHLEBOTOMY TECHNICIAN 14. PRACTICAL NURSING CATEGORY II STUDENT OCCUPATIONAL AREAS INVOLVED: The technical college student occupational programs or courses involved in the performance of Category II tasks are: 1. BARBERING 2. COSMETOLOGY 3. CULINARY ARTS 4. DENTAL ASSISTING 5. DENTAL LABORATORY TECHNOLOGY 6. DENTAL HYGIENE 7. EARLY CHILDHOOD CARE & EDUCATION 8. EMERGENCY MEDICAL TECHNICIAN/ FIREFIGHTER 9. HEMODIALYSIS PATIENT CARE TECHNICIAN 10. MEDICAL ASSISTING 11. PARAMEDICINE 12. PATIENT CARE ASSISTING 13. PHARMACY ASSISTANT 14. PHARMACY TECHNOLOGY 15. PHLEBOTOMY TECHNICIAN 16. PHYSICAL THERAPY 17. PRACTICAL NURSING 18. RADIOLOGY TECHNOLOGY 19. REGISTERED NURSE 20. SURGICAL TECHNOLOGY Regular Admission Applicants are asked to submit the following information to the Admissions Office. A completed application for admission with a $20 (nonrefundable) application fee. A completed high school diploma or GED. Applicants who have completed a minimum of 30 semester hours or 45 quarter hours at the degree level may submit official college transcripts in lieu of high school diploma or GED. Satisfactory scores on the SAT I, ACT, ASSET, or COMPASS placement test or a grade of C or better from an accredited postsecondary institution in English and math level 100 or higher. Algebra placement test scores are required for certain diploma programs and all degree programs. Test scores are considered valid for placement for a period of 5 years. 24

26 Applicants will be admitted with regular status to an associate degree program with the following SAT I and ACT scores: SATI Verbal: 450 Math 430 ACT Composite: 20 Applicants will be admitted with regular status to a diploma or technical certificate of credit program with the following SAT I and ACT scores: SATI Verbal: 410 Math 410 ACT Composite: 18 ASSET or COMPASS scores for all degree, diploma, and certificate programs are available upon request in the admissions office. Provisional Admission Applicants whose test scores do not meet regular admission standards may be admitted on a provisional basis. Provisional students may take learning support classes and occupational courses simultaneously. Students must satisfactorily complete prescribed learning support classes in order to progress through the curriculum. Provisional admission requires the applicant to (1) satisfactorily complete prescribed learning support classes, and (2) meet all other regular admission requirements. Learning Support Admission Learning Support admission is granted to students who score below the provisional cut scores in English, math and reading. These students are granted Learning Support status and receive institution credit. The students may not take occupational courses until achieving provisional status. Learning Support admission requires the applicant to (1) enroll in learning support classes, (2) meet all other regular admissions requirements, and (3) meet admissions test standards prior to being converted to regular admission status. Learning Support students are not eligible for federal financial aid (i.e. Pell, SEOG, and Federal Work Study). Learning Support students are eligible to enroll in learning support classes only. Students who fail the same learning support course for three semesters will not be able to enroll in the course again without receiving special written permission from the Vice President for Academic Affairs. Students who have received satisfactory grades in equivalent learning support courses at other Technical College System of Georgia colleges may request equivalent institution credit for exemption from such courses. Special Status Admission (Non-credential seeking) The special status admission category is designed for students who are not seeking a certificate/diploma/degree but who desire credit for coursework in a specific program. Special status students are not permitted to enroll in clinical courses. Students must submit an application along with a $20 (nonrefundable) application fee, and the following admission parameters apply under this classification. Students may receive credit for an unlimited number of courses, but apply up to a maximum of 25 quarter or 17 semester credit hours into a specific program for credential seeking purposes after achieving regular admit status. The number of hours taken as a special admits student in no way waives the requirements of the regular admission process. 1. Special status students are not eligible for financial aid. 2. Courses selected by special status students are subject to specific prerequisite requirements. 3. The number of hours taken as a special admits student in no way waives the requirements of the regular admission process. 4. Students may enroll in classes on space-available basis. Transient Student Admission Applicants who are in good standing at another accredited institution may be permitted to enroll as transient students on a spaceavailable basis. All transient applicants should be advised by their home institution concerning recommended courses in order to comply with requirements of their home institution. Transient students must submit the following: 1. A completed admissions application along with a $20 (nonrefundable) application fee. 2. Transient Agreement Form that verifies that the student is in good standing. The form should also list the courses the student is eligible to take. 3. A current Transient Agreement Letter is required for each term of enrollment. Readmission of Former Students Students who are absent from Atlanta Technical College for one to four semesters will be required to: 1. Submit a re-admission application to the Admissions Office by the advertised application deadline. 2. Meet the Atlanta Technical College general catalog admission requirements in effect at the time of re-admission. 3. Submit to the Admissions Office official transcripts from all high schools, colleges or universities attended. 25

27 Transfer Student Admission Applicants for transfer admission must submit the following to the Admissions Office: 1. Application for admission along with a $20 (nonrefundable) application fee. 2. Official transcript(s) from each post-secondary institution attended. 3. Applicants who have completed a minimum of 30 semester or 45 quarter hours at the degree level from a regionally accredited college or university may submit official college transcripts in lieu of high school diploma or GED. 4. Satisfactory scores on the SAT I, ACT, ASSET, COMPASS placement test or a grade of C or better from an accredited postsecondary institution in English and math level 100 or higher. Dual Enrollment Admission Dual enrollment provides high school students the opportunity to begin college coursework at Atlanta Technical College while still enrolled in high school. Students will receive credits for successfully completed coursework at their high school and at Atlanta Technical College. Courses to be taken are approved by the high school principal and/or school counselor and must be on the Department of Education's approved course list. Joint Enrollment Admission Joint enrollment provides high school students the opportunity to take College coursework in addition to their high school courses. Jointly enrolled students ONLY receive credits at Atlanta Technical College. Home Schooled Applicant Guidelines Applicants of home schools located in Georgia who did not attend a recognized accredited program must adhere to the following alternative path for admission: 1. Submit a Certificate of Attendance form from the local superintendent s office or a Declaration of Intent to utilize a Home Study Program from the Georgia Department of Education verifying that the parent or legal guardian complied with the requirements of home study programs as referenced in O.C.G.A Submit annual progress reports or a final transcript for the equivalent of the home-schooled student s junior and senior years. The final progress report should include the graduation date. Advanced Placement/Transfer Credit To ensure that coursework presented for transfer credit is at the collegiate level and comparable to Atlanta Tech's courses and learning outcomes, the College reserves the right to validate transfer credit, including course-by-course, tech prep, and military credit, courses offered by businesses, standard examination, and institutional examination. Transfer of Credit Atlanta Technical College encourages applicants who qualify to apply for advanced placement in their programs of study to submit previous postsecondary coursework from regionally accredited institutions. All students who wish to transfer credit(s) from another institution must complete a Transfer of Credit Form one month prior to the start of the term. Students may receive credit for courses taken at another postsecondary institution if the following admissions standards are met: The courses transferred must meet the College's accreditation standards, course content, and student learning outcomes as the Atlanta Tech course that it replaces. An official transcript from the previous institution attended is on file with the Registrar. A grade of "C" or better has been earned for each course to be transferred. Medical (and other health related) courses must have been taken within five years of the date of the transfer request. There is no time limit on the transfer of general core courses (English, mathematics, and psychology), all other courses have a transfer limit of ten years. All other courses have a transfer limit of ten years. No more than 50% of the total required hours in a certificate, diploma, or degree program will be approved for transfer credit. The course number for a transfer course must be equal to or greater than the course number of the Atlanta Tech credited course. The Registrar will make the final decision regarding awarding transfer of credit, based on state standards and/or course learning outcomes. Grade points will not be assigned. Atlanta Tech reserves the right to test the proficiency of students for coursework to be transferred. In instances, where course equivalency is questionable, the Registrar makes the final decision in consultation with the instructional department chair. 26

28 Transfer of credit will be indicated on students' transcripts with a "TR". Request for transfer credit should be done prior to registration. The Registrar will respond in writing to the request prior to enrollment if possible, but prior to the end of the first semester of enrollment. Military Training Credit Atlanta Technical College accepts credit for training received in the armed services provided that the training is certified by the Guide to the Evaluation of Education on the Armed Services or by the official catalog of the Community College of the Armed Forces or a similar document. Credit will be awarded when training experience meets required competencies of courses offered at Atlanta Technical College Credit for Courses Offered by Business Atlanta Technical College accepts credit for corporate training if it correlates with the courses in diploma programs. This training must be certified by an official document such as the National Guide to Educational Credit for Training Programs. Credit by Standard Exam Courses may be exempted through competency testing or nationally normed exams, such as the College Level Examination Program (CLEP) subject area examinations, the Proficiency Examination Program (PEP), and Advanced Placement Program (AP) offered by the College Board. To receive credit the exam must be taken within 5 years of the request. Credit by Articulation Courses can be articulated for classes taken while in high school, that were taught by the high school instructor. Students have to take the appropriate course (s), meet the eligibility requirements and pass the course examination. Institutional Exemption Exam Institutional exemption exams for demonstrating written and/or performance mastery of skills are available within instructional program for certain courses. Students may inquire with their instructors, academic advisors and/or divisional directors about the availability of exemption tests. The exemption test shall be done within or prior to the first 7 days of the semester. Students may qualify for a locally developed exemption test based on the following conditions: Enrolled at Atlanta Technical College at the time of test administration. Present evidence to indicate that past education, training, and /or work experience has been acquired and was similar to the content of the course to be replaced (experiential learning). Receive a score of 80 percent or higher on the examination for exemption. Register and pay fees for the course to be awarded credit by examination. Course fees will not exceed 25 percent of the tuition for the course. If a student previously attempted, audited, failed, or withdrew from a course after the drop/add period at Atlanta Tech, the student cannot receive credit for that course by exemption examination. The student will be allowed only one exemption per course. A prerequisite course requirement must be satisfied. If a student exempts a course, credit is given, but no grade points are calculated for that course. Exemption credit earned is considered toward the total hours earned, but does not count toward carried hours for the quarter. Course exemption may affect the full -time status of a student. A student may exempt no more than 50 percent of the program course work to be eligible for an Atlanta Tech degree, diploma, or technical certificate of credit. Students are responsible for the cost of exempted classes, and financial aid is not available for exempted courses. International Student Admission Atlanta Technical College is approved by Immigration and Naturalization Services for the issuance of I-20s. International students must meet INS requirements and those admissions requirements applicable to non-international student applicants. The following guidelines shall apply to the admission of all international students (I-20) Student Visa: 1. International students must submit the application form and $20 non-refundable application fee. 2. Students must submit an official high school transcript *translated in English, evaluated and determined to be equivalent to a U.S. high school diploma. 3. INS Form I-134 (Affidavit of Financial Support) must document, by bank statements and tax returns, a minimum of $26,000 per academic school to cover tuition and living expenses. 4. Students must prove fluency in English TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language). 5. Submit satisfactory proof SAT1, ACT, or Compass test scores. 6. Students who are lawful residents in another country and are studying at Atlanta Technical College on a student visa shall pay tuition at a rate four times that charged to Georgia residents. 7. Students who are lawfully documented residents of the United States, but do not otherwise qualify as Georgia residents shall pay tuition which is twice the rate charged to Georgia residents. 27

29 8. Non-resident tuition may be waived, on a semester-by-semester basis, for an international student selected by the President. However, the number of such waivers shall not exceed two percent of the full-time equivalent student enrollment in the quarter immediately preceding that in which the waiver is to be granted. Students receiving the waiver shall pay resident tuition rates but will not qualify for HOPE program scholarships. 9. Students at Atlanta Technical College are required to identify their country of lawful residence on the admissions application and are asked to submit documentation of state residency, permanent resident citizenship status, and refugee status. Prospective international students applying from within the United States must also submit: Change of Status form (I-539) and $ money order made out to the INS. Transfer Clearance Form to your advisor at your current college, if applicable. Students must hold a valid passport and visa. *We require applicants to use one of the following agencies for evaluation services for international transcripts/credentials: Josef Silny and Associates, Inc. Educational Credentials Evaluators 7101 SW 102 Avenue P.O. Box Miami, FL Milwaukee, WI Telephone: (305) Telephone: (414) Fax: (305) Web address: Foreign Credential Evaluations, Inc Market Boulevard, Suite 330 PMB#305 Roswell, GA Telephone: (770) Web address: Program/Major Change within the College Students who are pursuing a degree, diploma, or certificate at Atlanta Technical College and who desire to change their program/major are required to: 1. Obtain a Change of Program/Major Form from the Admissions Office. 2. Return the completed form to the Admissions Office before the semester deadline for applications. 3. Must meet admissions requirements for the desired program. Credits earned in one program may not be applicable toward another program. Verification of credits applicable to the new program/major will be given in writing from the Registrar's Office upon evaluation of the student's request for transfer credit. Residence Requirements for Degree/Diploma Atlanta Technical College requires that a minimum of 50% of the course work of a particular program of study be completed while enrolled at Atlanta Technical College. However, the fifty percent requirement may be waived if the student has completed a program from which standards have been implemented within the Technical College System of Georgia system. When a student attends two or more state technical colleges, the degree/diploma will be awarded by the technical college where the larger number of hours has been accumulated. State Residency A. Overview Determining a student s residency status must be based on the existence of surrounding objective circumstances that indicate a student s intent to maintain a permanent presence, or Domicile, in the State of Georgia. No single factor is conclusive. Similarly, there is no predetermined number of factors required to be met. The following indicators may be considered when documenting the Domicile of an individual, but this is not an exhaustive list: Location of employment. Location of voter registration. Location of property, including home purchase, and taxes paid thereon. State for which the individual filed and paid state income taxes. Address and other information on federal and state income tax returns. State where the person s automobile title is registered and the payment of property taxes thereon. 28

30 Address on driver s license and state of issuance. Address on the Georgia Driver s License Bureau ID. Reason for initially coming to Georgia. State of issuance of business, professional, or other licenses. Location of checking, savings or other banking accounts. Citizenship Requirements: o A student meets the Citizenship Requirements, for purposes of this procedure and the related policies, if he or she is a United States Citizen, born or naturalized. o A student meets the Citizenship requirements, for purposes of this procedure and the related policies, if he or she is an Eligible Non-Citizen, according to the Federal Title IV definition. o Ineligible Non-Citizens: A Non-Citizen cannot qualify for in-state tuition. However, in the discretion of the President of the college the international tuition may be waived in favor of an out of state tuition rate for a Non-Citizen. B. Georgia Residency 1. Dependent Students: A Dependent Student meets the Georgia Residency Requirements, for purposes of this procedure and the related policies, if his or her Parent has established and maintained Domicile in the State of Georgia for at least 12 consecutive months immediately preceding the first day of classes of the school term for which the student is seeking in-state tuition, and Such student graduated from an eligible high school located in the State of Georgia; or The Parent claimed the student as a dependent on the Parent s most recent federal income tax return. A Dependent Student meets the Georgia Residency Requirements, for purposes of this procedure and related policies, if a United States court-appointed Legal Guardian has established and maintained Domicile in the State of Georgia for at least 12 consecutive months immediately preceding the first day of classes of the school term for which the student is seeking in-state tuition, provided that the appointment was not made to avoid payment of Out-of-State Tuition. 2. Independent Students: An Independent Student meets the Georgia Residency requirements, for purposes of this procedure and the related policies, if he or she has established and maintained Domicile in the State of Georgia for at least 12 consecutive months immediately preceding the first day of classes of the school term for which the student is seeking In-State Tuition. It is presumed that no Independent Student shall have gained or acquired Georgia Residency, for purposes of this procedure and the related policies, while attending a TCSG college without clear evidence of having established a Domicile in the State of Georgia for purposes other than attending a TCSG college. C. Retaining Georgia Residency Dependent Students: If the Parent or United States court-appointed Legal Guardian of a Dependent Student who was correctly determined to meet Georgia Residency requirements for the purposes of this procedure and the related policies, establishes Domicile outside the State of Georgia, such student shall continue to retain his or her status as a Georgia Resident, for purposes of this procedure and the related policies, as long as such student remains continuously enrolled in a TCSG college. Independent Students: If an Independent Student who was correctly determined to meet Georgia Residency requirements, for purposes of this procedure and the related policies, temporarily relocates outside the State of Georgia, but returns to the State of Georgia within 12 months, such student shall retain his or her status as a Georgia Resident, for purposes of In-State Tuition. D. Eligibility for In-State Tuition Waivers: Students in the following classifications are eligible for In-State Tuition waivers. These waivers do not affect the student s eligibility for the HOPE Scholarship or Grant, except for waivers for military personnel and their dependents as provided for in the GSFC regulations: Employees and their children who move to Georgia for employment with a new or expanding industry as defined in OCGA Full-time employees of the Technical College System of Georgia, their spouses, and dependent children. Full-time teachers in a public school, a military base, or a public postsecondary college, their spouses, and dependent children. United States military personnel stationed in Georgia and on active duty and their dependents living in Georgia. United States military personnel, spouses and dependent children reassigned outside Georgia, who remain continuously enrolled and on active military status. United States military personnel and their dependents that are domiciled in Georgia, but are stationed outside the State. 29

31 Students who are domiciled in out-of-state counties bordering on Georgia counties and who are enrolled in a Technical College with a local reciprocity agreement. Career consular officers and their dependents that are citizens of the foreign nation which their consular office represents, and who is living in Georgia under orders of their respective governments. This waiver shall apply only to those consular officers whose nations operate on the principle of educational reciprocity with the United States. New Student Orientation Orientation sessions for new students are held at the beginning of each academic semester to acquaint students with the institutions programs and policies. During the orientation session, students receive an Orientation Manual, academic program advisement, Student Handbook, and class schedules. Each dean is responsible for planning and providing follow-up orientation as needed for new students entering all divisions. Staff members from the Student Affairs Division and Administrative Services Division are available to share important information regarding services that are provided. Services for Students with Disabilities Atlanta Technical College provides program accessibility and reasonable accommodations to individuals defined as disabled under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 or the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) of Special services assistance is designed to provide a comprehensive program of supportive services to individuals with disabilities. Students who have a legally defined disability and wish to request accommodations must first register with the ADA/Disabilities Services and provide documentation of the disability and its effect on their ability to perform in an academic environment. Procedures for Requesting Service In order to ensure that the appropriate supportive services are provided in an efficient and effective manner, students must adhere to the following guidelines: 1. Provide a written request identifying the type of accommodation needed. 2. Provide medical, psychological/diagnostic report completed by a licensed physician, psychiatrist, diagnostician or psychologist within the last three years prior to desire entry date to the college. 3. Request services for personnel at least 30 days before enrollment date and at least days before enrollment for equipment or supplies. 30

32 STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS AND ACTIVITIES Student organizations and clubs enrich the campus experience. Active participation in these groups affords students the opportunity to network with community and business leaders, develop life-long friendships, compete in national and international competitions, study abroad, and develop a wide-array of skills that can be useful in the workplace. The following organizations are currently active on the Atlanta Technical College campus. Please consult the website for updates on club activities. The Accounting Club (NUMBSRS) *Program club for accounting The Accounting Club, known as NUMBSRS, is a pre-professional and social club for accounting students and other interested individuals. Established in 2006, the mission of the Accounting Club is to broaden the student's appreciation of the profession of accounting. The Club promotes and expands students' exposure to the accounting and business communities by instituting a strong network of professional contacts; facilitating communication between the community, administration, and students; assisting students in preparing for a career in the accounting profession; and sponsoring various programs to enrich the educational and social experiences at Atlanta Technical College. Club Metro 1560 Club Metro 1560 is the arts and entertainment organization on campus. Students learn about the music entertainment industry and have opportunities to produce and perform creative works. Collegiate DECA The Atlanta Technical College Chapter of Collegiate DECA (formerly Delta Epsilon Chi) was chartered with the purpose of planning activities that further the members' knowledge and skills in marketing, management, and entrepreneurship. The organization's close ties with the business community provide opportunities for members and an appreciation of the free enterprise system. Culinary Arts *Program club for culinary The Culinary Arts Club is designed to: Unite its members in the bonds of friendship. Inform members of all activities and opportunities related to the culinary world in the metropolitan area and abroad. To help cultivate skills and encourage high scholastic and ethical standards. To help alleviate problems in the area of hardships to its members. To stimulate one another in the pursuit of knowledge and to be of service to the community and abroad. Foundation Setters for Future Minds (FSFFM) *Program club for early childhood education The purpose of FSFFM is to recognize the needs and desires of Atlanta Technical College Early Childhood Education students by providing a forum, support system and/or network where by ideas and communications related to school or business can be discussed. Georgia Occupational Award of Leadership The Georgia Occupational Award of Leader (GOAL) award is presented to the student elected most outstanding from a group of nominees submitted by instructors. Selection is based on grades earned, instructors' rating of students' personal traits, and an interview before a screening committee. The state GOAL winner, who traditionally receives a new automobile and a golden medallion, serves as representative of technical and adult education for the state of Georgia for a year. The Halle Exchange - Germany Exchange Program In 1998, Atlanta Technical College established an international partnership with Felix-Fechenbach School in Detmold, Germany. The theme of this partnership is "Living, Learning, and Working Together." Biennially groups of students visit the partner school, live with host families, and experience international cultural and educational activities. Plans are being made to expand the program to include postsecondary schools in other countries. Health Information Management Student Association *Program club for health information management The Health Information Management Student Association (HIMSA) was established in January 2013 by students and staff of the Health Information Technology program. The purpose of HIMSA is to promote and educate the community about the health 31

33 information management profession through community activities and fundraisers; to promote career and educational development; and networking amongst students in the Health Information Technology program at Atlanta Technical College. International Club The International Club is an organization formed to unite students from various cultures. Through the organization, students exchange ideas and to promote the understanding of different cultures. Each year, the club works with ATC staff to host International Day which is designed to help the entire campus community appreciate and understand foreign cultures. Millennium Club The organization is exclusively for educational purposes to promote occupational technical training and job attainment through Atlanta Technical College, for males and females who are enrolled in nontraditional programs for their gender. Students enrolled in the college in technical programs that are nontraditional for their gender and maintain a 2.2 GPA are eligible for membership. Students are exposed to professionals in the workplace that exemplify leadership, integrity, vision and commitment to the field they represent. National Technical Honor Society National Technical Honor Society is the acknowledged leader in the recognition of outstanding student achievement in career and technical education. The Society encourages higher scholastic achievement, cultivates a desire for personal excellence, and helps top students find success in today's highly competitive workplace. The criteria for NTHS applicants must: (1) be nominated by an instructor; (2) have completed two quarters of full-time training at Atlanta Tech in a diploma or degree program; and (3) have a GPA of 3.5 or higher. Phi Beta Lambda Phi Beta Lambda (PBL), a national organization founded in 1958 with state and local chapters, was established for students interested in a career in business. The activities of PBL provide an opportunity for business students to prepare for business and office occupations. It helps students to learn more about our economic system and the business community. By participating in PBL, students are able to get practical experience in the business community. Students participate in local, state, regional, and national competitions. Skills USA The Skills USA organization was founded in 1965 to serve students enrolled in technical, and health occupations, personal services, and in skilled and construction trades. Skills USA is dedicated to providing experiences and opportunities for individuals through the development of citizenship and leadership qualities. It also emphasizes leadership, dignity of work, citizenship, and respect for others. Local Skills USA winners compete in state and national competitions. Student Government Association The purpose of the SGA shall be to serve and represent the student body, provide a channel through which students may exhibit leadership, recommend activities that enhance student life outside the classroom; as well, provide constructive discussion leading to improvement of the institution. An additional purpose is to improve communication among students, faculty, staff, and the community to promote College spirit and loyalty. SGA membership guidelines are prescribed by the SGA constitution and bylaws. Student Leadership Council This organization is composed of SGA officers, representatives from PBL, SkillsUSA, DEX, NTHS, any program area and any student interested in promoting school spirit, planning activities, learning leadership skills, hard work and having fun. New members are accepted each semester. Visual Graphix Group *Program club for design and media production technology The Visual Graphix Group equips students with knowledge of the creative and technical processes of visual arts. Students network with professionals in the field, examine industry trends and innovation, and engage in community improvement activities. Program Clubs Selected programs have organized clubs for students enrolled in their programs. Contact the Department Chairperson of the specific program. 32

34 GENERAL STUDENT CONDUCT REGULATIONS It is a basic and fundamental responsibility of an educational institution to maintain order through reasonable policies and procedures. The filing of an application shall be regarded as evidence of applicant's intentions to abide by the standards and regulations of Atlanta Technical College. Students forfeit their right to remain in school if they fail to comply. A Student Conduct Code, including a statement on Student Rights and Responsibilities, may be found in the Student Handbook. The handbook is given to all students during orientation and is available in the Admissions Office. Student Appeals and Due Process Atlanta Technical College adheres to strict due process procedures in all areas of student affairs. Special precautions are taken to ensure due process in all matters pertaining to admissions, disciplinary issues, academic concerns, and civil matters. The purpose of the student grievance procedure is to provide a means to address students' complaints. Specific guidelines and procedures for filing grievances for grade appeal, academic dismissal, and student complaints are outlined in the Student Handbook. Student Conduct Atlanta Technical College's students are expected to behave in a mature and responsible manner at all times on campus. Students who, as a result of their actions, are charged, indicted, or convicted of violation of city or county ordinances or of state or federal laws shall be subject to disciplinary action by the College, including probation, suspension, or expulsion. Students who, either individually or with others, obstruct, disrupt, or attempt to interfere with any authorized activity on the College campus will be subject to disciplinary procedures, including dismissal. Students are responsible for understanding and observing the provisions of the Student Conduct Code as outlined in the Student Handbook. The Student Handbook is available on the ATC website. Illegal Drug Statement Atlanta Technical College is concerned with both the welfare of the community and the academic and personal development of students. Atlanta Tech strives to create a healthy environment free from the presence of illegal drugs. Atlanta Technical College prohibits the unlawful manufacture, distribution, possession, or use of illegal drugs, alcohol, or controlled substances by Atlanta Tech students and staff as set forth in Georgia Law (HB 1231, Act 1447), Drug-Free Postsecondary Education 33

35 Act of 1990, Federal Law (Public ), and the Drug-Free School and Community Act Amendment of 1989, Section 22, Drug- Free Schools and Campuses. Disability-Related Complaints Students with disability-related complaints should address them to the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA/504) Coordinator, Atlanta Technical College, 1560 Metropolitan Parkway, SW, Atlanta, Georgia 30310, The procedures for filing a grievance are outlined in the Student Handbook. Sexual Harassment Complaints Sexual harassment complaints that involve another student or a staff member should be addressed to the Equity Coordinator, at or the Vice President of Student Affairs at The Equity Coordinator's office is located in the Admissions Office in Room 166 B. Students who feel that they have been discriminated against should contact the Equity Coordinator. Children on Campus Because of safety and liability issues, Atlanta Technical College does not allow children in classrooms or laboratory areas at any time. There are exceptions made for approved field trips for children in the Atlanta Technical College child care center, for high school students attending ATC classes, and for those students touring from area schools. An adult must accompany children on the campus at all times. Student Right to Know and Campus Security Act The Student-Right-To-Know and Campus Security Act is an amendment to the Higher Education Act of The Act requires colleges and universities to make available to enrolled students and prospective students the graduation/completion rates, transfer-out rates, and campus crime statistics. This information is available in the student affairs office. Health Services Atlanta Technical College's Student Accident Insurance provides coverage only for accidental injury on campus or while participating in an approved student activity. In the event of a medical emergency that is not an accidental injury, Atlanta Technical College will refer students to the nearest medical facility. As a non-residential institution, students are expected to secure medical services through a private physician. For a non-accidental campus injury or a non-accidental injury during an approved campus activity, it is understood that the student or parent will assume full responsibility for the cost of emergency care at the hospital including ambulance charges if such service is necessary. Each registered student will pay a semester accident insurance fee. This insurance will cover students for the costs of an accidental injury on campus or while participating in an approved student activity as an official representative of the College. All students must have College insurance. Professional liability insurance is required for students in certain programs such as those in the Health Occupations and Human Services Divisions. First aid kits are available in the security office, Student Affairs, and in many laboratories throughout the campus. However, staff is instructed to contact campus security and call 911 for any potentially life threatening emergency and then to report the incident to the Vice President of Student Affairs. Electronic Devices in Classrooms and Labs Use of personal electronic devices is not permitted in labs and classrooms. Such devices include but are not limited to cell phones, walkie-talkies, music devices, and pagers. Student Representation in Governance Atlanta Technical College acknowledges that the input of its students is a valuable resource. The role of the student in governance is advisory and is formally accomplished through the Student Government Association. Student Rights and Responsibilities Atlanta Technical College (ATC) desires to make provisions for students to be as knowledgeable as possible regarding College policies and procedures and their rights and responsibilities relating to them. The information in this section is designed to clarify information pertaining to rights that are granted to students and responsibilities which students should fulfill as members of the College Community. The submission of an application for admission to ATC represents a voluntary decision on the part of the prospective student to participate in the programs offered by the institution pursuant to the policies and procedures of the College, Technical College System of Georgia, and state and federal agencies where applicable. College approval of a student's application, in turn, represents the extension of a privilege to matriculate and to remain an educational consumer as long as he/she meets the required 34

36 academic and behavioral standards. Each individual student is guaranteed the privilege of exercising his/her rights without fear or prejudice. Such rights include, but are not limited to, the following: Right to attend classes in an educational environment in which person property is respected. Right to privacy of their educational records. The Family Education Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) is applicable to all schools that receive funds under an applicable program of the U.S. Department of Education. These rights transfer to the students or former students who have reached the age of 18 or who are attending school beyond high school. Schools may disclose, without consent, "directory" type information such as student's name, address, telephone number, date and place of birth, honors and awards and dates of attendance; unless parents or students request that the school not discloses directory information about them. Right to maintain privacy of personal possessions unless appropriate Atlanta Technical College personnel have reasonable cause to believe a student possesses any object or material that is prohibited by law of ATC Board policy. Right to appeal to the President if the result of the hearing is suspension or expulsion. Right to call witnesses and to present evidence on his/her behalf. Right, upon request, to a list of witnesses who will appear against him/her. Right to confront and cross-examine witnesses and/or accusers. Right to request to copy of the record or the tape recording of a hearing. Within the limits of its facilities on all campuses and sites, ATC will be open to all persons without regard to sex, race, creed, disability, or national origin. It is the responsibility of ATC to publish its educational objectives and to make available the criteria it shall use in evaluating student success in all programs. It is the responsibility of the student to acquaint himself/herself with these objectives and criteria as published and set forth by ATC. Additionally, ATC faculty and administration routinely use various methods of communication to transmit critical information to students. These include electronic monitors, mail outs, , and posted notices. Students are responsible for reading these correspondences and governing themselves accordingly. The facilities and services of ATC will be available to all enrolled students, provided they are used in a manner which is appropriate to an academic environment and with regard to ATC policies and operating procedures. ATC's Student Conduct Code addresses behavior and actions which adversely impact the achievement of educational goals. It is the responsibility of the student to become familiar with the regulations governing student conduct and to adhere to policies where applicable. Lack of knowledge regarding ATC policies will not excuse any student from adherence to policies or sanctions that may be imposed for violations. ATC reserves the right to dismiss any student whose conduct and behavior poses a threat to the College environment or the health, safety, or security of others. 35

37 Financial Aid and Fees FINANCIAL AID PROGRAMS ADMINISTERED BY THE COLLEGE FEDERAL AND STATE FINANCIAL AID PROGRAMS Atlanta Technical College is pleased to participate in the administration of federal and state Student Financial Aid (SFA) programs. SFA programs are designed to assist students in meeting the educational costs required to complete their chosen program of study. The Financial Aid Office is also the liaison for numerous scholarship programs sponsored by the College foundation, civic, religious, and corporate agencies. To further assist students with the application process, financial aid counseling is available and workshops are conducted throughout each academic year. The following financial aid information will provide you with an overview of the programs available, the eligibility criteria, and the application process. Additional information and/or clarification of the SFA programs may be obtained from the Financial Aid Office. Please note that the information contained herein is subject to change pursuant to federal, state or institutional policy updates. Federal PELL Grant Program (PELL) The PELL Grant Program provides federal assistance to students who demonstrate financial need as defined by the U. S. Department of Education. PELL recipients must be enrolled in an eligible undergraduate program of study and must not have attained a baccalaureate degree or a first professional degree. Normally, all associate degree and diploma programs are Pell eligible. However, many of the Technical Certificate of Credit (TCC) programs do not meet the qualifications for Pell. A current listing of the Pell Eligible TCCs can be found at Award amounts vary based on individual need as determined by federal methodology and credit hours each semester. Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (FSEOG) This federal program is designed to supplement the grant assistance awarded to the neediest PELL Grant recipients. Funding for FSEOG is limited and based on the amount of funds allocated to the College each year. Thus funds are not available for all students who meet the eligibility criteria for this award. Since funds at Atlanta Tech are limited, students who meet the priority deadline date for applying for federal aid have the greatest chance of receiving FSEOG assistance. Federal Work Study (FWS) Program Federally funded, this program encourages part-time employment and participation in community service activities such as the America Reads initiative. Normally employed in departments on campus, FWS students must maintain a cumulative grade point average (GPA) of 2.0 or greater. FWS offers student employees opportunity for financial assistance, exposure to real work experiences, development of positive work ethics and time management skills. 36

38 Helping Outstanding Pupils Educationally (HOPE) Scholarship Program There are currently two components of the HOPE Scholarship Program available to Atlanta Tech students. The HOPE Grant component is available to students enrolled in a certificate or diploma program of study. Beginning with the fall term of 2004, all hours for which a student received HOPE Grant payment, retroactive to summer semester 2003, are counted as Paid-Hours. Recipients are eligible for a maximum of 63 semester hours of HOPE Grant payment. Effective fall semester 2013, HOPE Grant recipients must have a cumulative GPA of 2.0 or greater at the required check points (30 and 60 semester hours) to continue receiving funding. The HOPE Scholarship component is awarded to HOPE Scholars enrolled in an associate degree (AAT or AAS) program of study. HOPE Scholars are students who graduate from a Georgia high school with this distinguished honor or students who are grandfathered into the program after attempting a minimum of 30 associate or baccalaureate degree semester hours with a 3.0 or greater cumulative GPA at the required checkpoints. HOPE Scholarship applicants must complete an ATC HOPE Scholarship Application. The attempted hours limit is 127 semester hours. HOPE Scholarship recipients must have graduated from high school within the past seven years or received HOPE scholarship funding prior to summer semester Students become ineligible for HOPE scholarship seven years after the date they graduated high school or equivalent. Students who received a HOPE scholarship payment during the award year will remain eligible through June 20, 2015, regardless of graduation date. Active duty military service time does not count against the seven-year period. Students can only regain the HOPE scholarship one time. Combined HOPE Grant and Scholarship Limit: In addition to the HOPE Grant paid hours limit and the attempted HOPE Scholarship paid hours limit, there is a combined limit of 127 semester hours. If the student reaches the combined limit prior to reaching the Grant or Scholarship paid hours limit, said student will no longer qualify for Grant or Scholarship assistance. Effective fall 2013, the HOPE Grant and Scholarship award amount is equivalent to % of the cost of tuition each semester that the student is eligible to receive funding. This maximum award amount is subject to change pursuant to guidelines issued by the Georgia Student Finance Commission (GSFC). Zell Miller Scholarship covers 100% of tuition for students who are the Valedictorian or Salutatorian for their graduating class or received a score of at least 1,200 combined critical reading score and math score on a single administration of the SAT or an ACT composite scale score of at least 26 and graduated from high school with at least a 3.7 calculated GPA. Students must be enrolled in a degree program, and must have a 3.3 GPA at all checkpoints (30, 60 and 90 semester hours), at the end of spring and at the end of 3 term checkpoint for part time, beginning students. Students who lose eligibility may possibly regain the scholarship once. Students who lose eligibility for the Zell Miller Scholarship may continue to receive the HOPE scholarship if they are eligible. Degree classes taken at any post-secondary institution are counted in the GPA calculation. Georgia HERO Scholarship The Georgia HERO (Helping Educate Reservists and their Offspring) Scholarship Program was created to provide financial aid to students seeking a postsecondary education, who are current members of the Georgia National Guard and United States Military Reserves (or their children) who were deployed overseas on active service, on or after February 1, 2003, to a location designated as a combat zone; It is also available for spouses if the guard or reservist was killed in the combat zone, or died as a result of injuries received in the combat zone, or sustained 100 percent disability in the combat zone, or became 100 percent disabled as a result of injuries received in the combat zone. The maximum amount awarded to an eligible student is $2,000 per award year, for no more than four award years. Law Enforcement Personnel Grant (LEPD) Georgia s Law Enforcement Personnel Dependents (LEPD) Grant program provides assistance to the dependent children of law enforcement personnel, firefighters, and corrections officers/prison guards permanently disabled or killed in the line of duty that plan to attend eligible public and private institutions in Georgia. The maximum award is $2,000 per academic year, not to exceed a total of $8,000 for four academic years. Public Safety Grant The Georgia Public Safety Memorial (GPSM) Grant provides educational assistance for the cost of attending public Eligible Postsecondary Institutions in Georgia to the dependent children of Georgia Public Safety Officers permanently disabled or killed in the line of duty. The grant covers a student s total Cost of Attendance that is not covered by other student financial aid. STUDENT ELIGIBILITY Eligibility Criteria Although there are specific criteria governing each SFA program, all SFA recipients must meet the following criteria: U. S. citizenship or eligible non-citizenship Selective Service registration, if required 37

39 High school diploma or GED Enrollment in an eligible program of study Maintain Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) Not owe a refund to a federal grant program or be in default on a federal student loan Not have attained a baccalaureate or first professional degree (exception: student loans) Application Process The Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) is the document that students must complete to be considered for federal assistance. The FAFSA is also be used to determine if the student qualifies for state aid. Atlanta Tech s school code, , must be reported on the FAFSA. If requested, applicants must also be prepared to submit copies of certain financial documents (IRS tax return transcripts, verification of SNAP, social security, child support, etc.) to the Financial Aid Office prior to being considered for aid. Deadline Dates Applicants are encouraged to begin the application process as soon as possible prior to the academic year/term they would like to receive financial assistance. The academic year is July 1 - June 30, and the priority deadline date is April 1 st preceding the chosen academic year. Should the applicant fail to meet the priority deadline date, all aid applications and supportive documents must be submitted to the aid office by the following semester deadline dates: Fall Semester ~ June 15 Spring Semester ~ November 15 Summer Semester ~ April 15 Satisfactory Academic Progress Students who receive Title IV Federal financial aid funds and/or the Georgia HOPE Grant funds must maintain Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP). SAP is comprised of the student s cumulative grade point average (GPA) and the completion rate. Students must maintain a GPA of 2.0 or greater and must complete their program of study within 150% of the time normally required. The GPA is computed by the Registrar s Office and is computed on a scale of 4.0 (A=4, B=3, C=2, D=1, F=0). Grades that adversely affect a student s GPA are D, F, and Withdrew Failing (WF). The grades of Incomplete (IP), Withdrawal (W), Withdrew Passing (WP), Satisfactory (S), and Unsatisfactory (U) have no impact on the student s GPA. A satisfactory completion rate is used to measure whether or not the student will complete his/her program of study within 150% of the time normally required. The student must complete at least 67% of all attempted classes. The letter grades that indicate unsatisfactory completion are D, F, W, WF, WP, IP, and U. Federal regulations require all institution to check SAP at least once per academic year. At Atlanta Tech, if the student drops below the minimum requirements in either component, the student will be given aid for one semester on warning. If at the end of the warning semester, the student is still below the minimum requirements, his/her financial aid will be suspended until such time as he/she regains eligibility without the assistance of federal or state financial aid. Exception If the student feels that there are extenuating circumstances regarding his/her ability to maintain progress, he/she may submit a written letter of appeal with appropriate documentation for consideration. SAP Appeals are reviewed and evaluated by the Financial Aid Counselors, but will not be reviewed without appropriate documentation. Said student will receive a response within two weeks from the date the appeal was received in the Financial Aid Office. Pursuant to federal regulations, if an appeal is approved and it is anticipated that the student can regain eligibility after one semester, he/she will be granted one semester of aid on probation. If the appeal is approved and it is determined that the student cannot regain eligibility after one term, the student s appeal will be approved on a semester by semester basis. Semester by semester approvals will require the student to complete and pass all attempted hours on probation in order to receive aid on probation in subsequent semesters. Should the student not complete and pass all attempted hours prior to regaining eligibility, the student s financial aid will be suspended. Maintaining Financial Assistance Financial aid recipients must reapply for financial aid each academic year. Students who fail to renew their applications will be required to pay their educational costs until such time as their continued eligibility has been established. In some cases, the student will receive retroactive payment. 38

40 Recipients must notify the aid office in writing if their financial circumstances change (change or loss of employment, change in dependents, etc.). The Verification Process The Department of Education selects applicants (students who complete the FAFSA) for a review process called verification. If your federal application is selected for review, you must complete a Verification Worksheet for the academic year and document specific items which may include those shown below. Students applying for assistance for the academic year are required to provide documentation for the 2012 base year and sometimes the current year (2013). The items to be verified include: Household size Number in college Adjusted gross income U.S. taxes paid Certain types of untaxed income and benefits: SNAP, social security benefits, child support, IRA/Keogh deductions, foreign income exclusion, earned income credit, interest on tax-free bonds All other untaxed income included on the U.S. income tax return, excluding information on the schedules Students may contact the Internal Revenue Service at to request transcripts and/or Non-Filing Status Letters. SPECIAL CIRCUMSTANCES Students (and or the parents of dependent students) who experience changes (loss of employment, change in dependents, etc.) in their financial circumstances, should notify their Financial Aid Office in writing. Documentation is often required, but this could result in an increase in funding. It is highly recommended that students who are considering changing their majors, withdrawing from class, etc., check with a financial aid counselor to determine if and how this change will affect their financial aid. Financial Aid Counselors It is highly recommended that students who are considering changing their majors, withdrawing from class, etc., check with a financial aid counselor to determine if and how this change will affect their financial aid. Counselors are assigned based on the student s last name. Students whose last name begins with A-J should call , and students whose last name is K-Z should call Communicating with Students At ATC, we have found that the most effective means of communicating with students is via . Students may provide their address on their FAFSA or other documentation submitted to the Financial Aid Office. As a courtesy, students are also given an ATC student address. It is the student s responsibility to insure that accurate contact information is on file in the Student Affairs Department. Missing Document Letters Upon receiving financial aid applications, an evaluation of the student s data is made. If additional documentation is required, the student is sent a Missing Document Letter via indicating the documentation needed to complete the student s financial aid file. Award Letters After a final determination has been made regarding a student s eligibility for aid, the student is sent an Award Letter via . The award letter will show the type and amount of aid that the student has been awarded. Awards are normally based on full-time attendance and will be prorated for each term that the student is not enrolled on a full time basis. Full Time = 12 or more credit hours, ¾ Time = credit hours, ½ Time = credit hours, and Less than ½ Time = less than 6 credit hours. Refunds Students whose financial aid awards exceed the direct cost of tuition and fees will receive a refund. Refunds are processed by the ATC Business Office each term. For additional information regarding refunds, students should contact the Business Office. Federal R2T4 Policy The federal government requires colleges to monitor the enrollment activity of each federal financial aid recipients. A return to title IV funds process (R2T4) must be performed on students who totally withdraw from class prior to the end of the term. This process identifies the percentage of funding that the student earned, which often results in a reduction in the student s award for said term. Students who totally withdraw prior to the 60% point in the term are normally required to repay federal funds received. 39

41 State Refund Policy The Technical College System of Georgia defines the state refund policy that must be followed by ATC. Should the student alter his/her enrollment status during the first three days of the term, the students tuition and fee charges are revised accordingly. Should changes occur after the first three days of the term, there will be no reduction (refund) of tuition and fee charges. Repayment Requirements Occasionally, a student may receive federal or state funding in error. This may occur due to technical difficulties, human error, incorrect data provided by the student, etc. Please note that federal and state funds received in error, regardless of the reason, must be repaid by the student. Important Phone Numbers & Websites Helpful in Completing the Financial Aid Application Process Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) application and information Independent Verification Worksheet (13-14) Visit the Financial Aid Office or click Dependent Verification Worksheet (13-14) Visit the Financial Aid Office or click Federal Student Aid Information Center (To Request a duplicate Student Aid Report or check on the status of your application) Internal Revenue Service ( IRS) (To request a summary of your income tax data) National Student Loan Database System (NSLDS) (To check on your loan default status) Selective Service or Additional Sources of Financial Assistance VETERANS AND ELIGIBLE DEPENDENTS EDUCATIONAL BENEFITS Former service personnel, their survivors, and dependents may be eligible for Veterans Affairs Educational Benefits. Atlanta Tech is pleased to offer programs that are approved for veterans and their eligible dependents. To determine your eligibility, please contact the Atlanta Tech Veterans Affairs Office for assistance. Apply: If this is your initial claim, complete an Application for Benefits (VA Form ). This can be completed on line at or paper applications can be obtained from the Atlanta Technical College (ATC) Veteran's Affairs Office. The Veteran's Affairs Regional Office will process your application and send you a Certification of Eligibility if you qualify. Upon receiving a Certification of Eligibility, you should submit a copy of it, your DD214, and your class schedule to the ATC VA Office. If you have previously filed for VA Educational Benefits and have received a Certification of Eligibility (CE) from the VA, or if a CE is pending, you should just submit a copy of it, along with your DD214 and class schedule to the ATC VA Office. Certify: Once you have submitted the documentation described above, the VA Rep will validate your enrollment and send a certification to the appropriate VA Regional Office. This is called the Enrollment Certification Process. Since you cannot be paid for your benefits until the VA rep certifies your enrollment, and he or she cannot certify your enrollment until he has your class schedule, you must remember to submit a copy of your class schedule at the beginning of each semester. Enrollment Status Changes and Withdrawals: It is the student s responsibility to notify the ATC VA Rep of any changes in enrollment status, program of study, place of training, etc. These type changes affect your eligibility and must be reported to the VA Regional Office. If you withdraw from school or drop/add classes, we recommend that you notify the VA Representative within three days of that change. Failure to do this can result in the loss of future benefits and/or repayment of benefits received in error. Please remember to report any enrollment changes promptly. Change of Program or Place of Training: If you have been approved for VA educational benefits and then decide to transfer to another school and/or change programs or majors, you must complete a Request for Change of Program or Change of Place of Training (VA Form or VA Form depending on your program). You can get the forms from a VA Rep or download it from the VA web site: Address Changes: 40

42 Address changes and changes of Banks should also be reported to the Department of Veteran Affairs. Since VA WILL NOT forward your benefits checks to a new address, it is important that these type changes be reported immediately. If you close a bank account without first informing the VA, they will send your benefit payment to the old bank account. If the bank refuses the payment and sends the check back, it goes to the U.S. Department of Treasury and takes about two weeks to get reposted. You can change your payment information on the verification form or via telephone at the Department of Veteran Affairs phone number: (1-888-GI-BILL1). Time Frame/Payment of Benefits: The time period for an ORIGINAL CLAIM IS ROUGHLY 120 TO 150 DAYS TO PROCESS. The time period for Previous Claimed Certification Claims is 30 TO 90 days. Since we do not have advanced pay, the way to effectively work this system is to give it plenty of time. Plan ahead, apply for both VA and Federal Financial Aid assistance, and fill out all the required forms completely and accurately to avoid the errors that will cost you time. Educational Rates: To view the VA educational rates, please visit Satisfactory Academic Progress: All recipients are required to maintain Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) according to standards established and published by the College. This includes a cumulative grade point average of 2.0 or greater as well as a 67% or greater completion rate. If you fail to maintain the minimum requirements as stipulated in the SAP policy, your benefits will be terminated. If you have any questions, please call the Atlanta Technical College VA Representative at EDUCATIONAL COSTS Current Semester Fee Schedule (updated fall semester 2014.) Please check the college website and Tech Talk magazine for the most up-to-date fees. **Some courses are assessed a lab fee ranging from $20-$90. Consult your advisor for details. SEMESTER FEE SCHEDULE Number of Credit Hours Tuition Fee Mandatory Student Fees Fee Totals for Georgia Resident 1 $89 + $302= $178 + $302= $267 + $302= $356 + $302= $445 + $302= $534 + $302= $623 + $302= $712 + $302= $801 + $302= $890 + $302= $979 + $302= $1,068 + $302= $1,157 + $302= $1,246 + $302= to 21 $1,335 + $302= Mandatory Student Fees-Assessed Per Term Technology Fee $ Registration Fee $63.00 Special Instructional Fee $50.00 Facilities Fee $25.00 Campus Safety Fee $17.00 Student Assistance Program Fee $8.00 Student Activity Fee* $30.00 Student Accident Insurance* $4.00 Total Mandatory Student Fees $ (*Fee not assessed if schedule is 100% ON-LINE.) 41

43 Other fees that may apply to your enrollment: Application for Admission $20.00 Retest Fee $15.00 Late Registration $45.00 Returned Check $30.00 Parking Decal (renewed annually) $23.00 Replacement of Student ID $5.00 Replacement of Higher One Card $20.00 Academic Transcript $5.00 Graduation $35.00 Malpractice Fee - Based on Program: EMT/Paramedic $40.00 Health, Child Care, Cosmetology, Barbering $10.00 Diploma Replacement $25.00 Exemption Examination (per credit hour) 25% of tuition CTD Fuel Surcharge (CTD Program only) $ Payment of fees ALL TUITION AND FEES are due at time of registration. It is the responsibility of the student to assure that FULL PAYMENT is made by the designated deadline. Unfortunately, we cannot offer any payment plans or defer any tuition and fees. Our cashier s office accepts cash, personal checks, money orders, and credit/debit cards with Master Card or Visa logos. Financial aid and/or third party payments must be approved in time to meet payment deadlines, and recipients must ensure that their aid is sufficient to cover all fees for the term. They also must have a current authorization on file, allowing their financial aid to be used for payment of fees at ATC. Mandatory fees include a $63 Registration fee, $30 Student Activity fee, and $4 Insurance fee. Students are also required to pay a Technology Fee of $105 for each term of enrollment. Other fees include $10 or $40 malpractice fee, $45 late registration fee, $35 graduation fee, $23 parking decal, and $20 non-refundable application fee. Tuition and fees do not include textbooks, supplies, or tools that may be required for your program of study. Fee maximums are set by the Technical College Systems of Georgia, and are subject to change at the beginning of any term. Registration is on a first come, first serve basis at ATC. Schedules are not confirmed until all fees are paid for the semester of enrollment. EXPLANATION OF FEES Tuition Fee All students are required to pay a tuition fee based on their residency status, which is calculated according to the number of credit hours of enrollment. For all programs except Commercial Truck Driving (CTD), Georgia residents pay $89 per credit hour. Tuition for the CTD program is $132 per credit hour for GA residents. Students who are legal residents of the state of Georgia under the regulations of the State Board of the Technical College System of Georgia (TCSG) shall pay tuition and fees at the state resident rate. A legal resident has resided in the state of Georgia at least 12 months prior to their application date. Out-of-State Tuition Out-of-state tuition fees are calculated at twice the Georgia resident s tuition rate. International Student Tuition International students' tuition fees are calculated at four times the residents tuition fees. Application Fee All applicants to Atlanta Technical College must submit a one-time $20 application fee with the application form before the application can be processed. The fee is nonrefundable and will not apply toward students' registration. This fee includes payment for the entrance examination. Student Activity Fee 42

44 Registered students will pay Student Activity fees of $30. This fee is used to support student activities, campus activity days, student organizations, and more. Students taking only on-line courses are not assessed an activity fee. Registration Fee Each enrolled student will pay an administrative registration fee of $63. Accident Insurance Fee Each registered student will pay accident insurance fee of $4. This insurance will cover students for the costs of an accidental injury on campus or while participating in an approved student activity as an official representative of the college. All students must have college insurance. Students taking only on-line courses are not assessed an activity fee. Late Registration An additional fee of $45 will be added to the regular fees for all students who register during late registration, on the first day of class, or during the Add/drop period. This does not apply to students who have been purged and get their schedule reinstated. The late registration fee is non- refundable. Books, Tools, Uniforms, and Equipment Students are required to purchase books, tools, uniforms, and equipment appropriate for their programs of study. Financial aid may not cover the cost of all these supplies. Most books may be purchased at our Campus Bookstore. Graduation Fee Students are required to pay a one-time graduation fee of $35 at the completion of their program of study. This is an administrative fee associated with reviewing the student s academic history to assure that all requirements for the program of study have been met. Senior Citizen Fees Qualified senior citizens (age 62 or older), who wish to enroll in classes, pay application and other mandatory fees. Tuition fees for credit classes may be waived; however, tuition cannot be waived if the senior citizen enrollment is required for the minimum enrollment of the course. Senior citizens with tuition fees waived will be enrolled on a space-available basis during the drop/add period. Tuition cannot be waived for enrollment in noncredit courses. Employee Fees Full -time employees of Atlanta Technical College who wish to enroll in classes pay application and other mandatory fees. Employees who wish to enroll in credit classes are required to apply for financial aid assistance. If financial aid eligibility does not exist, tuition fees may be waived at the prior approval of the president. Employees with tuition fees waived will be enrolled on a space-available basis during the drop/add period. Tuition cannot be waived if the employee enrollment is required for the minimum enrollment of the course. Other Mandatory Expenses Program costs are incurred by students enrolled and vary by program. An example of this is the Malpractice Fee that is assessed during the clinical portion of several programs. This is a professional liability insurance is required for students in the Health Occupations and Human Services Divisions. These costs are subject to periodic changes, and the most current cost information may be obtained in the Business Office. Transcript Fee Students who have discharged all obligations to Atlanta Technical College are entitled to receive through written request a transcript of their permanent records from the office of the Registrar. A charge of $5 will be made for each transcript requested. Transcript requests must be in writing, and submitted to the Registrar's office. A request form is available for the convenience of students. There is a three-to-five day processing period for transcripts. Official transcripts will not be given to student but will be mailed as requested. The mailing address for the transcript must be included with the request. Unofficial student copies of transcripts will be given directly to the requester. Providing accurate attendance and name change information will enable staff to complete the request in a timely manner. Copies of other information in students' education records, with the exception of transcripts from other institutions, will be provided upon written request for a charge of $5 per request. Replacement of Student Identification Currently enrolled students who have lost their student ID may request to have it replaced. There is a charge of $5 for this service. Contact Student Services for the schedule of times when replacement ID s are being made in room Academic Credit by Departmental Examination 43

45 The fee for academic credit by examination is based on the number of credit hours of the exempted course. A fee of 25 percent of the tuition will be charged. A receipt must be secured from the Business Office reflecting payment of this fee before taking the examination. Replacement Diploma A replacement diploma may be obtained by making a request in the Admissions Office. There is a $25 charge for this service. Diplomas may be replaced within 5 years of graduation. Parking Decal Students will be charged a yearly decal fee of $23 per vehicle parked on campus. The parking cycle will begin on the first day of each fall semester, and expires on the last day of each summer term. FINANCIAL OBLIGATIONS Students who are delinquent in payment of any financial obligation will not be allowed to register until all delinquent fees are paid. In addition, students who are delinquent in their financial obligations will not be issued grades, transcripts, or student records until all financial obligations are resolved. Drop/Add Period Students may amend their schedules during the drop/add period each semester. All forms related to registration and change of registration must be initiated by the student, approved by the program advisor, and processed by the registrar's office before the end of the drop/add period. Students who add or remove classes from their schedule during the drop/add period will do so without academic penalty. Withdrawal Procedures Students who withdraw from school must complete withdrawal forms and submit them to the Admissions Office. Those who fail to withdraw officially from the school may be regarded as having been dropped from the program for lack of attendance. Withdrawal forms are available in the Admissions Office. The effective date of withdrawal is the date the student notifies the college of withdrawal or the date specified by the student, whichever is later. Students withdrawing after the 3 rd instructional day of the term will not receive a refund of applicable tuition and tees. Refund of Tuition and Fees Refunds are processed by the Business Office, and are paid to students through their Higher One Easy Refund cards. Cards are mailed to each new student at their residence on file at the start of the term. Students withdrawing from a course by the end of the third (3 rd ) instructional day of the term and students whose attendance is recorded as No Show shall receive a 100% refund of applicable tuition (hours below the 15 hour tuition cap) and applicable refundable fees, excluding the application fee. Exceptions may be allowed for customized courses that do not follow the college s standard academic calendar. Students who withdraw from a course after the third (3 rd ) instructional day of the term shall receive no refund of the related tuition and fees. For those students receiving federal financial aid, the technical colleges shall make available Consumer Information that may be found at under the appropriate aid year s Handbook. Although there will be no refund of tuition and fees after the third (3 rd ) instructional day, withdrawing students receiving Federal Pell Grant will have awards adjusted in compliance with the Return to Title IV process (R2T4) outlined in the Federal Student Aid Handbook. Cancelled Classes If tuition and fees are collected in advance of the start date of a class and the institution cancels the class, 100 per cent of all fees paid will be refunded. Refund of Books and Supplies Refunds shall be made for books or supplies that are returned in new condition and accompanied by a receipt in accordance with the college s book refund policy. No refunds shall be made for used supplies and equipment such as cosmetology kits, diskettes, tools, and uniforms. The book refund policy is prominently posted in the ATC bookstore. 44

46 Academic Policies ACADEMIC POLICIES Good Standing Students who achieve a semester GPA of 2.00 are considered to be in good standing. Academic Warning Students who fail to achieve a semester GPA of 2.00 are placed on academic warning. The purpose of an academic warning is to alert the student there is a need to improve academic performance. Academic Probation Students who fail for the second consecutive quarter to achieve a semester GPA of 2.00 are placed on academic probation. Students are required to consult with program advisors to plan for improvement. Academic Suspension Students who fail for the third consecutive semester to achieve a semester GPA of 2.00 are placed on academic suspension. A student placed on academic suspension must stay out of school for one full semester before applying for readmission. Readmission A student placed on academic suspension, for the first time, is eligible to apply for readmission after serving a one- semester suspension. Upon return, if the semester GPA falls below 2.00, the student will be suspended for one full calendar year. Subsequent to the one-year suspension, if the semester GPA falls below 2.00, the student must appeal in writing to the Vice President of Academic Affairs. Attendance & Withdrawal Policy Because employers demand workers who are competent and reliable, regular attendance and punctuality are critical traits in the workplace. Students are expected to attend all classes as scheduled. Specific attendance requirements are established by each program and outlined in the course syllabus; however, programs governed by state and federal licensing agencies may have more specific attendance policies. Records of absences and tardiness are maintained by each instructor. Excessive absenteeism and tardiness impact work ethics evaluations and course grades. Therefore, it may become necessary to withdraw from a course due to excessive absenteeism or tardiness. Formal withdrawal from the College or specific courses is the sole responsibility of the student. This can be done via Banner Web or by completing an official withdrawal form in the Office of the Registrar, located within the Student Affairs Division on the first floor 45

47 of the Dennard Building. Failure to comply with the official withdrawal process may result in a failing grade for the course; unofficial withdrawal from the course by the instructor for lack of attendance could jeopardize current and future financial aid eligibility. Students who stop attending a class or miss 20 percent of class time or more will be unofficially withdrawn from the course. The student will receive a grade of "W" should this occur prior to midterm, and a grade of "WP" (withdrawal passing) or "WF" (withdrawal failing) should this occur after the midterm. The grade will be determined based on the student's academic performance up to the time the student ceases to be enrolled. The last date of attendance will be recorded as the last day that the student attended class or participated in an academically related activity. Make-Up Work Students are responsible for arranging make-up work with their instructors in accordance with procedures set forth in the Course syllabus. Assignments Missed During Disciplinary Suspension When students are suspended for disciplinary reasons, they will have an opportunity to make up the assignments missed. Students are responsible for requesting the materials and information needed to complete these assignments. Absence Due to Military Reserve or National Guard Duty Students who must be absent for military reserve or National Guard duty should inform their instructors and the Financial Aid Office, if appropriate. Such students must provide a copy of their orders, signed by the appropriate military authority. Instructors will assign a grade of "I" for any course(s) not completed due to military duty. Course Load Students may register for no more than 18credit hours per semester. Full-time Definition Students who are enrolled in 12 or more credit hours are classified as full -time. This is an academic classification and may differ from the full-time calculation of federal credit hours use for financial aid purposes. Double Majors At this time double majors are not allowed at Atlanta Technical College. Grading System Grades are issued at the end of each semester. Students are responsible for notifying the Admission Office of address changes. A grade of "C" or better is required in all courses for graduation. Transcripts of grades are not built for noncredit courses. Grade Numerical Equivalent Grade Points A B C D F The following symbols are approved for use in the cases indicated. I IP W WP Indicates that students have an "incomplete" but have satisfactorily completed a substantial portion of the course work. For NON-ACADEMIC reasons beyond their control, the students have not been able to complete some specific part or amount of the work required. An "I" must be satisfactorily changed to a letter grade by the midpoint of the next semester, or it will be changed to the grade of "F" by the Registrar. Students must get approval from the instructor prior to the end of the semester to be eligible for an "I" grade. No credit is given and no grade points are calculated. Indicates that a course continues beyond the end of the semester. Students who withdraw before the midpoint of the semester receive a grade of W Withdrew. No credit is given and no grade points are calculated. Indicates students who withdraw passing from a course after the midpoint of the semester receive a grade of "WP Withdrew Passing," if they were passing the course at the time of withdrawal. No credit is given and no grade points are calculated. 46

48 WF EX TR AC AU Indicates students who withdraw from a course after the midpoint of a semester (or course) receive a grade of "WF-Withdrew Failing," if they were failing the course at the time of withdrawal. The "WF" grade is calculated as an "F" in the grade point average. Indicates that a student has exempted a course through examination or through the articulated Tech Prep programs. Credit is given but grade points are not calculated. Instructors must submit an Advanced Placement Verification Form to the registrar's office to report an exemption. Indicates that a student has been awarded transfer credit from another institution. Credit is given but no grade points are calculated. If a student earns credit for a course taken at Atlanta Technical College for which transfer credit has been awarded, then the transfer credit will be deleted from the student's record. Indicates articulated credit earned by students as a part of formal articulation agreements. Indicates an audited course. No grade is given, no credit hours are earned and grade points are not calculated. Auditing a course must be initiated during the registration process. Approval for an audit cannot be granted after participation in classroom instruction. Instructors must submit an Advanced Placement Verification Form to the registrar's office to report an audit. Audited classes are not eligible for financial aid. Grade Point Average To calculate student grade point average, use this formula: Credit Hours x Grade Point Equivalent (GPE) = Total Quality Points. Example: Grade Grade Point Credit Quality Equivalent Hours Points A = (4.0) x (2.0) = 8.0 B = (3.0) x (5.0) = 15.0 C = (2.0) x (4.0) = 8.0 D = (1.0) x (5.0) = 5.0 Total (16.0) Total (36.0) Multiply the number of Credit Hours for each course times the assigned Grade Point Equivalent. Total Credit Hours, and then total all Quality Points. Total Quality Points divided by Total credit Hours = Grade Point Average divided by 16 = 2.25 GPA. Graduation Grade Point Average The graduation Grade Point Average (GPA) is calculated using only those courses required for graduation. (For example, if a student took classes in Welding, but is graduating in Cosmetology, then the Welding classes are not calculated in the GPA for graduation). When a course is taken more than once, the final grade will be used in calculating the GPA for graduation. An overall 2.0 GPA is required for graduation. Graduation Requirements Atlanta Technical College conducts one commencement exercise per year for students who have completed all graduation requirements or are in their final classes at that time. To qualify for graduation, the student must satisfy the following requirements: 1. Complete an Application for Graduation by the posted semester deadline and submit to the Registrar. 2. Complete the prescribed course requirements with a graduation grade point average of 2.0. *A grade of C or better is required in all courses for graduation.* 3. If transfer credit has been accepted, receive credit from Atlanta Technical College for a minimum of 50% of the hours required for the course requirements. 4. Satisfy all financial obligations to the college, including payment of all graduation fees. Honor Graduates Students who achieve a cumulative GPA of 3.50 or higher will receive special recognition at graduation. Letter Grades Numerical values of letter grades are as follows: Quality Grade Points Excellent A

49 Good B Average C Below Average D Failure F 59 and below Incomplete I Not Computed EX Credit by Examination Not Computed W Withdrew Not Computed WP Withdrew Passing Not Computed WF Withdrew Failing Computed as F WF* Withdrew Failing Not Computed (Learning Support) TR Transfer Credit Not Computed AU Audited Not Computed AC Articulated Credit Not Computed Excellent A* (Not Computed) Good B* (Not Computed) Average C* (Not Computed) Below Average D* (Not Computed) Failure F* Not Computed (Learning Support) Grade Appeal Procedures Students may only appeal a final course grade. STEP 1. STEP 2. STEP 3. If students receive final grades and desire to clarify questions about grades, program standards, and grading practices, they should first discuss disagreements with their instructors and have appropriate documentation. When an agreement cannot be reached at step one, students should submit written appeals within ten days to the dean. The students' appeals must be signed and dated. The dean must respond within ten days after receipt of notification from step one. If an agreement is not reached from the previous steps, students should submit copies of their original appeal within ten school days to the Vice President for Academic Affairs, who will have ten days to review and respond to the appeal. The decision of the Vice President of Academic Affairs shall be final. Academic Dismissal Appeal Procedures If students are dismissed from a program of study for academic reasons, they may appeal by following steps two through three as outlined in the appeal procedure for grades. Grade Change Procedures Grade changes must be accomplished by instructors by the mid-point of the semester immediately following the semester in which the grade was submitted. Students should contact the instructor promptly if there are questions concerning the grade(s) earned. Grades will be changed by the Registrar once written notification of the grade change has been received from the instructor. Repeating a Course A course may be repeated two times during the duration of the program. When a course is taken more than once, the final grade will be used in calculating the grade point average for graduation. Under extenuating circumstances a student may be allowed to enroll in a course again with the written permission of the Vice President for Academic Affairs. Any exceptions to this policy will appear in specific program policies. Work Ethics Grade A work ethics grade will be given each semester for specified courses. The work ethics grade will not affect the academic grade point average (GPA) of a student; that is, work ethics grades remain separate from academic grades. Work ethics grades will be reported each semester. The work ethics program is designed to evaluate and encourage good work habits that ensure job retention and career advancement. 48

50 Employability skills refer to the basic academic, interpersonal, reasoning, problem solving skills, and work ethics that, when transferred to the occupational settings, facilitate job acquisition, retention, and advancement. The work ethics program will focus on the following characteristics in accordance with the Technical College System of Georgia s work ethics guide: 1. ATTENDANCE 6. PRODUCTIVITY 2. CHARACTER 7. ORGANIZATIONAL SKILLS 3. TEAMWORK 8. COMMUNICATION 4. APPEARANCE 9. COOPERATION 5. ATTITUDE 10. RESPECT Students of core and program courses will receive a work ethics grade. Work ethics grades are optional for developmental courses and for grades of W, WF, or WP. Work ethics grades will not be used for grades of AC, AU, EX, I, IP, or TR. Work ethics grades are not required for online courses. Approved Work Ethics Grades 3 = Exceeds Expectations 2 = Meets Expectations 1 = Needs Improvement 0 = Unacceptable Student Records In accordance with provisions of the federal Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) of 1974 and its amendment, the USA Patriot Act of 2001, we accord all the rights under the law to students who are declared independent. No one outside the College shall have access to any information from students' educational records without the written consent of students, except the following: authorized college personnel officials of other institutions in which students seek to enroll organizations providing student financial aid accrediting agencies carrying out their accreditation function persons in compliance with a judicial order persons in an emergency in order to protect the health or safety of students or other persons Within the college, only those staff members, individually or collectively, acting in students' educational interests is allowed access to student educational records. These staff members include administrators, the registrar, financial aid personnel and academic personnel, all held within a need-to-know limitation. At the discretion of the College, directory information may be provided in accordance with the provisions of the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act. Directory information includes the following: name of student address telephone number date and place of birth program of study dates of attendance and/or graduation certificates and awards received most recent school attended participation in student organizations or activities Students who wish to examine their files or desire a hearing to challenge information contained therein should contact the registrar. Students who do not want directory information released must notify the registrar at the beginning of each semester of enrollment in writing. Release of Student Records Documents submitted by or for students in support of their application for admission or for transfer credit will not be returned to students or sent elsewhere at their request. For example, a transcript from another technical school, college, or high school, will not be sent to a third institution. Students should request another transcript from the original institution. In exceptional cases, however, where another transcript is unobtainable, or can be secured only with the greatest difficulty, copies may be prepared and released to prevent 49

51 hardship to students. Students must present a signed request for this procedure. The copy sent will be marked as a certified copy of what is in the students' files. Change of Address Students are required to notify the Admissions Office of address changes. Accurate address information allows for timely correspondence with students. Change of Address Form is available in the Admissions Office. Registration Students who have received an official letter of acceptance from the Admissions Office and continuing students who are not on academic suspension may register for classes. Students enrolling under the special admission provisions are also eligible to register for certain classes. Catalog prerequisite and test score restrictions are maintained to prohibit students from registering for course-work without proper assessment. During registration processing, prerequisite and test score restrictions are in effect to ensure academic performance. Upon advisement, eligible students may register for the upcoming semester. After registering, students must confirm their intent to attend by paying assessed fees. New students are notified about specific dates for registration and must bring acceptance letters with them to register. Students must complete the proper forms and procedures for registration and verify that their schedules of classes are correct. Registration is complete when all fees are paid. Academic Advisement Academic advisors are instructors in the various divisions who assist students with planning class schedules. The Student Advisement and Success Handbook contain a directory of advisors and contact information. All students are issued a student advisement handbook during new student orientation. Students are encouraged to maintain regular contact with advisors in order to ensure academic success. All students have assigned program advisors. Web Registration During the registration process, students will be given instructions to register via BANNER Web. Students will be given a registration form by their advisors. The course reference number (CRN) for each selected course will be written on the registration form. Students will then proceed to designate computer labs on campus or to home computers to process their registration. This process is in effect for both currently enrolled students as well as new and returning students to the college. Georgia Virtual Technical College As a member of the Georgia Virtual Technical College (GVTC), Atlanta Technical College delivers online credit courses and programs to all students in Georgia's technical colleges. GVTC's goal is to bring together the resources of Georgia's statewide system of technical Colleges to expand program offerings by al owing students access to a larger variety of courses. Atlanta Technical College offers many online courses. All online courses follow the same 15-week semester format as on-campus courses. Some online courses require on-campus final exams. Check the GVTC web site, located at for a listing of courses available online. Students enrolled in online courses are provided appropriate services such as structured access to and interaction with full-time faculty members. Staff information is posted electronically for online courses so that students can contact instructors/advisors via . The application process and registration are coordinated by the admissions office and the registrar, respectively. 50

52 Economic Development Economic Development The Economic Development Division at Atlanta Technical College aids in the growth and vitality of the metro Atlanta economy. By keeping its finger on the pulse of business and industry needs, the Economic Development team delivers training solutions and workforce development services to employers in the Atlanta area. For information contact or Quick Start Georgia's Quick Start program is nationally recognized as providing world-class training as an incentive to new business and industry as well as promoting the expansion of existing businesses. Quick Start helps industries by creating customized training programs to equip workers with the right knowledge base, technology skills, and interpersonal effectiveness to achieve the high productivity and quality levels required in today's competitive business environment. For information about Quick Start contact or Certified Specialist Programs Designed by experts in their fields, these certification specialist programs prepare Georgia's workforce in the areas of customer service, manufacturing, warehousing and distribution, and construction. These programs focus on the changing business technologies and methods that workers must clearly understand and competently use to successfully enter the workforce and allow Georgia's employers to hire with confidence. For information contact or Professional Assessment and Certification Center Certifications are quickly becoming a requirement for those entering the workforce, especially the technology field. A certification shows an employer that you have the knowledge and skills required to successfully perform a job. Certifications are also a way to demonstrate and separate your qualifications from, and above, other job candidates. To meet this demand, Atlanta Technical College provides a professional testing and certification center for students, businesses and members of the community. The testing is done in a secure, monitored environment on computers that are usually linked with the hosting service via the World Wide Web. Those who wish to take a professional certification test must register and schedule the exam through the sponsoring vendor and/or our center. Official identification is required when reporting for testing. All certification testing is by APPOINTMENT ONLY! The Center currently provides assessment services through the following vendors: * American College Testing (ACT) * Georgia Pest Control Commission * Georgia Work Ready Program * ISO Quality Testing (IQT) The Center is located in Building G, room 109. For information contact or

53 American College Testing (ACT) Center The ACT Center network offers: Computer-based tests for licensure and certification in many professions Workplace skills assessments A secure computerized testing center The Center network currently delivers these computer-based assessments. To register contact the associations below: * American Board of Ophthalmology (ABO) * GF Education Group (GF) * American Board of Pediatric Dentistry (ABPD) * International Association of Six Sigma Certification (IASSC) * American College of Medical Practice Execs (ACMPE) * Lamaze International * Alabama Prospective Teacher Testing Program (APTTP) * Lawson * Board of Environmental, Health & Safety Auditor Certifications (BEAC) * Liebert Services (LSENP) * Boston University (BU) * McCann * Building Professionals Quality Institute (BPQI) * Metro Ethernet Forum (MEF) * Commission of Dietetic Registration (CDR) * National Association of Certified Child Forensic Interviewers (NACCFI) * Chiropractic Board of Clinical Nutrition (CBCN) * National Association of Legal Assistants (NALA) * Center for Guardianship Certification (CGC) * National Inspection, Testing, and Certification Corporation (NITC) * Comira * Nuclear Medicine Technology Certification Board (NMTCB) * COMPASS Internet Version Remote Testing (CIV) * Professional Association of Health Care Office Management (PAHCOM) * Compliance Services and Assessments (CSA) * Professional Golfers Association (PGA) * Continental Testing Services (CTS) * Recreational Vehicle Industry Association (RVIA) * Council of Petroleum Accountants Societies (COPAS) * Rockwell Collins * Emerson Network Power * Standard & Poor s (S&P) * estrategy Solutions (ess) * University of Wisconsin (UW) * Essay-Writing Study * WorkKeys * Foreign Service Officer Test (FSOT) * Yardstick Georgia Pest Control The Georgia Department of Agriculture in cooperation with the Technical Colleges System of Georgia has implemented computerized administration of the Structural Pest Control Examinations. Interested persons may go on-line at and schedule to take the exam at Atlanta Technical College in the following areas: Employee Registration Examination Certification Examination Commercial Examination ISQ-QualityTesting Inc. Atlanta Technical College is a testing and assessment center for ISO-Quality Testing, Inc. -- a full-service testing company serving the needs of licensing boards and credentialing agencies with a wide range of test development and administration services. Registration and additional information regarding the following is available at * American Academy of Allergy Asthma & Immunology * Lymphology Association of North America (LANA) * American Association of Family & Consumer Sciences (AAFCS)* Medical Dosimetrist Certification Board (MDCB) * American Association of Legal Nurse Consultants (AALNC) * National Academy of Sports Medicine (NASM) * American Board of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery * National Dental Hygiene Certification Board (NDHCB) * American Board of Pediatric Dentistry * National Air Duct Cleaners Association (NADCA) *American Chiropractic Neurology Board (ACNB) * National Association of Healthcare Access Management (NAHAM) * American College of Theriogenologists * National Association of Professional Organizers (CPO) * American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists * National Board of Certification of Orthopaedic Technologists *Association of Government Accountants (ASA) * National Board for Colon Hydrotherapy *Association of Otolaryngology Administrators (AOA) * National Certification Commission for Acupuncture & Oriental Medicine * Board of Certification for Cert. Org. Ombudsman Practitioners *National Coalition of Estheticians, Manuf./Distributors & Ass. * Board of Nephrology Examiners, Nursing & Technology *National Commission for Certification of CME Professionals, Inc. * BSD Certification Group Inc. * National Recreation and Park Association * Building Commissioning Association (BCA) * National Registry of Environmental Professional (NREP) * Center for Financial Certifications (CFC) * National Business Aviation Association (NBAA) * Certified Retirement Financial Advisors (CRFA) * National Council of Examiners for Engineering and Surveying * College of Dietitians of Ontario * National Council on Family Relations (NCFR) * College of Financial Planning (CFP) * National Council of State Boards of Nursing (NCSBN) * College of Massage Therapists of Ontario (MT) * National Federation of Professional Trainers (NFPT) * College of Massage Therapists of Newfoundland & Labrador *National-Interstate Council of State Boards of Cosmetology, Inc. (NIC) * College of Nurses of Ontario (CNO) * National Surgical Assistant Association (CSA) * College of Occupational Therapists of Ontario * Ophthalmic Photographers Society * International Certification & Reciprocity Consortium * Restoration Industry Association (RIA) * International Special Events Society (ISES) * Society of American Foresters * International Nurses Society on Additions (IntNSA) * Society of Certified Senior Advisors (CSA) * Irrigation Association * Society of Maintenance & Reliability Professionals Certifying Organizations (SMRP) 52

54 * J.A. Thomas & Associates (JATA) * US Psychiatric Rehabilitation Association (USPRA) WorkKeys and Georgia Work Ready Programs The Georgia Work Ready assessment is administered by ACT s nationally accredited WorkKeys (WR) system through the Technical College System of Georgia. WorkKeys assessment takes the guesswork out of high-stakes decisions like hiring and promoting. This comprehensive program has the tools needed for building a high-performance workforce throughout the state of Georgia. WorkKeys measures both core skills and work habits sorted after by employers and businesses. For additional information on the Georgia Work Ready program, please visit or call To schedule an appointment at Atlanta Technical College, call the Professional Assessment Center at or Effective February 1, 2012, the Governor s Office of Workforce Development has made changes to the mission and eligibility of the Georgia Work Ready program. The Work Ready assessment is now available only to individuals taking the exam for the first time and who meet the following requirements: Unemployed Georgians with proof of unemployment in the last 12 months, including benefits from the Georgia Department of Labor, TANF benefits, or a letter of separation from an employer. These unemployed Georgians will need to be eligible for work at the time of the assessment and not incarcerated or detained which would preclude the Georgian from employment. Documented proof of unemployment must be presented to the testing administrator prior to taking the exam. Georgians applying for a job posted to The WRConnect code for the position you are applying for must be presented to the testing administrator prior to taking the exam. Applicants must provide proof of their citizenship or eligible noncitizen status and/or males must provide proof that they have registered with the Selective Service or satisfy the exempt status. Georgia Business Expansion Support Act The Georgia Business Expansion Support Act provides a number of tax credits for various job creation, investment, retraining, machinery acquisition and similar activities for expanding businesses. The objective of the retraining tax credit section of the act is to foster the profitability and competitiveness of Georgia's existing industry by encouraging workforce training and development through tax incentives to stay on the cutting of edge of technology and management systems. For information contact or Customized Contract Training Programs Customized training can be designed, developed, and delivered by the Economic Development Division for the specific needs of a company. Some examples of this specialized instruction are lean manufacturing, safety courses that meet or exceed OSHA standards, supervisory training, computer and technical skills, soft skills, industrial technologies skills, as well as health care industry training. The desired training can be developed and taught at the company's location or on our campus. For information contact or Continuing Education The role of continuing education is to develop short courses, workshops, and seminars for professional development and personal enrichment. The offerings range from cutting-edge technology to personal development courses, the goal of this department is to meet the needs of the community. Because our size enables us to offer personalized service and flexibility, we can keep our offerings fresh and relevant. If what you are looking for is not currently offered by the College, every effort will be made to develop the course or program to fit your needs. For information contact us at or Students who satisfactorily complete most career, professional and Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses receive continuing education units (CEU's) documenting that the instruction has met established standards in planning, design, instruction, and evaluation. The American Heart Association Training Center Atlanta Technical College is an official American Heart Association Training Center, and we offer a variety courses. According to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), approximately 4 million injuries and illnesses occur annually in the workplace, and nearly 80 percent of sudden cardiac arrests occur outside the hospital. Unfortunately, emergencies happen in the workplace. When a life is at stake, don t settle for less. Rely on quality training from the trusted leader in CPR and emergency cardiovascular care rely on ATC American Heart Association Training Center for your educational needs. Upon completion of the 53

55 training course, students will receive a 2 year completion card. To meet the need of companies and working families the Training Center now offers online training for all curriculums. For information contact us at or The Cleveland L. Dennard Conference Center The Dennard Conference Center (DCC) offers best-in-class meeting and event spaces at an affordable price. Whether it s a corporate training session or lavish banquet, The DCC is perfectly suited to host a wide range of events. Our state-of-the-art, 30,000 square foot conference site has a flexible array of room configurations catering to the needs of variously sized groups. Up to 450 attendees can be accommodated in our 10 meeting and event rooms. Telephone, internet, cable and wireless connectivity are available as a standard offering to our clients. Additionally, we offer multimedia, teleconferencing and videoconferencing capabilities. Our professional planners will help you create the ideal setting for your executive board meeting, seminar, workshop, training session, reception or wedding. Every facet of your event plan, from check-in to departure, will receive their experienced attention. You will see why so many of our guests return again and again to the Dennard Conference Center. Our service is second to none. For information contact us at or Check out this video of our venue! 54

56 Student Support Services Student Success Center Hours: Monday Thursday 9:30 AM 6:00 PM. Advisement services are available by appointment. Walk-in times vary by semester. Contact: Johnnie C. Sawyer Student Success Advisors: Elaina Chance Arts & Sciences Ira Johnson Business & Public Services Technology Tracye Paggett Arts & Sciences Katrina Patton Health & Public Safety Technology Achievement Coaches: P.W. Reed Arts & Sciences Michelle Patton Industrial & Transportation Technology The Student Success Center (SSC) offers a diverse menu of free services to help students achieve their personal and professional goals. The SSC staff provides academic advisement, life coaching, workshops and seminars, and supplemental learning services to improve student outcomes. Visitors to the SSC can also obtain information on external resources such as non-profit organizations, government programs and private endowments that provide financial and resource assistance to students. The SSC has direct oversight for first semester Academic Advisement. SSC advisors and coaches provide advisement services for all first time students who are enrolled in learning support courses. Included in this process is: course selection, registration, and career planning. The advisement team also offers student enrichment workshops on topics such as: study skills, learning styles, and basic computer skills. Learning Support Center Hours: Monday - Thursday 7:30 AM 8:00 PM, Friday 7:30 AM 4:00 PM, Saturday 9:00 AM. 1:00 PM Contact: Ronald Laws Anet Edwards The Staff of the Learning Support Center offers one-on-one, group, tutorial services in the general core areas. All tutorial services are free. In addition, the Learning Support Center serves as an open study location for students. It is equipped with free Wi-Fi and 32 internet-accessible computers. Student Success Center Learning Lab Rules The following is a list of rules that apply to the SSC Learning Lab and Advisement Services: 1. All students must sign in before entering the lab and sign out before exiting. 2. This is a learning environment, therefore please respect others, work quietly, and raise your hand for assistance. 3. Children are not allowed in the lab. 4. Food and Beverages are prohibited in the lab. 5. Computers are for academic purposes only. Preference is given to students doing course work over those engaged in personal use (face book, twitter, etc.). 6. The use of cell phones is prohibited in the lab. Staff members reserve the right to ask anyone using a cell phone to go outside of the lab. 7. Profanity or the disrespect of others will not be tolerated. Disruptive students will be asked to leave and security will be called for volatile cases. 8. Computer use is limited to 2 hours. After 2 hours, the computer will automatically shut down. 9. Do not leave your personal property unattended. Staff members are not responsible for any lost or stolen property. 10. Violating any of the above stated rules may result in being removed or banned from the lab and/or advisement area. 55

57 The Reading Oasis Center of Excellence Hours: Monday Thursday 9 AM 4 PM Contact: Sharon Dewberry-Outlaw In an effort to provide students with assistance in improving their reading proficiency, vocabulary, and critical thinking skills, Atlanta Technical College has developed the Reading Oasis. This program is a component of the college s Quality Enhancement Plan (QEP), which is a long-term strategic initiative designed to ensure continuous improvement and growth. Through the Reading Oasis, ATC students are given extra support in grasping literacy-related content and study strategies. With the help of the Reading Oasis, the college hopes to boost student retention and graduation rates. Career Placement Services Hours: Monday - Thursday 9:00 AM 5:30 PM, Friday 9:00 AM 12:00 PM Contact: Michael Burnside Atlanta Technical College is committed to assisting program graduates in the pursuit of suitable, rewarding employment. While the college cannot guarantee all students employment upon graduation or completion of personal objectives, instructors and the career placement staff constantly seek to assist students with employment opportunities. The Career Placement Services staff conducts workshops on a semester basis for students to disseminate information on the availability, scope, and use of career placement resources. These resources include, but are not limited to, current and projected employment opportunities, information on employers to ensure that students have the widest possible choices of employment. Career Services also provides information on the employment process, preparing job search competencies and tools for graduates to present themselves effectively as candidates for employment. The Career Placement Services (CPS) staff provides assistance to the Department of Institutional Effectiveness in conducting semester follow-up surveys of graduates and their employers. The responses from these surveys ensure that Atlanta Technical College is achieving its educational objectives of providing students with the skills necessary to perform in a competitive workforce environment. The Career Placement Services Office maintains a web-based job posting site that is accessible to Atlanta Technical College students and alumni. Potential employers may register on the site upon acceptance from the CPS staff. Adult Education Department Adult Literacy and GED Prep Hours: TBD Contact: Monique Faulkner / Who we serve: Minors (ages 16 and 17) and adults (ages 18 and older) Services offered: Adult Basic Education (ABE) - improving reading, writing and math skills. HS Graduation Test or GED Preparation Classes - Preparing students to pass the GED, or HS Graduation Test. Dual Enrollment programs - offered to students who TABE test at a high enough level to be dually enrolled in a technical certificate program and Adult Ed to earn their GED and technical certification simultaneously. Transition Services- Assisting with transition to college, the workplace, or the military, including workforce development, financial and family support training, referrals for services, expungment and soft skills workshops. Registration and Intake: Intake for Adult Education is ongoing, as space arises. However, registration is conducted within each quarter as follows: July through September - 1 st week of July 150 students and 1 st Week of August 150 students* October through December - 1 st week of October 150 students* January through March - 1 st week of January 150 students and first week of February 150 students* March through June - 1 st week of March 150 students* 56

58 *Students on the AE waiting list receive first preference for quarterly registration Interested students should visit the Adult Education Department located in the New Connections building F, or for more information. Prior to Beginning Classes: Students will be required to take the Test for Adult Basic Education (TABE) assessment. TABE assessments determine: which grade level the student is functioning at which class student will be placed in how close a student is to GED attainment TABE assessments also give instructors a tool that they can use to move students educational gains at progressive rates. Students will be administered a locator test prior to being pre-tested to determine which level of the TABE is best suited for the individual student. State law mandates that students are pre-tested prior to 12 instructional hours and post-tested at every 30, or 40 instructional hours depending on how well they score on the pre-test. Instructors will evaluate the TABE Pre and Post test results with their individual students at mandated student/teacher conferences to develop and build upon the Student Education Plan (SEP). Technical College System of Georgia (TCSG) Requirements for Program Enrollment: Every student must have a valid State ID Students ages 16 through 19 must have an official school withdrawal form evidencing withdrawal from public, private, or home school systems. Every student must be able to prove Verification of Eligibility for public benefits in the State of Georgia Underage Youth, (individuals who are 16 and 17 years of age), must be enrolled into the program by a parent, or guardian, or must show proof of court mandate for enrollment. For further information of the requirements for enrollment, please contact the Adult Education Department at , or GED TESTING Hours: Monday - Thursday 9:00 AM 4:00 PM GED testing is held in Building G (Library & Testing Center) Contact: Marilyn Arrington Your future is calling. With the GED test, you can answer the call. Passing the GED test is a key to opening doors to college, a better job, and earning the respect you deserve. Don t miss this chance to turn one small step into your next big opportunity in life! For the first time in 70 years, the GED test is offered on computer and you will enjoy the benefits of it: 24/7 online registration and scheduling Test at your own pace Instant score report Type your essay How Do I Register and Schedule the Computer-Based GED Exam? To register for the GED computer-based test (CBT), visit Create your account, register, and schedule your test. Or call EXAM-GED ( ). You must have a credit/debit card or voucher to pay the fees. For additional information, visit Atlanta Technical College, Building G (Library &Testing Center) Monday -Thursday, 9 AM to 4 PM or us at Phone What Are the Eligibility Requirements? All GED candidates must present a valid state or federal picture ID; i.e., passport, driver s license. 16 and 17 year-olds will be referred to a state-approved adult education program. You may contact the Atlanta Technical College Adult Education Department for additional information; or or 57

59 What is the cost? The cost of the GED Test is $32 for each individual module. There are five modules: reading, writing, math, science and social studies. TOTAL TEST BATTERY - $160. What if I need preparation classes? GED preparation classes are offered at no cost through state-approved adult education programs. Atlanta Technical College is pleased to offer GED preparation classes. Contact: or What if I already started the GED test and need to finish? If you ve already started the GED test, you re almost there. The current version of the GED test is expiring at the end of 2013 and your scores will expire too if you don t finish and pass the test by then. If you act soon, you won t have to re-take the parts of the test you ve already passed. Visit to learn more or call Atlanta Technical College at GED and GED Testing Service are registered trademarks of the American Council on Education (ACE). They may not be used or reproduced without the written permission of ACE or GED Testing Service. The GED and GED Testing Service brands are administered by GED Testing Service LLC under license from the American Council on Education. Other GED Resources: After the GED Test Complete the Application for Admission to enroll in a program of study and pay the $20 application fee Go to to apply for financial aid For GED transcript/diploma information, contact or visit Atlanta Technical College Institute for Males Hours: Monday Thursday 8:30 AM 4:30 PM (closed between 12-1 daily); Friday 8:30 AM 11:00 AM Contact: Henry Carter Carlton Morrow Curtis Halton The mission of the Atlanta Technical College Institute for Males (AIM) is to provide intensive support for minority men who wish to purse post-secondary education at Atlanta Technical College, and ultimately gain high-wage employment. AIM programs addresses focus on improving educational outcomes, increasing exposure to cultural experiences, and fostering an environment of civic engagement. Administrations take a three-prong approach to addressing and combating the issue of low graduation rates among minority men, targeting college-age males, high school students and men in the criminal justice system. Campus Initiative The AIM campus initiative serves to increase the enrollment and retention of males at Atlanta Technical College. This initiative offers post-secondary preparation, academic and personal support for current and new students. To become a member of AIM, a student 58

60 must complete a registration form and complete the intake process. Members of the collegiate AIM program receive the following services: counseling, tutoring, student support, personal development seminars/workshops, professional development seminars/workshops and mentoring. They also participate in campus-based and community service learning projects. High School Summer Leadership Camp (SLC) AIM hosts a six-week camp for 11th and 12th-grade males that focuses on discipline, teamwork, respect, and responsibility. The camp participants attend workshops that teach them leadership development, entrepreneurship, healthy lifestyles, career and college exploration, and financial literacy. Participants are assigned activities by the facilitators of the workshops that foster interpersonal communications, goal setting, and critical thinking skills. High School Saturday Academy Students enrolled in the Saturday Academy attend a three-hour session once a month that focuses on Leadership Development, Entrepreneurship, Financial Literacy, and College Preparatory. The participants are assigned activities by the workshop facilitator that foster goal setting, dressing for success, creating an operational and marketing plan, budgeting, etc. Workshop materials include: Operational Hope s Financial Literacy curriculum, ScholarShop and The 21 Irrefutable Laws of Leadership. Recidivism Initiative Recognizing that men in the criminal justice system will need viable options for employment when they are released, AIM staffers provide outreach services to men in juvenile detention centers and correctional facilities. With the goal of decreasing recidivism, they conduct workshops on self-esteem development, leadership, interpersonal skills, financial literacy, technical education and career exploration. Once individuals are released from custody, AIM officials help them transition from incarceration to college life and/or employment. In addition to providing academic support, the team helps ex-offenders overcome the life challenges that may hinder them from successfully re-entering the mainstream. Atlanta Technical College Childcare Center Hours: Monday - Friday 7:00 AM 6:00 PM; Before & After-Care Available Daycare Subsidy Accepted Pre-K Monday - Friday 8:00 AM - 3:00 PM Contact: Marsha Whittle The Atlanta Technical College Early Childcare Center has earned accreditation from the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) the nation s leading organization of early childhood professionals. Philosophy It is our hope that the lives of both you and your child will be enriched because of your association with us. We care about each child individually, striving not to compare, but to appreciate the precious rhythm of each one's growth. We do not in any way attempt to replace the priority of the home and its environment, but rather seek to supplement and enrich your child's experience. About Us Atlanta Technical College staff: Low teacher/child ratio First Aid/CPR trained Provide an organized and structured program which focuses on: o Academics o Arts & Crafts o Literacy Awareness o Group Activities o Social Skills o Music & Games o Structured Indoor & Outdoor Play Atlanta Technical College Childcare Center Provides: A safe and healthy academic learning environment Nutritious meals (breakfast, lunch & snack) Activities, materials, and equipment which are age and developmentally appropriate An environment that encourages creativity through a variety of art experiences An open door policy, which supports open communication between children, adults, the community, and the center s staff Creative curriculum for ages 7 months 5 years old Developmentally appropriate and child sized furnishings GA Pre-K Program 59

61 Parent Involvement Parents are encouraged to participate in their child s education. The observation area is open for parents to observe, however, it must not conflict with the instructional environment. Parent involvement activities are offered each quarter. Parent-teacher conferences are an integral part of helping children achieves their best. Conferences are arranged on a scheduled basis or at the parent s request. Special Needs The Early Education Center follows The Atlanta Public Schools Program under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). Placement in appropriate special education program is determined by the child s individualized Education Program (IEP) and recommendations of the placement committee. Communication Education is a partnership between home and school. We value parent involvement at every level and encourage you to partner with us. In order for this partnership to be effective, we need to be able to communicate. Please feel free to call, write a note, or us if you have concerns or questions about your child s education. We are always available to schedule a conference to discuss any issue or concern you have regarding your child. Translators are available at no cost through Atlanta Technical College. Atlanta Technical College Foundation Hours: Monday- Thursday 9:00 AM 6:00 PM, 9:00 AM 12:00 PM Contact: Elizabeth King Scholarships The Atlanta Technical College Foundation (ATCF) awards a number of merit- and need-based scholarships to students enrolled in the college. The criterion for each scholarship is on the ATCF website at Students should consult the website often for updates. Announcements concerning the availability of scholarships are also sent to student s through the official ATC student system. Scholarships include: Atlanta Marriott Marquis Hotel/Restaurant/Tourism Management Student Scholarship Fund The Hank Aaron Chasing the Dream Foundation "4 for 4" Endowed Scholarship The American Building Supply, Inc. Student Scholarship The Brenda Watts Jones Memorial Foundation Student Scholarship The Cornelia "NeNe" Williams Business Office Technology Student Scholarship Moving Forward No Matter What Scholarship W.W. Grainger Tools for Tomorrow Scholarship The Dr. Hilliard A. Bowen Business Office Technology and Early Childhood Student Scholarship Fund The Atlanta Technical College Foundation Scholarship Hardship Loans The Atlanta Technical College Foundation administers the Merancas Hardship Loan program at ATC. The purpose of the program is to provide students with immediate funding to meet unusual and unexpected expenses beyond the ordinary educational expenses met through financial aid. A student can receive a maximum loan amount of $350 or 60% of financial surplus (whichever is less). Please note that a student may not apply for a loan for two consecutive semesters and a student may only receive funding twice during their matriculation through Atlanta Technical College. Grants will be administered at the discretion of the Atlanta Technical College Foundation. Students should be reminded that hardship loan monies are repaid to the Atlanta Technical College Foundation from their financial aid refund. Examples of preferred requests - educational materials not available in the Atlanta Technical College bookstore, childcare services, transportation needs. Examples of requests that are not considered emergency/hardships student account balances due to student negligence, utilities (unless disconnected excludes cable, cell phones and internet), mortgage payment (unless home is in foreclosure), rent (unless there is an eviction notice), car payment (unless repossessed). Please note that financial aid must be utilized in book store prior to applying for a hardship loans (if you need assistance for book purchases). For more information contact the Atlanta Technical College Foundation or visit Funds for the program are generously provided by the Merancas Foundation and donations from corporate, individual and community contributors. 60

62 The Atlanta Technical College Alumni Association Hours: Monday - Thursday 9:00 AM - 6:00 PM; 9:00 AM - 12:00 PM Contact: Elizabeth King Atlanta Tech alumni, over 20,000 strong, are a vibrant, growing force in Atlanta s economy across virtually every business and industry. Our alumni network extends the power of an ATC education far beyond the classroom. The alumni connection provides opportunities to meet people with shared experiences and career pursuits. Members of the ATC Alumni Association have access to numerous programs and services as well as the opportunity to give back to the students who are striving each day to reach the goal of graduation. Your membership will allow you to keep in touch with classmates, stay in tune with what s happening at ATC, and take advantage of important information about career and volunteer opportunities. We look forward to building the association with your help! Discover. Connect. Empower! 61

63 Library Services Mission The mission of the Atlanta Technical College Library is to serve the educational and informational needs of its students, faculty and staff by: (1) providing organized access to information resources and services via qualified library staff; (2) careful selection of learning materials; (3) development of lifelong literacy skills for students to competently use throughout their lives; (4) providing access to collections and databases from any location, and (5) continuously update equipment, technology, and physical facilities as demanded by the needs of its users. These activities will insure the delivery of quality credit programs to prepare a highly skilled workforce that meets the needs of the Atlanta metropolitan business and industry communities, and the community at large. Location: Building G Phone: Website: Library Hours: Monday Thursday 7:30 AM - 8:00 PM and Friday 7:30 AM - 4:00 PM Library Staff Library assistance is readily available for reference inquiries and with patron records, circulation, reserves, and interlibrary loan processes. Library staff also coordinates library orientations and bibliographic instruction sessions in the use of GALILEO, the Internet, online catalog, print, and A/V resources. Director of Library Services Cataloging Librarian Tosha Bussey Diana Jiang Circulations and Reference Librarian Library Technical Assistant Cordelia Riley Pamela Sutton

64 Library Operation Guidelines Have your current Atlanta Technical College Picture Identification (ID) Card available whenever you visit the library. Present your card each time you want to borrow materials. No Food or Drinks are allowed in the library or computer lab. Reference materials, videos, and periodicals do not circulate. Circulation items may be checked out for two weeks and renewed once. You are responsible for items checked out on your card. Fines of 20 per school day are assessed for overdue items. The fine is payable upon the return of the item. An adult must remain with children at all times. You must provide supervision and/or materials for their use while in the library. Our computers are for student use only. There is an unlimited time on all workstations in the library computer lab. Keep cell telephones on vibrate, silent or off. No MP3 players please. With your library privileges, you agree to abide by the Atlanta Technical College acceptable use policy and avoid using the computers to access Internet sites that may be considered pornographic, lewd, or obscene. NOTE: Remember to set up a library account and a printing account at the circulation desk. Who may use the library? The library is open to the public. Enrolled students with a valid Atlanta Technical College picture ID card can borrow books. Current faculty and staff with a valid Atlanta Technical College picture ID can borrow books, videos, and equipment, and upon request other available print and non-print materials. Library Card A current and valid Atlanta Technical College picture ID will serve as the library card for all faculty, students and staff. Library cards are used for borrowing materials and accessing other library and media resources. You will need proof of enrollment each quarter to activate your library account. The library collection contains over 51,000 items, including print and non-print materials, books, periodicals, newspapers, and videotapes and audio tapes. The library collection also includes over 30,000 ebooks. In addition to the computer lab in the academic Building, there are 200 workstations available in the library computer lab with online capabilities. These workstations provide access to the library s online catalog (OPAC), the Internet, Microsoft Office Suite, and research databases (GALILEO). All workstations have word processing, spreadsheet, and database software capabilities. The Library offers a variety of instructional programs and services. Online tutorials, research related resources and research instruction are available to students, faculty and staff. Library orientation and bibliographic instruction are available to all by appointment. The library staff recommends that instructors schedule customized library instruction for their students during class sessions. Printed instructional guides and brochures are available during library hours. However, with online capabilities, database tutorials, library orientation and search techniques instruction for research can be accessed remotely at any time. User s Conduct and Responsibilities It is the user s responsibility to maintain proper standards of behavior in order to protect individual rights and privileges of other library patrons. If a user becomes a public nuisance, they may be asked to leave the facility. Children in Library Children must be supervised at all time. While children may remain in the library with an adult, they are not allowed to use the computers. Interlibrary Loan Interlibrary Loan is a free service for faculty, students and staff of Atlanta Technical College. As a member of the Georgia Online Database (GOLD) and the Library Network LYRASIS, the library is able to access, request and borrow resources from other libraries across the region and state by means of a computer database. A patron can request any journal or book, but not all materials requested are available. The Atlanta Technical College library is subject to the restrictions of the lending institutions regarding items requested, the loan period and renewals. Students, faculty, and staff can only use Interlibrary Loan for books, periodicals, or individual articles that cannot be obtained online in full text. Each institution has a different lending (ILL) policy. It is important to complete the necessary forms and be in contact with library staff during this process. ATC Interlibrary Loan service must be returned promptly when due. 63

65 Non-circulating Materials Reference materials and periodicals do not circulate for students. Reference materials include almanacs, dictionaries, encyclopedias, directories, maps and atlases. Reserves Instructors can place books, periodicals, articles, and videotapes on reserve each quarter for student use. Reserve means that the requested materials are available for two-hour use in the library only. If the patron keeps the library material beyond the two hour time limit, he/she will be assessed a fine of $.50 for each hour over the time limit. Book Returns and Fines It is the responsibility of the user to ensure the return of the library materials by the due date and in the same condition as when they were checked out. Books may be returned at the Circulation Desk in the library or in the Book Return Drop Box (Red Mailbox) at the front entrance of the Academic Complex Building. The charge for an overdue book is 20 per day after the initial two-week checkout period. The charge for a lost book is the cost of the book. The late fee is waived. All fines must be paid in full by the last day of the quarter. Students with outstanding library fines will have a hold placed on their account and will not be able to conduct school transactions such as registration. Food and Drink Food and drink are not allowed in the library and computer lab. Enclosed drinks (such as plastic capped bottles or cups) are not allowed either. Noise and Cell Phones While in the library, people expect to find a quiet place for research, study, and concentration. Everyone in the library should be considerate of those around them. If you are being disturbed, remind the person that this area is intended for quiet study. If this does not resolve the problem, please contact a library staff member. Upon entering the library, please turn cell telephone off or set ringer to silent or vibrate mode. Printing and Photocopying The Atlanta Technical College library uses the Pharos system for payment for printing from the computer workstations and for all photocopying. Library printing and photocopying services are fee-based and available through your Atlanta Technical College student ID and library account. Payment is transacted using the barcode on the Atlanta Technical College student ID. Black and white printing is available for 5 per page. Color printing is available for 10 per page. Photocopying is 10 per page. 20 per page for 11 X 17 copies. GALILEO and the Internet Atlanta Technical College enhances its library and learning resources through a collaborative effort with state institutions through Georgia Library Learning Online (GALILEO). GALILEO is a World Wide Web based virtual library sponsored by the Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia. It provides access to multiple information resources locally and remotely. These resources include secured access to licensed databases that include over 20,000 full text journals. As a participating institution, Atlanta Technical College students, faculty, and staff have access to over 200 databases indexing thousands of periodicals, scholarly journals, and other reference materials such as encyclopedias, business directories, and government publications and other recommended Internet sites. 64

66 The Atlanta Technical College library uses Library of Congress classification systems. The Library of Congress Classification system is an alphabetical and numeric system that also creates call numbers to identify each book or item in the library. Library of Congress Classification System Information Books in the Atlanta Technical College Library Congress Call Numbers. Each letter or two letter combination represents a subject area. To find the call number of a book, use the Online Public Access Catalog (OPAC) at (on campus) or (off campus). Please visit the ATC Library website A: General Works AE: Encyclopedias AG: Dictionaries B: Philosophy, Psychology, Religion BF: Psychology BJ: Ethics C: Auxiliary Sciences of History CB: History of Civilization CT: Biography D: History (General) and History of Europe DA: Great Britain DS: Asia DT: Africa E: History: America E : Afro-Americans E : Nineteenth Century E : Twentieth Century F: History: America F: Local, Regional F : Georgia G: Geography, Anthropology, Recreation G: Atlas & Maps GE: Environment GN: Race & Culture GT: Church GV: Sports & Games Tips for Finding Books on the Shelf Read call numbers line by line. H: Social Sciences HG: Finance HM: Sociology HN: Social History J: Political Science JS: Local government JV: Emigration & Immigration K: Law K85-89: Legal research K : Constitutional law K : Food, Drugs, Cosmetics L: Education LB : Early childhood education LB : School management and discipline M: Music, Books on Music ML: Literature on music N: Fine Arts N: Visual Arts NA: Architecture P: Language, Literature PE: English, grammar PN: American literature PN : Juvenile literature PS: American literature PZ: Fiction & Juvenile Q: Science QA75-76: Computer Software QA : Mathematics - Algebra QM: Human Anatomy R: Medicine RA: Public Health RC: Internal Medicine RK: Dentistry RM: Pharmacology RT: Nursing S: Agriculture SF: Pharmacology T: Technology TH: Building Construction TL: Motor Vehicles TX: Home Economics - Culinary U: Military Science UA: Army: Organization, distribution, military situation V: Naval Science VA: Navies: Organization, distribution, naval situation Z: Bibliography, Library Science, Information Resources (General) ZA: Information resources LB Read the first line in alphabetical order: A, B, BF, C, D... L, LA, LB, LC, M, ML Read the second line as a whole number: 1, 2, 3, 45, 100, 101, 1000, 2000, C65 The third line is a combination of a letter and numbers. Read the letter alphabetically. Read the number as a decimal, e.g.:.c65 =.65.C724 = The last line is the year the book was published. Read in chronological order: 1985, 1991,

67 Arts and Sciences Division The Arts and Sciences Division includes the Learning Support Center, General Education, Learning Support, and English as a Second Language (ESL). In addition, students may access open computer labs and receive tutorial support from the division. Bilingual Services/ English as a Second Language Students who have Limited English Proficiency (LEP) receive supportive services such as counseling, translating, tutoring, and various resources from their instructors. General Education The General Education Department provides learning opportunities that assist the student in developing academic skills and professional knowledge required for job acquisition, retention, and advancement. The General Education Department provides quality instruction to facilitate student success. When students graduate from a diploma, certificate or associate degree program, they will demonstrate competencies in the following areas: Research: Students will use the major steps in conducting research to locate and use appropriate reference materials for written and oral reports. Writing: Students will produce well-organized, coherent, grammatically correct written communications based on experiences, observations and readings. Reading: Students will analyze the methods of development, identify the structural elements, identify the different levels of literary effectiveness, and examine the ideas and values of various literary works. Oral Communications: Students will prepare and deliver informative, persuasive and well-organized speeches appropriate to the audience, setting or occasion, and demonstrate the ability to effectively listen to and summarize the ideas and viewpoints of other speakers. Mathematics: Students will use appropriate mathematical skills to gather, record, analyze and communicate quantitative data for the purpose of solving practical problems. Psychosocial Behavior: Students will interpret and apply the methodological and theoretical concepts of sociological groups and the effects of personality, emotions, conflicts, stress, and learning/intelligence on these groups. Each of these competencies is attained through courses in the General Education Core: I) Language Arts/Communication; II) Social/Behavioral Sciences; III) Natural Sciences/Mathematics and IV) Humanities/Fine Arts. 66

68 Learning Support Learning Support (LS) provides lecture and computer based instruction designed to fulfill the basic academic needs of program entry by assisting special population, certificate, diploma, and degree students in the areas of Reading, General Mathematics, Algebra, and English. This will enhance a student s ability to succeed in college-level courses. Students are referred to classes by placement assessment or instructors. Courses LEARNING SUPPORT COURSES ENGL 0090 Learning Support English 3 MATH 0090 Learning Support Mathematics 3 READ 0090 Learning Support Reading 3 COLL 1000 College Success and Survival Skills 2 Courses ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE COURSES ENGL 0091 Beginning Vocational English as a Second Language 3 ENGL 0092 Advanced Beginning Vocational English as a Second Language 3 ENGL 0093 Intermediate Vocational English as a Second Language 3 ENGL 0094 Advanced Vocational English as a Second Language 3 Credits General Core Requirements The General Education department emphasizes college level writing, communication, social sciences, humanities, natural sciences, and mathematics. All of these disciplines are required for the various certificates, diplomas, and associate degrees offered at Atlanta Technical College. This department assists students in attaining the skills, knowledge, perspectives, values, and dispositions that will enable them to apply their skills beyond the classroom in order to become valuable citizens and successful workers. 67

69 GENERAL EDUCATION COURSES ASSOCIATE DEGREE Credits Area I Language Arts/Communication ENGL 1101 Composition and Rhetoric 3 ENGL 1102 Literature and Composition 3 SPCH 1101 Public Speaking 3 GRMN 1101 Introduction to German Language & Culture I 3 Area II - Social/Behavioral Science ECON 1101 Principles of Economics 3 ECON 2105 Macroeconomics 3 ECON 2106 Microeconomics 3 HIST 1111 World History I 3 HIST 1112 World History II 3 HIST 2111 U.S. History I 3 HIST 2112 U.S. History II 3 POLS 1101 American Government 3 PSYC 1101 Introduction to Psychology 3 SOCI 1101 Introduction to Sociology 3 Area III -Natural Sciences/Mathematics BIOL 1111 Biology I 3 BIOL 1111L Biology I Lab 1 BIOL 1112 Biology II 3 BIOL 1112L Biology II Lab 1 CHEM 1211 Chemistry I 3 CHEM 1211L Chemistry I Lab 1 CHEM 1212 Chemistry II 3 CHEM 1212L Chemistry II Lab 1 MATH 1100 Quantitative Skills and Reasoning 3 MATH 1101 Mathematical Modeling 3 MATH 1111 College Algebra 3 MATH 1112 College Trigonometry 3 68

70 MATH 1113 Pre-calculus 3 MATH 1127 Introduction to Statistics 3 PHYS 1110 Conceptual Physics 3 PHYS 1110L Conceptual Physics Lab 1 Area IV Humanities/Fine Arts ARTS 1101 Art Appreciation 3 HUMN 1101 Introduction to Humanities 3 ENGL 2130 American Literature from the Beginning to MUSC 1101 Music Appreciation 3 Degree Courses (Not Considered General Education Courses) ENGL 1105 Technical Communications 3 PSYC 2103 Human Development 3 BIOL 2113 Anatomy/Physiology I 3 BIOL 2113L Anatomy/Physiology I Lab 1 BIOL 2114 Anatomy/Physiology II 3 BIOL 2114L Anatomy/Physiology II Lab 1 BIOL 2117 Introductory Microbiology 3 BIOL 2117L Introductory Microbiology Lab 1 GENERAL EDUCATION COURSES DIPLOMA ENGL 1010 Fundamentals of English I 3 EMPL 1000 Interpersonal Relations and Professional Development 2 MATH 1011 Business Mathematics 3 MATH 1012 Foundations of Mathematics 3 MATH 1013 Algebraic Concepts 3 MATH 1015 Geometry and Trigonometry 3 PSYC 1010 Basic Psychology 3 ALHS Courses ALHS 1011 Structure and Function of the Human Body 5 ALHS 1015 Basic Inorganic Chemistry 2 69

71 Programs of Study Programs of Study Atlanta Technical College offers a variety of programs of study that lead to an Associate of Applied Science Degree, a Diploma, or a Technical Certificate of Credit. Depending on program objectives and the number of semesters or courses required, a degree, diploma, or technical certificate of credit is awarded upon the successful completion of all courses. The programs of study offered by Atlanta Tech are divided into the following credentials: Associate of Applied Science Degree (two years plus); Diploma Programs (one to two years plus); Technical Certificate of Credit Programs (generally less than one year). Many Atlanta Tech programs are recognized by state and national accrediting and licensing boards. Program-specific accreditations are listed on the respective program pages. In addition, many programs of study prepare students to sit for state licensing exams in areas such as barbering, cosmetology, electrical maintenance, and medical assisting. 70

72 ACCOUNTING DIVISION: BUSINESS & PUBLIC SERVICE TECHNOLOGIES ACCOUNTING Associate of Applied Science Degree PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: AC13 The Accounting Associate Degree program is a sequence of courses that prepares students for a variety of careers in accounting in today s technology-driven workplaces. Learning opportunities develop academic, technical, and professional knowledge and skills required for job acquisitions, retention, and advancement. Program graduates receive an Associate of Applied Science Degree in Accounting. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS Must be 16 years of age Completion of high school diploma or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum General Education Courses 15 Area I Language Arts/Communication ENGL 1101 Composition and Rhetoric 3 Area II - Social/Behavioral Sciences PSYC 1101 Introductory Psychology 3 Area III - Natural Sciences/Mathematics MATH 1111 College Algebra 3 Area IV - Humanities/Fine Arts One Course Area IV General Education Course 3 Program-Specific General Education Course Requirements 3 Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses (Includes Electives Below) 49 ACCT 1100 Financial Accounting I 4 ACCT 1105 Financial Accounting II 4 Credits 71

73 ACCT 1110 Managerial Accounting 3 ACCT 1115 Computerized Accounting 3 ACCT 1120 Spreadsheet Applications 4 ACCT 1125 Individual Tax Accounting 3 ACCT 1130 Payroll Accounting 3 BUSN 1440 Document Production 4 COMP 1000 Introduction to Computers 3 ELECT ACCT Accounting Electives 9 ELECT ADV Specific Occupational-Guided Electives (Advisor Approved) 6 ELECT GEN General Elective 3 ACCOUNTING Diploma PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: AC12 The Accounting Diploma program is a sequence of courses that prepares students for a variety of entry-level positions in accounting in today s technology-driven workplaces. Learning opportunities develop academic, technical, and professional knowledge and skills required for job acquisition, retention, and advancement. Program graduates receive an Accounting Diploma. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS Must be 16 years of age Completion of high school or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. COURSE OUTLINE Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 64 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 5 Estimated Program Cost $11,400 Curriculum Basic Skills (General Core) Courses 8 ENGL 1010 Fundamentals of English 3 EMPL 1000 Interpersonal Relations and Professional Development 2 Credits MATH 1011 Select One of the Following Business Math 3 MATH 1012 Foundations of Math (3) 72

74 Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses (Including Electives Below) 34 ACCT 1100 Financial Accounting I 4 ACCT 1105 Financial Accounting II 4 ACCT 1115 Computerized Accounting 3 ACCT 1120 Spreadsheet Applications 4 ACCT 1125 Individual Tax Accounting 3 ACCT 1130 Payroll Accounting 3 BUSN 1440 Document Production 4 COMP 1000 Introduction to Computers 3 ELEC - ADV Specific Occupational-Guided Electives (Advisor Approved) 3 ELEC - ACCT Accounting Elective 3 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 42 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 4 Estimated Program Cost $8,500 COMPUTERIZED ACCOUNTING SPECIALIST Technical Certificate of Credit Program PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: CAY1 The Computerized Accounting Specialist technical certificate provides students with skills needed to perform a variety of accounting applications using accounting software and practical accounting procedures. Topics include principles of accounting, computerized accounting, spreadsheet fundamentals and basic computers. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS Must be 16 years of age Completion of high school or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses 21 ACCT 1100 Financial Accounting I 4 ACCT 1105 Financial Accounting II 4 ACCT 1115 Computerized Accounting 3 ACCT 1120 Spreadsheet Applications 4 73 Credits

75 COMP 1000 Introduction to Computers 3 ELEC - ACCT Accounting Elective 3 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 21 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 2 Estimated Program Cost $3,225 OFFICE ACCOUNTING SPECIALIST Technical Certificate of Credit Program PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: OA31 The Office Accounting Specialist technical certificate provides entry-level office accounting skills. Topics include principles of accounting, computerized accounting and basic computer skills. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS Requirements Must be 16 years of age Completion of high school diploma or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by registrar Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 G.P.A. and complete all required courses to graduate. COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses 14 ACCT 1100 Financial Accounting I 4 ACCT 1105 Financial Accounting II 4 ACCT 1115 Computerized Accounting 3 COMP 1000 Introduction to Computers 3 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 14 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 2 Credits Estimated Program Cost $2,450 74

76 PAYROLL ACCOUNTING SPECIALIST Technical Certificate of Credit Program PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: PA61 The Payroll Accounting Specialist technical certificate provides entry-level skills into payroll accounting. Topics include: principles of accounting, computerized accounting principles of payroll, mathematics and basic computer use. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS Must 16 years of age Completion of high school or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 G.P.A. and complete all required courses to graduate. COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses 17 ACCT 1100 Financial Accounting I 4 ACCT 1105 Financial Accounting II 4 ACCT 1115 Computerized Accounting 3 ACCT 1130 Payroll Accounting 3 COMP 1000 Introduction to Computers 3 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 17 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 2 Credits Estimated Program Cost $2,880 75

77 AIR CONDITIONING TECHNOLOGY DIVISION: INDUSTRIAL & TRANSPORTATION TECHNOLOGIES AIR CONDITIONING TECHNOLOGY Diploma PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: ACT2 The Air Conditioning Technology Diploma program is a sequence of courses that prepares students for careers in the air conditioning industry. Learning opportunities develop academic, occupational, and professional knowledge and skills required for job acquisition, retention, and advancement. The program emphasizes a combination of air conditioning theory and practical application necessary for successful employment. Program graduates receive an Air Conditioning Technology diploma and have the qualification of an air conditioning technician. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS Must be 16 years of age Completion of high school or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum Basic Skills (General Core) Courses 8 EMPL 1000 Interpersonal Relations and Professional Development 2 ENGL 1010 Fundamentals of English I 3 MATH 1012 Foundations of Mathematics 3 Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses 43 AIRC 1005 Refrigeration Fundamentals 4 AIRC 1010 Refrigeration Principles and Practices 4 AIRC 1020 Refrigeration Systems Components 4 AIRC 1030 HVACR Electrical Fundamentals 4 AIRC 1040 HVACR Electrical Motors 4 AIRC 1050 HVACR Electrical Components and Controls 4 AIRC 1060 Air Conditioning Systems Application and Installation 4 AIRC 1070 Gas Heat 4 Credits 76

78 AIRC 1080 Heat Pumps and Related Systems 4 AIRC 1090 Troubleshooting Air Conditioning Systems 4 COMP 1000 Introduction to Computers 3 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 51 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 3 Estimated Program Cost $7,850 AIR CONDITIONING TECHNICIAN ASSISTANT Technical Certificate of Credit Program PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: AZ31 The Refrigeration Technician Assistant TCC is a series of courses that prepares students to hold positions as refrigeration technician assistant. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS Must be 16 years of age Completion of high school or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses 12 AIRC 1005 Refrigeration Fundamentals 4 AIRC 1010 Refrigeration Principles and Practices 4 AIRC 1020 Refrigeration Systems Components 4 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 12 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 1 Credits Estimated Program Cost $2,350 77

79 HEATING AND AIR CONDITIONING INSTALLATION TECHNICIAN Technical Certificate of Credit Program PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: HAA1 The Heating and Air Conditioning Installing Technician TCC prepares students for careers in the installation of heating and air conditioning systems. Emphasis is placed on the theory and practical application skills necessary to provide the skills for successful employment. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS Must be 16 years of age Completion of high school or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses 12 AIRC 1010 Refrigeration Principles and Practices 4 AIRC 1030 HVACR Electrical Fundamentals 4 AIRC 1060 Air Conditioning Systems Application and Installation 4 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 12 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 1 Credits Estimated Program Cost $2,350 78

80 AUTO COLLISION REPAIR DIVISION: INDUSTRIAL & TRANSPORTATION TECHNOLOGIES AUTO COLLISON REPAIR Diploma PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: ACR2 The Automotive Collision Repair Program is a sequence of courses designed to prepare students for careers in the automotive collision repair profession. Learning opportunities develop academic, technical and professional knowledge and skills required for job acquisition, retention, and advancement. The program emphasizes either major automotive collision repair or automotive painting and refinishing depending on the specialization area a student chooses to complete. Program graduates receive an Automotive Collision Repair diploma which qualifies them as major collision repair technicians or painting and refinishing technicians. ADMISSSIONS REQUIREMENTS Must be 16 years of age Completion of high school or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum Basic Skills (General Core) Courses 8 ENGL 1010 Fundamentals of English I 3 EMPL 1000 Interpersonal Relations and Professional Development 2 MATH 1012 Foundations of Mathematics 3 Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses 29 ACRP 1000 Introduction to Auto Collision Repair 4 ACRP 1005 Automobile Component Repair and Replacement 4 ACRP 1010 Foundations of Collision Repair 5 ACRP 1015 Fundamentals of Automotive Welding 4 ACRP 1017 Mechanical and Electrical Systems I 4 ACRP 1019 Mechanical and Electrical Systems II 5 Credits 79

81 COMP 1000 Introduction to Computers 3 Complete One of the Following Specializations 12 Refinishing Specialization (12) ACRP 2001 Introduction to Auto Painting and Refinishing 5 ACRP 2002 Painting Refinishing Techniques 5 ACRP 2009 Refinishing Internship 2 OR Major Collision Repair Specialization (12) ACRP 2010 Major Collision Repair 5 ACRP 2015 Major Collision Replacements 5 ACRP 2019 Major Collision Repair Internship 2 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 49 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 3 Estimated Program Cost $6,269 AUTOMOTIVE COLLISION REPAIR ASSISTANT I Technical Certificate of Credit Program PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: AB51 The Automotive Collision Repair Assistant I certificate program prepares students for employment as assistants to lead and master technicians in an automotive collision repair shop. Topics covered include work safety, hand and power tools, basic component replacement, automotive welding techniques, and mechanical and electrical systems. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS Must be 16 years of age Completion of high school or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses 21 ACRP 1000 Introduction to Auto Collision Repair 4 ACRP 1005 Automobile Component Repair and Replacement 4 ACRP 1010 Foundations of Collision Repair 5 ACRP 1015 Fundamentals of Automotive Welding 4 80 Credits

82 ACRP 1017 Mechanical and Electrical Systems I 4 ACRP 1019 Mechanical and Electrical Systems II 5 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 21 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 2 Estimated Program Cost $4,552 AUTOMOTIVE COLLISION REPAIR ASSISTANT II Technical Certificate of Credit Program PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: AZ51 The Automotive Collision Repair Assistant II certificate program is an advanced certificate option a student can complete after finishing the Automotive Collision Repair Assistant I program. Topics covered include collision repair tolls and equipment, hydraulic systems, damage analysis and estimations, frame straightening and conventional/unibody structural panel repairs and replacement. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS Must be 16 years of age Completion of high school or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses 15 ACRP 1010 Foundations of Collision Repair 5 ACRP 2010 Major Collision Repair 5 ACRP 2015 Major Collision Replacements 5 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 15 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 3 Credits Estimated Program Cost $4,603 81

83 AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGY DIVISION: INDUSTRIAL & TRANSPORTATION TECHNOLOGIES AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGY Diploma PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: AT14 The Automotive Technology Diploma program is a sequence of courses designed to prepare students for careers in the automotive service and repair profession. Learning opportunities enable students to develop academic, technical and professional knowledge and skills required for job acquisition, retention, and advancement. The program emphasizes a combination of automotive mechanics theory and practical application necessary for successful employment. Program graduates receive an Auto Technology diploma that qualifies them as well rounded entry-level technicians. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS Must be 16 years of age Completion of high school or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum Basic Skills (General Core) Courses 8 EMPL 1000 Interpersonal Relations and Professional Development 2 ENGL 1010 Fundamentals of English I 3 MATH 1012 Foundations of Mathematics 3 Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses 47 AUTT 1010 Automotive Technology Introduction 2 AUTT 1020 Automotive Electrical Systems 7 AUTT 1030 Automotive Brake Systems 4 AUTT 1040 Automotive Engine Performance 7 AUTT 1050 Automotive Suspension and Steering Systems 4 AUTT 1060 Automotive Climate Control Systems 5 AUTT 2010 Automotive Engine Repair 6 AUTT 2020 Automotive Manual Drive Train and Axles 4 AUTT 2030 Automotive Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles 5 COMP 1000 Introduction to Computers 3 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 55 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 5 82 Credits

84 Estimated Program Cost $7,176 AUTO ELECTRICAL/ELECTRONIC SYSTEM TECHNICIAN Technical Certificate of Credit Program PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: AE41 The certificate program provides students with the knowledge and skills necessary to diagnose, service, and repair basic electrical/electronic automotive systems as an entry-level technician. Topics covered includes automotive shop safety, electrical theory and circuit diagnosis, automotive batteries, starting, and charging systems, instrumentation, lighting, and various vehicle accessories. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS Must be 16 years of age Completion of high school or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses 9 AUTT 1010 Automotive Technology Introduction 2 AUTT 1020 Automotive Electrical Systems 7 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 9 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 1 83 Credits Estimated Program Cost $3,901 AUTOMOTIVE CHASSIS TECHNICIAN SPECIALIST Technical Certificate of Credit Program PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: ASG1 The Automotive Chassis Technician Specialist certificate program provides students with skills needed to enter the automotive industry as an entry-level chassis technician. Topics covered include: shop safety, basic electrical/electronic theory and diagnosis, chassis components and types, steering system components and service, alignment theory and procedure, brake system operation, diagnosis and repair. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS Must be 16 years of age Completion of high school or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum

85 Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses 17 AUTT 1010 Automotive Technology Introduction 2 AUTT 1020 Automotive Electrical Systems 7 AUTT 1030 Automotive Brake Systems 4 AUTT 1050 Automotive Suspension and Steering Systems 4 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 17 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 2 Credits Estimated Program Cost $4,627 AUTOMOTIVE CLIMATE CONTROL TECHNICIAN Technical Certificate of Credit Program PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: AH21 The Automotive Climate Control Technician certificate program provides students with skills for entering the automotive service industry as an entry-level climate control technician. Topics include basic shop safety, electrical/electronic theory and diagnosis, and the theory, operation, diagnosis and servicing of automotive climate control systems. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS Must be 16 years of age Completion of high school or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses 14 AUTT 1010 Automotive Technology Introduction 2 AUTT 1020 Automotive Electrical Systems 7 AUTT 1060 Automotive Climate Control Systems 5 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 14 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 2 Credits Estimated Program Cost $2,522 AUTOMOTIVE TRANSMISSION/TRANSAXLE TECH SPECIALIST Technical Certificate of Credit Program 84

86 PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: AA71 The Automotive Transmission/Transaxle Tech Specialist certificate program provides students with the skills to enter the automotive industry as an entry-level transmission, transaxle, and drive line technician. Topics covered include: shop safety, basic electrical/electronic theory and diagnosis, manual transmission/transaxle operation and diagnosis, automatic transmission/transaxle operation and diagnosis, axles operations and diagnosis, differentials operation and diagnosis, and 4 WD/AWD systems operations and diagnosis. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS Must be 16 years of age Completion of high school or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses 18 AUTT 1010 Automotive Technology Introduction 2 AUTT 1020 Automotive Electrical Systems 7 AUTT 2020 Automotive Manual Drive Train and Axles 4 AUTT 2030 Automotive Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles 5 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 18 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 2 Credits Estimated Program Cost $2,822 85

87 AVIATION MAINTENANCE TECHNOLOGY DIVISION: INDUSTRIAL & TRANSPORTATION TECHNOLOGIES AVIATION MAINTENANCE TECHNOLOGY Diploma PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: AM34 The Aviation Maintenance Technology diploma program is intended to provide students with an introduction to the occupational area of aviation maintenance as currently understood and practiced by Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) mechanic certificate holders with airframe and/or power plant ratings. In addition, the combined power plant and airframe curriculum is designed to provide students with the technical knowledge and skills required to diagnose problems and repair aircraft power plants, both reciprocating and turbine, their system components; and airframes, both metal and wood, their systems and components. Satisfactory completion of all program courses entitles students to participate in FAA power plant and airframe examinations and certification processes. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS Must be 16 years of age Completion of high school or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum Basic Skills (General Core) Courses 8 ENGL 1010 Fundamentals of English I 3 EMPL 1000 Interpersonal Relations and Professional Development 2 MATH 1013 Algebraic Concepts 3 Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses 82 AVMT 1000 Aviation Mathematics 2 AVMT 1010 Aircraft Maintenance Regulations 2 AVMT 1020 Aircraft Applied Sciences I 5 AVMT 1025 Aircraft Applied Sciences II 4 AVMT 1030 Aircraft Electricity and Electronics 5 AVMT 1210 Aviation Physics 2 AVMT 2010 Aircraft Airframe Structures 2 Credits 86

88 AVMT 2020 Airframe Sheet Metal and Non- Metallic Structures 2 AVMT 2025 Airframe Non- Metallic Structures 2 AVMT 2030 Airframe Welding 1 AVMT 2040 Airframe Assembly and Rigging 2 AVMT 2060 Aircraft Hydraulic and Pneumatic Systems 2 AVMT 2070 Aircraft Landing Gear Systems 3 AVMT 2080 Aircraft Environmental Control Systems 3 AVMT 2085 Aircraft Fuel and Instrument Systems 3 AVMT 2090 Aircraft Electrical Systems 4 AVMT 2095 Aircraft Communication and Navigation Systems 2 AVMT 2210 Reciprocating Engine Powerplants I 3 AVMT 2220 Reciprocating Engine Powerplants II 4 AVMT 2230 Gas Turbine Powerplants I 3 AVMT 2240 Gas Turbine Powerplants II 3 AVMT 2260 Aircraft Engine Fuel and Fuel Metering Systems 4 AVMT 2270 Powerplant Instruments, Fire Protection and Electrical Systems 3 AVMT 2275 Powerplant Ignition and Starting Systems 4 AVMT 2280 Aircraft Powerplant Accessory Systems 3 AVMT 2285 Aircraft Propeller Systems 3 COMP 1000 Introduction to Computers 3 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 90 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 6 Estimated Program Cost $9,669 Certifying/Licensing Agency: Federal Aviation Administration, (FSDO) 107 Charles W. Grant Parkway Hapeville, GA ; Phone The FAA certifies the Aviation Maintenance Tech program as a FAR Part 147 School. Graduates of the program are eligible to sit for licensing exams in: Air Frame, Powerplant, and AirFrame & Powerplant. 87

89 AVIONICS MAINTENANCE TECHNOLOGY Diploma PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: AM44 The Avionics Maintenance Technology diploma program is a sequence of courses designed to prepare students to work in the field of avionics maintenance technology. Leaning opportunities develop academic, technical, and professional knowledge and skills required for job acquisition, retention and advancement. The program emphasizes a combination of aircraft airframe and avionics theory and practical application necessary for successful employment. Program graduates receive an Avionics Maintenance Technology diploma that qualifies them as avionics technicians and prepares them to sit for the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Airframe certification exams as well as the General Radio Operating License (GROL) exam. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS Must be 16 years of age Completion of high school or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum Basic Skills (General Core) Courses 8 ENGL 1010 Fundamentals of English I 3 EMPL 1000 Interpersonal Relations and Professional Development 2 MATH 1013 Algebraic Concepts 3 Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses 87 AVMT 1000 Aviation Mathematics 2 AVMT 1010 Aircraft Maintenance Regulations 2 AVMT 1020 Aircraft Applied Sciences I 5 AVMT 1025 Aircraft Applied Sciences II 4 AVMT 1030 Aircraft Electricity and Electronics 5 AVMT 1210 Aviation Physics 2 AVMT 2010 Aircraft Airframe Structures 2 AVMT 2020 Airframe Sheet Metal and Non- Metallic Structures 5 AVMT 2030 Airframe Welding 1 AVMT 2040 Airframe Assembly and Rigging 2 AVMT 2050 Airframe Inspection 4 AVMT 2060 Aircraft Hydraulic and Pneumatic Systems 2 AVMT 2070 Aircraft Landing Gear Systems 3 88 Credits

90 AVMT 2080 Aircraft Environmental Control Systems 3 AVMT 2085 Aircraft Fuel and Instrument Systems 3 AVMT 2090 Aircraft Electrical Systems 4 AVMT 2095 Aircraft Communication and Navigation Systems 2 AVIO 1010 Basic Electronics 4 AVIO 1020 Avionics Maintenance Practices 3 AVIO 1030 Advanced Electronics 4 AVIO 1040 Digital Electronics 4 AVIO 1060 Aircraft Logic Systems 4 AVIO 1070 Aircraft Communication Systems 5 AVIO 1080 Navigation Systems 5 AVIO 1090 Flight Director and Autopilot Systems 4 COMP 1000 Introduction to Computers 3 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 95 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 6 Estimated Program Cost $9,839 Certifying/Licensing Agency: Federal Aviation Administration, (FSDO) 107 Charles W. Grant Parkway Hapeville, GA , Phone The FAA certifies the Aviation Maintenance Tech program as a FAR Part 147 School. Graduates of the program are eligible to sit for licensing exams in: Air Frame. Certifying/Licensing Agency: Federal Communicating Commission (FCC) th Street, Washington, D.C , Phone Graduates of the program are eligible to sit for licensing exams in: Elements 1, 3, and 8. Certifying/Licensing Agency: Natural Center for Aerospace & Transportation Technologies (NCATT), Post Office Box , Fort Worth TX 76136, Phone Graduates of the program are eligible to sit for licensing exams in: Aircraft Electronics Technician (AET) standard and certification. 89

91 AVIATION AIRFRAME TECHNICIAN Technical Certificate of Credit Program PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: AMT The Aviation Airframe program will train students to serve as Aviation Airframe Technicians to meet Industry and Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) standards as specified in Federal Aviation Regulation Part 147. Upon completion of these requirements students will be eligible to sit for the FAA Aviation Maintenance Airframe written, oral and practical examination. Requirements must be met under FAR Part 65 to receive their FAA Airframe License. Airframe Technicians gain employment in commercial, private, corporate or government entities that require trained licensed individuals that inspect and perform maintenance on aircraft landing gear, instruments, pressurized sections, accessories brakes, valves, pumps, and air conditioning systems, for example and other parts of the aircraft. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS Must be 16 years of age Completion of high school or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses 51 AVMT 1000 Aviation Mathematics 2 AVMT 1010 Aircraft Maintenance Regulations 2 AVMT 1020 Aircraft Applied Sciences I 5 AVMT 1025 Aircraft Applied Sciences II 4 AVMT 1030 Aircraft Electricity and Electronics 5 AVMT 1210 Aviation Physics 2 AVMT 2010 Aircraft Airframe Structures 2 AVMT 2020 Airframe Sheet Metal and Non- Metallic Structures 5 AVMT 2030 Airframe Welding 1 AVMT 2040 Airframe Assembly and Rigging 2 AVMT 2050 Airframe Inspection 4 AVMT 2060 Aircraft Hydraulic and Pneumatic Systems 2 AVMT 2070 Aircraft Landing Gear Systems 3 AVMT 2080 Aircraft Environmental Control Systems 3 AVMT 2085 Aircraft Fuel and Instrument Systems 3 AVMT 2090 Aircraft Electrical Systems 4 Credits 90

92 AVMT 2095 Aircraft Communication and Navigation Systems 2 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 51 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 4 Estimated Program Cost $5,343 Certifying/Licensing Agency: Federal Aviation Administration, (FSDO) 107 Charles W. Grant Parkway Hapeville, GA Ph The FAA certifies the Aviation Maintenance Tech program as a FAR Part 147 School. Graduates of the program are eligible to sit for licensing exams in: Air Frame. AVIATION MAINTENANCE TECHNICIAN Technical Certificate of Credit Program PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: AM24 The Aviation Maintenance Technician program courses prepare students for employment in the field of aviation maintenance. The program emphasizes a combination of aircraft maintenance theory and aircraft maintenance application. This program meets the academic requirements for the FAA Airframe and Powerplant certificate. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS Must be 16 years of age Completion of high school or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses 84 AVMT 1000 Aircraft Mathematics 2 AVMT 1010 Aircraft Maintenance Regulations 2 AVMT 1020 Aircraft Applied Sciences I 5 AVMT 1025 Aircraft Applied Sciences II 4 AVMT 1030 Aircraft Electricity and Electronics 5 AVMT 1210 Aviation Physics 2 AVMT 2010 Aircraft Airframe Structures 2 AVMT 2020 Airframe Sheet Metal and Non-Metallic Structures 5 AVMT 2030 Airframe Welding 1 AVMT 2040 Airframe Assembly and Rigging 2 Credits 91

93 AVMT 2050 Airframe Inspection 4 AVMT 2060 Aircraft Hydraulic and Pneumatic Systems 2 AVMT 2070 Aircraft Landing Gear Systems 3 AVMT 2080 Aircraft Environmental Control Systems 3 AVMT 2085 Aircraft Fuel and Instrument Systems 3 AVMT 2090 Aircraft Electrical Systems 4 AVMT 2095 Aircraft Communication and Navigation Systems 2 AVMT 2210 Reciprocating Engine Powerplants I 3 AVMT 2220 Reciprocating Engine Powerplants II 5 AVMT 2230 Gas Turbine Powerplants I 3 AVMT 2240 Gas Turbine Powerplants II 3 AVMT 2250 Aircraft Engine Inspection 1 AVMT 2260 Aircraft Engine Fuel and Fuel Metering Systems 5 AVMT 2270 Powerplant Instruments, Fire Protection and Electrical Systems 3 AVMT 2275 Powerplant Ignition and Starting Systems 4 AVMT 2280 Aircraft Powerplant Accessory Systems 3 AVMT 2285 Aircraft Propeller Systems 3 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 84 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 7 Estimated Program Cost $8,734 Certifying/Licensing Agency: Federal Aviation Administration, (FSDO) 107 Charles W. Grant Parkway Hapeville, GA ; Phone The FAA certifies the Aviation Maintenance Technician Program as a FAR Part 147 school. Graduates of the program are eligible to sit for licensing exams in: Airframe, PowerPlant, and Airframe & Powerplant. 92

94 AVIATION POWER PLANT TECHNICIAN Technical Certificate of Credit Program PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: AM61 The Aviation Power Plant program will train students to serve as Aviation Power Plant Technicians to meet Industry and Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) standards as specified in Federal Aviation Regulation Part 147. Upon completion of these requirements students will be eligible to sit for the FAA Aviation Maintenance Power Plant written, oral and practical examination. Requirements must be met under FAR Part 65 to receive their FAA Airframe License. Power plant Technicians gain employment in commercial, private, corporate or government entities that require trained licensed individuals that inspects and performs maintenance on aircraft reciprocating and gas turbine engines, and other parts of the aircraft that are related to power plant systems. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS Must be 16 years of age Completion of high school or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses 53 AVMT 1000 Aviation Mathematics 2 AVMT 1010 Aircraft Maintenance Regulations 2 AVMT 1020 Aircraft Applied Sciences I 5 AVMT 1025 Aircraft Applied Sciences II 4 AVMT 1030 Aircraft Electricity and Electronics 5 AVMT 1210 Aviation Physics 2 AVMT 2210 Reciprocating Engine Powerplants I 3 AVMT 2220 Reciprocating Engine Powerplants II 5 AVMT 2230 Gas Turbine Powerplants I 3 AVMT 2240 Gas Turbine Powerplants II 3 AVMT 2250 Aircraft Engine Inspection 1 AVMT 2260 Aircraft Engine Fuel and Fuel Metering Systems 5 AVMT 2270 Powerplant Instruments, Fire Protection and Electrical Systems 3 AVMT 2275 Powerplant Ignition and Starting Systems 4 AVMT 2280 Aircraft Powerplant Accessory Systems 3 AVMT 2285 Aircraft Propeller Systems 3 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation Credits

95 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 4 Estimated Program Cost $5,343 Certifying/Licensing Agency: Federal Aviation Administration, (FSDO) 107 Charles W. Grant Parkway Hapeville, GA ; Phone The FAA certifies the Aviation Maintenance Tech program as a FAR Part 147 School. Graduates of the program are eligible to sit for licensing exams in: Power Plant. AVIONICS BENCH TECHNICIAN Technical Certificate of Credit Program PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: AB81 The Avionics Bench Technician certificate program is a sequence of courses that prepare students for employment in the field of avionics maintenance technology-aircraft electronics. Graduates of this program are qualified to work on aircraft electronics in avionics repair stations and should be prepared to sit for the General Radio Operating License (GROL) exam. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS Must be 16 years of age Completion of high school or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses 33 AVIO 1010 Basic Electronics 4 AVIO 1020 Avionics Maintenance Practices 3 AVIO 1030 Advanced Electronics 4 AVIO 1040 Digital Electronics 4 AVIO 1060 Aircraft Logic Systems 4 AVIO 1070 Aircraft Communications Systems 5 AVIO 1080 Navigation Systems 5 AVIO 1090 Flight Director and Autopilot Systems 4 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 33 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 3 Credits Estimated Program Cost $3,561 Certifying/Licensing Agency: Federal Communications Commission (FCC) th Street, Washington, D.C , Phone Graduates of the program are eligible to sit for licensing exams in: Elements 1, 3, and 8. 94

96 Certifying/Licensing Agency: Natural Center for Aerospace & Transportation Technologies (NCATT), Post Office Box , Fort Worth TX 76136, Phone Graduates of the program are eligible to sit for licensing exams in: Aircraft Electronics Technician (AET) standard and certification. 95

97 BARBERING DIVISION: BUSINESS & PUBLIC SERVICES TECHNOLOGIES BARBERING Diploma PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: BA12 The Barbering program is a sequence of courses that prepares students for careers in the field of barbering. Learning opportunities develop academic and professional knowledge and skills required for job acquisition, retention, and advancement. The program emphasizes specialized training in safety, sanitation, hair treatments and manipulations, haircutting techniques, shaving, skin care, reception, sales, and management. The curriculum meets state licensing requirements of the Georgia State Board of Barbering. The program graduate receives a Barbering diploma and is employable as a barber, salon/shop manager, or a salon/shop owner. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS Must be 16 years of age Completion of high school or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. Blood and Airborne Pathogens: Students enrolled in Category I and II programs at Atlanta Technical College will be performing tasks in which there is a normal occurrence for exposure to blood, other potentially infectious body materials, and airborne pathogens. These tasks will be performed in the classroom, laboratory, and clinical activities for each occupational training program/course. Students will be required to present documentation of Hepatitis B and Tuberculosis immunizations as a result of potential occupational exposure. Students should contact their program directors for more information on policies and procedures regarding blood and airborne pathogens. COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum Credits Basic Skills (General Core) Courses 8 ENGL 1010 Fundamentals of English I 3 EMPL 1000 Interpersonal Relations and Professional Development 2 MATH 1012 Foundations of Mathematics 3 Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses 44 BARB 1000 Introduction to Barber/Styling Implements 3 BARB 1010 Science: Sterilization, Sanitation, and Bacteriology 3 BARB 1020 Introduction to Haircutting and Shampooing 5 96

98 BARB 1030 Haircutting/Basic Styling 3 BARB 1040 Shaving 2 BARB 1050 Science: Anatomy and Physiology 3 BARB 1060 Introduction to Color Theory/Color Applications 3 BARB 1070 Chemical Restructuring of Hair 5 BARB 1080 Advanced Haircutting/Styling 5 BARB 1090 Structures of Skin, Scalp, Hair and Facial Treatments 3 BARB 1100 Barbering/Styling Practicum and Internship 3 BARB 1110 Shop Management/Ownership 3 COMP 1000 Introduction to Computers 3 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 52 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 4 Estimated Program Cost $5,815 Licensing Agency: Georgia State Board of Barbering, 237 Coliseum Dr. Macon, GA , BARBERING FOR COSMETOLOGISTS Technical Certificate of Credit Program PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: BF21 The Barbering for Cosmetologists Technical Certificate allows the student who holds a current Master Cosmetology license to receive additional training that will qualify the student to take the examination for Barbering. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS Must be 16 years of age Completion of high school or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. Blood and Airborne Pathogens: Students enrolled in Category I and II programs at Atlanta Technical College will be performing tasks in which there is a normal occurrence for exposure to blood, other potentially infectious body materials, and airborne pathogens. These tasks will be performed in the classroom, laboratory, and clinical activities for each occupational training program/course. Students will be required to present documentation of Hepatitis B and Tuberculosis immunizations as a result of potential occupational exposure. Students should contact their program directors for more information on policies and procedures regarding blood and airborne pathogens. 97

99 COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum Credits Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses 19 BARB 1000 Introduction to Barber/Styling Implements 3 BARB 1010 Science: Sterilization, Sanitation, and Bacteriology 3 BARB 1020 Introduction to Haircutting and Shampooing 5 BARB 1030 Haircutting/Basic Styling 3 BARB 1040 Shaving 2 BARB 1100 Barbering/Styling Practicum and Internship 3 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 19 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 2 Estimated Program Cost $2,615 Licensing Board: Georgia State Board of Barbering, 237 Coliseum Drive, Macon, GA 31217; Phone:

100 BIOSCIENCE DIVISION: HEATLH & PUBLIC SAFETY TECHNOLOGIES BIOSCIENCE TECHNOLOGY Associate of Applied Science Degree PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: BT13 The bioscience technology degree prepares graduates to perform a number of biotechnology related careers, including laboratory research, and skills to work in sophisticated biotechnology manufacturing settings. Bioscience encompasses many critical areas of research on living organisms including development of drugs and medical devices, criminal forensics, environmental science, and agricultural biotechnology. This program focuses principally on advanced biochemistry and biotechnology laboratory skills, such as analytical DNA, RNA, and protein techniques, cell culture, and microbiology. Our educational approach emphasizes critical-thinking and problem-solving skills. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS Must be 16 years of age Completion of high school or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES The skill set provided by this program is required to work in laboratories at research universities like the University of Georgia, biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies, many major research hospitals, and governmental laboratories. Additionally, these same skills are required to work at food production companies and biomanufacturing facilities that produce pharmaceuticals and vaccines for both humans and animals. Designing new medications and medical devices, improving the environment, enhancing food yield and quality as these are samples of the work that biotechnologists do. LICENSURE/CERTIFICATION - N/A SALARY POTENTIAL Minimum: $38,060 PROGRAM ADDITIONAL FEES (Cost are estimated and are subject to change) Books & Supplies: $2,250 Uniform: $ Blood and Airborne Pathogens: Students enrolled in Category I and II programs at Atlanta Technical College will be performing tasks in which there is a normal occurrence for exposure to blood, other potentially infectious body materials, and airborne pathogens. These tasks will be performed in the classroom, laboratory, and clinical activities for each occupational training program/course. Students will be required to present documentation of Hepatitis B and Tuberculosis immunizations as a result of potential occupational exposure. Students should contact their program directors for more information on policies and procedures regarding blood and airborne pathogens. 99

101 COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum Credits General Education Courses 20 Area I - English/Humanities/Fine Arts ENGL 1101 Composition and Rhetoric 3 Area II - Social/Behavioral Sciences SOCI 1101 Introduction to Sociology 3 Area III - Natural Sciences/Mathematics MATH 1111 College Algebra 3 BIOL 1111 Biology I 3 BIOL 1111L Biology Lab I 1 CHEM 1211 Chemistry I 3 CHEM 1211L Chemistry I Lab 1 Area IV - Humanities/Fine Arts HUMN 1101 Introduction to Humanities 3 Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses 39 COMP 1000 Introduction to Computers 3 CHEM 1212 Chemistry II 3 CHEM 1212 Chemistry II Lab 1 BIOL 2117 Introduction to Microbiology 3 BIOL 2117L Introduction to Microbiology Lab 1 CHEM 2211 Organic Chemistry I 3 CHEM 2211L Organic Chemistry I Lab 1 CHEM 2300 Quantitative Analysis 3 CHEM 2300L Quantitative Analysis Lab 2 BSCI 1111 Introduction to Bioscience 3 BSCI 1211 Regulatory Compliance 3 BSCI 2220 Nucleic Acid Chemistry and Analysis 4 BSCI 2230 Methods of Protein Analysis 4 100

102 BIOL 2290 Integrative Biology 5 ELECT - BIOS Specific Occupational Guided Electives (Advisor Approved Electives) 9 BSCI 1212 Validation, Documentation and Quality Assurance 3 BSCI 1220 Fundamentals of Biomanufacturing 3 BSCI 1230 Environmental Laboratory Testing Methods 3 BSCI 1240 Pollution and Remediation 3 CHEM 2212 Organic Chemistry II 3 CHEM 2212L Organic Chemistry II Lab 1 BIOL 2250 Applied Biotechnology Internship 3 BIOL 2300 Biological Research 3 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 68 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 6 Estimated Program Cost $6,807 BIOSCIENCE ENVIRONMENTAL LABORATORY TECHNOLOGIST Technical Certificate of Credit PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: BE61 Environmental laboratory testing is a crucial aspect of our society s environmental management. The orchestration of drinking water purification and waste water management, along with pollution remediation dominate the careers available to bioscience environmental laboratory technologists. This program prepares students to work in laboratories associated with environmental management. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS Must be 18 years of age Completion of high school diploma or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES Environmental laboratory technicians may work in a wet lab analyzing ph, phosphate levels or microbial screening. Other technicians may determine biological oxygen demand or chemical oxygen demand in samples. LICENSURE/CERTIFICATION - N/A SALARY POTENTIAL Minimum: $35,000 PROGRAM ADDITIONAL FEES (Cost are estimated and are subject to change) Books & Supplies: $1,025 Uniform: $ Blood and Airborne Pathogens: Students enrolled in Category I and II programs at Atlanta Technical College will be performing tasks in which there is a normal occurrence for exposure to blood, other potentially infectious body materials, and airborne pathogens. These tasks will be performed in the classroom, laboratory, and clinical activities for each occupational training program/course. Students will be required to present documentation of Hepatitis B and Tuberculosis immunizations as a result of potential occupational exposure. Students should contact their program directors for more information on policies and procedures regarding blood and airborne pathogens. 101

103 COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum Basic Skills (General Core) Courses 9 ALHS 1015 Basic Inorganic Chemistry 2 BIOL 1111 Biology I 3 BIOL 1111L Biology Lab I 1 MATH 1012 Foundations of Mathematics 3 Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses 15 BSCI 1111 Introduction to Bioscience 3 COMP 1000 Introduction to Computers 3 BSCI 1211 Regulatory Compliance 3 BSCI 1230 Environmental Laboratory Testing Methods 3 BSCI 1240 Pollution and Remediation 3 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 24 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms Credits Estimated Program Cost $2,284 BIOSCIENCE REGULATORY ASSURANCE TECHNOLOGIST Technical Certificate of Credit Program PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: BR21 This bioscience regulatory assurance technologist certificate will familiarize students with regulatory principles in bioscience and serve as an introduction to laboratory procedures common in quality management bioscience laboratories. Applicants include individuals interested in changing careers and persons already working in the regulatory assurance industry. The program focuses on not only the regulatory system in the United States, but also the global trends towards international regulatory systems. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS Must be 18 years of age Completion of high school diploma or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES Graduates may work in governmental positions during regulatory monitoring and enforcement while others may work in private industry on the compliance side of the assurance field. SALARY POTENTIAL Minimum: $32,000 PROGRAM ADDITIONAL FEES (Cost are estimated and are subject to change) Books & Supplies: $1,025 Uniform: $ Blood and Airborne Pathogens: Students enrolled in Category I and II programs at Atlanta Technical College will be performing tasks in which there is a normal occurrence for exposure to blood, other potentially infectious body materials, and airborne pathogens.

104 These tasks will be performed in the classroom, laboratory, and clinical activities for each occupational training program/course. Students will be required to present documentation of Hepatitis B and Tuberculosis immunizations as a result of potential occupational exposure. Students should contact their program directors for more information on policies and procedures regarding blood and airborne pathogens. COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum Credits Basic Skills (General Core) Courses 9 ALHS 1015 Basic Inorganic Chemistry 2 BIOL 1111 Biology I 3 BIOL 1111L Biology Lab I 1 MATH 1012 Foundations of Mathematics 3 Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses 15 BSCI 1111 Introduction to Bioscience 3 COMP 1000 Introduction to Computers 3 BSCI 1211 Regulatory Compliance 3 BSCI 1212 Validation, Documentation and Quality Assurance 3 BSCI 1220 Fundamentals of Biomanufacturing 3 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 24 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 2 Estimated Program Cost $2,

105 BUSINESS ADMINISTRATIVE TECHNOLOGY DIVISION: BUSINESS & PUBLIC SERVICE TECHNOLOGIES BUSINESS ADMINISTRATIVE TECHNOLOGY Associate of Applied Science Degree PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: BA23 The Business Administrative Technology program is designed to prepare graduates for employment in a variety of positions in today s technology-driven workplaces. The Business Administrative Technology program provides learning opportunities, which introduce, develop, and reinforce academic and occupational knowledge, skills, and attitudes required for job acquisition, retention, and advancement. The program emphasizes the use of word processing, spreadsheet, and presentation applications software. Students are also introduced to accounting fundamentals, electronic communications, internet research, and electronic file management. The program includes instruction in effective communication skills and terminology that encompasses office management and executive qualifications and technology innovations for the office. Additionally, the program provides opportunities to upgrade present knowledge and skills or to retrain in the area of administrative technology. Graduates of the program receive a Business Administrative Technology, Associate of Applied Science degree. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS Must be 16 years of age Completion of high school or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum General Education Courses 15 Area I Language Arts/Communication ENGL 1101 Composition and Rhetoric 3 Area II - Social/Behavioral Sciences PSYC 1101 Introductory Psychology 3 Select one of the following SOCI 1101 Introduction to Sociology 3 SPCH 1101 Public Speaking 3 Area III - Natural Sciences/Mathematics MATH 1111 College Algebra 3 Credits Area IV - Humanities/Fine Arts Select one of the following 104

106 HUMN 1101 Introduction to Humanities 3 ENGL 2130 American Literature 3 Program-Specific General Education Course Requirements 3 Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses 46 BUSN 1190 Digital Technologies in Business 2 BUSN 1240 Office Procedures 3 BUSN 1400 Word Processing Applications 4 BUSN 1410 Spreadsheet Concepts and Applications 4 BUSN 1420 Database Applications 4 BUSN 1430 Desktop Publishing and Presentation Applications 4 BUSN 1440 Document Production 4 BUSN 2160 Electronic Mail Applications 2 BUSN 2190 Business Document Proofreading and Editing 3 BUSN 2210 Applied Office Procedures 3 COMP 1000 Introduction to Computers 3 MGMT 1100 Principles of Management 3 Select One of the Following ACCT 1100 Financial Accounting I 4 BUSN 2200 Office Accounting 4 ELECT - ADV Specific Occupational-Guided Electives (Advisor Approved) 6 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 67 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 5 Estimated Program Cost $6,

107 BUSINESS ADMINISTRATIVE TECHNOLOGY Diploma PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: BA22 The program includes instruction in effective communication skills and technology that encompasses office management and executive assistant qualifications and technology innovations for the office. Also provided are opportunities to upgrade present knowledge and skills or to retrain in the area of business administrative technology. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS Must be 16 years of age Completion of high school or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum Basic Skills (General Core) Courses 8 ENGL 1010 Fundamentals of English I 3 MATH 1011 Business Math 3 Select One of the Following EMPL 1000 Interpersonal Relations and Professional Development 2 PSYC 1010 Basic Psychology (3) Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses 42 BUSN 1400 Word Processing Applications 4 BUSN 1440 Document Production 4 BUSN 2190 Business Document Proofreading and Editing 3 COMP 1000 Introduction to Computers 3 Select One Accounting Course BUSN 2200 Office Accounting 4 ACCT 1100 Financial Accounting I 4 Complete One of the Following Specializations Business Administrative Assistant Specialization (24) BUSN 1190 Digital Technologies in Business 2 BUSN 1240 Office Procedures 3 BUSN 1410 Spreadsheet Applications 4 Credits 106

108 BUSN 1430 Desktop Publishing and Presentation Applications 4 BUSN 2160 Electronic Mail Applications 2 BUSN 2210 Applied Office Procedures 3 ELECT - ADV Specific Occupational-Guided Electives Below (Advisor Approved) 6 BUSN 1100 Introduction to Keyboarding (3) BUSN 1180 Computer Graphics and Design (3) BUSN 1200 Machine Transcription (2) BUSN 1210 Electronic Calculators (2) BUSN 1220 Telephone Training (2) BUSN 1230 Legal Terminology (3) BUSN 1250 Records Management (3) BUSN 1300 Introduction to Business (3) BUSN 1310 Introduction to Business Culture (3) BUSN 1320 Business Interaction Skills (3) BUSN 1330 Personal Effectiveness (3) BUSN 1340 Customer Service Effectiveness (3) BUSN 1420 Database Applications (4) BUSN 2170 Web Page Design (2) BUSN 2180 Speed and Accuracy Keying (1) BUSN 2220 Legal Administrative Procedures (3) BUSN 2240 Business Administrative Assistant Internship I (4) BUSN 2250 Business Administrative Assistant Internship II (6) OR Medical Administrative Assistant Specialization (24) ALHS 1010 Introduction to Anatomy and Physiology 4 ALHS 1011 Anatomy and Physiology 5 BUSN 2310 Anatomy and Terminology for the Medical Administrative Assistant 3 BUSN 2340 Medical Administrative Procedures 4 BUSN 2370 Medical Office Billing/Coding/Insurance 3 MAST 1120 Human Pathological Conditions in the Medical Office 3 107

109 Select one of the following ALHS 1090 Medical Terminology for Allied Health Sciences 2 BUSN 2300 Medical Terminology 2 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 50 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 4 Estimated Program Cost $5,490 ADMINISTRATIVE SUPPORT ASSISTANT Technical Certificate of Credit Program PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: AS21 The Administrative Support Assistant program prepares individuals to provide administrative support under the supervision of office managers, executive assistants, and other office personnel. Courses include: Introduction to microcomputers, word processing, and office procedures. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS Must be 16 years of age Completion of high school or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses 20 BUSN 1240 Office Procedures 3 BUSN 1400 Word Processing Applications 4 BUSN 1440 Document Production 4 COMP 1000 Introduction to Computers 3 ELECT - ADV Specific Occupational-Guided Electives (Advisor Approved) 6 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 20 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 2 Credits Estimated Program Cost $2,

110 MICROSOFT EXCEL APPLICATION PROFESSIONAL Technical Certificate of Credit Program PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: ME51 The certificate program prepares students to be end users of Microsoft Excel. The program emphasizes Microsoft Excel operations necessary for successful employment. It provides short-term training for students desiring to progress in their occupation. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS Must be 16 years of age Completion of high school or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses 13 BUSN 1410 Spreadsheet Concepts and Applications 4 COMP 1000 Introduction to Computers 3 Select One of the Following Mathematics Course MATH 1011 Business Math 3 MATH 1012 Foundations of Mathematics 3 ELECT - ADV Specific Occupational-Guided Elective 3 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 13 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms Credits Estimated Program Cost $1,440 MICROSOFT OFFICE APPLICATION PROFESSIONAL Technical Certificate of Credit Program PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: MF41 The Microsoft Office Applications Professional certificate program provides students with the knowledge and skills to perform word processing, spreadsheet, database, and presentation applications in an office environment. It is designed to provide hands-on instruction for developing foundation skills for office assistant careers as well as to prepare students for Microsoft Certified Application Specialist (MCAS) certification. Graduates of the program receive a Microsoft Office Applications Professional Certificate of Credit. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS Must be 16 years of age Completion of high school or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate.

111 COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses 22 BUSN 1400 Word Processing Applications 4 BUSN 1410 Spreadsheet Concepts and Applications 4 BUSN 1420 Database Applications 4 BUSN 1430 Desktop Publishing and Presentation Applications 4 COMP 1000 Introduction to Computers 3 BUSN 1250 Records Management 3 ELECT - ADV Specific Occupational-Guided Elective (Advisor Approved) 3 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 22 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 2 Credits Estimated Program Cost $2,115 MICROSOFT WORD APPLICATION PROFESSIONAL Technical Certificate of Credit Program PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: MWA1 The certificate program provides students with the knowledge and skills to perform word processing, spreadsheet, database, and presentation applications in an office environment. It is designed to provide hands-on instruction for developing foundation skills for office assistant careers. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS Must be 16 years of age Completion of high school or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses 14 BUSN 1100 Introduction to Keyboarding 3 BUSN 1400 Word Processing Applications 4 BUSN 1440 Document Production 4 COMP 1000 Introduction to Computers 3 Credits 110

112 BUSN 1300 Introduction to Business 3 ELECT - ADV Specific Occupational-Guided Elective (Advisor Approved) 3 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 14 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 2 Estimated Program Cost $1,

113 BUSINESS MANAGEMENT DIVISION: BUSINESS & PUBLIC SERVICE TECHNOLOGIES BUSINESS MANAGEMENT Associate of Applied Science Degree PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: MD13 The Business Management program is designed to prepare students for entry into management and supervisory occupations in a variety of businesses and industrial opportunities will introduce, develop, and reinforce academic and occupational knowledge, skills, and attitudes required for job acquisition, retention, and advancement in management. Graduates of the program receive a Business Management degree with a specialization in General Management, Small Business Management, Service Sector Management, Operations Management and Resource Management. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS Must be 16 years of age Completion of high school or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum Basic Skills (General Core) Courses 6 ENGL 1010 Fundamentals of English I 3 Select One of the Following EMPL 1000 Interpersonal Relations and Professional Development 2 PSYC 1010 Basic Psychology 3 Select One of the Following MATH 1011 Business Math 3 MATH 1012 Foundations of Mathematics 3 Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses 42 BUSN 1400 Word Processing Applications 4 BUSN 1440 Document Production 4 BUSN 2190 Business Document Proofreading and Editing 3 Credits 112

114 COMP 1000 Introduction to Computers 3 Select One Accounting Course BUSN 2200 Office Accounting 4 ACCT 1100 Financial Accounting I 4 Complete One of the Following Specializations Business Administrative Assistant Specialization (24) BUSN 1190 Digital Technologies in Business 2 BUSN 1240 Office Procedures 3 BUSN 1410 Spreadsheet Applications 4 BUSN 1430 Desktop Publishing and Presentation Applications 4 BUSN 2160 Electronic Mail Applications 2 BUSN 2210 Applied Office Procedures 3 ELECT - ADV Specific Occupational-Guided Electives Below (Advisor Approved) 6 BUSN 1100 Introduction to Keyboarding (3) BUSN 1180 Computer Graphics and Design (3) BUSN 1200 Machine Transcription (2) BUSN 1210 Electronic Calculators (2) BUSN 1220 Telephone Training (2) BUSN 1230 Legal Terminology (3) BUSN 1250 Records Management (3) BUSN 1300 Introduction to Business (3) BUSN 1310 Introduction to Business Culture (3) BUSN 1320 Business Interaction Skills (3) BUSN 1330 Personal Effectiveness (3) BUSN 1340 Customer Service Effectiveness (3) BUSN 1420 Database Applications (4) BUSN 2170 Web Page Design (2) BUSN 2180 Speed and Accuracy Keying (1) BUSN 2220 Legal Administrative Procedures (3) BUSN 2240 Business Administrative Assistant Internship I (4) 113

115 BUSN 2250 Business Administrative Assistant Internship II (6) OR Medical Administrative Assistant Specialization (24) ALHS 1010 Introduction to Anatomy and Physiology 4 ALHS 1011 Anatomy and Physiology 5 BUSN 2310 Anatomy and Terminology for the Medical Administrative Assistant 3 BUSN 2340 Medical Administrative Procedures 4 BUSN 2370 Medical Office Billing/Coding/Insurance 3 MAST 1120 Human Pathological Conditions in the Medical Office 3 Select one of the following ALHS 1090 Medical Terminology for Allied Health Sciences 2 ENGL 1101 Composition and Rhetoric 3 Area II - Social/Behavioral Sciences Select one of the following PSYC 1101 Introductory Psychology 3 SOCIO 1101 Introductory Sociology 3 ECON 1101 Principles of Economics 3 Area III - Natural Sciences/Mathematics Select one of the following MATH 1111 College Algebra 3 MATH 1100 Quantitative Skills and Reasoning 3 MATH 1101 Mathematical Modeling 3 Area IV - Humanities/Fine Arts Select one of the following HUMN 1101 Introduction to Humanities 3 ENGL 1102 Literature and Composition 3 Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses 48 COMP 1000 Introduction to Computers 3 MGMT 1100 Principles of Management 3 Select one of the following MGMT 1135 Managerial Accounting and Finance 3 ACCT 1100 Financial Accounting I 4 Select one of the following 114

116 MGMT 1110 Employment Law 3 MGMT 1130 Business Regulations and Compliance 3 Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses (continued) MGMT 1105 Organizational Behavior 3 MGMT 1120 Introduction to Business 3 MGMT 1115 Leadership 3 MGMT 1125 Business Ethics 3 MGMT 2115 Human Resource Management 3 MGMT 2125 Performance Management 3 MGMT 2215 Team Project 3 MGMT 2120 Labor Management Relations 3 MGMT 2130 Employee Training and Development 3 MGMT 2210 Project Management 3 Business Management Specialization (Select Two of the Following) ACCT 2145 Personal Finance 6 BUSN 1045 Managing Customer Relationship 3 BUSN 1430 Desktop Publishing & Presentation Applications 3 MGMT 2140 Retail Management 3 MKTG 1100 Principles of Marketing 3 MKTG 2300 Marketing Management 3 SCMA 1006 Supply Chain Management Concepts 3 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 63 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 5 Estimated Program Cost $5,485 BUSINESS MANAGEMENT Diploma PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: MD12 The Business Management program is designed to prepare students for entry into management positions in a variety of businesses and industries. Learning opportunities introduce, develop, and reinforce academic and occupational knowledge, skills, and attitudes required for job acquisition, retention, and advancement in management. Graduates of the program receive a Business Management diploma with a specialization in General Management, Small Business Management, Service Sector Management, Operations Management or Human Resource Management. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS Must be 16 years of age 115

117 Completion of high school or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum Credits Basic Skills (General Core) Courses 6 ENGL 1010 Fundamentals of English I 3 PSYC 1010 Basic Psychology (3) MATH 1011 Business Math 3 Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses 39 COMP 1000 Introduction to Computers 3 MGMT 1100 Principles of Management 3 MGMT 1105 Organizational Behavior 3 MGMT 1115 Leadership 3 MGMT 1120 Introduction to Business 3 MGMT 1125 Business Ethics 3 MGMT 2115 Human Resource Management 3 MGMT 2125 Performance Management 3 MGMT 2215 Team Project 3 Select one of the following MGMT 1135 Managerial Accounting and Finance 3 ACCT 1100 Financial Accounting I 4 Select one of the following MGMT 1110 Employment Law 3 MGMT 1130 Business Regulations and Compliance 3 Guided Electives in Area of Concentration 6 BUSN 1430 Desktop Publishing & Presentation Applications 3 ECON 1101 Principles of Economics 3 MGMT 2140 Retail Management 3 116

118 MKTG 1100 Principles of Marketing 3 MKTG 2300 Marketing Management 3 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 45 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 4 Estimated Program Cost $4,

119 CARPENTRY DIVISION: INDUSTRIAL & TRANSPORTATION TECHNOLOGIES CARPENTRY Diploma PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: CA22 The Carpentry, Diploma program is a sequence of courses that prepares students for careers in the carpentry industry. Learning opportunities develop academic, occupational, and professional knowledge and skills required for job acquisition, retention, and advancement. The program emphasizes a combination of carpentry theory and practical application necessary for successful employment. Program graduates receive a carpentry diploma and have the qualifications for an entry-level residential carpenter or entry-level commercial carpenter. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS Must be 16 years of age Completion of high school or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum Basic Skills (General Core) Courses 8 ENGL 1010 Fundamentals of English I 3 EMPL 1000 Interpersonal Relations and Professional Development 2 MATH 1012 Foundations of Mathematics 3 Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses 36 CARP 1070 Site Layout, Footings and Foundations 3 CARP 1105 Floor and Wall Framing 4 CARP 1110 Ceiling and Roof Framing Covering 5 CARP 1112 Exterior Finishes and Trim 5 CARP 1114 Interior Finishes I 4 COFC 1000 Safety 2 COFC 1011 Overview of Building Construction Practice 2 COFC 1020 Professional Tool Use and Safety Credits

120 COFC 1030 Materials and Fasteners 2 COFC 1050 Construction Print Reading Fundamentals 3 COMP 1000 Introduction to Computers 3 Complete One of the Following Specializations Residential Specialization 6 CARP 1190 Interior Finishes II 2 CARP 1260 Stair 4 OR Commercial Specialization 6 CARP 1310 Doors and Door Hardware 2 CARP 1320 Site Development, Concrete Forming, and Rigging and Reinforcing 4 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 50 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 4 Estimated Program Cost $5,860 CERTIFIED CONSTRUCTION WORKER Technical Certificate of Credit Program PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: CCW1 The Certified Construction Worker certificate program offers training in the construction industry providing students with the knowledge and skills they need to work effectively on a construction site. Completion of the program qualifies graduates for entrylevel employment. Topics include safety, tool use and safety, materials and fasteners, and construction print reading. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS Must be 16 years of age Completion of high school or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum Credits Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses 12 COFC 1000 Safety 2 COFC 1011 Overview of Building Construction Practice 2 119

121 COFC 1020 Professional Tool Use and Safety 3 COFC 1030 Materials and Fasteners 2 COFC 1050 Construction Print Reading Fundamentals 3 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 12 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 1 Estimated Program Cost $1,872 COMMERCIAL CARPENTER Technical Certificate of Credit Program PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: CCC1 The Commercial Carpenter certificate program provides instruction in the field of commercial construction. Topics include site layout, footings, and foundations, concrete forming, site development, steel rigging and reinforcing, and an internship/practicum opportunity. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS Must be 16 years of age Completion of high school or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum Credits Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses 12 CARP 1070 Site Layout, Footings and Foundations 3 CARP 1310 Doors and Door Hardware 2 CARP 1320 Site Development, Concrete Forming and Rigging, and Reinforcing 4 CARP 1114 Interior Finishes I 4 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 13 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 1 120

122 FRAMING CARPENTY Technical Certificate of Credit Program PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: FC71 The Framing Carpenter certificate program prepares students for employment as framing carpenters. Program completers are trained in the use of hand and power tools, materials, blueprint reading, and floor, wall, ceiling and roof framing. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS Must be 16 years of age Completion of high school or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses 12 CARP 1070 Site Layout, Footings and Foundations 3 CARP 1105 Floor and Wall Framing 4 CARP 1110 Ceiling and Roof Faming Covering 5 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 12 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 1 Credits Estimated Program Cost $1,

123 COMMERCIAL TRUCK DRIVING DIVISION: INDUSTRIAL & TRANSPORTATION TECHNOLOGIES COMMERCIAL TRUCK DRIVING Technical Certificate of Credit Program PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: CT61 The Commercial Truck Driving certificate program provides basic training in the principles and skills of commercial truck operations. The program is based on the definition of a truck driver as one who operates a commercial motor vehicle of all different sizes and descriptions on all types of roads. At the completion of the program, the student is administered the Georgia CDL Skills Exam. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS Must be 21 years of age Completion of high school or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses 9 CTDL 1010 Fundamentals of Commercial Driving 3 CTDL 1020 Combination Vehicle Basic Operation and Range Work 2 CTDL 1030 Combination Vehicle Advanced Operations 4 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 9 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 1 Credits Estimated Program Cost $1,

124 COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS DIVISION: BUSINESS & PUBLIC SERVICE TECHNOLOGIES COMPUTER PROGRAMMING Associate of Applied Science Degree PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: CP23 The Computer Information Systems - Computer Programming is a sequence of courses designed to provide students with an understanding of concepts, principles, and techniques required for computer information processing. Graduates are to be competent in the general areas of humanities or fine arts, social or behavioral science, and natural sciences or mathematics, as well as in the technical areas of computer terminology and concepts, program design and development, and computer networking. Program graduates are qualified for employment as computer programmers. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS Must be 16 years of age Completion of high school or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum General Education Courses 15 Area I Language Arts/Communications ENGL 1101 Composition and Rhetoric 3 Credits Area II - Social/Behavioral Sciences Select one of the following ECON 1101 Principles of Economics 3 PSYC 1101 Introductory Psychology 3 SOCI 1101 Introduction to Sociology 3 Area III - Natural Sciences/Mathematics MATH 1111 College Algebra 3 Area IV - Humanities/Fine Arts Select one of the following ENGL 2130 American Literature 3 HUMN 1101 Introduction to Humanities 3 123

125 ARTS 1101 Art Appreciation 3 Program Specific General Education Elective 3 Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses 51 ACCT 1100 Financial Accounting I 4 CIST 1001 Computer Concepts 4 CIST 1220 Structured Query Language (SQL) 4 CIST 1305 Program Design and Development 3 CIST 1510 Web Development I 3 CIST 2921 IT Analysis, Design, and Project Management 4 COMP 1000 Introduction to Computers 3 ELECT - CIST Specific Occupational-Guided Electives (Advisor Approved) 6 ELECT - CIST Programming Language Class Electives (Advisor Approved) 20 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 66 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 5 Estimated Program Cost $8,355 DATABASE SPECIALIST Associate of Applied Science Degree PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: DS13 The Computer Information Systems Database Specialist program is a sequence of courses designed to provide students with an understanding of the concepts, principles, and techniques required in computer information processing. Graduates are to be competent in the general areas of humanities or fine arts, social or behavioral sciences, and natural sciences or mathematics, as well as in the technical areas of computer terminology and concepts, program design and development, and computer networking. Program graduates are qualified for employment as database specialists. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS Must be 16 years of age Completion of high school or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. 124

126 COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum Credits General Education Courses 15 Area I Language Arts/Communication ENGL 1101 Composition and Rhetoric 3 Area II Social/Behavioral Sciences Select one of the following ECON 1101 Principles of Economics 3 PSYC 1101 Introductory Psychology 3 SOCI 1101 Introduction to Sociology 3 Area III Natural Sciences/Mathematics MATH 1111 College Algebra 3 Area IV Humanities/Fine Arts Select one of the following ENGL 2130 American Literature 3 HUMN 1101 Introduction to Humanities 3 ARTS 1101 Art Appreciation 3 Program Specific General Education Elective 3 Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses 45 CIST 1001 Computer Concepts 4 CIST 1200 Database Management 4 CIST 1305 Program Design and Development 3 CIST 2921 IT Analysis, Design, and Project Management 4 CIST XXXX CIS Programming Language Course 4 COMP 1000 Introduction to Computers 3 Complete the Oracle Specialization 23 CIST 1210 Introduction to Oracle Databases 4 CIST 2212 Oracle Database Administration I 4 CIST 2214 Oracle Database Administration II 4 CIST 2216 Oracle Advanced Topics 4 CIST XXXX Elective 4 Operating Systems Courses Select one of the following 125

127 CIST 1130 Operating Systems Concepts 3 CIST 2431 UNIX/Linux Introduction 4 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 63 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 5 Estimated Program Cost $7,905 NETWORKING SPECIALIST Associate of Applied Science Degree PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: NS13 The Computer Information Systems-Networking Specialist program is a sequence of courses designed to provide students with an understanding of the concepts, principles, and techniques required in computer information processing. Graduates are to be competent in the general areas of humanities or fine arts, social or behavioral sciences, and natural sciences or mathematics, as well as in the technical areas of computer terminology and concepts, program design and development, and computer networking. Program graduates are qualified for employment as networking specialists. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS Must be 16 years of age Completion of high school or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum General Education Courses 15 Area I Language Arts/Communication ENGL1101 Composition and Rhetoric 3 Credits Area II Social/Behavioral Sciences Select one of the following ECON 1101 Principles of Economics 3 PSYC 1101 Introductory Psychology 3 SOCI 1101 Introduction to Sociology 3 Area III Natural Sciences/Mathematics MATH 1111 College Algebra 3 Area IV Humanities/Fine Arts Select one of the following ENGL 2130 American Literature 3 HUMN 1101 Introduction to Humanities 3 126

128 ARTS 1101 Art Appreciation 3 ELECT - GEN General Education Course Elective (Required) 3 Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses 51 CIST 1001 Computer Concepts 4 CIST 1122 Hardware Installation and Maintenance 4 COMP 1000 Introduction to Computers 3 ELECT - CIST Network Security Elective Course 3 ELECT - ADV Specific Occupational Guided Electives (Advisor Approved) 16 Select One of the Following Introductory-Level Networking Class CIST 1401 Computer Networking Fundamentals 4 CIST 2451 Introduction to Networks 4 Select One of the Following Operating Systems Courses CIST 1130 Operating Systems Concepts 3 CIST 2431 UNIX/Linux Introduction 4 Choose One of the Following Specializations 16 Cisco Exploration Specialization Linux/Unix Specialization Microsoft Specialization (16) (16) (16) Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 66 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 5 Estimated Program Cost $8,245 COMPUTER PROGRAMMING Diploma PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: CP24 The Computer Information Systems-Computer Programming Diploma program is a sequence of courses designed to provide students with an understanding of the concepts, principles, and techniques required in computer processing. Graduates will be competent in the general areas of humanities or fine arts, social or behavioral sciences, and natural sciences or mathematics, and in the technical areas of computer terminology and concepts, program design and development, and computer networking. Program graduates are qualified for employment as computer programmers. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS Must be 16 years of age Completion of high school or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. 127

129 COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum Credits Basic Skills (General Core) Courses 8 ENGL 1010 Fundamentals of English I 3 EMPL 1000 Interpersonal Relations and Professional Development 2 MATH 1012 Foundations of Mathematics 3 Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses 44 CIST 1001 Computer Concepts 4 CIST 1220 Structured Query Language 4 CIST 1305 Program Design and Development 3 CIST 1510 Web Development I 3 CIST 2921 IT Analysis, Design, and Project Management 4 COMP 1000 Introduction to Computers 3 ELECT - CIST Network Security Elective Course 3 ELEC - ADV Specific Occupational Guided Electives - Program Language (Advisor Approved) 20 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 52 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 4 Estimated Program Cost $6,785 DATABASE SPECIALIST Diploma PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: DS14 The Computer Information Systems-Database Specialist program is a sequence of courses designed to provide students with an understanding of the concepts, principles, and techniques required in computer information processing. Graduates will be competent in the general areas of humanities or fine arts, social or behavioral sciences, natural sciences or mathematics, and in the technical areas of computer terminology and concepts, program design and development, and computer networking. Program graduates are qualified for employment as database specialists. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS Must be 16 years of age Completion of high school or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. 128

130 COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum Basic Skills (General Core) Courses 8 ENGL 1010 Fundamentals of English I 3 EMPL 1000 Interpersonal Relations and Professional Development 2 MATH 1012 Foundations of Mathematics 3 Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses 45 CIST 1001 Computer Concepts 4 CIST 1200 Database Management 4 CIST 1305 Program Design and Development 3 CIST 2921 IT Analysis, Design, and Project Management 4 COMP 1000 Introduction to Computers 3 Choose One of the Following Operating Systems Courses CIST 1130 Operating Systems Concepts 3 CIST 2431 UNIX/Linux Introduction 4 Choose One of the Following Programming Courses CIST 2311 Visual Basic Programming I 4 CIST 2341 C# Programming I 4 CIST 2361 C++ Programming 4 CIST 2371 Java Programming I 4 Oracle Specialization 23 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 53 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms Credits Estimated Program Cost $6,860 NETWORKING SPECIALIST Diploma PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: NS14 The Computer Information Systems Networking Specialist program is a sequence of courses designed to provide students with an understanding of the concepts, principles, and techniques required in computer information processing. Graduates are to be competent in the general areas of humanities or fine arts, social or behavioral sciences, and natural sciences or mathematics, as well as in the technical areas of computer terminology and concepts, program design and development, and computer networking. Program graduates are qualified for employment as networking specialists.

131 ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS Must be 16 years of age Completion of high school or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum Basic Skills (General Core) Courses 8 ENGL 1101 Composition and Rhetoric 3 EMPL 1000 Interpersonal Relations and Professional Development 2 Credits MATH 1012 Foundations of Mathematics Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses 46 CIST 1001 Computer Concepts 4 CIST 1122 Hardware installation and Maintenance 4 CIST XXXX Elective 7 COMP 1000 Introduction to Computers 3 Introductory-Level Networking Class CIST 1401 Computer Networking Fundamentals 4 CIST 2451 Introduction to Networks 4 Choose One of the Following Operating Systems Courses CIST 1130 Operating Systems Concepts 3 CIST 2431 UNIX/Linux Introduction 4 Choose One of the Following Specializations Cisco Exploration Specialization 16 Linux/Unix Specialization 16 Microsoft Specialization 16 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation

132 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 5 Estimated Program Cost $6,951 C ++ PROGRAMMER Technical Certificate of Credit Program PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: CP21 The Computer Information Systems-Computer Programming Technical Certificate of Credit is a sequence of courses designed to provide students with an understanding of the concepts, principles, and techniques required in computer information processing. Graduates will be competent in the general areas of humanities or fine arts, social or behavioral sciences, and natural sciences or mathematics, to include the technical areas of computer terminology and concepts, program design and development, and computer networking. Program graduates are qualified for employment as computer programmers. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS Must be 16 years of age Completion of high school or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses 15 CIST 1220 Structured Query Language (SQL) 4 CIST 1305 Program Design and Development 3 CIST 2361 C + + Programming I 4 CIST 2362 C + + Programming II 4 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 15 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 2 Credits Estimated Program Cost $2,512 CISCO NETWORK SPECIALIST Technical Certificate of Credit Program PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: CN71 The Cisco Network Specialist program teaches how to build, maintain and troubleshoot computer networks. Students also learn how to connect these networks to other networks and the Internet. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS Must be 16 years of age Completion of high school or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. 131

133 COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses 16 CIST 2451 Introduction to Networks 4 CIST 2452 Routing & Switching 4 CIST 2453 Scaling Networks 4 CIST 2454 Connecting Networks 4 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 16 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms Credits Estimated Program Cost $2,461 COMPUTER HARDWARE AND NETWORK TECHNICIAN Technical Certificate of Credit Program PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: CHA1 The Computer Hardware and Network Technician certificate provides opportunities to enhance students' skills in microcomputer Local Area Network support and maintenance industry. Successful completion will provide necessary skills for entry-level positions in computer hardware installation and help desk support. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS Must be 16 years of age Completion of high school or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses 33 CIST 1001 Computer Concepts 4 CIST 1121 Microcomputer Troubleshooting 4 CIST 1122 Hardware Installation and Maintenance 4 CIST 1130 Operating Systems Concepts 3 CIST 1401 Computer Networking Fundamentals 4 CIST 2122 A+ Preparation 3 CIST 2411 Microsoft Client 4 Credits

134 CIST XXXX CIS Elective 3 COMP 1000 Introduction to Computers 3 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 33 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 4 Estimated Program Cost $4,114 DATABASE ADMINISTRATOR Technical Certificate of Credit Program PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: DA11 The Database Administrator certificate program provides educational opportunities for students that will enable them to obtain the knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary to succeed in the field of database management and administration. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS Must be 16 years of age Completion of high school or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average or higher and complete all required courses to graduate. COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses 24 CIST 1200 Database Management 4 CIST 1210 Introduction to Oracle Database 4 CIST 2212 Oracle Database Administration I 4 CIST 2214 Oracle Database Administration II 4 CIST 2216 Oracle Advanced Topics 4 CIST 2431 UNIX/Linux Introduction 4 Minimum Quarter-hour Credits Required for Graduation 24 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 3 Credits Estimated Program Cost $3,854 JAVA PROGRAMMER Technical Certificate of Credit Program PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: JP11 The Java Programmer certificate provides the opportunity for students and IT professionals to add Java program language and object oriented programming skills to their IT knowledge base. Completers of this certificate are Java Programmers. 133

135 ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS Must be 16 years of age Completion of high school or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses 22 CIST 1220 Structured Query Language 4 CIST 1305 Program Design and Development 3 CIST 1510 Web Development I 3 CIST 2371 Java Programming I 4 CIST 2372 Java Programming II 4 CIST 2373 Java Programming III 4 Minimum Quarter-hour Credits Required for Graduation 22 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 2 Credits Estimated Program Cost $3,037 LINUX/UNIX SYSTEM ADMINISTRATOR Technical Certificate of Credit Program PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: LA31 The Linux/Unix System Administrator program is designed to train students in the skills needed to design, build, and maintain Unix/Linux networks. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS Must be 16 years of age Completion of high school or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses 16 Credits 134

136 CIST 2431 Unix/Linux Introduction 4 CIST 2432 Unix/Linux Server 4 CIST 2433 Unix/Linux Advanced Server 4 CIST 2434 Unix/Linux Scripting 4 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 16 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 1 Estimated Program Cost $2,461 MICROSOFT NETWORK ADMINISTRATOR Technical Certificate of Credit Program PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: MS11 The Microsoft Network Service Technician certificate provides training in Microsoft networking. This certificate will prepare the student for an entry-level computer networking position. Skills taught include implementation of Microsoft operating systems, implementation of Microsoft servers, and networking Infrastructure. This certificate prepares the student to sit for the Microsoft Certified IP Professional (MCITP) networking exam. Hands-on labs provide students with real world simulations. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS Must be 16 years of age Completion of high school or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses 15 CIST 2411 Microsoft Client 4 CIST 2412 Microsoft Server Directory Services 4 CIST 2413 Microsoft Server Infrastructure 4 CIST 2414 Microsoft Server Administrator 3 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 15 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 3 Credits Estimated Program Cost $2,

137 CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT DIVISION: INDUSTRIAL & TRANSPORTATION TECHNOLOGIES CONSTRUCTION MANAGER Technical Certificate of Credit Program PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: CM81 The Construction Manager Technical Certificate of Credit prepares students for entry-level Construction Management supervisory positions. Topics include principles of accounting, estimating review, construction drafting, codes review, computerized scheduling, and construction contracting. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS Must be 16 years of age Completion of high school or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses 23 ACCT 1100 Financial Accounting I 4 CMTT 2010 Residential Estimating Review 3 CMTT 2020 Construction Drafting I 3 CMTT 2050 Residential Code Review 3 CMTT 2130 Computerized Construction Scheduling 3 CMTT 2170 Construction Contracting 4 COMP 1000 Introduction to Computers 3 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 23 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 2 Credits Estimated Program Cost $2,

138 COSMETOLOGY DIVISION: BUSINESS & PUBLIC SERVICE TECHNOLOGIES COSMETOLOGY Diploma PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: CO12 The Cosmetology program is a sequence of courses that prepares students for careers in the field of cosmetology. Learning opportunities develop academic and professional knowledge and skills required for job acquisition, retention, and advancements. The program emphasizes specialized training in safety, sanitation, state laws, rules, and regulations, chemistry, anatomy and physiology, skin, hair, and nail diseases and disorders, hair treatment and manipulations, hair shaping, hair styling, artificial hair, braiding/intertwining hair, chemical reformation and application, skin and hair care, hair coloring, hair lightening, reception, sales, management, math, reading, writing, interpersonal relations development, computer skills, employability skills, and work ethics. The curriculum meets state licensing requirements for the State Board of Cosmetology. Program graduates receive a Cosmetology diploma and are employable as a cosmetologist, salon manage, or a salon owner. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS Must be 16 years of age Completion of high school or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. Blood and Airborne Pathogens: Students enrolled in Category I and II programs at Atlanta Technical College will be performing tasks in which there is a normal occurrence for exposure to blood, other potentially infectious body materials, and airborne pathogens. These tasks will be performed in the classroom, laboratory, and clinical activities for each occupational training program/course. Students will be required to present documentation of Hepatitis B and Tuberculosis immunizations as a result of potential occupational exposure. Students should contact their program directors for more information on policies and procedures regarding blood and airborne pathogens. COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum Credits Basic Skills (General Core) Courses 8 ENGL 1010 Fundamentals of English I 3 EMPL 1000 Interpersonal Relations and Professional Development 2 MATH 1012 Foundations of Mathematics 3 Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses 46 COMP 1000 Introduction to Computers 3 COSM 1000 Introduction to Cosmetology Theory 4 137

139 COSM 1010 Chemical Texture Services 3 COSM 1020 Hair Care and Treatment 2 COSM 1030 Haircutting Version 3 3 COSM 1040 Styling 3 COSM 1050 Hair Color 3 COSM 1060 Fundamentals of Skin Care 3 COSM 1070 Nail Care and Advanced Techniques 3 COSM 1080 Cosmetology Practicum I 4 COSM 1090 Cosmetology Practicum II 4 COSM 1100 Cosmetology Practicum III 4 COSM 1110 Cosmetology Practicum IV 4 COSM 1120 Salon Management 3 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 54 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 3 Estimated Program Cost $6,157 Licensing Board: Georgia State Board of Cosmetology, 237 Coliseum Drive, Macon, GA 31217, SHAMPOO TECHNICIAN Technical Certificate of Credit Program PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: ST11 The Shampoo Technician Technical Certificate of Credit introduces courses that prepare students for careers in the field of Cosmetology as Shampoo Technicians. Learning opportunities develop academic and professional knowledge required for job acquisition, retention and advancement. The program emphasizes specialized training for safety, sanitation, state laws, rules and regulations, chemistry, anatomy and physiology, skin hair, hair treatment and manipulations, hair styling, artificial hair, braiding/intertwining hair, reception, sales, management, employability skills, and work ethics. Graduates receive a Shampoo Technician Technical Certificate of Credit and are employable as a Cosmetology salesperson, salon manager, or salon owner. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS Must be 16 years of age Completion of high school or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. Blood and Airborne Pathogens: Students enrolled in Category I and II programs at Atlanta Technical College will be performing tasks in which there is a normal occurrence for exposure to blood, other potentially infectious body materials, and airborne pathogens. These tasks will be performed in the classroom, laboratory, and clinical activities for each occupational training program/course. Students will be required to present documentation of Hepatitis B and Tuberculosis immunizations as a result of potential occupational exposure. Students should contact their program directors for more information on policies and procedures regarding blood and airborne pathogens. 138

140 COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum Credits Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses 11 COSM 1000 Introduction to Cosmetology Theory 4 COSM 1020 Hair Care and Treatment 2 COSM 1120 Salon Management 3 EMPL 1000 Interpersonal Relations and Professional Development 2 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 11 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 1 Estimated Program Cost $1,

141 CRIMINAL JUSTICE TECHNOLOGY DIVISION: BUSINESS & PUBLIC SERVICE TECHNOLOGIES CRIMINAL JUSTICE TECHNOLOGY Associate of Applied Science Degree PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: CJT3 The Criminal Justice Technology Associate Degree program is a sequence of courses that prepares students for Criminal Justice professions. Learning opportunities develop academic, occupational, and professional knowledge and skills required for job acquisition, retention, and advancement. The program emphasizes a combination of Criminal Justice theory and practical application necessary for successful employment. Program graduates receive a Criminal Justice Technology associate degree. Graduates who are current practitioners will benefit through enhancement of career potential. Entry-level persons will be prepared to pursue diverse opportunities in the corrections, security, investigative, and police administration fields. Completion of the Criminal Justice Technology associate degree does not ensure certification of officer status in Georgia. Students must seek such certification from the Peace Officer Standards and Training (P.O.S.T.) Council. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS Must be 16 years of age Completion of high school or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum General Education Courses 15 Area I Language Arts/Communication ENGL 1101 Composition and Rhetoric 3 ENGL 1102 Literature and Composition 3 Area II - Social/Behavioral Sciences PSYC 1101 Introductory Psychology 3 Area III - Natural Sciences/Mathematics MATH 1111 College Algebra 3 Area IV - Humanities/Fine Arts HUMN 1101 Introduction to Humanities 3 Credits 140

142 Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses 45 CRJU 1010 Introduction to Criminal Justice 3 CRJU 1030 Corrections 3 CRJU 1040 Principles of Law Enforcement 3 CRJU 1400 Ethics and Cultural Perspectives for Criminal Justice 3 CRJU 2050 Criminal Procedure 3 CRJU 1068 Criminal Law for Criminal Justice 3 CRJU 2020 Constitutional Law for Criminal Justice 3 CRJU 2070 Juvenile Justice 3 CRJU 1052 Criminal Justice Administration 3 CRJU 1072 Introduction to Forensic Science 3 CRJU 1062 Methods of Criminal Investigation 3 CRJU 1063 Crime Scene Processing 3 CRJU 1043 Probation and Parole 3 CRJU 2100 Criminal Justice Externship 3 COMP 1000 Introduction to Computers 3 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 60 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 4 Estimated Program Cost $7,149 CRIMINAL JUSTICE TECHNOLOGY Diploma PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: CJT2 The Criminal Justice Technology Diploma program is a sequence of courses that prepares students for Criminal Justice professions. Learning opportunities develop academic, occupational, and professional knowledge and skills required for job acquisition, retention, and advancement. The program emphasizes a combination of Criminal Justice theory and practical application necessary for successful employment. Program graduates receive a Criminal Justice Technology diploma. Graduates who are current practitioners will benefit through enhancement of career potential. Entry-level persons will be prepared to pursue diverse opportunities in the corrections, security, investigative, and police administration fields. Completion of the Criminal Justice Technology diploma does not ensure certification of officer status in Georgia. Students must seek such certification from the Peace Officer Standards and Training (P.O.S.T.) Council. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS Must be 16 years of age Completion of high school or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. 141

143 COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum Credits Basic Skills (General Core) Courses 9 ENGL 1010 Fundamentals of English I 3 PSYC 1010 Basic Psychology 3 MATH 1012 Foundations of Mathematics 3 Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses 39 CRJU 1010 Introduction to Criminal Justice 3 CRJU 1030 Corrections 3 CRJU 1040 Principles of Law Enforcement 3 CRJU 2050 Criminal Procedure 3 CRJU 1068 Criminal Law for Criminal Justice 3 CRJU 2020 Constitutional Law for Criminal Justice 3 CRJU 1072 Introduction to Forensic Science 3 CRJU 1062 Methods of Criminal Investigation 3 CRJU 1063 Crime Scene Processing 3 CRJU 1400 Ethics and Cultural Perspectives for Criminal Justice 3 CRJU 2070 Juvenile Justice 3 CRJU 2100 Criminal Justice Externship 3 COMP 1000 Introduction to Computers 3 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 48 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 4 Estimated Program Cost $6,174 CRIMINAL JUSTICE TECHNOLOGY SPECIALIST Technical Certificate of Credit Program PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: CJ11 The Criminal Justice Technology Specialist Technical Certificate of Credit is a sequence of courses that prepares students for criminal justice professions. Learning opportunities develop academic, occupational, and professional knowledge and skills required for job acquisition, retention, and advancement. The program emphasizes a combination of criminal justice theory and practical application necessary for successful employment. Upon completion of this technical certificate of credit may permit students to pursue entry level 142

144 opportunities in the criminal justice field. Completion of the Criminal Justice Specialist Technical Certificate of Credit does not ensure certification of officer status in Georgia. Students must seek such certification from the Peace Officer Standards and Training (P.O.S.T.) Council. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS Must be 16 years of age Completion of high school or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses 18 CRJU 1010 Introduction to Criminal Justice 3 CRJU 1030 Corrections 3 CRJU 1040 Principles of Law Enforcement 3 CRJU 1068 Criminal Law for Criminal Justice 3 CRJU 2020 Constitutional Law for Criminal Justice 3 COMP 1000 Introduction to Computers 3 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 18 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 2 Credits Estimated Program Cost $2,599 CRIMINAL INVESTIGATION SPECIALIST Technical Certificate of Credit Program PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: CI31 The Criminal Investigation Specialist Technical Certificate of Credit begins to introduce students to various careers in the rapidly growing field of forensic science. Students will gain introductory exposure to knowledge and skills that may encourage further academic preparation in careers in forensic technology in areas such as crime scene investigation, death investigation, laboratory technology, evidence technology, forensic computer science, and general forensic science or criminal justice fields. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS Must be 16 years of age Completion of high school or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. 143

145 COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum Credits Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses 30 CRJU 1010 Introduction to Criminal Justice 3 CRJU 1030 Corrections 3 CRJU 1040 Principles of Law Enforcement 3 CRJU 2050 Criminal Procedure 3 CRJU 1068 Criminal Law for Criminal Justice 3 CRJU 2020 Constitutional Law for Criminal Justice 3 CRJU 1072 Introduction to Forensic Science 3 CJRU 1062 Methods of Criminal Investigation 3 CJRU 1063 Crime Scene Processing 3 COMP 1000 Introduction to Computers 3 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 30 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 2 Estimated Program Cost $3,

146 CULINARY ARTS DIVISION: BUSINESS & PUBLIC SERVICE TECHNOLOGIES CULINARY ARTS Associate of Applied Science Degree PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: CA43 Atlanta Technical College offers an award winning Culinary Arts program that prepares aspiring chefs and foods service professionals for the culinary profession. Why not study in a city with a reputation of impeccable southern charm, fine dining and world-class sophistication? The Culinary Arts program consists of a sequence of courses that emphasizes a combination of culinary theory and practical application necessary for successful employment. Atlanta is home to the world s busiest airport and provides a rich and eclectic blend of foodservice/hospitality businesses in which to pursue a vibrant career. Gain hands on experience while studying in Atlanta, a city that has hosted over 45 million tourists annually, has been named by the New York Times as one of the top 52 Places to Go in Atlanta Technical College also offers opportunities to train or upgrade present knowledge or skills. Graduates of this program receive an Associates of Applied Science. Students will be prepared to pursue diverse opportunities in the culinary field as cooks, bakers, or caterers or food-service managers both here or around the world. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS Must be 16 years of age Completion of high school or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. Blood and Airborne Pathogens: Students enrolled in Category I and II programs at Atlanta Technical College will be performing tasks in which there is a normal occurrence for exposure to blood, other potentially infectious body materials, and airborne pathogens. These tasks will be performed in the classroom, laboratory, and clinical activities for each occupational training program/course. Students will be required to present documentation of Hepatitis B and Tuberculosis immunizations as a result of potential occupational exposure. Students should contact their program directors for more information on policies and procedures regarding blood and airborne pathogens. COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum Credits General Education Courses 15 Area I Language Arts/Communication ENGL 1101 Composition and Rhetoric 3 Area II - Social/Behavioral Sciences PSYC 1101 Introductory Psychology 3 Area III - Natural Sciences/Mathematics 145

147 MATH 1111 College Algebra 3 OR MATH 1100 Quantitative Skills and Reasoning (3) MATH 1101 Mathematical Modeling (3) Area IV - Humanities/Fine Arts HUMN 1101 Introduction to Humanities 3 Program Specific General Education Course Requirements 3 Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses 50 COMP 1000 Introduction to Computers 3 CUUL 1000 Fundamentals of Culinary Arts 4 CUUL 1110 Culinary Safety and Sanitation 2 CUUL 1120 Principles of Cooking 6 CUUL 1129 Fundamentals of Restaurant Operations 4 CUUL 1220 Baking Principles 5 CUUL 1320 Garde Manger 4 Practicum or Advanced CUUL Courses (Select One of Two) 6 CUUL 2130 Culinary Practicum (6) OR CUUL 2140 Advanced Baking and International Cuisine (6) CUUL 1370 Culinary Nutrition and Menu Development 3 CUUL 2160 Contemporary Cuisine 4 CUUL 2190 Principles of Culinary Leadership 3 ELEC - ADV Culinary or Hotel, Restaurant, Tourism Management Related Electives 6 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 65 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 5 Estimated Program Cost $6074 CULINARY ARTS Diploma PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: CA44 The Culinary Arts Diploma program is a sequence of courses that prepares students for the culinary profession. Learning opportunities develop academic, occupational, and professional knowledge and skills required for job acquisition, retention, and advancement. The program emphasizes a combination of culinary theory and practical application necessary for successful employment. Program 146

148 graduates receive a Culinary Arts Diploma. Graduates who are current practitioners will benefit through enhancement of career potential. Entry-level persons will be prepared to pursue diverse opportunities in the culinary field as cooks, bakers, or caterers/culinary managers. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS Must be 16 years of age Completion of high school or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. Blood and Airborne Pathogens: Students enrolled in Category I and II programs at Atlanta Technical College will be performing tasks in which there is a normal occurrence for exposure to blood, other potentially infectious body materials, and airborne pathogens. These tasks will be performed in the classroom, laboratory, and clinical activities for each occupational training program/course. Students will be required to present documentation of Hepatitis B and Tuberculosis immunizations as a result of potential occupational exposure. Students should contact their program directors for more information on policies and procedures regarding blood and airborne pathogens. COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum Credits Basic Skills (General Core) Courses 8 ENGL 1010 Fundamentals of English I 3 EMPL 1000 Interpersonal Relations and Professional Development 2 MATH 1012 Foundations of Mathematics 3 Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses 38 COMP 1000 Introduction to Computers 3 CUUL 1000 Fundamentals of Culinary Arts 4 CUUL 1110 Culinary Safety and Sanitation 2 CUUL 1120 Principles of Cooking 6 CUUL 1129 Fundamentals of Restaurant Operations 4 CUUL 1220 Baking Principles 5 CUUL 1320 Garde Manger 4 CUUL 1370 Culinary Nutrition and Menu Development 3 CUUL 2160 Contemporary Cuisine 4 CUUL 2190 Principles of Culinary Leadership 3 PRACTICUM 6 CUUL 2130 Culinary Practicum and Leadership 6 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation

149 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 4 Estimated Program Cost $4,969 CULINARY NUTRITION ASSISTANT Technical Certificate of Credit Program PROGRAM DESCRIPTION To deliver quality meals that contributes to the nutritional well being of students. Major Code: CNB1 ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS Must be 16 years of age Completion of high school or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. Blood and Airborne Pathogens: Students enrolled in Category I and II programs at Atlanta Technical College will be performing tasks in which there is a normal occurrence for exposure to blood, other potentially infectious body materials, and airborne pathogens. These tasks will be performed in the classroom, laboratory, and clinical activities for each occupational training program/course. Students will be required to present documentation of Hepatitis B and Tuberculosis immunizations as a result of potential occupational exposure. Students should contact their program directors for more information on policies and procedures regarding blood and airborne pathogens. COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses 16 CUUL 1120 Principles of Cooking 6 CUUL 1110 Culinary Safety and Sanitation 2 CUUL 1170 Introduction to Culinary Nutrition 3 CUUL 1370 Culinary Nutrition and Menu Development 3 EMPL 1000 Interpersonal Relations and Professional Development 2 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 16 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 2 Credits Estimated Program Cost $2,354 CULINARY NUTRITION MANAGER Technical Certificate of Credit Program PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: CNG1 Atlanta Technical College offers opportunities to train or upgrade present knowledge or skills. Students enrolled within the Culinary Nutrition Manager Program will be able to deliver a both healthy and quality meal that contributes to the nutritional well-being of potential consumers. 148

150 ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS Must be 16 years of age Completion of high school or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. Blood and Airborne Pathogens: Students enrolled in Category I and II programs at Atlanta Technical College will be performing tasks in which there is a normal occurrence for exposure to blood, other potentially infectious body materials, and airborne pathogens. These tasks will be performed in the classroom, laboratory, and clinical activities for each occupational training program/course. Students will be required to present documentation of Hepatitis B and Tuberculosis immunizations as a result of potential occupational exposure. Students should contact their program directors for more information on policies and procedures regarding blood and airborne pathogens. COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses 25 CUUL 1000 Fundamentals of Culinary Arts 4 CUUL 1400 Basic Nutrition 3 CUUL 1420 Marketing and Customer Service 3 CUUL 1450 Food Service Manager in Training I 3 CUUL 1460 Food Service Manager in Training II 3 COMP 1000 Introduction to Computers 3 MATH 1012 Foundations of Mathematics 3 MGMT 1115 Leadership 3 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 25 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 2 ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS Must be 16 years of age Completion of high school or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math 149 Credits Estimated Program Cost $3,124 PREP COOK Technical Certificate of Credit Program PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: PC51 Enter any kitchen with the fundamental skills necessary to succeed. Students in the Prep Cook technical certificate of credit will learn three primary components in the culinary industry: technique and methodology in cooking, purchasing and food control and proper safety and sanitation in the work place. Students who complete this are also eligible to receive a Safe Serv Certification upon completion. Atlanta Technical College offers opportunities to train or upgrade present knowledge or skills also.

151 Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. Blood and Airborne Pathogens: Students enrolled in Category I and II programs at Atlanta Technical College will be performing tasks in which there is a normal occurrence for exposure to blood, other potentially infectious body materials, and airborne pathogens. These tasks will be performed in the classroom, laboratory, and clinical activities for each occupational training program/course. Students will be required to present documentation of Hepatitis B and Tuberculosis immunizations as a result of potential occupational exposure. Students should contact their program directors for more information on policies and procedures regarding blood and airborne pathogens. COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum Credits Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses 12 CUUL 1000 Fundamentals of Culinary Arts 4 CUUL 1120 Principles of Cooking 6 CUUL 1110 Culinary Safety and Sanitation 2 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 12 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 1 Estimated Program Cost $

152 DENTAL ASSISTING DIVISION: HEATLH & PUBLIC SAFETY TECHNOLOGIES DENTAL ASSISTING Diploma PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: DA12 The Dental Assisting accredited program prepares students for employment in a variety of positions in today s dental offices. The Dental Assisting program provides learning opportunities which introduce, develop, and reinforce academic and occupational knowledge, skills, and attitudes required for job acquisition, retention, and advancement. Additionally, the program provides opportunities to upgrade present knowledge and skills or to retrain in the area of dental assisting. Graduates of the program receive a Dental Assisting diploma and are eligible to sit for a national certification examination. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS Must be 17 years of age Completion of high school or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar Must be CPR Certified with the American Heart Association and Basic Life Support before beginning the occupational courses. Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. Blood and Airborne Pathogens: Students enrolled in Category I and II programs at Atlanta Technical College will be performing tasks in which there is a normal occurrence for exposure to blood, other potentially infectious body materials, and airborne pathogens. These tasks will be performed in the classroom, laboratory, and clinical activities for each occupational training program/course. Students will be required to present documentation of Hepatitis B and Tuberculosis immunizations as a result of potential occupational exposure. Students should contact their program directors for more information on policies and procedures regarding blood and airborne pathogens. COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum Credits Basic Skills (General Core) Courses 6 ENGL 1010 Fundamental s of English I 3 PSYC 1010 Basic Psychology 3 Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses 43 COMP 1000 Introduction to Computers 3 DENA 1010 Basic Human Biology 1 DENA 1030 Preventive Dentistry 2 DENA 1050 Microbiology and Infection Control 2 151

153 DENA 1070 Oral Pathology and Therapeutics 3 DENA 1080 Dental Anatomy 5 DENA 1090 Dental Assisting National Board Examination Preparation 2 DENA 1340 Dental Assisting I: General Chairside 6 DENA 1350 Dental Assisting II: Dental Specialties and EFDA Skills 7 DENA 1390 Dental Radiology 4 DENA 1400 Dental Practice Management 2 DENA 1460 Dental Practicum I 1 DENA 1470 Dental Practicum II 1 DENA 1480 Dental Practicum III 5 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 49 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 6 Estimated Program Cost $5,173 Accrediting Agency: American Dental Association, 211 East Chicago Avenue, Chicago, IL , or and of the program are eligible to sit for the Dental Assisting Certification exam. BASIC DENTAL ASSISTING Technical Certificate of Credit Program PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: BDA1 The Basic Dental Assisting certificate program prepares students for employment in a variety of positions in today s dental offices. The program provides learning opportunities which introduce academic and occupational knowledge, skills, and attitudes required for job acquisition and retention. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS Must be 17 years of age Completion of high school or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. Blood and Airborne Pathogens: Students enrolled in Category I and II programs at Atlanta Technical College will be performing tasks in which there is a normal occurrence for exposure to blood, other potentially infectious body materials, and airborne pathogens. These tasks will be performed in the classroom, laboratory, and clinical activities for each occupational training program/course. Students will be required to present documentation of Hepatitis B and Tuberculosis immunizations as a result of potential occupational exposure. Students should contact their program directors for more information on policies and procedures regarding blood and airborne pathogens. COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum 152

154 Credits Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses 14 DENA 1050 Microbiology and Infection Control 3 DENA 1080 Dental Biology 5 DENA 1340 Dental Assisting I: General Chair side 6 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 14 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 2 Estimated Program Cost $2,

155 DENTAL HYGIENE DIVISION: HEATLH & PUBLIC SAFETY TECHNOLOGIES DENTAL HYGIENE Associates Degree PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: DH13 The Dental Hygiene program is a sequence of courses that prepares students for positions in the dental profession. Learning opportunities develop academic, technical, and professional knowledge and skills required for job acquisition, retention, and advancement. Registered dental hygienists work in a variety of professional settings including private and public practice. They provide numerous services designed to detect and prevent diseases of the mouth. These include oral prophylaxis and examination of head, neck, and the oral cavity for signs of disease. Additionally, patient education regarding oral hygiene, performing radiographic examinations, and application of fluoride and/or sealants are services provided by dental hygienists. Registered dental hygienists play a vital role in protecting the oral health of the American public. Program graduates receive a Dental Hygiene Associate of Applied Science degree. OCCUPATIONAL TRENDS Occupational Trends: The demand for dental services will grow because of population growth, older people increasingly retaining more teeth, and a growing emphasis on preventative dental care. To help meet this demand, facilities that provide dental care, particularly dentists' offices, will increasingly employ additional dental hygienists to meet the growing need. Ongoing research indicating a link between oral health and general health also will spur additional demand for preventative dental services, which are typically provided by dental hygienists. Nationally the dental hygiene profession is growing to include position with expanded duties as Advanced Dental Hygiene Practitioners, also known as community dental health coordinators. This position will provide costeffective, diagnostic, preventive, therapeutic and restorative services directly to the un-served public. Advancement opportunities outside the dental office include completion of a bachelor or master degree in dental hygiene. Dental hygienists may also pursue careers within education, Oral pharmaceutical corporations or public health settings. EMPLOYMENT TRENDS Dental hygiene ranks among the fastest growing of occupations. (Occupational Outlook Handbook, th Edition) Employment of dental hygienists is expected to grow 36 percent through 2018, which is much faster than the average for all occupations. This projected growth ranks dental hygienists among the fastest growing occupations, in response to increasing demand for dental care and more use of hygienists. Job prospects are expected to be favorable in most areas, but competition for jobs is likely in some areas. In Georgia alone the forecasted openings are predicted to be elevated by 25% for the next 5 years. (EMSO Occupational Report). Program graduates may be employed in a variety of settings including private practice and public health settings such as clinicians, educators, researchers, administrators, sales and consultants. ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS Minimum Required Age: 18 High School Diploma or GED Required: Yes Minimum Test Scores: ASSET COMPASS Reading: English: Mathematics: NA 37 Algebra: 42 NA Other conditions for Admission: Contact dental hygiene program directly for additional information on program application. Blood and Airborne Pathogens: Students enrolled in Category I and II programs at Atlanta Technical College will be performing tasks in which there is a normal occurrence for exposure to blood, other potentially infectious body materials, and airborne pathogens. 154

156 These tasks will be performed in the classroom, laboratory, and clinical activities for each occupational training program/course. Students will be required to present documentation of Hepatitis B and Tuberculosis immunizations as a result of potential occupational exposure. Students should contact their program directors for more information on policies and procedures regarding blood and airborne pathogens. Additional Information Students applying for admission into the dental hygiene should complete the pre-requisite general education courses prior to applying for placement in the program. In order to obtain licensure as a dental hygienist a background check without violation is required by the state dental board. Reference: The Georgia Board of Dental Examiners and/or other state licensing agencies will request documented information regarding conviction of a felony and/or misdemeanor, pending and/or current criminal charges. State licensing agencies do not issue licensure to individuals with records of criminal and felonious charges and convictions. All applicants for licensure as a dental hygienist shall consent to a criminal background check; Georgia state law OCGA The board shall have the authority to refuse to grant, revoke, or discipline the license of any licensed dental hygienist if such dental hygienist has any of the following: 1. A felony conviction; 2. A conviction for any crime involving moral turpitude 3. An arrest, charge, or sentence for any felony or crime involving moral turpitude where: a) A plea of nolo contendere was entered b) First offender treatment granted, or the adjudication was otherwise withheld. See state website at The program in dental hygiene is accredited by the Commission on Dental Accreditation (has been granted the accreditation status of initial accreditation). The Commission is a specialized accrediting body recognized by the United States Department of Education. The Commission on Dental Accreditation can be contacted at (312) or at 211 East Chicago Avenue, Chicago, Il The Commission s web address is: www,.ada.org/100.aspx COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum Credits General Education Courses 15 Area I ENGL 1101 Composition and Rhetoric 3 SPCH 1101 Public Speaking 3 Area II PSYC 1101 Introduction to Psychology 3 Area III MATH 1111 College Algebra 3 Area IV HUMN 1101 Introduction to Humanities 3 Additional Program-Specific General Education Course Requirements 22 SOCI 1101 Introduction to Sociology 3 COMP 1000 Introduction to computers 3 155

157 CHEM 1211/1211L Chemistry I 3 CHEM 1211L Chemistry I Lab Component 1 BIOL 2113 Anatomy & Physiology I 3 BIOL 2113L Anatomy & Physiology lab component 1 BIOL 2114 Anatomy & Physiology II 3 BIOL 2114L Anatomy & Physiology II lab component 1 BIOL 2117 Microbiology 3 BIOL 2117 L Microbiology lab 1 Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses 49 DHYG 2200 Periodontology 3 DHGY 1040 Preclinical Dental Hygiene Lecture 2 DHGY 1050 Preclinical Dental Hygiene Lab 2 DHGY 1110 Clinical Dental Hygiene I Lecture 1 DHGY 1111 Clinical Dental Hygiene I Lab 3 DHYG 2010 Clinical Dental Hygiene II Lecture 2 DHYG 2020 Clinical Dental Hygiene II Lab 2 DHYG 2090 Clinical Dental Hygiene III Lab 4 DHYG 2080 Clinical Dental Hygiene III Lecture 2 DHYG 2130 Clinical Dental Hygiene IV Lecture 1 DHYG 2140 Clinical Dental Hygiene IV Lab 4 DHYG 2110 Biochemistry and Nutrition Fundamentals for the Dental Hygienist 3 DHYG 2050 Oral Pathology 3 DHYG 2070 Community Dental Health 3 DHYG 1000 Tooth Anatomy and Root Morphology 2 DHYG 1010 Oral Embryology and Histology 2 DHGY 1020 Head and Neck Anatomy 2 DHGY 1030 Dental Materials 2 DHGY 1070 Radiology Lecture 1 DHGY 1090 Radiology Lab 2 DHGY 1206 Pharmacology 3 156

158 Minimum semester hour credits required for graduation 86 Minimum program length in semesters 6 Estimated total program cost $16,

159 DENTAL LABORATORY TECHNOLOGY DIVISION: HEATLH & PUBLIC SAFETY TECHNOLOGIES DENTAL LABORATORY TECHNOLOGY Diploma PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: DLT4 The Dental Laboratory Technology accredited program prepares students for employment in a variety of positions in today s dental laboratories. The Dental Laboratory Technology program provides learning opportunities which introduce, develop, and reinforce academic and occupational knowledge, skills, and attitudes required for job acquisition, retention, and advancement. Additionally, the program provides opportunities to upgrade present knowledge and skills or to retrain in the area of dental laboratory technology. Graduates of the program receive a dental laboratory technology diploma and are eligible to sit for a National Board of Certification Recognized Graduate examination. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS Must be 18 years of age Completion of high school or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. Blood and Airborne Pathogens: Students enrolled in Category I and II programs at Atlanta Technical College will be performing tasks in which there is a normal occurrence for exposure to blood, other potentially infectious body materials, and airborne pathogens. These tasks will be performed in the classroom, laboratory, and clinical activities for each occupational training program/course. Students will be required to present documentation of Hepatitis B and Tuberculosis immunizations as a result of potential occupational exposure. Students should contact their program directors for more information on policies and procedures regarding blood and airborne pathogens. COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum Credits Basic Skills (General Core) Courses 8 ENGL 1010 Fundamental s of English I 3 MATH 1012 Foundations of Mathematics 3 EMPL 1000 Interpersonal Relations and Professional Development 2 Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses 51 DELA 1000 Anatomy and Physiology of Head and Neck 2 DELA 1010 Introduction to Dental Technology 3 158

160 DELA 1020 Physics and Chemistry and Dental Materials 3 DELA 1030 Tooth Morphology 4 DELA 1040 Principles of Occlusion 2 DELA 1110 Removable Partial Dentures 4 DELA 1120 Crown and Bridge 4 DELA 1130 Complete Dentures 4 DELA 1140 Dental Ceramics 4 DELA 1150 Orthodontics/Pedodontics 2 DELA 2010 Principles of Laboratory Management 3 DELA 2020 Advanced Removable Partial Dentures 2 DELA 2030 Advanced Crown and Bridge 2 DELA 2040 Advanced Complete Dentures 2 DELA 2050 Advanced Dental Ceramics 3 Specialization Area DELA 1160 Fixed Prosthodontics Practicum 7 OR DELA 1170 Removable Prosthodontics Practicum 7 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 59 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 5 Estimated Program Cost $6,690 Accrediting Agency: American Dental Association, 211 East Chicago Avenue, Chicago, IL , phone During their final semester in the program, students can sit for the Recognized Graduate Exam which satisfies a part of the Certified Dental Technician Exam. 159

161 DESIGN & MEDIA PRODUCTION TECHNOLGY DIVISION: BUSINESS & PUBLIC SERVICE TECHNOLOGIES DESIGN AND MEDIA PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGY Degree Program PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: DAM3 Design and Media Production Technology prepares students for employment in a variety of media production industries. This program of study emphasizes hands on production in specialized areas. Graduates of the program received a Design and Media Production degree with specializations in Graphic Design and Prepress, Computer Animation, Photography, Video Production or Motion Graphics. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS Must be 16 years of age. Completion of high school diploma or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply. Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math. Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar. Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum General Education Courses 15 Area I Language Arts/Communication ENGL 1101 Composition and Rhetoric 3 Credits Area II - Social/Behavioral Sciences (Choose one of the following) PSYC 1101 Introductory Psychology 3 ECON 1101 Economic 3 Area III - Natural Sciences/Mathematics (Choose one of the following) MATH 1111 College Algebra 3 MATH 1100 Quantitative Skills and Reasoning 3 MATH 1101 Mathematical Modeling 3 Area IV - Humanities/Fine Arts (Choose one of the following) ARTS 1101 Art Appreciation 3 HUMN 1101 Introduction to Humanities 3 160

162 General Core Elective (Choose one of the following) ECON 1101 Principles of Economics 3 ENGL 2130 American Literature 3 SPCH 1101 Public Speaking 3 Program-Specific General Education Course Requirements Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses 23 COMP 1000 Introduction to Computers 3 DMPT 1000 Introduction to Design and Media Production 6 DMPT 1005 Vector Graphics 5 DMPT 1010 Raster Imaging 5 DMPT 2930 Exit Review 4 Complete One of Five Specializations Graphic Design and Prepress 28 DMPT 2100 Identity Design 4 DMPT 2105 Page Layout 4 DMPT 2110 Publication Design 4 DMPT 2115 Advertising and Promotional Design 4 DMPT 2120 Prepress and Output 4 DMPT 2905 Practicum/Internship II 4 ELEC - DMPT DMPT Elective 4 Computer Animation 28 DMPT 2400 Basic 3D Modeling and Animation 4 DMPT 2405 Intermediate 3D Modeling 4 (Choose 5 of 6 Courses from the following) DMPT 2410 Digital Texture and Lighting 4 DMPT 2415 Character Rigging 4 DMPT D Production and Animation 4 ELEC - DMPT DMPT Elective 4 ELEC - DMPT DMPT Elective 4 ELEC - DMPT DMPT Elective 4 161

163 Motion Graphics 28 DMPT 1600 Introduction to Video 4 DMPT 2600 Basic Video Editing 4 DMPT 2605 Introduction to Video Compositing and Broadcast Animation 4 DMPT 2610 Intermediate Video Compositing and Broadcast Animation 4 DMPT 2615 Intermediate Video Editing 4 DMPT 2625 DVD Authoring 4 DMPT 2905 Practicum/Internship II 4 ELEC - DMPT DMPT Elective 4 Photography 28 DMPT 1020 Introduction to Photography 4 DMPT 1025 Production Photography 4 DMPT 2125 Advanced Raster Imaging 4 DMPT 2135 Documentary Photography 4 DMPT 2700 Portraiture 4 DMPT 2705 Photography II 4 ELEC - DMPT DMPT Elective 4 Video Production 28 DMPT 1600 Introduction to Video Production 4 DMPT 2600 Basic Video Editing 4 DMPT 2615 Intermediate Video Editing 4 DMPT 2800 Intermediate Video Production 4 DMPT 2805 Narrative Filmmaking 4 DMPT 2810 Documentary Filmmaking 4 ELEC - DMPT DMPT Elective 4 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 66 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 5 Estimated Program Cost $7,

164 DESIGN AND MEDIA PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGY Diploma Program PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: DEM2 Design and Media Production Technology prepares students for employment in a variety of media production industries. This program of study emphasizes hands on production in specialized areas. Graduates of the program received a Design and Media Production degree with specializations in Graphic Design and Prepress, Computer Animation, Photography, Video Production or Motion Graphics. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS Must be 16 years of age. Completion of high school diploma or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply. Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math. Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar. Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum Basic Skills (General Core) Courses 8 ENGL 1010 Fundamentals of English I 3 (Choose one of the following) EMPL 1000 Interpersonal Relations and Professional Development 2 PSYC 1010 Basic Psychology 3 (Choose one of the following) MATH 1011 Business Math 3 MATH 1012 Foundations of Mathematics 3 Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses 23 COMP 1000 Introduction to Computers 3 DMPT 1000 Introduction to Design and Media Production 6 DMPT 1005 Vector Graphics 5 DMPT 1010 Raster Imaging 5 DMPT 2930 Exit Review 4 Complete One of Five Specializations Graphic Design and Prepress 20 DMPT 2100 Identity Design 4 DMPT 2105 Page Layout 4 Credits 163

165 DMPT 2120 Prepress and Output 4 (Choose 2 of 3 courses from the following) DMPT 2110 Publication Design 4 DMPT 2115 Advertising and Promotional Design 4 ELEC - DMPT DMPT Elective 4 Motion Graphics 20 DMPT 1600 Introduction to Video 4 DMPT 2600 Basic Video Editing 4 DMPT 2605 Introduction to Video Compositing and Broadcast Animation 4 (Choose 2 of 3 courses from the following) DMPT 2610 Intermediate Video Compositing and Broadcast Animation 4 DMPT 2615 Intermediate Video Editing 4 DMPT 2625 DVD Authoring 4 DMPT 2905 Practicum/Internship II 4 ELEC - DMPT DMPT Elective 4 Computer Animation 20 DMPT 2400 Basic 3D Modeling and Animation 4 DMPT 2405 Intermediate 3D Modeling 4 (Choose 3 of 4 courses from the following) DMPT 2410 Digital Texture and Lighting 4 DMPT 2415 Character Rigging 4 DMPT D Production and Animation 4 ELEC - DMPT DMPT Elective 4 Photography 28 DMPT 1020 Introduction to Photography 4 DMPT 1025 Production Photography 4 DMPT 2125 Advanced Raster Imaging 4 DMPT 2135 Documentary Photography 4 DMPT 2700 Portraiture 4 DMPT 2705 Photography II 4 164

166 ELEC - DMPT DMPT Elective 4 Video Production 28 DMPT 1600 Introduction to Video Production 4 DMPT 2600 Basic Video Editing 4 DMPT 2615 Intermediate Video Editing 4 DMPT 2800 Intermediate Video Production 4 DMPT 2805 Narrative Filmmaking 4 DMPT 2810 Documentary Filmmaking 4 ELEC - DMPT DMPT Elective 4 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 51 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 4 Estimated Program Cost $7,650 ADVERTISING LAYOUT SPECIALIST Technical Certificate of Credit Program PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: AL61 The Advertising Layout Specialist TCC provides entry-level training in advertising layout with courses in identity design, page layout, advertising and promotional design. Students will have the opportunity to choose from electives in advertising, photography and commercial photography. Additionally, the program provides opportunities to upgrade present knowledge or skills. Graduates will receive a technical certificate of credit. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS Must be 16 years of age. Completion of high school diploma or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply. Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math. Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar. Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum Credits Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses 35 DMPT 1000 Introduction to Design and Media Production 6 DMPT 1005 Vector Graphics 5 DMPT 1010 Raster Imaging 5 DMPT 2105 Page Layout 4 165

167 DMPT 2115 Advertising and Promotional Design 4 DMPT 2100 Identity Design 4 (Choose 2 of 3 courses from the following) DMPT 1020 Introduction to Photography 4 DMPT 1025 Production Photography 4 MKTG 1190 Integrated Marketing Communications 3 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 35 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 3 Estimated Program Cost $3,479 DESIGN AND MEDIA PRODUCTION SPECIALIST Technical Certificate of Credit Program PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: DAM1 The Design and Media Production Specialist TCC prepares students with basic design and media production skills, including those in vector graphics and raster imaging. Additionally, the program provides opportunities to upgrade present knowledge or skills. Graduates will receive a technical certificate of credit. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS Must be 16 years of age. Completion of high school diploma or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply. Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math. Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar. Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate Curriculum Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses 16 DMPT 1000 Introduction to Design and Media Production 6 DMPT 1005 Vector Graphics 5 DMPT 1010 Raster Imaging 5 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 16 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 2 Credits Estimated Program Cost $1,

168 DIGITAL ILLUSTRATION SPECIALIST Technical Certificate of Credit Program PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: DI21 The Digital Illustration Specialist TCC provides entry-level skills in traditional and digital illustration with courses in drawing, beginning and advanced vector graphics, raster imaging and identity design. Additionally, the program provides opportunities to upgrade present knowledge or skills. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS Must be 16 years of age. Completion of high school diploma or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply. Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math. Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar. Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. COURSE OUTLINE Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses 22 DMPT 1005 Vector Graphics 5 DMPT 1010 Raster Imaging 5 DMPT 1015 Drawing 4 DMPT 2100 Identity Design 4 DMPT 2130 Advanced Vector Graphics 4 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 22 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 2 Estimated Program Cost $2,374 GRAPHIC DESIGN AND PREPRESS TECHNICIAN Technical Certificate of Credit Program PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: GD21 The Graphic Design & Prepress Technician TCC provides students with the fundamental skills required for graphic design, image editing, and prepress production. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS Must be 16 years of age. Completion of high school diploma or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply. Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math. Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar. Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. COURSE OUTLINE 167

169 Curriculum Credits Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses 24 DMPT 1000 Introduction to Design and Media Production 6 DMPT 1005 Vector Graphics 5 DMPT 1010 Raster Imaging 5 DMPT 2105 Page Layout 4 DMPT 2120 Prepress and Output 4 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 24 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 2 Estimated Program Cost $2,544 MOTION GRAPHICS ASSISTANT Technical Certificate of Credit Program PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: MG21 Motion Graphics Assistant TCC (also known as Multi-media artists and animators) combines the specialist skills of pre-production, production and an emphasis on post-production. Motion Graphics are graphics that use video and/or animation technology to create the illusion of motion or a transforming appearance. Students develop valuable industry standard techniques and become adept with using various software applications to integrate 2D and 3D design elements with live footage, audio and visual effects artistry. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS Must be 16 years of age. Completion of high school diploma or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply. Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math. Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar. Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum Credits Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses 32 DMPT 1000 Introduction to Design and Media Production 6 DMPT 1005 Vector Graphics 5 DMPT 1010 Raster Imaging 5 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 32 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 3 168

170 Estimated Program Cost $3,479 PHOTOGRAPHER Technical Certificate of Credit Program PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: PH11 The Photographer TCC will cover a wide range of photographic skills, including an introduction to photography, photography for commercial use and documentary journalism, as well as beginning and advanced raster imaging. Additionally, the program provides opportunities to upgrade present knowledge or skills. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS Must be 16 years of age. Completion of high school diploma or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply. Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math. Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar. Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses 27 DMPT 1000 Introduction to Design and Media Production 6 DMPT 1010 Raster Imaging 5 DMPT 1020 Introduction to Photography 4 DMPT 1025 Production Photography 4 DMPT 2125 Advanced Raster Imaging 4 DMPT 2135 Documentary Photography 4 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 27 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 3 Credits Estimated Program Cost $ 3,

171 DIESEL EQUIPMENT TECHNOLOGY DIVISION: INDUSTRIAL & TRANSPORTATION TECHNOLOGIES DIESEL EQUIPMENT TECHNOLOGY Diploma PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: DET4 The Diesel Equipment Technology diploma program is a sequence of courses designed to prepare students for careers in the diesel equipment services and repair profession. Learning opportunities enables students to develop academic, technical and professional knowledge and skills required for job acquisition, retention, and advancement. The program emphasizes a combination of truck, heavy equipment, marine systems, or emergency power generator repair theory and practical application necessary for successful employment depending on the specialization area a student chooses to complete. Program graduates receive a Diesel Equipment Technology diploma that qualifies them as entry- level Diesel Equipment technicians. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS Must be 16 years of age Completion of high school or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum Basic Skills (General Core) Courses 8 ENGL 1010 Fundamentals of English I 3 EMPL 1000 Interpersonal Relations and Professional Development 2 MATH 1012 Foundations of Mathematics 3 Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses 28 COMP 1000 Introduction of Computers 3 DIET 1000 Introduction to Diesel Technology, Tools, and Safety 3 DIET 1010 Diesel Electrical and Electronic Systems 7 DIET 1020 Preventive Maintenance 5 DIET 1030 Diesel Engines 7 DIET 1040 Diesel Truck and Heavy Equipment HVAC Systems 3 Completion of the Medium/Heavy Truck Specialization 14 DIET 2000 Truck Steering and Suspension Systems Credits

172 DIET 2010 Truck Brake Systems 4 DIET 2020 Truck Drivetrains 6 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 50 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 4 Estimated Program Cost $6,204 DIESEL ELECTRICAL/ELECTRONIC SYSTEMS TECHNICIAN Technical Certificate of Credit Program PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: DE11 The Diesel Electrical and Electronic Systems Technician certificate program provides the student with training for becoming an entry level diesel electrical/electronic systems technician. The topics presented include diesel shop safety and tool use, basic electrical and electronics theory, starting and charging systems, and electronic controls and accessory systems. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS Must be 16 years of age Completion of high school or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses 10 DIET 1000 Introduction to Diesel Technology, Tools, and Safety 3 DIET 1010 Diesel Electrical and Electronic Systems 7 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 10 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms Credits Estimated Program Cost $2,096 DIESEL ENGINE SERVICE TECH Technical Certificate of Credit Program PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: DE21 The Diesel Engine Service Technician certificate program provides the student with training to become an entry level diesel engine service technician. The topics covered include diesel shop safety, tools and equipment, diesel electrical/electronic systems, and diesel engines and support systems. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS Must be 16 years of age Completion of high school or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar

173 Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses 17 DIET 1000 Introduction to Diesel Technology, Tools, and Safety 3 DIET 1010 Diesel Electrical and Electronic Systems 7 DIET 1030 Diesel Engines 7 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 17 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms Credits Estimated Program Cost $2,747 DIESEL TRUCK MAINTENANCE TECHNICIAN Technical Certificate of Credit Program PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: DTM1 The Diesel Truck Maintenance Technician certificate program provides training in the essential knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary for employment as a maintenance technician on semi-trucks, trailers or other diesel equipment. The topics covered include diesel shop safety, tools, and equipment, preventive maintenance procedures, truck brake systems, and truck drive trains. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS Must be 16 years of age Completion of high school or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses 17 DIET 1000 Introduction to Diesel Technology, Tools, and Safety 3 DIET 1010 Diesel Electrical and Electronic Systems 7 DIET 1020 Preventive Maintenance 5 DIET 2010 Truck Brake Systems 4 DIET 2020 Truck Drivetrains 6 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 25 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 2 Credits

174 Estimated Program Cost $3,

175 DISTRIBUTION - MATERIALS MANAGEMENT DIVISION: INDUSTRIAL & TRANSPORTATION TECHNOLOGIES PROCUREMENT Associate of Applied Science Degree PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: PR23 The Procurement Associate Degree program is a sequence of courses that prepares students for careers in the procurement profession. It will also give the student foundation that will allow them the opportunity to advance their study at a four-year institution. Areas covered in this degree program include basic fundamentals of supply chain management, principles of procurement, introduction to global sourcing, and basic of supplier negotiation. It also includes business management, accounting principles, business communication. Program graduates receive a Procurement Associate of Applied Science Degree, which qualifies them for entry level salaried professional in a Procurement function. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS Must be 16 years of age Completion of high school or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum General Education Courses 18 Area I Language Arts/Communication ENGL 1101 Composition and Rhetoric 3 SPCH 1101 Public Speaking 3 Area II - Social/Behavioral Sciences ECON 1101 Principles of Economics 3 PSYC 1101 Introductory Psychology 3 Area III - Natural Sciences/Mathematics Choose 1 of the following: MATH 1111 College Algebra 3 MATH 1100 Quantitative Skills and Reasoning (3) MATH 1101 Mathematical Modeling (3) Credits 174

176 Area IV - Humanities/Fine Arts ENGL 2130 American Literature 3 Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses 34 Choose One of the Following: MGMT 1100 Principles of Management 3 OR MKTG 1100 Principles of Marketing (3) ACCT 1100 Financial Accounting I 4 COMP 1000 Introduction to Computers 3 ENGL 1105 Technical Communications 3 OR MGMT 1105 Organizational Behavior (3) OR MGMT 1115 Leadership (3) MGMT 1125 Business Ethics 3 OR ACCT 2140 Legal Environment of Business (3) MKTG 1130 Business Regulations and Compliance 3 SCMA 1003 Introduction to Transportation and Logistics Management 3 SCMA 1007 Basics of Negotiations 3 SCMA 2103 Supply Chain Management Concepts 3 SCMA 2105 Procurement Methodologies 3 SCMA 2108 Global Sourcing 3 Guided Electives Choose Minimum of 9 Credits 9 ACCT 1105 Financial Accounting II 4 ACCT 1110 Managerial Accounting 3 BIOL 1111 Biology I 3 BIOL 1111L Biology Lab I 1 BUSN 1410 Spreadsheet Concepts and Applications 4 175

177 ECON 2105 Macroeconomics 3 ECON 2106 Microeconomics 3 MGMT 2115 Human Resource Management 3 MGMT 1120 Introduction to Business 3 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 61 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 6 Estimated Program Cost $5,931 SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT Associate of Applied Science Degree PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: SC13 The Supply Chain Management Associate Degree program is a sequence of courses that prepares students for careers in the SCM profession. It will also give the student foundation that will allow them the opportunity to advance their study at a four-year institution. Areas covered in this degree program include basic fundamentals of supply chain management including procurement, issues in executing global supply chains, logistics and transportation. It also includes business management, accounting principles, business communication, supply and demand, computer fundamentals, and database management skills. Program graduates receive a Supply Chain Management Associate of Applied Science Degree will be qualified as future potential entry level salaried supervisors and coordinators. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS Must be 16 years of age Completion of high school or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum General Education Courses 18 Area I Language Arts/Communication ENGL 1101 Composition and Rhetoric 3 SPCH 1101 Public Speaking 3 Area II - Social/Behavioral Sciences ECON 1101 Principles of Economics 3 PSYC 1101 Introductory Psychology 3 Credits Area III - Natural Sciences/Mathematics Choose One of the Following 176

178 MATH 1111 College Algebra 3 MATH 1100 Quantitative Skills and Reasoning (3) MATH 1101 Mathematical Modeling (3) Area IV - Humanities/Fine Arts ENGL 2130 American Literature 3 Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses 35 Choose One of the Following MKTG 1100 Principles of Marketing 3 OR MGMT 1100 Principles of Management (3) ACCT 1100 Financial Accounting I 4 BUSN 1420 Database Applications 4 COMP 1000 Introduction to Computers 3 ENGL 1105 Technical Communications 3 OR MGMT 1105 Organizational Behavior (3) OR MGMT 1115 Legal Environment of Business (3) MGMT 1125 Business Ethics 3 OR ACCT 2140 Legal Environment of Business (3) MKTG 1130 Business Regulations and Compliance 3 SCMA 1003 Introduction to Transportation and Logistics Management 3 SCMA 2103 Supply Chain Management Concepts 3 SCMA 2105 Procurement Methodologies 3 SCMA 2106 Key Issues in the Global Integrated Supply Chain 3 Guided Electives Choose Minimum of 9 Credits 9 ACCT 1105 Financial Accounting II 4 ACCT 1110 Managerial Accounting 3 BUSN 1410 Spreadsheet Concepts and Applications 4 177

179 ECON 2105 Macroeconomics 3 ECON 2106 Microeconomics 3 SCMA 1007 Basics of Negotiations 3 BIOL 1111 Biology I 3 BIOL 1111L Biology Lab I 3 MGMT 2115 Human Resource Management 3 MGMT 1120 Introduction to Business 3 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 62 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 6 Estimated Program Cost $6,006 SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT Diploma PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: SC12 The Supply Chain Management diploma program is a sequence of courses that prepares students for careers in the SCM profession. It will also give the student a solid foundation that will allow them the opportunity to advance their study at a four-year institution. Areas covered in this diploma program include basic fundamentals of supply chain management including procurement, issues in executing global supply chains, logistics and transportation. It also includes business management, accounting principles, business communications, economics of supply and demand, and computer fundamentals, and database management skills. Program graduates who receive a diploma in Supply Chain Management will be qualified as future potential entry-level salaried supervisors and coordinators. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS * Must be 16 years of age * Completion of high school or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply * Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math * Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum Basic Skills (General Core) Courses 11 ENGL 1010 Fundamentals of English I 3 EMPL 1000 Interpersonal Relations and Professional Development 2 COMP 1000 Introduction to Computers 3 Choose One of the Following PSYC 1010 Basic Psychology 3 Credits 178

180 EMPL 1000 Interpersonal Relations and Professional Development (2) Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses 29 ACCT 1100 Financial Accounting I 4 SCMA 1003 Introduction to Transportation and Logistics Management 3 Choose One of the Following MKTG 1100 Principles of Marketing 3 MGMT 1100 Principles of Management (3) Choose One of the Following MGMT 1125 Business Ethics 3 ACCT 2140 Legal Environment of Business (3) MKTG 1130 Business Regulations and Compliance 3 SCMA 2103 Supply Chain Management Concepts 3 SCMA 2105 Procurement Methodologies 3 SCMA 2106 Key Issues in the Global Integrated Supply Chain 3 BUSN 1420 Database Applications 4 Guided Electives Choose Minimum of 8 Credits 8 ACCT 1105 Financial Accounting II 4 ACCT 1110 Managerial Accounting 3 BUSN 1410 Spreadsheet Concepts and Applications 4 ECON 2105 Macroeconomics 3 ECON 2106 Microeconomics 3 SCMA 1007 Basics of Negotiations 3 MGMT 2115 Human Resource Management 3 MGMT 1120 Introduction to Business 3 BIOL 1111 Biology I 3 BIOL 1111L Biology Lab I 3 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 48 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 5 Estimated Program Cost $4,

181 CERTIFIED WAREHOUSING AND DISTRIBUTION SPECIALIST Technical Certificate of Credit Program PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: CW11 The Certified Warehousing and Distribution Specialist Certificate of Credit provides instruction that will allow graduates to function safely and effectively in the warehouse environment. Topics include workforce skills, warehousing and distribution processes, technology skills, and representative warehousing skills. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS Must be 16 years of age Completion of high school or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses CWDS 1540 Working in the Warehousing Environment 2 CWDS 1560 Warehousing Core and Workforce Skills 2 CWDS 1580 Warehousing and Distribution Process 2 CWDS 1600 Warehousing Technology Skills 2 CWDS 1620 Representative Warehouse Skills 1 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 9 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 1 Estimated Program Cost $1176 SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGER Technical Certificate of Credit Program PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: SC41 The Supply Chain Manager Technical Certificate for Credit (TCC) program is a sequence of courses that prepares students for careers in the SCM profession. It will also give the student a solid foundation that will allow them the opportunity to advance their training to a degree level program if they choose. Areas covered in this certificate program include basic fundamentals of supply chain management including procurement, issues in executing global supply chains, logistics and transportation. Program graduates who receive a Technical Certificate of Credit (TCC) in Supply Chain Manager become specialists qualified as future potential entry-level hourly and/or entry level exempt coordinators. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS Must be 16 years of age Completion of high school diploma or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar. 180

182 Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses Credits ACCT 1100 Financial Accounting I 4 BUSN 1420 Database Applications 4 COMP 1000 Introduction to Computers 3 MKTG 1000 Principles of Marketing 3 OR MGMT 1000 Principles of Management (3) MKTG 1125 Business Ethics 3 MKTG 1130 Business Regulations and Compliance 3 SCMA 1003 Introduction to Transportation and Logistics Management 3 SCMA 2103 Supply Chain Management Concepts 3 SCMA 2105 Procurement Methodologies 3 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 29 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 3 Estimated Program Cost $3,

183 DRAFTING DIVISION: INDUSTRIAL & TRANSPORTATION TECHNOLOGIES DRAFTING TECHNOLOGY Diploma PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: DT12 The Drafting Technology diploma program prepares students for employment in a variety of positions in the drafting field, such as drafter, CAD operator or Civil Tech based on the specialization area a student chooses to complete. The program provides learning opportunities which introduce, develop, and reinforce academic and technical knowledge, skills and attitudes required for job acquisition, retention, and advancement. Additionally, the program provides opportunities to upgrade present knowledge and skills or retrain in drafting practices and software. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS Must be 16 years of age Completion of high school or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum Credits Basic Skills (General Core) Courses 8 ENGL 1010 Fundamentals of English I 3 EMPL 1000 Interpersonal Relations and Professional Development 2 MATH 1013 Algebraic Concepts or 3 MATH 1012 Foundation of Mathematics 3 Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses 42 COMP 1000 Introduction to Computers 3 DFTG 1015 Practical Geometry and Trigonometry 3 DFTG 1101 CAD Fundamentals 4 DFTG 1103 Multiview/Basic Dimensioning 4 Architectural Drafting Specialization

184 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 50 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 4 Estimated Program Cost $5,310 CAD OPERATOR Technical Certificate of Credit PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: CP41 All of the courses in the CAD Operator TCC program are embedded in the Drafting Technology diploma and degree programs. The CAD Operator TCC program endows students with the prospect to continue on the career pathway toward advancement in the drafting profession. Additionally, the program provides opportunities to upgrade present knowledge and skills or to retrain in drafting practices and software. This TCC could also serve if needed as an exit point for high school dual enrolled students needing a point of exit for employment purposes. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS * Must be 16 years of age * Completion of high school or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply * Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math * Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses DFTG 1101 CAD Fundamentals 4 DFTG 1103 Technical Drawing I 4 COMP 1000 Introduction to Computers 3 Architectural Drafting Specialization 12 DFTG 1125 Architectural Fundamentals 4 DFTG 1127 Architectural 3D Modeling 4 DFTG 1129 Residential Drawing I 4 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 23 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 2 Estimated Program Cost $2,

185 EARLY CHILDHOOD CARE AND EDUCATION DIVISION: BUSINESS & PUBLIC SERVICE TECHNOLOGIES EARLY CHILDHOOD CARE/EDUCATION Associate of Applied Science Degree PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: EC13 The Early Childhood Care and Education associate of applied science degree program is a sequence of courses designed to prepare students for a variety of careers in the field of early childhood education. The program emphasizes a combination of early childhood care and education theory and practical application as well as general core competencies necessary for successful employment. Graduates have qualifications to be employed in early care and educations settings including child care centers, Head start, Georgia Pre- K programs, and elementary school paraprofessional positions. Graduates of this program will receive one of six areas of specialization: Exceptionalities, School Age and Youth Care, Family Child Care, Infant and Toddler Development, Program Administration and Paraprofessional. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS Must be 16 years of age Completion of high school or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. Blood and Airborne Pathogens: Students enrolled in Category I and II programs at Atlanta Technical College will be performing tasks in which there is a normal occurrence for exposure to blood, other potentially infectious body materials, and airborne pathogens. These tasks will be performed in the classroom, laboratory, and clinical activities for each occupational training program/course. Students will be required to present documentation of Hepatitis B and Tuberculosis immunizations as a result of potential occupational exposure. Students should contact their program directors for more information on policies and procedures regarding blood and airborne pathogens. Negative tuberculosis skin analysis is a requirement for participation in Practicum ECCE 1121 and Internship ECCE Criminal Background Check: All Early Childhood Care and Education students are required to submit a completed state and federal criminal records background check prior to registering for Practicum and Internship courses. The State of Georgia has a law regarding the placement of persons with criminal records in childcare facilities. Anyone who has been convicted of a felony offense, or of neglecting or abusing a dependent person, a sexual offense or any other covered crime will not be allowed to work in a childcare facility. If you are affected by this law, or think you may be, discuss your situation immediately with the department chair. Because your employment options may be severely limited in the early childhood profession, a person who has received an unsatisfactory criminal records check is discouraged from pursuing the ECCE program of study and may need to reconsider their chosen field of study. Students will not be allowed to take ECCE 1121 and ECCE 2240, if their criminal history/arrest record request form (from any police department in the state of Georgia or federal background check) comes back with an arrest history. COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum General Education Courses 18 Area I Language Arts/Communication Credits 184

186 ENGL 1101 Composition and Rhetoric 3 ENGL 1102 Literature and Composition 3 SPCH 1101 Public Speaking 3 Area II - Social/Behavioral Sciences PSYC 1101 Introductory Psychology 3 Area III - Natural Sciences/Mathematics MATH 1111 College Algebra 3 MATH1101 Mathematical Modeling (3) Area IV - Humanities/Fine Arts Program-Specific General Education Course Requirements 3 Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses 54 COMP 1000 Introduction to Computers 3 ECCE 1101 Introduction to Early Childhood Care and Education 3 ECCE 1103 Child Growth and Development 3 ECCE 1105 Health, Safety and Nutrition 3 ECCE 1112 Curriculum and Assessment 3 ECCE 1113 Creative Activities for Children 3 ECCE 1121 Early Childhood Care and Education Practicum 3 ECCE 2115 Language and Literacy 3 ECCE 2116 Math and Science 3 ECCE 2201 Exceptionalities 3 ECCE 2202 Social Issues and Family Involvement 3 ECCE 2203 Guidance and Classroom Management 3 ECCE 2240 Early Childhood Care and Education Internship 12 Specializations Select One Pair (Two Courses) Paraprofessional Specialization ECCE 2310 Paraprofessional Methods and Materials 3 ECCE 2312 Paraprofessional Roles and Practices 3 Program Administration ECCE 2320 Program Administration and Facility Management 3 185

187 ECCE 2322 Personnel Management 3 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 72 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 5 Estimated Program Cost $8,054 To be employed in child care centers, public schools, or Head Start centers, an individual must have a satisfactory criminal record check. Persons who have been convicted of a felony offense are not employable in the child care field. Evidence of a current satisfactory criminal record background check is required at the student's expense prior to participation in practicum or internship. EARLY CHILDHOOD CARE/EDUCATION Diploma PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: ECC2 The Early Childhood Care and Education Diploma program is a sequence of courses designed to prepare students for a variety of careers in the field of early childhood education. The program emphasizes a combination of early childhood care and education theory and practical application as well as limited general core competencies necessary for successful employment. Graduates have qualifications to be employed I nearly care and education settings including child care centers, Head start, and Georgia pre K programs. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS Must be 16 years of age Completion of high school or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. Blood and Airborne Pathogens: Students enrolled in Category I and II programs at Atlanta Technical College will be performing tasks in which there is a normal occurrence for exposure to blood, other potentially infectious body materials, and airborne pathogens. These tasks will be performed in the classroom, laboratory, and clinical activities for each occupational training program/course. Students will be required to present documentation of Hepatitis B and Tuberculosis immunizations as a result of potential occupational exposure. Students should contact their program directors for more information on policies and procedures regarding blood and airborne pathogens. Negative tuberculosis skin analysis is a requirement for participation in Practicum ECCE 1121 and Internship ECCE 2240 Criminal Background Check: All Early Childhood Care and Education students are required to submit a completed state and federal criminal records background check. The State of Georgia has a law regarding the placement of persons with criminal records in childcare facilities. Anyone who has been convicted of a felony offense, or of neglecting or abusing a dependent person, a sexual offense or any other covered crime will not be allowed to work in a childcare facility. If you are affected by this law, or think you may be, discuss your situation immediately with the department chair. Because your employment options may be severely limited in the early childhood profession, a person who has received an unsatisfactory criminal records check is discouraged from pursuing the ECCE program of study and may need to reconsider their chosen field of study. Students will not be allowed to take ECCE 1121 and ECCE 2240, if their criminal history/arrest record request form (from any police department in the state of Georgia or federal background check) comes back with an arrest history. COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum Basic Skills (General Core) Courses 8 Credits 186

188 ENGL 1010 Fundamental of English I 3 EMPL 1000 Interpersonal Relations and Professional Development 2 MATH 1012 Foundations for Mathematics 3 Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses 45 COMP 1000 Introduction to Computers 3 ECCE 1101 Introduction to Early Childhood Care and Education 3 ECCE 1103 Child Growth and Development 3 ECCE 1105 Health, Safety and Nutrition 3 ECCE 1112 Curriculum and Assessment 3 ECCE 1113 Creative Activities for Children 3 ECCE 1121 Early Childhood Care and Education Practicum 3 ECCE 2115 Language and Literacy 3 ECCE 2116 Math and Science 3 ECCE 2202 Social Issues and Family Involvement 3 ECCE 2203 Guidance and Classroom Management 3 ECCE 2240 Early Childhood Care and Education Internship 12 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 53 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 4 Estimated Program Cost $5,725 To be employed in child care centers, public schools, or Head Start centers, an individual must have a satisfactory criminal record check. Persons who have been convicted of a felony offense are not employable in the child care field. Evidence of a current satisfactory criminal record background check is required at the student's expense prior to participation in practicum or internship. EARLY CHILDHOOD EXCEPTIONALITIES Technical Certificate of Credit Program PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: EC41 The Early Childhood Care and Education Exceptionalities TCC is a sequence of three courses designed to prepare students to work with students with special needs. The program emphasizes an inclusive classroom. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS Must be 19 years of age Completion of high school diploma or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math Post-secondary credentials from an accredited institution, a current Child Development Associate Credential (CDA), or qualifying experience pending approval of the department chair. Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. 187

189 Blood and Airborne Pathogens: Students enrolled in Category I and II programs at Atlanta Technical College will be performing tasks in which there is a normal occurrence for exposure to blood, other potentially infectious body materials, and airborne pathogens. These tasks will be performed in the classroom, laboratory, and clinical activities for each occupational training program/course. Students may be required to present documentation of Hepatitis B and Tuberculosis immunizations as a result of potential occupational exposure. Students should contact their program directors for more information on policies and procedures regarding blood and airborne pathogens. Criminal Background Check: All Early Childhood Care and Education students may be required to submit a completed state and federal criminal records background check form during their first semester. The State of Georgia has a law regarding the placement of persons with criminal records in childcare facilities. Anyone who has been convicted of a felony offense, or of neglecting or abusing a dependent person, a sexual offense or any other covered crime will not be allowed to work in a childcare facility. If you are affected by this law, or think you may be, discuss your situation immediately with the department chair. Because your employment options may be severely limited in the early childhood profession, a person who has received an unsatisfactory criminal records check is discouraged from pursuing the ECCE program of study and may need to reconsider their chosen field of study. COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum Credits Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses ECCE 2201 Exceptionalities 3 ECCE 2360 Classroom Strategies for Exceptional Children 3 ECCE 2362 Exploring Your Role in the Exceptional Environment 3 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 9 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 1 Estimated Program Cost $1,424 To be employed in child care centers, public schools, or Head Start centers, an individual must have a satisfactory criminal record check. Persons who have been convicted of a felony offense are not employable in the child care field. Evidence of a current satisfactory criminal record background check is required at the student's expense prior to participation in practicum or internship. EARLY CHILDHOOD PROGRAM ADMINISTRATION Technical Certificate of Credit Program PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: ECP1 The Early Childhood Care and Education Program Administration TCC program is a sequence of three courses designed to prepare students for a job as manager of Childcare Learning Center or a group Day Care Center. The program emphasizes child growth and development and management and administration issues involved in managing a child care center. Graduates have qualifications to be employed in early care and education settings including child care centers, Head Start, and Georgia Pre-K programs. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS Must be 21 years of age Completion of high school diploma or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar. Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate Blood and Airborne Pathogens: Students enrolled in Category I and II programs at Atlanta Technical College will be performing tasks in which there is a normal occurrence for exposure to blood, other potentially infectious body materials, and airborne pathogens. These tasks will be performed in the classroom, laboratory, and clinical activities for each occupational training program/course. 188

190 Students may be required to present documentation of Hepatitis B and Tuberculosis immunizations as a result of potential occupational exposure. Students should contact their program directors for more information on policies and procedures regarding blood and airborne pathogens. Criminal Background Check: All Early Childhood Care and Education students may be required to submit a completed state and federal criminal records background check form during their first semester. The State of Georgia has a law regarding the placement of persons with criminal records in childcare facilities. Anyone who has been convicted of a felony offense, or of neglecting or abusing a dependent person, a sexual offense or any other covered crime will not be allowed to work in a childcare facility. If you are affected by this law, or think you may be, discuss your situation immediately with the department chair. Because your employment options may be severely limited in the early childhood profession, a person who has received an unsatisfactory criminal records check is discouraged from pursuing the ECCE program of study and may need to reconsider their chosen field of study. COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses ECCE 1103 Child Growth and Development 3 ECCE 2320 Program Administration and Facility Management 3 ECCE 2322 Personal Management 3 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 9 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 1 Estimated Program Cost $1,424 INFANT/TODDLER CHILD CARE SPECIALIST Technical Certificate of Credit Program PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: IC31 The Early Childhood Care and Education Infant/Toddler Child Care Specialist TCC program is a sequence of five courses designed to prepare students with the basics needed for working with infants and toddler. The program provides an intense look at understanding and learning activities and proper care needed for infants and toddlers. Graduates have qualifications to be employed in early care and education settings including child care centers, Head Start, and Georgia Pre K programs. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS * Must be 16 years of age * Completion of high school or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply * Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math * Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. Blood and Airborne Pathogens: Students enrolled in Category I and II programs at Atlanta Technical College will be performing tasks in which there is a normal occurrence for exposure to blood, other potentially infectious body materials, and airborne pathogens. These tasks will be performed in the classroom, laboratory, and clinical activities for each occupational training program/course. Students are required to present documentation of Hepatitis B and Tuberculosis immunizations as a result of potential occupational exposure. Students should contact their program directors for more information on policies and procedures regarding blood and airborne pathogens. Criminal Background Check: All Early Childhood Care and Education students may be required to submit a completed state criminal records background check form during their first semester. The State of Georgia has a law regarding the placement of persons with criminal records in childcare facilities. Anyone who has been convicted of a felony offense, or of neglecting or abusing a 189

191 dependent person, a sexual offense or any other covered crime will not be allowed to work in a childcare facility. If you are affected by this law, or think you may be, discuss your situation immediately with the department chair. Because your employment options may be severely limited in the early childhood profession, a person who has received an unsatisfactory criminal records check is discouraged from pursuing the ECCE program of study and may need to reconsider their chosen field of study. COURSE OUTLINE Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses Curriculum ECCE 1101 Introduction to Early Childhood Care and Education 3 ECCE 1103 Child Growth and Development 3 ECCE 1105 Health, Safety and Nutrition 3 ECCE 2330 Infant/Toddler Development 3 ECCE 2332 Infant/ Toddler Group Care and Curriculum 3 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 15 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 1 Estimated Program Cost $1,

192 ELECTRICAL CONSTRUCTION AND MAINTENANCE DIVISION: INDUSTRIAL & TRANSPORTATION TECHNOLOGIES ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGY Diploma PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: ES12 The Electrical Systems Technology program provides instruction in the inspection, maintenance, installation, and repair of electrical systems in the residential, commercial, and industrial industries. A combination of theory and practical application is emphasized to develop academic, technical, and professional knowledge and skills. Program graduates receive a diploma in Electrical Systems Technology with a specialization in residential or industrial applications. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS Must be 16 years of age Completion of high school or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum Basic Skills (General Core) Courses 8 EMPL 1000 Interpersonal Relations and Professional Development 2 ENGL1010 Fundamentals of English I 3 MATH 1012 Foundations of Mathematics 3 Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses 26 ELTR 1020 Electrical Systems Basics I 3 ELTR 1060 Electrical Prints, Schematics, and Symbols 2 ELTR 1080 Commercial Wiring I 5 ELTR 1090 Commercial Wiring II 3 ELTR 1180 Electrical Controls 4 IDFC 1007 Industrial Safety Procedures 2 IDFC 1007 Direct Current I 3 Credits 191

193 Occupational Related Elective 3 Completion of One of the Following Specializations: Electrical Construction and Maintenance Specialization 10 Industrial Electrical Technology Specialization (10) Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 43 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 4 Estimated Program Cost $5,585 COMMERCIAL WIRING Technical Certificate of Credit Program PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: CW31 The Commercial Wiring Technical Certificate of Credit provides instruction in the knowledge and skills necessary to perform wiring functions in a commercial setting. Topics include safety practices, blueprint and schematic reading and interpretation, and wiring procedures and practices. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS * Must be 16 years of age * Completion of high school or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply * Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math * Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses ELTR 1060 Electrical Prints, Schematics, and Symbols 2 ELTR 1080 Commercial Wiring I 5 ELTR 1090 Commercial Wiring II 3 IDFC 1007 Industrial Safety Procedures 2 ELTR 1020 Electrical Systems Basics I 3 IDFC 1011 Direct Current I 3 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 18 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 1 Estimated Program Cost $2,500 INDUSTRIAL ELECTRICAL CONTROLS Technical Certificate of Credit Program PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: IE31 The Industrial Electrical Controls Technical Certificate of Credit prepares students for an entry level position in a commercial or industrial environment in which electrical controls are utilized. Emphasis is placed on electrical theory, electric motors, and programmable logic controllers. 192

194 ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS * Must be 16 years of age * Completion of high school or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply * Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math * Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses ELTR 1020 Electrical Systems Basic I 3 ELTR 1180 Electrical Controls 4 ELTR 1220 Industrial PLC s 4 IDFC 1007 Industrial Safety Procedures 2 MATH 1012 Foundations of Mathematics 3 Credits Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 16 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 1 Estimated Program Cost $2,074 RESIDENTIAL WIRING TECHNICIAN Technical Certificate of Credit Program PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: RW21 The Residential Wiring Technical Certificate of Credit prepares students for employment in the construction industry as qualified residential wiring technicians. Topics include NEC regulations, blueprint reading, principles of direct and alternating current, and residential wiring procedures and practices. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS * Must be 16 years of age * Completion of high school or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply * Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math * Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum Credits Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses ELTR 1020 Electrical Systems Basic I 3 ELTR 1060 Electrical Prints, Schematics, and Symbols 2 ELTR 1205 Residential Wiring I 3 ELTR 1210 Residential Wiring II 3 IDFC 1007 Industrial Safety Procedures 2 IDFC 1011 Direct Current I 3 193

195 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 16 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 1 Estimated Program Cost $2,

196 ELECTRONICS AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS DIVISION: INDUSTRIAL & TRANSPORTATION TECHNOLOGIES ELECTRONICS FUNDAMENTALS Diploma PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: EF12 The Electronics Fundamentals program is designed to prepare students for careers in electronics professions. Learning opportunities develop academic, technical, professional knowledge and skills required for job acquisition, retention, and advancement. The program emphasizes a combination of electronics theory and practical application necessary for successful employment. Program graduates receive an Electronic Fundamentals diploma which prepares them for entry-level positions in the electronics field and qualifies them for advancement in the Electronics Technology program. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS Must be 16 years of age Completion of high school or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum Credits Basic Skills (General Core) Courses 11 ENGL 1010 Fundamentals of English I 3 EMPL 1000 Interpersonal Relations and Professional Development 2 MATH 1013 Algebraic Concepts 3 MATH 1111 College Algebra 3 Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses 30 COMP 1000 Introduction to Computers 3 ELCR 1005 Soldering Technology 1 ELCR 1010 Direct Current Circuits 6 ELCR 1020 Alternating Current Circuits 7 ELCR 1030 Solid State Devices 5 ELCR 1040 Digital and Microprocessor Fundamentals 5 ELCR 1060 Linear Integrated Circuits 3 195

197 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 41 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 3 Estimated Program Cost $4,254 ELECTRONICS TECHNOLOGY Diploma PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: ET14 The Electronics Technology Diploma program is a sequence of courses designed to prepare students for careers in electronics technology professions. Learning opportunities develop academic, technical, and professional knowledge and skills required for job acquisition, retention, and advancement. Program graduates are to be competent in the general areas of communications, mathematics, computer literacy, and interpersonal relations. The program emphasizes a combination of electronics technology theory and practical application necessary for successful employment using both manual and computerized electronics systems. Program graduates receive an Electronics Technology Diploma which qualifies them as electronics technicians with a specialization in biomedical instrumentation, communications electronics, computer electronics, general electronics, industrial electronics, or telecommunications electronics. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS * Must be 16 years of age * Completion of high school or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply * Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math * Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum Credits Basic Skills (General Core) Courses 11 ENGL 1010 Fundamentals of English I 3 EMPL 1000 Interpersonal Relations and Professional Development 2 MATH 1013 Algebraic Concepts 3 MATH 1111 College Algebra 3 Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses 29 COMP 1000 Introduction to Computers 3 ELCR 1005 Soldering Technology 1 ELCR 1010 Direct Current Circuits 5 ELCR 1020 Alternating Current Circuits 7 ELCR 1030 Solid State Devices 5 ELCR 1040 Digital and Microprocessor Fundamentals 5 ELCR 1060 Linear Integrated Circuits 3 Completion of the Following Specialization: 196

198 Telecommunications Electronics Technology Specialization 18 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 58 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 5 Estimated Program Cost $5,

199 FIRE SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY DIVISION: HEALTH & PUBLIC SAFETY TECHNOLOGIES FIRE SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY Associate of Applied Science Degree PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: FS13 The Fire Science Associate of Applied Science terminal degree program is a sequence of courses designed to prepare fire service personnel at all levels to become better officers and leaders. The program provides learning opportunities which introduce, develop, and reinforce academic and occupational knowledge, skills, and attitudes required for job acquisition, retention, and advancement. Additionally, the program provides opportunities to retrain and upgrade present knowledge and skills. Completion of the program of study leads to an AAS degree in Fire Science. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS Must be 18 years of age Completion of high school diploma or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar. Must be NPQI certified or certified at the Fire Fighter I level. Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum Credits General Education Courses 15 Area I Language Arts/Communication ENGL 1101 Composition and Rhetoric 3 Area II - Social/Behavioral Sciences PSYC 1101 Introductory Psychology 3 SOCI 1101 Introduction to Sociology 3 Area III - Natural Sciences/Mathematics MATH 1111 College Algebra 3 MATH 1100 Quantitative Skills and Reasoning (3) MATH 1101 Mathematical Modeling (3) Area IV - Humanities/Fine Arts 198

200 General Core Elective 3 Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses 47 COMP 1000 Introduction to Computers 3 FRSC 1100 Introduction to the Fire Service 3 FRSC 1110 Fire Administration Supervision and Leadership 3 FRSC 1121 Firefighting Strategy and Tactics 3 FRSC 1132 Fire Service Instructor 4 FRSC 1141 Hazardous Materials Operations 4 FRSC 1151 Fire Prevention & Inspection 4 FRSC 1161 Fire Service Safety and Loss Control 3 FRSC 2100 Fire Administration - Management 3 FRSC 2110 Fire Service Hydraulics 3 FRSC 2120 Fire Protection Systems 3 FRSC 2130 Fire Service Building Construction 3 FRSC 2141 Incident Command 4 FRSC 2170 Fire and Arson Investigation 4 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 62 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 6 Estimated Program Cost $8,006 FIRE SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY Diploma PROGRAM ESCRIPTION Major Code: FST2 The Fire Science Diploma program is a sequence of courses designed to prepare fire service personnel at all levels to become better officers and leaders. The program provides learning opportunities which introduce, develop, and reinforce academic and occupational knowledge, skills, and attitudes required for job acquisition, retention, and advancement. Additionally, the program provides opportunities to retrain and upgrade present knowledge and skills. Completion of the program of study leads to a Diploma in Fire Science. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS Must be 18 years of age Completion of high school diploma or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar. Must be NPQI certified or certified at the Fire Fighter I level. Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. 199

201 COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum Credits Basic Skills (General Core) Courses 6 ENGL 1010 Fundamentals of English I 3 MATH 1012 Foundations of Mathematics 3 Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses 47 COMP 1000 Introduction to Computers 3 FRSC 1100 Introduction to the Fire Service 3 FRSC 1110 Fire Administration Supervision and Leadership 3 FRSC 1121 Firefighting Strategy and Tactics 3 FRSC 1132 Fire Service Instructor 4 FRSC 1141 Hazardous Materials Operations 4 FRSC 1151 Fire Prevention & Inspection 4 FRSC 1161 Fire Service Safety and Loss Control 3 FRSC 2100 Fire Administration Management 3 FRSC 2110 Fire Service Hydraulics 3 FRSC 2120 Fire Protection Systems 3 FRSC 2130 Fire Service Building Construction 3 FRSC 2141 Incident Command 4 FRSC 2170 Fire and Arson Investigation 4 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 53 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 4 Estimated Program Cost $6,529 FIREFIGHTER I Technical Certificate of Credit PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: FF11 The Firefighter I Technical Certificate of Credit program is conducted in cooperation with the Georgia Fire Academy and Georgia Firefighter Standards and Training to ensure graduates have the skills, knowledge and credentials to serve as firefighters in paid and volunteer fire departments. Graduates will be tested and certified at the National Professional Qualifications level. Program graduates receive a Firefighter I Technical Certificate of Credit. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS * Must be 18 years of age * Completion of high school diploma or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply * Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math * Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar. 200

202 * Must pass a Physical Examination. * For employment as a Firefighter, a student must be prepared to pass a legal background check. * Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. Blood and Airborne Pathogens: Students enrolled in Category I and II programs at Atlanta Technical College will be performing tasks in which there is a normal occurrence for exposure to blood, other potentially infectious body materials, and airborne pathogens. These tasks will be performed in the classroom, laboratory, and clinical activities for each occupational training program/course. Students will be required to present documentation of Hepatitis B and Tuberculosis immunizations as a result of potential occupational exposure. Students should contact their program directors for more information on policies and procedures regarding blood and airborne pathogens. COURSE OUTLINE Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses Curriculum FRSC 1020 Basic Firefighter Emergency Services Fundamentals 3 FRSC 1030 Basic Firefighter MODULE I 5 FRSC 1040 Basic Firefighter MODULE II 3 FRSC 1141 Hazardous Materials Operations 4 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 15 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 2 Estimated Program Cost $1,777 Georgia Firefighter Standards and Training Council, 1000 Indian Springs Dr., Forsythe, Georgia Graduates of this program are eligible to sit for the exam administered by the Georgia Firefighter Standards and Training Council for NPQI and Hazardous Materials Awareness and hazardous Materials Operations. FIREFIGHTER II Technical Certificate of Credit Program PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: FF21 The Firefighter II Technical Certificate of Credit program is conducted in cooperation with the Georgia Fire Academy and Georgia Firefighter Standards and Training to ensure graduates have the skills, knowledge and credentials to serve as firefighters in paid and volunteer fire departments. The certificate builds upon skills and knowledge acquired in the Firefighter I certificate and parallels the Advanced Firefighter Curriculum being developed by the Georgia Fire Academy. Students must be a graduate of Firefighter I Technical Certificate of Credit or NPQ Firefighter I Certified. Program graduates receive a Firefighter II Technical Certificate of Credit. Note: Candidate must be certified at the NPQ Firefighter I level to be eligible for NPQ Firefighter II certification. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS * Must be 18 years of age * Completion of high school diploma or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply * Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math * Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar. * Must pass a Physical Examination. * For employment as a Fire Fighter, a student must be prepared to pass a legal background check. * Must be NPQI certified and/or have successfully completed the Firefighter I program. Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all 201

203 required courses to graduate. Blood and Airborne Pathogens: Students enrolled in Category I and II programs at Atlanta Technical College will be performing tasks in which there is a normal occurrence for exposure to blood, other potentially infectious body materials, and airborne pathogens. These tasks will be performed in the classroom, laboratory, and clinical activities for each occupational training program/course. Students will be required to present documentation of Hepatitis B and Tuberculosis immunizations as a result of potential occupational exposure. Students should contact their program directors for more information on policies and procedures regarding blood and airborne pathogens. COURSE OUTLINE Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses Curriculum FRSC 1050 Fire and Life Safety Educator I 3 FRSC 1060 Fire Prevention, Preparedness and Maintenance 3 FRSC 1070 Introduction to Technical Rescue 4 FRSC 1080 Fire Ground Operations 3 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 13 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 2 Estimated Program Cost $1,627 Certifying Agency: Georgia Firefighter Standards and Training Council 1000 Indian Springs Dr., Forsyth, Georgia Graduates of this program are eligible to sit for the exam administered by the Georgia Fire Academy for NPQI II. 202

204 HEALTH CARE SCIENCE DIVISION: HEALTH & PUBLIC SAFETY TECHNOLOGIES HEALTHCARE SCIENCE Technical Certificate of Credit PROGRAM DESCRIPTION: Major Code: HS21 The Health Care Science Technical Certificate of Credit is a program that provides academic foundations at the degree level in communications, mathematics, and human relations, as well as health care technical fundamentals. Program graduates are trained in the underlying fundamentals of health care delivery including Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR), Infection Control/ Blood-borne Pathogens, Vital Signs and Basic emergency care/first aid and triage. These graduates are well prepared for employment as health care support workers and subsequent upward mobility. This program also provides foundational academic preparation for students opting to apply for admission into certain allied health associate degree programs and serves as a pathway into the following associate degree programs of study: Associate Degree in Nursing; Dental Hygiene, Physical Therapist Assistant, Radiologic Technology, and Surgical Technology. These associate degree programs have additional rigorous general education and science core courses. For program entry, a highly competitive admission process is required. To obtain specific advisement regarding the above listed associate degree programs, please contact the program representatives as follows: PROGRAM CHAIR ROOM PROGRAM NAME BUILDING PHONE CONTACT NUMBER Dr. Geraldine Fells Registered Nursing, Program Coordinator Allied Health Building H232G Ms. Candace Marshall Dental Hygiene, Program Coordinator Allied Health Building H106G Dr. Denise Edwards Physical Therapist Assistant, Coordinator Allied Health Building H149H Mrs. Debra Kendall Radiologic Technology, Program Coordinator Allied Health Building H149C Mrs. Kimberly Carter Surgical Technology, Program coordinator Allied Health Building H218G Occupational Trends Employment for Healthcare support workers is expected to increase by 17% in the state of Georgia, and nationwide to increase by 15% from 2008 to Healthcare support workers are employed in medical and surgical centers, nursing homes, medical laboratories, outpatient clinics of chiropractors, dentists, physical therapists, psychologists, hospitals, health care centers and the offices of physicians. They perform front office duties, direct patient interactions as permitted by licensure boards. Postsecondary educational training in healthcare is increasing in importance for job acquisition. Occupations in those settings include, but not limited to, patient access representative, supply distribution technician, equipment technician, unit clerk, and transporter/escort service clerk. Admission Requirements for Health Care Science Technical Certificate of Credit Must be 17 years of age; Completion of high school diploma or GED and submission of official transcripts required to apply; Official high school or GED transcripts and/ or official college transcripts from all colleges attended in the past; transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar. Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English and Math; Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar. A grade of C or better has been earned for each course to be transferred. Science and Math courses must have been taken in within five years of the date of the transfer request. 203

205 For students using the Healthcare Science as a foundation and pathway to apply to the above mentioned associate degree, please note that those programs have a minimum requirement of a B grade in the credits that will be transferred. Blood and Airborne Pathogens: Students enrolled in Category I and II programs at Atlanta Technical College will be performing tasks in which there is a normal occurrence for exposure to blood, other potentially infectious body materials, and airborne pathogens. These tasks will be performed in the classroom, laboratory, and clinical activities for each occupational training program/course. Students will be required to present documentation of Hepatitis B and Tuberculosis immunizations as a result of potential occupational exposure. Students should contact their program directors for more information. COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum Basic Skills Courses 12 ENGL 1101 Composition and Rhetoric 3 MATH 1101 Math Modeling 3 MATH 1111 College Algebra 3 PSYC 1101 Introduction to Psychology 3 HUMN 1101 OR ENGL 2130 OR ENGL 2310 OR SPCH 1101 Introduction to Humanities OR American Literature OR English Literature OR Public Speaking Technical Courses 16 ALHS 1040 Introduction to Health Care 3 ALHS 1090 Medical Terminology for Allied Health Sciences 2 COMP 1000 Introduction to Computers 3 BIOL 2113 Anatomy & Physiology I 3 BIOL 2113L Anatomy & Physiology I Lab 1 BIOL 2114 Anatomy & Physiology II 3 BIO 2114L Anatomy & Physiology II Lab 1 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 28 Minimum Program Length in Semester 2 Credits Estimated Program Cost $3,679 3 Health Concentration for Specific Pathways: Students using the Health Care Science as a pathway to apply for admission into the following Associate degree programs will need to complete additional general and program-required courses. Please contact the appropriate Program Advisor for specific advisement. 204

206 Associate Degree Nursing (NU53) BIOL 2117 Introductory Microbiology 3 B IOL 2117L Introductory Microbiology Lab 1 Dental Hygiene (DH13) BIOL 2117 Introductory Microbiology 3 BIOL 2117L Introductory Microbiology Lab 1 CHEM 1211 Chemistry I 3 CHEM 1211L Chemistry I Lab 1 Physical Therapist Assistant (PTA3) PHYS 1110 Conceptual Physics 3 PHYS 1110L Conceptual Physics Lab 1 PSYC 2103 Human Growth & Development 3 Surgical Technology (ST13) BIOL 2117 Introductory Microbiology 3 BIOL 2117L Introductory Microbiology Lab 1 HEALTH CARE ASSISTANT Technical Certificate of Credit Program PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: HA21 The Health Care Science Certificate of Credit is a program that provides academic foundations at the diploma level in communications, mathematics, and human relations, as well as technical fundamentals. Program graduates are trained in the underlying fundamentals of health care delivery and are well prepared for employment and subsequent upward mobility. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS Must be 17 years of age Completion of high school diploma or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar. Required minimum test scores for program admission. Refer to the Practical Nursing Handbook for additional program requirements. Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. Blood and Airborne Pathogens: Students enrolled in Category I and II programs at Atlanta Technical College will be performing tasks in which there is a normal occurrence for exposure to blood, other potentially infectious body materials, and airborne pathogens. These tasks will be performed in the classroom, laboratory, and clinical activities for each occupational training program/course. Students will be required to present documentation of Hepatitis B and Tuberculosis immunizations as a result of potential occupational exposure. Students should contact their program directors for more information. Students should contact their program directors for more information on policies and procedures regarding blood and airborne pathogens. 205

207 COURSE OUTLINE Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses Curriculum ALHS 1011 Anatomy and Physiology 5 ALHS 1040 Introduction to Health Care 3 ALHS 1090 Medical Terminology for Allied Health Sciences 2 COMP 1000 Introduction to Computers 3 ENGL 1010 Fundamentals of English I 3 MATH 1012 Foundations of Mathematics 3 OR MATH 1013 Algebraic Concepts (3) PSYC 1010 Basic to Psychology 3 XXXX XXXX Occupational Courses 14 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 36 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 2 Estimated Program Cost $4,153 HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY Associate of Applied Science of Degree PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: HI13 The Health Information Technology program is a sequence of courses designed to provide students with the technical knowledge and skills necessary to process, maintain, analyze, and report health information data according to legal, accreditation, licensure and certification standards for reimbursement, facility planning, marketing, risk management, utilization management, quality assessment and research. Program graduates will develop leadership skills necessary to serve in a functional supervisory roles; classify, code and index diagnoses and procedures; coordinate information for cost control, quality management, statistics, marketing, and planning; monitor governmental and nongovernmental standards; facilitate research; and design system controls to monitor patient information security. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS Must be 18 years of age. Official high school or GED transcript is required to apply. Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, Language, and Math. Required minimum scores for program admission on COMPASS OR ASSET. Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar. Submit a signed document acknowledging that the commission of a felony before or during their enrollment in this program may prevent them from participating in practicums or externships courses, which will ultimately prevent them from completing the program and will jeopardize their ability to sit for the RHIT certification examination. PROGRAM ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS Applicants to the Health Information Technology Program must meet additional requirements to receive consideration for admission to this program. The program admits students twice a year in summer semester and fall semester. Applicants must submit all required documentation to Admission office by the requested due date to receive consideration in the selection process. Applicants must be in good academic standing to receive consideration for admission to this program. Complete a Health Information Technology Program application for admission. 206

208 Submit a letter of Intent/application to the ATC Health Information Technology program. This form is included in the HIT application packet. Submit official transcripts showing a minimum grade point average of 2.5 on a 4.0 scale in high school and on all college work attempted. Submit a Health Information Technology Essay. Requirements for transferring courses from another accredited program include only six HIT transfer credits that are less than five (5) years old. Must meet all eligibility requirements for entry into HIT program, this includes the following courses specific to the Health Information Technology program: ENGL 1101, ENGL 1102, SPCH 1101, PSYC 1101, MATH 1111 ALHS 1090 with a minimum letter grade of B with 2 attempts. BIOL 2113/Lab with a minimum letter grade of B with 2 attempts. BIOL 2114/Lab with a minimum letter grade of B with 2 attempts. All science based courses (includes transfer credits) must be less than five (5) years old. Attend HIT program information sessions. (Mandatory). The Health Information Technology program will host information sessions with detailed description of the program and admission process. Student will gain useful information regarding program costs, program requirements, and program course information, etc. The program requires a full-time commitment from the applicant as classes are scheduled daily from 8:00am-6:00pm with some evening and/or weekend time commitments. The Admission Selection Committee will accept students determined by the availability of space and ranking of applicants according to scores on the HIT program's essay and prerequisite (general education) courses, grade point average. *If the above criteria are not met, an applicant s file cannot be processed for selection into the Health Information Technology Program.* Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 3.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. ACCREDITATION The Health Information Technology degree program is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation for Health Informatics and Information Management Education (CAHIIM). ( LICENSURE/CERTIFICATION: Upon completion of the Health Information Technology degree program, students will be eligible to apply to take the American Health Information Management Association s (AHIMA) national examination for the Registered Health Information Technician (RHIT) certification. SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS OF CLINICAL/PRACTICUM STIES Physical exam, and lab work including current TB testing and immunizations Hepatitis B Vaccination or a completed declination form Drug Screening Criminal Background Check COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum Credits General Education Courses 15 Area I Language Arts/Communication ENGL 1101 Composition and Rhetoric 3 207

209 Area II - Social/Behavioral Sciences PSYC 1101 Introductory to Psychology 3 Area III - Natural Sciences/Mathematics MATH 1111 College Algebra 3 Area IV - Humanities/Fine Arts ENGL 1102 Literature and Composition 3 Program Specific General Education SPCH 1101 Fundamentals of Speech 3 Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses 49 ALHS 1090 Medical Terminology for Allied Health Science 2 BIOL 2113 Anatomy & Physiology I 3 BIOL 2113L Anatomy & Physiology I Lab 1 BIOL 2114 Anatomy & Physiology II 3 BIOL 2114L Anatomy & Physiology II Lab 1 COMP 1000 Introduction to Computers 3 MAST 1120 Human Pathological Conditions in the Medical Office 3 HIMT 1100 Introduction to Health Information Technology 3 HIMT 1150 Computer Applications in Healthcare 2 HIMT 1200 Legal Aspects in Healthcare 2 HIMT 1250 Health Record Content and Structure 2 HIMT 1350 Pharmacotherapy 2 HIMT 1400 Coding and Classification: ICD Basic 4 HIMT 1410 Coding and Classification: ICD Advanced 3 HIMT 2150 Healthcare Statistics 2 HIMT 2200 Performance Improvement 2 HIMT 2300 Healthcare Management 3 HIMT 2400 Coding and Classification: CPT/HCPCS 3 HIMT 2410 Revenue Cycle Management 2 208

210 HIMT 2460 Health Information Technology Practicum 3 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 64 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 6 Estimated Program Cost 10,725 HEALTH INFORMATION CODING Diploma PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: HI12 The Health Information Coding Associate prepares students to be medical coders to classify medical records according to accepted standards. The classification of diagnoses and treatments is required for Medicare and insurance reimbursement in hospitals, outpatient clinics and medical offices. The program offers training in anatomy and physiology, medical terminology, diagnostic coding, medical procedural coding. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS Must be 17 years of age. Official high school or GED transcript is required to apply. Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, Language, and Math. Required minimum scores for program admission on COMPASS OR ASSET. Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar. PROGRAM ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS Must complete ALHS 1090 with a minimum letter grade of B with 2 attempts. Must complete ALHS 1011 with a minimum letter grade of B with 2 attempts. All science based courses (includes transfer credits) must be less than five (5) years old. Requirements for transferring courses from another accredited program include only six HIT transfer credits that are less than five (5) years old. Attend HIT program information sessions. (Mandatory). The Health Information Technology program will host information sessions with detailed description of the program and admission process. Student will gain useful information regarding program costs, program requirements, and program course information, etc. The program requires a full-time commitment from the student as classes are scheduled daily from 8:00am-6:00pm with some evening and/or weekend time commitments. Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum Credits General Education Courses 9 Area I Language Arts/Communication ENGL 1010 Fundamentals of English 3 Area II - Social/Behavioral Sciences PSYC 1010 Basic Psychology 3 209

211 Area III - Natural Sciences/Mathematics MATH 1013 Algebraic Concepts 3 Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses 40 COMP 1000 Introduction to Computers 3 ALHS 1090 Medical Terminology for Allied Health Science 2 ALHS 1011 Anatomy & Physiology 5 MAST 1120 Human Pathological Conditions in the Medical Office 3 HIMT 1100 Introduction to Health Information Technology 3 HIMT 1150 Computer Applications in Healthcare 2 HIMT 1200 Legal Aspects in Healthcare 2 HIMT 1250 Health Record Content and Structure 2 HIMT 1350 Pharmacotherapy 2 HIMT 1400 Coding and Classification: ICD Basic 4 HIMT 1410 Coding and Classification: ICD Advanced 3 HIMT 2400 Coding and Classification: CPT/HCPCS 3 HIMT 2410 Revenue Cycle Management 2 HIMT 2500 Certification Seminar 4 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 49 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 4 Estimated Program Cost 7,838 MEDICAL BILLING CLERK Technical Certificate of Credit Program PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: MB21 The Medical Billing Clerk is designed to provide training for an entry-level position in the medical field. Instructions in medical insurance and medical billing/coding for reimbursement purposes will be placed on specific skills required for medical billers. Learning opportunities develop academic, technical and professional knowledge and skills are required for job acquisition, retention, and advancements. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS Must be 16 years of age. Official high school or GED transcript is required to apply. Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, Language, and Math. Required minimum scores for program admission on COMPASS OR ASSET. Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar. 210

212 Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. COURSE OUTLINE Basic Skills (General Core) Courses Curriculum ENGL 1010 Fundamentals of English I 3 EMPL 1000 Interpersonal Relations and Professional Development 2 Credits 5 Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses COMP 1000 Introduction to Computers 3 ALHS 1090 Medical Terminology for Allied Health Sciences 2 ALHS 1011 Anatomy & Physiology 5 BUSN 2370 Medical Office Billing/Coding/Insurance 3 BUSN 1440 Document Production 3 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 21 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 2 Credits 16 Estimated Program Cost 3,

213 HOTEL-RESTAURANT-TRAVEL MANAGEMENT DIVISION: BUSINESS & PUBLIC SERVICE TECHNOLOGIES HOTEL/RESTAURANT/TOURISM MANAGEMENT Associate of Applied Science Degree PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: HM13 Welcome to the world s largest and most dynamic industry! Under the umbrella of hospitality and tourism there are countless career opportunities. The Hotel/Restaurant/Tourism Management program prepares students for employment in the areas of: Food Service, Meeting and Convention Planning, Airlines, Cruise, Travel, Recreation and Theme Parks. Why not study in a city with a reputation of impeccable southern charm, fine dining and world-class sophistication? Atlanta is home to the world s busiest airport and provides a rich and eclectic blend of hospitality business in which to pursue a vibrant career. Gain hands on experience while studying in Atlanta, a city that has hosted over 45 million tourists annually, has been named by the New York Times as one of 52 Places to Go in 2014, and is one of only nine U.S. cities that USA Today readers voted Atlanta as a top five convention destination. Atlanta Technical College also offers opportunities to train or upgrade present knowledge or skills. Graduates of this program receive an Associates of Applied Science Degree upon completion. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS Must be 16 years of age Completion of high school or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum Credits General Education Courses 15 Area I Language Arts/Communication ENGL 1101 Composition and Rhetoric 3 Area II - Social/Behavioral Sciences PSYC 1101 Introductory Psychology 3 Area III - Natural Sciences/Mathematics (Choose 1) MATH 1111 College Algebra 3 MATH 1100 Quantitative Skills and Reasoning (3) MATH 1101 Mathematical Modeling (3) Area IV - Humanities/Fine Arts HUMN 1100 Introduction to Humanities 3 212

214 General Core Elective 3 Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses 45 COMP 1000 Introduction to Computers 3 HRTM 1100 Introduction to Hotel, Restaurant, and Tourism Management 3 HRTM 1110 Travel Industry and Travel Geography 3 HRTM 1140 Hotel Operations Management 3 HRTM 1150 Event Planning 3 HRTM 1160 Food and Beverage Management 3 HRTM 1201 Hospitality Marketing 3 HRTM 1210 Hospitality Law 3 HRTM 1220 Supervision and Leadership in the Hospitality Industry 3 HRTM 1230 Internship 3 HRTM XXXX (Choose Hotel, Restaurant, and Tourism Related Electives) 15 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 60 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 4 Estimated Program Cost $5,100 HOTEL/RESTAURANT/TOURISM MANAGEMENT Diploma PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: HM12 The Hotel/Restaurant/Tourism Management program prepares students for employment in a variety of positions in today s Hotel/Restaurant/Tourism management fields. The Hotel/Restaurant/Tourism Management program provides learning opportunities which introduce, develop, and reinforce academic and occupational knowledge, skills, and attitudes required for job acquisition, retention, and advancement. Additionally, the program provides opportunities to upgrade present knowledge and skills or to retrain in the area of Hotel/Restaurant/Tourism management. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS Must be 16 years of age Completion of high school or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum Credits 213

215 Basic Skills (General Core) Courses 8 ENGL 1010 Fundamentals of English I 3 EMPL 1000 Interpersonal Relation and Professional Development 2 (Choose 1 of 2) MATH 1011 Business Math (3) or MATH 1012 Foundations of Mathematics 3 Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses 36 COMP 1000 Introduction to Computers 3 HRTM 1100 Introduction to Hotel, Restaurant, and Tourism Management 3 HRTM 1110 Travel Industry and Travel Geography 3 HRTM 1140 Hotel Operations Management 3 HRTM 1150 Event Planning 3 HRTM 1160 Food and Beverage Management 3 HRTM 1201 Hospitality Marketing 3 HRTM 1210 Hospitality Law 3 HRTM 1220 Supervision and Leadership in the Hospitality Industry 3 HRTM 1230 Internship 3 HRTM XXXX Hotel, Restaurant, Tourism or Related Electives 6 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 44 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 4 Estimated Program Cost $4,658 HOTEL MANAGEMENT SPECIALIST Technical Certificate of Credit Program \ PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: HM21 The Hotel Management Specialist certificate program prepares students for employment in a variety of positions in today s hotel certificate program learning opportunities which introduce, develop, and reinforce academic and occupational knowledge, skills, and attitudes require advancement. 214

216 Admission Requirements Must be 16 years of age Completion of high school or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum Hotel Management Specialist TCC 15 HRTM 1220 Supervision and Leadership in the Hospitality Industry 3 HRTM 1150 Event Planning 3 HRTM 1201 Hospitality Marketing 3 HRTM 1210 Hospitality Law 3 HRTM 1140 Hotel Operations Management 3 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 15 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 3 Credits Estimated Program Cost $1,125 FOOD AND BEVERAGE DIRECTOR Technical Certificate of Credit Program PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: FAB1 The Food and Beverage Director certificate program prepares students for employment in a variety of positions in today's hotels and restaurants. The Food and Beverage program provides learning opportunities which introduce, develop, and reinforce occupational knowledge, skills, and attitudes required for job acquisition, retentions, and advancement. Additionally, the program provides opportunities to upgrade present knowledge and skills or to retrain in the area of Food and Beverage Management. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS Must be 16 years of age Completion of high school or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum Food and Beverage Director TCC 17 HRTM 1100 Introduction to Hotel, Restaurant, Tourism 3 215

217 HRTM 1220 Supervision and Leadership in the Hospitality Industry 3 HRTM 1160 Food and Beverage Management 3 HRTM 1000 Fundamental of Culinary Arts 4 HRTM 1100 Culinary Safety and Sanitation 4 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 17 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 2 Estimated Program Cost $1,275 EVENT COORDINATOR Technical Certificate of Credit Program PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: SES1 The Event Coordinator certificate program prepares students for employment in a variety of positions in today's Hotel/Restaurant/Tourism fields. The Event Coordinator certificate provides learning opportunities which introduce, develop, and reinforce academic and occupational knowledge, skills, and attitudes required for job acquisition, retention, and advancement. Additionally, the program provides opportunities to upgrade present knowledge and skills or to retrain in the area of Hotel/Restaurant/Tourism events. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS Must be 16 years of age Completion of high school or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum Credits Event Coordinator TCC 9 HRTM 1150 Event Planning 3 HRTM 1201 Hospitality Marketing 3 HRTM 1210 Hospitality Law 3 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 9 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 1 Estimated Program Cost $

218 TRAVEL AGENCY OPERATIONS SPECIALIST Technical Certificate of Credit Program PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: TA01 The Travel Agency Operations Specialist certificate program prepares students for employment in a variety of positions in today's tourism field. The Travel Agency Operations program provides learning opportunities which introduce, develop, and reinforce academic and occupational knowledge, skills, and attitudes required for job acquisition, retention, and advancement. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS Must be 16 years of age Completion of high school or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum Travel Agency Operations Specialist TCC 15 ENG 1010 Fundamentals of English I 3 COMP 1000 Intro to Microcomputers 3 HRTM 1110 Travel Industry and Travel Geography 3 HRTM 1120 Travel, Tour, and Cruise Management 3 HRTM 1201 Hospitality Marketing 3 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 15 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 2 Estimated Program Cost $1,125 FRONT OFFICE MANAGER Technical Certificate of Credit Program PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: FFM1 The Front Office Manager certificate program prepares students for employment in a variety of positions in today's hotel front office. The Front Office Manager certificate provides learning opportunities which introduce, develop, and reinforce academic and occupational knowledge, skills, and attitudes required for job acquisition, retention, and advancement. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS Must be 16 years of age Completion of high school or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. 217

219 COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum Credits Front Office Manager TCC 12 HRTM 1130 Business Etiquette & Communication 3 HRTM 1140 Hotel Operations Management 3 HRTM 1210 Hospitality Law 3 HRTM 1220 Supervision and Leadership in the Hospitality Industry 3 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 12 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 2 Estimated Program Cost $900 RESTAURANT MANAGER Technical Certificate of Credit Program PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: RM11 The Restaurant Manager certificate program prepares students for employment in the restaurant industry with skills necessary to manage and operate food service establishments. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS * Must be 16 years of age * Completion of high school or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply * Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math * Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum Restaurant Manager TCC 16 HRTM 1130 Business Etiquette & Communication 3 HRTM 1220 Supervision and Leadership in the Hospitality Industry 3 HRTM 1160 Food and Beverage Management 3 HRTM 1210 Hospitality Law 3 CUUL 1100 Culinary Safety and Sanitation 4 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 16 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 2 Estimated Program Cost $1,

220 HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT SPECIALIST Technical Certificate of Credit Program PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: HRM1 The Human Resource Management Specialist Certificate prepares individuals to perform human resources functions in the HR Department in most companies. Learning opportunities will introduce, develop and reinforce students knowledge, skills and attitudes required for job acquisition, retention and advancement in management. Graduates will receive a Human resources Management Specialist TCC. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS * Must be 16 years of age * Completion of high school or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply * Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math * Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. COURSE OUTLINE Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses Curriculum MGMT 1105 Organizational Behavior 3 MGMT 2115 Human Resource Management 3 Select 1 of 3 MGMT 1110 Employment Law 3 MGMT 1130 Business Regulations and Compliance (3) MGMT 2120 Labor Management Relations (3) MGMT 2125 Performance Management 3 MGMT 2130 Employee Training and Development 3 XXXX XXXX Guided Elective 3 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 18 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 2 Estimated Program Cost $1,

221 INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY DIVISION: Industrial and Transportation INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY Associate of Applied Science Degree PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: IET3IS13 The Associate Degree curriculum in Industrial Engineering Systems Technology (IET) at Atlanta Technical College program is designed for four semesters plus two summer sessions. It encompasses technical courses that embraces physical science and mathematics with general education courses. Graduate will acquire knowledge and skills necessary intended to run, control, and maintain modern provide the opportunity for students to explore a career in industrial plants, service and repair systems technology at the professional level. The degree program teaches skills in Industrial Systems Technology providing background skills in several areas of industrial equipment Computer technologies are taught for graduates to have the ability to acquire data, analyze for safe, and manage operations of the maintenance including electronics, industrial facilities. IET is uniquely designed to exploit applications wiring, motors, controls, PLCs, instrumentation, fluid power, mechanical, pumps and piping, and computers. Program graduates will receive an Associate of evolving network protocols and firmware technologies to control Applied Science degree in Industrial Systems Technology, qualifying them as industrial processes, testing system maintenance personnel, technicians, electricians, millwrights, and other related jobs that are charged with inspecting, maintaining, troubleshooting, and repairing commercial and industrial mechanical and electrical systems. These systems are found in manufacturing applications, assembly lines, and validation, installation and inspection rather than research and development. production facilities. The complex machinery found in each of these situations needs technicians to install, service, troubleshoot, maintain, and repair the machinery in order for the companies to maintain a high level of productivity. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS Must be 16 years of age Completion of high school or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, Language Art, Science, English, and Math Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.50 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum General Education Courses 15 Area I Language Arts/Communication ENGL 1101 Composition and Rhetoric 3 ENGL 1102 Technical Communication Literature and Composition 3 Credits Area II - Social/Behavioral Sciences (Choose 1 of the following) 220

222 PSYC 1101 Introductory Psychology 3 SOCI 1101 Introduction to Sociology (3) ECON 1101 Principle of Economics (3) Area III - Natural Sciences/Mathematics MATH 1111 College Algebra 3 MATH 1113 Pre-Calculus 3 Area IV - Humanities/Fine Arts (Choose 1 of the following) ARTS 1101 Art Appreciation 3 ENGL 2130 American Literature (3) MUSC 1101or HUMN 1101 Music Appreciation / Introduction to Humanities (3) Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses 51 COMP1000 Introduction to Computers 3 IDSY 1101 Industrial Safety Procedures DC Circuit Analysis 3 IDSY 1105 Basic AC Circuit Analysis 3 IDSY 1110 Industrial Motor Controls I 5 IDSY 1120 Basic Industrial PLCs 5 IDSY 1130 Industrial Wiring 5 IDSY 1170 Industrial Mechanics 5 IDSY 1190 Fluid Power and Piping Systems 5 IDSY 1210 Industrial Motor Controls II 5 ELUT 1215 Hydraulics 3 CIST 1401 Computer Networking Fundamentals 4 ECLR 1060 Linear Integrated Circuits 3 ICET 1120 Control Modeling (MATLAB/Simulink) 3 ICET 1130 Intermediate Industrial Network Protocol PLCs 45 ICET 1140 Industrial Process Simulations Instrumentation 35 ICET 1007 Industrial Controllers (NI-Lab VIEW) Safety Procedures 2 ICET1170 Industrial Systems Analysis 3 221

223 ICET1190 Reliability Engineering 3 ELCR-2800 Embedded Systems Capstone Project 1 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 67 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 5 Estimated Program Cost $10,

224 INDUSTRIAL SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGY DIVISION: Industrial and Transportation INDUSTRIAL SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGY Associate of Applied Science Degree PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: IS13 The Industrial Systems Technology program is intended to provide the opportunity for students to explore a career in industrial systems technology at the professional level. The degree program teaches skills in Industrial Systems Technology providing background skills in several areas of industrial maintenance including electronics, industrial wiring, motors, controls, PLCs, instrumentation, fluid power, mechanical, pumps and piping, and computers. Program graduates will receive an Associate of Applied Science degree in Industrial Systems Technology, qualifying them as industrial system maintenance personnel, technicians, electricians, millwrights, and other related jobs that are charged with inspecting, maintaining, troubleshooting, and repairing commercial and industrial mechanical and electrical systems. These systems are found in manufacturing applications, assembly lines, and production facilities. The complex machinery found in each of these situations needs technicians to install, service, troubleshoot, maintain, and repair the machinery in order for the companies to maintain a high level of productivity. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS Must be 16 years of age Completion of high school or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum General Education Courses 15 Area I Language Arts/Communication ENGL 1101 Composition and Rhetoric 3 ENGL 1102 Literature and Composition 3 Area II - Social/Behavioral Sciences (Choose 1 of the following) PSYC 1101 Introductory Psychology 3 SOCI 1101 Introduction to Sociology (3) Credits 223

225 Area III - Natural Sciences/Mathematics MATH 1111 College Algebra 3 Area IV - Humanities/Fine Arts (Choose 1 of the following) ARTS 1101 Art Appreciation 3 ENGL 2130 American Literature (3) HUMN 1101 Introduction to Humanities (3) Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses 51 COMP 1000 Introduction to Computers 3 IDSY 1101 DC Circuit Analysis 3 IDSY 1105 AC Circuit Analysis 3 IDSY 1110 Industrial Motor Controls 5 IDSY 1120 Basic Industrial PLCs 5 IDSY 1130 Industrial Wiring 5 IDSY 1170 Industrial Mechanics 5 IDSY 1190 Fluid Power and Piping Systems 5 IDSY 1210 Industrial Motor Controls II 5 IDSY 1220 Intermediate Industrial PLCs 5 IDSY 1230 Industrial Instrumentation 5 IDFC 1007 Industrial Safety Procedures 2 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 66 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 5 Estimated Program Cost $10,

226 MARKETING MANAGEMENT DIVISION: BUSINESS & PUBLIC SERVICE TECHNOLOGIES MARKETING MANAGEMENT Associate of Applied Science Degree PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: MM13 The Marketing Management program is designed to prepare students for employment in a variety of positions in today s marketing and management fields. The Marketing Management program provides learning opportunities that introduce, develop, and reinforce academic and occupational knowledge, skills, and attitudes required for job acquisition, retention, and advancement. Additionally, the program provides opportunities to upgrade present knowledge and skills or to retrain in the area of marketing management. Graduates of the program receive a Marketing Management degree with specializations in marketing management, entrepreneurship, retail management, e- business, professional selling, and sports marketing. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS * Must be 16 years of age * Completion of high school or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply * Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math * Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum Credits General Education Courses 15 Area I Language Arts/Communication ENGL 1101 Compositions and Rhetoric 3 SPCH 1101 Public Speaking 3 Area II - Social/Behavioral Sciences PSYC 1101 Introductory Psychology 3 Area III - Natural Sciences/Mathematics MATH 1111 College Algebra 3 Area IV - Humanities/Fine Arts HUMN 1101 Into to Humanities 3 Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses 50 ACCT 1100 Financial Accounting I 4 BUSN 1190 Digital Technologies in Business 2 COMP 1000 Introduction to Computers 3 MGMT 1100 Principles of Management 3 MKTG 1100 Principles of Marketing 3 MKTG 1130 Business Regulations and Compliance 3 MKTG 1160 Professional Selling 3 225

227 MKTG 1190 Integrated Marketing Communications 3 MKTG 2090 Marketing Research 3 MKTG 2300 Marketing Management 3 MKTG 2000 Global Marketing 3 Program Specific Advisor Approved Elective XXXX XXXX Elective 3 Specializations Select One of the Following Areas Marketing Management 12 Entrepreneurship 12 E-Business 11 Professional Selling 12 Sports Marketing 12 Social Media Marketing 12 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 65 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 5 Estimated Program Cost $6,733 MARKETING MANAGMENT Diploma PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: MM12 The Marketing Management program is designed to prepare students for employment in a variety of positions in today s marketing and management fields. The Marketing Management program provides learning opportunities that introduce, develop, and reinforce academic and occupational knowledge, skills, and attitudes required for job acquisition, retention, and advancement. Additionally, the program provides opportunities to upgrade present knowledge and skills or to retrain in the area of marketing management. Graduates or the program receive a Marketing Management diploma with specializations in marketing management, entrepreneurship, retail management, e business, professional selling, and sports marketing. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS * Must be 16 years of age * Completion of high school or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply * Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math * Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum 226 Credits Basic Skills (General Core) Courses 8 ENGL 1010 Fundamentals of English I 3 EMPL 1000 Interpersonal Relations and Professional Development 2 MATH 1011 Business Math 3 Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses 47 ACCT 1100 Financial Accounting I 4

228 BUSN 1190 Digital Technologies in Business 2 MKTG 1100 Principles of Marketing 3 MKTG 1130 Business Regulations and Compliance 3 MKTG 1160 Professional Selling 3 MKTG 1190 Integrated Marketing Communications 3 MKTG 2090 Marketing Research 3 MKTG 2300 Marketing Management 3 MKTG 2000 Global Marketing 3 Program Specific Advisor Approved Elective (Choose one of the Following) 3 ACCT 2145 Personal Finance 3 BUSN 1100 Introduction to Keyboarding 3 BUSN 1240 Office Procedures 3 BUSN 1410 Spreadsheet Concepts and Applications 3 BUSN 1430 Desktop Publishing and Presentation Techniques 3 BUSN 2170 Webpage Design 3 DMPT 2115 Advertising & Promotional Design 4 DMPT 1000 Intro to Design Media Promotion 3 Specializations Select One of the Following Areas Marketing Management 12 Entrepreneurship 12 E-Business 11 Professional Selling 12 Sports Marketing 12 Social Media Marketing 12 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 55 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 4 Estimated Program Cost $5,939 SMALL BUSINESS MARKETING MANAGER Technical Certificate of Credit PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: SB51 This program prepares individuals to develop and manage independent small businesses. Included are courses in marketing, management, selling, promotion, and business regulations. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS Must be 16 years of age Completion of high school or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses Credits

229 MKTG 1100 Principles of Marketing 3 MKTG 1130 Business Regulations and Compliance 3 MKTG 1160 Professional Selling 3 MKTG 1190 Integrated Marketing Communications 3 MKTG 2010 Small Business Management 3 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 15 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 2 Estimated Program Cost $1,

230 MEDICAL ASSISTING DIVISION: HEALTH & PUBLIC SAFETY TECHNOLOGIES MEDICAL ASSISTING Diploma PROGRAM DESCRIPTION MAJOR CODE: A Medical Assistant (MA) is an essential member of the health care delivery team. Trained in both clinical and administrative duties, the medical assistant can serve in multiple capacities at a medical office. Medical assistants are critical members of the team and can sometimes act as a liaison between the physician and patient. Medical assistants typically complete the following tasks: Complete patient history and measure vital signs (blood pressure, pulse, temperature) Assist the physician with patient exams and/or minor office surgeries Give patient injections as directed Draw blood and prepare laboratory tests Schedule patient appointments Complete insurance forms Graduates of the program receive a Medical Assisting diploma. ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS Must be 18 years of age. Completion of high school diploma or GED. Submission of official transcripts. Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math. PROGRAM ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS Completion of all Prerequisite courses to include: ENGL 1010, MATH 1012, PSYC 1010, COMP 1000, ALHS 1011, ALHS 1040, ALHS 1090, and BUSN GPA of 2.5 or better. Completion of a Request for Entry form. Mandatory attendance to Program Orientation. NOTE: Availability is limited; students must have completed two semesters of coursework (GPA 2.5) at ATC. Transfer students will be considered upon availability EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES Graduates of the Medical Assisting program are prepared for employment in physicians offices, urgent care centers, and other health care facilities. NOTE: A felony conviction may limit employment opportunities. SALARY POTENTIAL Median Pay: $13.76 per hour (Bureau of Labor Statistics) LICENSURE/ CERTIFICATION Upon completion of the program students may register to take the RMA (American Medical Technologists, AMT) or the CMA (American Association of Medical Assistants, AAMA). NOTE: A felony conviction may disqualify a student from sitting for the exam. EXTERNSHIP 229

231 Medical Assisting students must complete 225 unpaid hours as a part of the curriculum. Students cannot receive pay for the hours worked during this time. Students must be able to adhere to the externship site schedule; students will be evaluated by the site preceptor. The student will also maintain weekly timesheets. Students are responsible for transportation to and from the site. SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS for PROGRAM/ EXTERN SITES CPR certification Hepatitis B vaccine Drug Screening Criminal Background Check Physical Exam Dental Screening TB testing Immunizations NOTE: These expenses are not included with tuition. PROGRAM ADDITIONAL FEES (These costs are estimated and are subject to change.) Books & Supplies: $ CPR card: $7.00 Liability Insurance: $11.00 Certification Exam: $95.00 (RMA)/ $ (CMA) Other additional fees that the student will be responsible for are: Physical exam, dental screening, TB testing, immunizations, criminal background check, drug screening, uniforms, and others that are deemed necessary. GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS GPA 2.0 or better must be maintained. Completion of all required courses. Must sit for the RMA or CMA Blood and Airborne Pathogens: Students enrolled in Category I and II programs at Atlanta Technical College will be performing tasks in which there is a normal occurrence for exposure to blood, other potentially infectious body materials, and airborne pathogens. These tasks will be performed in the classroom, laboratory, and clinical activities for each occupational training program/course. Students will be required to present documentation of Hepatitis B and Tuberculosis immunizations as a result of potential occupational exposure. Students should contact their program directors for more information on policies and procedures regarding blood and airborne pathogens. COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum Credits Basic Skills (General Core) Courses 9 ENGL 1010 Fundamental of English I 3 PSYC 1010 Basic Psychology 3 MATH 1012 Foundations of Mathematics 3 Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses 52 ALHS 1011 Anatomy and Physiology 5 ALHS 1040 Introduction to Health Care 3 ALHS 1090 Medical Terminology for Allied Health Sciences 2 BUSN 1440 Document Production 4 230

232 COMP 1000 Introduction to Computers 3 MAST 1010 Legal and Ethical Concerns in the Medical Office 2 MAST 1030 Pharmacology in the Medical Office 4 MAST 1060 Medical Office Procedures 4 MAST 1080 Medical Assisting Skills I 4 MAST 1090 Medical Assisting Skills II 4 MAST 1100 Medical Insurance Management 2 MAST 1110 Administrative Practice Management 3 MAST 1120 Human Pathological Conditions in the Medical Office 3 MAST 1170 Medical Assisting Externship 6 MAST 1180 Medical Assisting Seminar 3 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 61 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 5 Estimated Program Cost $7,091 Accrediting Agency: The Medical Assisting Program is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs ( ) upon the recommendation and approval of the Medical Assisting Education Review Board (MAERB) of the American Association of Medical Assistants Endowment (AAMAE). Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Program (CAAHEP) 1361 Park Street Clearwater, FL / Experiential Learning Policy The Medical Assisting Program does not award credit(s) for Experiential Learning Graduates of the program are required to sit for the medical assisting certification exam. 231

233 MEDICAL LABORATORY TECHNOLOGY DIVISION: HEALTH & PUBLIC SAFETY TECHNOLOGIES PHLEBOTOMY TECHNICIAN Technical Certificate of Credit Program PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: PT21 The Phlebotomy Technician program educates students to draw and process blood specimens. Phlebotomy technicians typically work in concert with medical lab technicians in hospitals or other healthcare organizations. Topics covered include human anatomy, anatomical terminology, venipuncture, and clinical practice. Occupational Trends: Phlebotomists are employed throughout the health care system in hospitals, neighborhood health center, medical group practices, HMOs, public health facilities, and veterans hospitals. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS * Must be 18 years of age * Completion of high school or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply * Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math * Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. Blood and Airborne Pathogens: Students enrolled in Category I and II programs at Atlanta Technical College will be performing tasks in which there is a normal occurrence for exposure to blood, other potentially infectious body materials, and airborne pathogens. These tasks will be performed in the classroom, laboratory, and clinical activities for each occupational training program/course. Students will be required to present documentation of Hepatitis B and Influenza immunizations and Tuberculosis screening as a result of potential occupational exposure. Students should contact their program directors for more information. Students should contact their program directors for more information on policies and procedures regarding blood and airborne pathogens. COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses 24 ALHS 1011 Anatomy and Physiology 5 ALHS 1040 Introduction to Health Care 3 ALHS 1090 Medical Terminology for Allied Health Sciences 2 COMP 1000 Introduction to Computers 3 ENGL 1010 Fundamentals of English I 3 PHLT 1030 Introduction to Venipuncture 3 PHLT 1050 Clinical Practice 5 232

234 ELECTIVE 2 EMPL 1000 Interpersonal Relationships and Professional Development 2 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 26 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 3 Estimated Program Cost $3,

235 NURSING AND RELATED PROGRAMS DIVISION: HEALTH & PUBLIC SAFETY TECHNOLOGIES ASSOCIATE OF SCIENCE IN NURSING DEGREE PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: NU63 The Associate of Science in Nursing Degree (ASN) program at Atlanta Technical College is a sequence of courses that prepares students for positions in the nursing profession. The curriculum is designed to produce highly trained, technically advanced, competent and caring individuals who are prepared to practice professional nursing in a variety of healthcare settings. The purpose of the ASN program is to provide the learner with the necessary knowledge, skills, and attitudes to practice competently and safely as a beginning nurse generalist in a variety of acute and long-term care settings. The nurse is viewed as a caring, holistic person who possesses critical thinking/problem solving skills, integrity, accountability, a theoretical knowledge base, refined psychomotor skills, and a commitment to life-long learning. Program graduates receive a Nursing Associate of Applied Technology Degree. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS College Admission Students who wish to be admitted to the Associate of Science in Nursing Program must be enrolled full time at Atlanta Technical College and be identified as program ready by meeting the admission requirements listed below. ASSOCIATE OF SCIENCE DEGREE IN NURSING ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS The ASN program utilizes a competitive admission process to select students. Program faculty and the Admissions staff designed the process to ensure maximum opportunity for student success in the program and on the NCLEX-RN examination. The program admits students once per year during summer semester for fall semester. Applicants must submit all required documentation to the Admissions office by the requested due date to receive consideration in the selection process. Applicants must be in good academic standing at the time of selection to receive consideration as candidates for admission. Applicants not selected for the program may reapply during subsequent admission intake periods. Applicants must complete the application process for each attempt at program entry. Only current class taken, those five years or less, will be considered during the reapplication process. Applicants must meet the criteria listed below to be considered for admission into the ADN Program: Must be 18 years of age; Must complete and sign application for admission and submit a non-refundable application fee to the College Admissions Office; Must be admitted into the college and accepted into the Health Care Science TCC Program Must complete and sign ASN Program application for admission and submit it to the program coordinator by due date. Applications received after determined due date will not be accepted. Submit official high school or GED transcripts and/or official college transcripts from all colleges attended in the past to the Admissions Office (see General Admission Requirements); Must have associate degree level COMPASS, ASSET, SAT, or ACT test scores; Must take and pass the Kaplan Nursing Admission Test with a score of 75% or better for program admission, to be identified by the Admissions Office and faculty; Must meet all eligibility requirements for entry into ADN Program, including but not limited to achieving a minimum grade of (B) in MATH 1101, BIOL 2113, BIOL 2113 Lab, BIOL 2114, BIOL 2114 Lab, BIOL 2117, BIOL 2117 Lab, are less than five (5) years old; Must ensure that transfer courses from other approved institutions of higher education are no more than five (5) years old; these include MATH 1101, BIOL 2113, BIOL 2113 Lab, BIOL 2114, BIOL 2114 Lab, BIOL 2117, BIOL 2117 Lab 234

236 *Requirements for transferring courses from another approved institution includes ensuring MATH 1101, BIOL 2113, BIOL 2113 Lab, BIOL 2114, BIOL 2114 Lab, BIOL 2117, BIOL 2117 Lab, are less than five years old; Must understand that Nursing curriculum courses will not be considered for transfer credit; Must successfully complete the Healthcare Science TCC program with an overall cumulative grade point average (CGPA) of 3.0 or better After successful completion of the Healthcare Science program curriculum, in order to meet eligibility for the ASN Program, the student must achieve a minimum, overall CGPA of 3.0; Must have a baseline criminal background check no less than three months prior to beginning the first clinical experience. Name of agency performing the background check as well as procedure will be shared with student during the beginning of the course clinical component. Students should be aware that background checks are required at various intervals of the program by many clinical agencies. These agencies reserve the right to prohibit clinical experience based on negative background checks. Criminal background checks will be required at various intervals throughout the program, as designated by the program faculty. Blood and Airborne Pathogens: Students enrolled in Category I and II programs at Atlanta Technical College will be performing tasks in which there is a normal occurrence for exposure to blood, other potentially infectious body materials, and airborne pathogens. These tasks will be performed in the classroom, laboratory, and clinical activities for each occupational training program/course. Students will be required to present documentation of Hepatitis B and Tuberculosis immunizations as a result of potential occupational exposure. Students should contact their program directors for more information on policies and procedures regarding blood and airborne pathogens. COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum Credits General Education Courses 27 Area I Language Arts/Communications ENGL 1101 Composition and Rhetoric 3 SPCH 1101 Public Speaking (Elective) 3 Area II - Social/Behavioral Sciences PSYC 1101 Introductory Psychology 3 Area III - Natural Sciences/Mathematics MATH 1101 Mathematical Modeling 3 BIOL 2113 Anatomy and Physiology I 3 BIOL 2113L Anatomy and Physiology Lab I 1 BIOL 2114 Anatomy and Physiology II 3 BIOL 2114L Anatomy and Physiology Lab II 1 BIOL 2117 Introduction to Microbiology I 3 BIOL 2117L Introduction to Microbiology Lab I 1 Area IV - Humanities/Fine Arts HUMN 1101 Introductory to Humanities 3 235

237 Occupational Courses 45 RNSG 1300 Professional Practice I: Fundamentals of Nursing 7 RNSG 1302 Professional Practice II: Health Assessment 3 RNSG 1304 Professional Practice III: Pharmacology 3 RNSG 1308 Professional Practice IV: Medical-Surgical Nursing I 8 RNSG 1312 Professional Practice V: Psycho-Social Mental Health and Illness 4 RNSG 2300 Professional Practice IV: The Childbearing Family 4 RNSG 2302 Professional Practice V: The Childrearing Family 4 RNSG 2306 Professional Practice VII: Medical-Surgical Nursing II 7 RNSG 2308 Professional Practice VIII: Transition Leadership and Management 5 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 72 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 6 Estimated Program Cost $12,000 HEMODIALYSIS PATIENT CARE SPECIALIST Technical Certificate of Credit Program PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: HPC1 The Hemodialysis Patient Care Specialist Technical certificate of Credit equips health care workers with the skills, knowledge, and attitude necessary to succeed in the field of hemodialysis. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS Must be 18 years of age Completion of high school or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. Blood and Airborne Pathogens: Students enrolled in Category I and II programs at Atlanta Technical College will be performing tasks in which there is a normal occurrence for exposure to blood, other potentially infectious body materials, and airborne pathogens. These tasks will be performed in the classroom, laboratory, and clinical activities for each occupational training program/course. Students will be required to present documentation of Hepatitis B and Influenza immunizations and Tuberculosis screening as a result of potential occupational exposure. Students should contact their program directors for more information on policies and procedures regarding blood and airborne pathogens. COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum 236

238 Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses ALHS 1040 Introduction to Health Care 3 ALHS 1060 Diet and Nutrition for Allied Health Sciences 2 COMP 1000 Introduction to Computers 3 HECT 1100 Hemodialysis Patient Care 7 HECT 1120 Hemodialysis Practicum 4 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 19 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 2 Estimated Program Cost $3,395 PATIENT CARE ASSISTANT Technical Certificate of Credit Program PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: PC21 The Patient Care Assistant Technical Certificate of Credit prepares students with rigorous classroom training and practice as well as the clinical experiences to perform a full range of patient care duties or services under nursing or medical direction. This includes taking vital signs, obtaining lab specimens, assisting with activities of daily living, observing and charting patient information, and reporting appropriate information to supervisors. It may also include providing various outreach services to clients within the community. Students who successfully complete the Patient Care Assistant Technical Certificate of Credit may be eligible to sit for the National Burse Aide Assessment program (NBAAP) which determines competency to become enrolled in the State nurse aide registry. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS * Must be 16 years of age * Completion of high school or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply * Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math * Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. Blood and Airborne Pathogens: Students enrolled in Category I and II programs at Atlanta Technical College will be performing tasks in which there is a normal occurrence for exposure to blood, other potentially infectious body materials, and airborne pathogens. These tasks will be performed in the classroom, laboratory, and clinical activities for each occupational training program/course. Students will be required to present documentation of Hepatitis B and Tuberculosis immunizations as a result of potential occupational exposure. Students should contact their program directors for more information on policies and procedures regarding blood and airborne pathogens. COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum Credits Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses 23 ALHS 1011 Anatomy and Physiology 5 237

239 ALHS 1040 Introduction to Health Care 3 ALHS 1060 Diet and Nutrition for Allied Health Sciences 2 ALHS 1090 Medical Terminology for Allied Health Sciences 2 COMP 1000 Introduction to Computers 3 EMPL 1000 Interpersonal Relations and Professional Development 2 NAST 1100 Nurse Aide Fundamentals 6 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 23 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 2 Estimated Program Cost $2,

240 PARALEGAL STUDIES DIVISION: BUSINESS & PUBLIC SERVICE TECHNOLOGIES PARALEGAL STUDIES Associate of Applied Science Degree PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: PS13 The Paralegal Studies program is a sequence of courses that prepares students for positions in the paralegal profession. Learning opportunities develop academic, technical and professional knowledge and skills required for job acquisition, retention, and advancement. The knowledge and skills emphasized in this program include ethical obligations; research in state and federal law; legal correspondence preparation; family law matters; basic concepts of real property law, criminal law and procedure, civil litigation, tort law, substantive contract law; and wills, trusts, and probate law. The program of study emphasizes opportunities that provide students with specialized legal knowledge and skills required to aid lawyers in the delivery of legal services. Program graduates receive a Paralegal Studies Associate of Applied Science degree. Unauthorized Practice of Law-According to the Official Code of Georgia , paralegals shall not engage in the unauthorized practice of law and must work under the supervision and direction of an attorney in good standing with the State Bar of Georgia. The Paralegal Studies program is a member of the American Association for Paralegal Education ( ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS Must be 16 years of age Completion of high school or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math A student must complete at least four legal specialty courses in a traditional classroom setting. Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the Registrar. Any student seeking to transfer paralegal classes for credit may be asked to provide the Paralegal Studies Program Director and the Registrar's Office with a copy of a course description and syllabus for every class for which transfer credit is sought. Whether a paralegal course is transferable to Atlanta Technical College is subject to the discretion of the Paralegal Studies Program Director and the Registrar's Office. Atlanta Technical College reserves the right to request additional course materials for any class for which transfer credit is sought. Transfer credit may only be given for courses that are equivalent in content and credit hours. Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum General Education Courses 18 Area I Language Arts/Communication ENGL 1101 Composition and Rhetoric 3 Credits 239

241 SPCH 1101 Public Speaking 3 Area II - Social/Behavioral Sciences PSYC 1101 Introductory Psychology 3 SOCI 1101 Introduction to Sociology 3 Area III - Natural Sciences/Mathematics MATH 1111 College Algebra 3 Area IV - Humanities/Fine Arts ARTS 1101 Art Appreciation 3 OR ENGL 2130 American Literature (3) OR HUMN 1101 Introduction to Humanities (3) Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses 51 COMP 1000 Introduction to Computers 3 PARA 1100 Introduction to Law and Ethics 3 PARA 1105 Legal Research and Legal Writing I 3 PARA 1110 Legal Research and Legal Writing II 3 PARA 1115 Family Law 3 PARA 1120 Real Estate Law 3 PARA 1125 Criminal Law and Criminal Procedure 3 PARA 1130 Civil Litigation 3 PARA 1135 Wills, Trusts, Probate, and Administration 3 PARA 1140 Tort Law 3 PARA 1145 Law Office Management 3 PARA 1150 Contracts, Commercial Law and Business Organizations 3 PARA 2210 Paralegal Internship I 6 PARA 2215 Paralegal Internship II 6 240

242 Complete 3 Credits from the following courses PARA 1200 Bankruptcy /Debtor-Creditor Relations 3 OR PARA 1205 Constitutional Law (3) OR PARA 1210 Legal and Policy Issues in Healthcare (3) Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 69 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 6 Estimated Program Cost $7,

243 PARAMEDICINE DIVISION: HEALTH & PUBLIC SAFETY TECHNOLOGIES PARAMEDICINE Diploma Program PROGRAM DESCRIPTION: Major Code: PT12 The Paramedicine Diploma program prepares students to provide advanced emergency medical care for critical and emergent patients who access the emergency medical system. This individual possesses the complex knowledge and skills necessary to provide patient care and transportation. Paramedics function as part of a comprehensive EMS response, under medical oversight. Paramedics perform interventions with the basic and advanced equipment typically found on an ambulance. The Paramedic is a link from the scene into the health care system. The Paramedicine diploma program prepares students for employment in paramedic positions in today's health services field. The Paramedic Diploma program provides learning opportunities that introduce, develop, and reinforce academic and occupational knowledge, skills, and attitudes required for job acquisition, retention, and advancement. The program provides opportunities to upgrade present knowledge and skills from the EMT-I 1985/AEMT levels to a paramedic level. Successful completion of the program allows the graduate to take the National Registry of Emergency Medical Technicians (NREMT ) Paramedic certification examination and apply for Georgia licensure with the Georgia Department of Public Health- Health Protection-Emergency Preparedness and Response as a Paramedic. Criminal background checks and drug screens may be required based on the requirements for participation in clinical experiences. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS Must be 18 years of age Completion of high school diploma or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the Registrar. Student must pass an NCIC background check. Student must be either a Georgia licensed EMT Intermediate-OR AEMT and/or National Registry of EMT s certified EMT-Intermediate or AEMT. Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. Blood and Airborne Pathogens: Students enrolled in Category I and II programs at Atlanta Technical College will be performing tasks in which there is a normal occurrence for exposure to blood, other potentially infectious body materials, and airborne pathogens. These tasks will be performed in the classroom, laboratory, and clinical activities for each occupational training program/course. Students will be required to present documentation of Hepatitis B and Tuberculosis immunizations as a result of potential occupational exposure. Students should contact their program directors for more information on policies and procedures regarding blood and airborne pathogens. Policies and procedures regarding blood and airborne pathogens may be reviewed at COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum Basic Skills (General Core) Courses 6 ENGL 1010 Fundamentals of English I 3 Credits 242

244 MATH 1012 Foundations of Mathematics 3 Technical Fundamental Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses 49 ALHS 1011 Anatomy and Physiology 5 EMSP 2110 Foundations of Paramedicine 3 EMSP 2120 Applications of Pathophysiology 3 EMSP 2130 Advanced Resuscitative Skills for Paramedics 3 EMSP 2140 Advanced Cardiovascular Concepts 4 EMSP 2310 Therapeutic Modalities of Cardiovascular Care 3 EMSP 2320 Therapeutic Modalities of Medical care 5 EMSP 2330 Therapeutic Modalities of Trauma Care 4 EMSP 2340 Therapeutic Modalities for Special Patient Populations 4 EMSP 2510 Clinical Applications for the Paramedic I 2 EMSP 2520 Clinical Applications for the Paramedic II 2 EMSP 2530 Clinical Applications for the Paramedic III 2 EMSP 2540 Clinical Applications for the Paramedic IV 1 EMSP 2550 Clinical Applications for the Paramedic V 1 EMSP 2560 Clinical Applications for the Paramedic VI 1 EMSP 2570 Clinical Applications for the Paramedic VII 1 EMSP 2710 Field Internship for the Paramedic 2 EMSP 2720 Practical Applications for the Paramedic 3 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 49 Minimum Program Length in Semesters 5 Estimated Program Cost $8,530 Graduates of the program are eligible to sit for the exam administered by the National Registry of Emergency Medical Technicians. Licensing Agency: Department of Public Health - Office of Emergency Medical Services and Trauma 2600 Skyland Drive, Lower Level, Atlanta, Georgia The Paramedicine Diploma Program is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs ( upon the recommendation of the Committee on Accreditation for Educational Programs for the Emergency Medical Services Profession ( Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs 1361 Park Street, Clearwater, FL 33756;

245 ADVANCED EMERGENCY MEDICAL TECHNICIAN (AEMT) Technical Certificate of Credit Program PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: EMH1 The Advanced Emergency Medical Technician certificate program prepares students to provide basic and limited advanced emergency medical care and transportation for critical and emergent patients who access the emergency medical system. This individual possesses the basic knowledge and skills necessary to provide patient care and transportation. Advanced Emergency Medical Technicians function as part of a comprehensive EMS response, under medical oversight. Advanced Emergency Medical Technicians perform interventions with the basic and advanced equipment typically found on an ambulance. The Advanced Emergency Medical Technician is a link from the scene to the emergency health care system. Successful completion of the program allows the graduate to take the National Registry of Emergency Medical Technicians AEMT certification examination and apply for Georgia licensure as an AEMT. This technical certificate of credit replaces the EM01 "Emergency Medical Technician (Intermediate)" technical certificate of credit. Criminal background checks and drug screens may be required based on the requirements for participation in clinical experiences. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS Must be 18 years of age Completion of high school diploma or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the Registrar. Student must pass an NCIC background check. Student must be either a Georgia licensed EMT or Nationally Registered EMT to enroll in the AEMT TCC. Students with NREMT certification or licensure as an EMT may enter the program during the AEMT portion of the class (EMSP1510). Proof of Licensure or Certification must be provided before enrollment (NREMT certification accepted). Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. Blood and Airborne Pathogens: Students enrolled in Category I and II programs at Atlanta Technical College will be performing tasks in which there is a normal occurrence for exposure to blood, other potentially infectious body materials, and airborne pathogens. These tasks will be performed in the classroom, laboratory, and clinical activities for each occupational training program/course. Students will be required to present documentation of Hepatitis B and Tuberculosis immunizations as a result of potential occupational exposure. Students should contact their program directors for more information on policies and procedures regarding blood and airborne pathogens. Policies and procedures regarding blood and airborne pathogens may be reviewed at COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses 10 EMSP 1510 Advanced Concepts for the AEMT 3 EMSP 1520 Advanced Patient Care for the AEMT 3 EMSP 1530 Clinical Applications for the AEMT 1 EMSP 1540 Clinical and Practical Applications for the AEMT 3 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 10 Minimum Program Length in Semesters Credits Estimated Program Cost $2,426 Graduates of the program are eligible to sit for the AEMT exam administered by the National Registry of Emergency Medical Technicians. NREMT

246 Licensing Agency: Georgia Department of Public Health Georgia Department of Public Health Health Protection Emergency Preparedness and Response Skyland Drive, Lower Level, Atlanta, Georgia The Advanced Emergency Medical Technology Program is approved by the Georgia Department of Public Health - Health Protection Emergency Preparedness and Response. EMERGENCY MEDICAL TECHNICIAN (EMT) Technical Certificate of Credit Program PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: EMJ1 The Emergency Medical Technician certificate program prepares students to provide basic emergency medical care and transportation for critical and emergent patients who access the emergency medical system. This individual possesses the basic knowledge and skills necessary to provide patient care and transportation. Emergency Medical Technicians function as part of a comprehensive EMS response, under medical oversight. Emergency Medical Technicians perform interventions with the basic equipment typically found on an ambulance. The Emergency Medical Technician is a link from the scene to the emergency health care system. Successful completion of the program allows the graduate to take the National Registry of Emergency Medical Technicians EMT certification examination and apply for Georgia licensure as an EMT. This technical certificate of credit replaces the previous EMB1 "Emergency Medical Technician (Basic)" technical certificate of credit. Criminal background checks and drug screens may be required based on the requirements for participation in clinical experiences. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS Must be 18 years of age Completion of high school diploma or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the Registrar. Student must pass an NCIC background check. Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. Blood and Airborne Pathogens: Students enrolled in Category I and II programs at Atlanta Technical College will be performing tasks in which there is a normal occurrence for exposure to blood, other potentially infectious body materials, and airborne pathogens. These tasks will be performed in the classroom, laboratory, and clinical activities for each occupational training program/course. Students will be required to present documentation of Hepatitis B and Tuberculosis immunizations as a result of potential occupational exposure. Students should contact their program directors for more information on policies and procedures regarding blood and airborne pathogens. Policies and procedures regarding blood and airborne pathogens may be reviewed at COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses 16 EMSP 1110 Introduction to the EMT Profession 3 EMSP 1120 EMT Assessment/Airway Management and Pharmacology 3 EMSP 1130 Medical Emergencies for the EMT 3 EMSP 1140 Special Patient Populations 3 EMSP 1150 Shock and Trauma for the EMT 3 EMSP 1160 Clinical and Practical Applications for the EMT Credits

247 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 16 Minimum Program Length in Semesters 2 Estimated Program Cost $3,370 Graduates of the program are eligible to sit for the exam administered by the National Registry of Emergency Medical Technicians. Licensing Agency: Georgia Department of Public Health - Georgia Department of Public Health Health Protection Emergency Preparedness and Response, 2600 Skyland Drive, Lower Level, Atlanta, Georgia The Advanced Emergency Medical Technology Program is approved by the Georgia Department of Public Health - Health Protection Emergency Preparedness and Response. 246

248 PHARMACY TECHNOLOGY DIVISION: HEALTH & PUBLIC SAFETY TECHNOLOGIES PHARMACY TECHNOLOGY Associate of Applied Science Degree PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: PT23 The Pharmacy Technology program is a sequence of courses that prepares students for careers in the pharmacy field. Learning opportunities develop academic and professional knowledge and skills required for job acquisition, retention, and advancement. Pharmacy Technology program graduates are prepared to function as pharmacy technicians in positions requiring preparation of medications according to prescriptions under supervision of a pharmacist. Program graduates are to be competent in the general areas of communications, math, interpersonal relations, and computer literacy. Graduates are also to be competent to perform basic occupational functions relations, and computer literacy. Graduates are also to be competent to perform basic occupational functions including pouring, weighing, or measuring dosage; grinding, heating, filtering, dissolving, and mixing liquid or soluble drugs and chemicals; procuring, storing and issuing pharmaceutical materials and supplies; and maintaining files and records. Graduate of the program receive a Pharmacy Technology degree which qualifies them as pharmacy technician. The Pharmacy Technology program at Atlanta Technical College is accredited by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS *Must be 18 years of age *Cannot be convicted of a felony that occurred within the last ten 10 years, and/or any conviction that was drug or pharmacy related. *Completion of high school diploma or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply *Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math *Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar. *Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. *Must complete MATH 1111 with a minimum letter grade of B within 2 attempts. *Must complete PHAR 1000 with a minimum letter grade of B within 2 attempts. LICENSURE/CERTIFICATION Upon completion of the Pharmacy Technology program, students may register to take the Pharmacy Technician Certification Examination (PTCE). In order to sit for the PTCE, a candidate must have received a high school diploma or GED by application receipt deadline for the exam and have never been convicted of a felony. PRACTICUM EDUCATION Pharmacy Technology students will be required to complete practicum assignments which will be given by the instructor at the beginning of the semester. Requirements for practicum courses include a minimum of 20 hours a week in a supervised setting, for a total of 225 hours. Students may not receive pay from the sites for these hours. Student evaluations are completed by the practicum site preceptor and the program instructor, as well as weekly time sheets. The student is required to adhere to his/her practicum schedule at all times and a total of 450 hours is required to graduate. All students must know that traveling may be required for practicum rotations. Special Requirements of the Practicum Sites: CPR Certification Hepatitis B Vaccine 247

249 Drug Screening Criminal Background Check Registration with the State of Georgia as Pharmacy Technician Physical, and lab work including TB testing and immunizations Blood and Airborne Pathogens: Students enrolled in Category I and II programs at Atlanta Technical College will be performing tasks in which there is a normal occurrence for exposure to blood, other potentially infectious body materials, and airborne pathogens. These tasks will be performed in the classroom, laboratory, and clinical activities for each occupational training program/course. Students will be required to present documentation of Hepatitis B and Tuberculosis immunizations as a result of potential occupational exposure. Students should contact their program directors for more information on policies and procedures regarding blood and airborne pathogens. COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum Credits General Education Courses 15 Area I - English/Humanities/Fine Arts ENGL 1101 Composition and Rhetoric 3 Area II - Social/Behavioral Sciences PSYC 1101 Introductory Psychology 3 Area III - Natural Sciences/Mathematics MATH 1111 College Algebra 3 MATH 1100 Quantitative Skills and Reasoning (3) MATH 1101 Mathematical Modeling (3) Area IV - Humanities/Fine Arts HUMN 1101 Introduction to Humanities 3 XXXX XXXX General Core Elective 3 Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses 50 ALHS 1040 Introduction to Health Care 3 ALHS 1090 Medical Terminology for Allied Health Sciences 2 COMP 1000 Introduction to Computers 3 BIOL 2113 Anatomy and Physiology I 3 BIOL 2113L Anatomy and Physiology Lab I 1 BIOL 2114 Anatomy and Physiology II 3 BIOL 2114L Anatomy and Physiology Lab II 1 PHAR 1000 Pharmaceutical Calculations 4 PHAR 1010 Pharmacy Technology Fundamentals 5 PHAR 1020 Principles of Dispensing Medications 4 PHAR 1030 Principles of Sterile Medication Preparation 4 PHAR 1040 Pharmacology 4 PHAR 1050 Pharmacy Technology Practicum 5 PHAR 2060 Advanced Pharmacy Technology Principles 3 PHAR 2070 Advanced Pharmacy Technology Practicum 5 248

250 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 65 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 5 Estimated Program Cost $8,230 PHARMACY TECHNOLOGY Diploma PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: PT22 The Pharmacy Technology program is a sequence of courses that prepares students for careers in the pharmacy field. Learning opportunities develop academic and professional knowledge and skills required for job acquisition, retention, and advancement. Pharmacy Technology program graduates are prepared to function as pharmacy technicians in positions requiring preparation of medications according to prescriptions under supervision of a pharmacist. Program graduates are to be competent in the general areas of communications, math, interpersonal relations, and computer literacy. Graduates are also to be competent to perform basic occupational functions relations, and computer literacy. Graduates are also to be competent to perform basic occupational functions including pouring, weighing, or measuring dosage; grinding, heating, filtering, dissolving, and mixing liquid or soluble drugs and chemicals; procuring, storing and issuing pharmaceutical materials and supplies; and maintaining files and records. Graduate of the program receive a Pharmacy Technology diploma which qualifies them as pharmacy technician. Graduates will be employable as an entry level pharmacy technician. The Pharmacy Technology program at Atlanta Technical College is accredited by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS Must be 18 years of age Completion of high school diploma or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply Cannot be convicted of a felony that occurred within the last ten (10) years, and/or any conviction that was drug or pharmacy related. Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar. Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. Must complete MATH 1012 with a minimum letter grade of B within 2 attempts. Must complete PHAR 1000 with a minimum letter grade of B within 2 attempts. EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES Graduates of the Pharmacy Technology program are prepared for employment in hospital pharmacies, retail pharmacies, home infusion pharmacies, institutional pharmacies, military base pharmacies, major drug companies and other healthcare facilities requiring professional qualified personnel. NOTE: A felony conviction may limit employment opportunities. LICENSURE/CERTIFICATION Upon completion of the Pharmacy Technology program, students may register to take the Pharmacy Technician Certification Examination (PTCE). In order to sit for the PTCE, a candidate must have received a high school diploma or GED by application receipt deadline for the exam and have never been convicted of a felony. PRACTICUM EDUCATION Pharmacy Technology students will be required to complete practicum assignments which will be given by the instructor at the beginning of the semester. Requirements for practicum courses include a minimum of 20 hours a week in a supervised setting, for a total of 225 hours. Students may not receive pay from the sites for these hours. Student evaluations are completed by the practicum site preceptor and the program instructor, as well as weekly time sheets. The student is required to adhere to his/her practicum schedule at all times and a total of 450 hours is required to graduate. All students must know that traveling may be required for practicum rotations. Special Requirements of the Practicum Sites: CPR Certification Hepatitis B Vaccine Drug Screening Criminal Background Check Registration with the State of Georgia as Pharmacy Technician Physical, and lab work including TB testing and immunizations 249

251 SALARY POTENTIAL $20,000- $35,000 PROGRAM ADDITIONAL FEES (Cost are estimated and are subject to change) Books & Supplies: $2, CPR Card $6.00 Liability Insurance: $11.00 per year Uniform:$ Certification Exam: $ Physical Exam: $ TB Test: $ Panel Drug Test: $50.00 Criminal Background Check: $50.00 Pharmacy Technician Registration/Fingerprint: $ Blood and Airborne Pathogens: Students enrolled in Category I and II programs at Atlanta Technical College will be performing tasks in which there is a normal occurrence for exposure to blood, other potentially infectious body materials, and airborne pathogens. These tasks will be performed in the classroom, laboratory, and clinical activities for each occupational training program/course. Students will be required to present documentation of Hepatitis B and Tuberculosis immunizations as a result of potential occupational exposure. Students should contact their program directors for more information on policies and procedures regarding blood and airborne pathogens. COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum Basic Skills (General Core) Courses 9 ENGL 1010 Fundamentals of English I 3 MATH 1012 Foundations of Mathematics 3 PSYC 1010 Basic Psychology 3 Credits Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses 47 ALHS 1011 Anatomy and Physiology 5 ALHS 1040 Introduction to Healthcare 3 ALHS 1090 Medical Terminology for Allied Health Sciences 2 COMP 1000 Introduction to Computers 3 PHAR 1000 Pharmaceutical Calculations 4 PHAR 1010 Pharmacy Technology Fundamentals 5 PHAR 1020 Principles of Dispensing Medications 4 PHAR 1030 Principles of Sterile Medication Preparation 4 PHAR 1040 Pharmacology 4 PHAR 1050 Pharmacy Technology Practicum 5 PHAR 2060 Advanced Pharmacy Technology Principles 3 250

252 PHAR 2070 Advanced Pharmacy Technology Practicum 5 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 56 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 4 Estimated Program Cost $7,229 PHARMACY ASSISTANT Technical Certificate of Credit Program PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: PB71 The Pharmacy Assistant Technical Certificate of Credit (TCC) is designed to provide students with short term training to prepare them for entry level employment in a variety of settings such as, retail pharmacies, nursing homes, medical clinics, etc. Students will receive didactic instruction and laboratory training in anatomy and physiology, fundamental concepts and principles for receiving, storing and dispensing medication. The Pharmacy Technology program at Atlanta Technical College is accredited by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS Must be 18 years of age Cannot be convicted of a felony that occurred within the last ten (10) years, and/or any conviction that was drug or pharmacy related. Completion of high school diploma or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar. Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. Must complete MATH 1012 with a minimum letter grade of B within 2 attempts. Must complete PHAR 1000 with a minimum letter grade of B within 2 attempts. PRACTICUM EDUCATION Pharmacy Technology students will be required to complete practicum assignments which will be given by the instructor at the beginning of the semester. Requirements for practicum courses include a minimum of 20 hours a week in a supervised setting, for a total of 225 hours. Students may not receive pay from the sites for these hours. Student evaluations are completed by the practicum site preceptor and the program instructor, as well as weekly time sheets. The student is required to adhere to his/her practicum schedule at all times and a total of 225hours is required to graduate. All students must know that traveling may be required for practicum rotations. Special Requirements of the Practicum Sites: CPR Certification Hepatitis B Vaccine Drug Screening Criminal Background Check Registration with the State of Georgia as Pharmacy Technician Physical, and lab work including TB testing and immunizations SALARY POTENTIAL $15,000-$25,000 PROGRAM ADDITIONAL FEES (Cost are estimated and are subject to change) Books & Supplies: $1,000 CPR Card $6.00 Liability Insurance: $11.00 per year Uniform:$

253 Certification Exam: $ Physical Exam: $ TB Test: $ Panel Drug Test: $50.00 Criminal Background Check: $50.00 Pharmacy Technician Registration/Fingerprint : $ Blood and Airborne Pathogens: Students enrolled in Category I and II programs at Atlanta Technical College will be performing tasks in which there is a normal occurrence for exposure to blood, other potentially infectious body materials, and airborne pathogens. These tasks will be performed in the classroom, laboratory, and clinical activities for each occupational training program/course. Students will be required to present documentation of Hepatitis B and Tuberculosis immunizations as a result of potential occupational exposure. Students should contact their program directors for more information on policies and procedures regarding blood and airborne pathogens. COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum General Core Courses Credits Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses ALHS 1011 Anatomy and Physiology 5 ALHS 1090 Medical Terminology for Allied Health Sciences 2 COMP 1000 Introduction to Computers 3 MATH 1012 Foundations of Mathematics 3 PHAR 1000 Pharmaceutical Calculations 4 PHAR 1010 Pharmacy Technology Fundamentals 5 PHAR 1020 Principles of Dispensing Medications 4 PHAR 1040 Pharmacology 4 PHAR 1055 Pharmacy Assistant Practicum 5 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 35 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 3 Estimated Program Cost $3,

254 PHYSICAL THERAPIST ASSISTANT DIVISION: HEATLH & PUBLIC SAFETY TECHNOLOGIES PHYSICAL THERAPIST ASSISTANT Associate Degree PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: PTA3 The program integrates general education, health core curriculum, and specific occupational courses and clinical experience over five semesters of continuous full time study. As well as half-day clinical observations and laboratory experiences off campus, students will attend three full-time clinical rotations, two of four-week duration and one of seven-week duration. Students are wholly responsible for all transportation to and from clinical facilities and are financially responsible for their clinical uniforms and laboratory clothing. The program is offered on a full-time basis during daytime hours. There is no online option. The program admits 12 students once a year, with an application deadline of May 1st. Once admitted, students must maintain current CPR certification and student membership with the American Physical Therapy Association (APTA) updated annually at the professional rescuer level, a documented medical examination, including an annual TB test, and maintains a C average or better to remain in good standing. Students are readmitted to the program upon successful completion of a readmission examination with a grade of 80% or higher. Mission Statement The mission of the physical therapist assistant program is to graduate culturally competent physical therapist assistants to work with the underserved population under the direction and supervision of a physical therapist. Accreditation The Physical Therapist Assistant program at Atlanta Technical College is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education (CAPTE), 1111 North Fairfax Street, Alexandria, Virginia 22314; telephone: ; website: Work Environment Physical therapist assistants work in a variety of settings including hospitals, rehabilitation facilities, skilled nursing facilities, outpatient clinics, the school system and home health. Hours of work vary with each practice setting based on the needs of the facility. Nature of the Work A physical therapist assistant (PTA) is a licensed healthcare provider who is part of the healthcare team working under the direction and supervision of a licensed physical therapist (PT). PTAs assist patients to improve their function on order to be able to perform activities of daily living (ADLs). A physical therapist assistant must possess excellent communication and interpersonal skills in order to appropriately interact with patients, coworkers and other members of the healthcare team and to be able to motivate patients to do their best. The job of a physical therapist assistant may be physically demanding at times and may involve lifting. ADMISSIONS REQUIEMENTS Must be eighteen (18) years of age. Complete and sign application for admission and pay a nonrefundable fee to Atlanta Technical College Admissions Office. Complete a Physical Therapist Assistant Program application for admission. Submit letter of Intent/application to the ATC Physical Therapist Assistant program. This form is included inside the PTA application packet. Upon conditional acceptance into the program the student must submit criminal background check and Drug Test. Provide a copy of valid American Heart Association CPR card (needs to be valid for program duration) along with application 253

255 documents. Criminal background checks and drug screen will be required at various intervals throughout the program as designated by the program faculty. Attend Program Information Sessions (mandatory). The Physical Therapist Assistant Program will host Information Sessions with detailed description of the program and the admission process. Student will gain useful information regarding program costs, program requirements, program course information etc. Submit official High-School or GED transcripts and/or official college transcripts from all colleges attended in the past to the Admissions Office (see General Admissions Requirements). Selection Process: Weighting will be assigned to students who have completed college courses, and have a minimum grade of (B) in BIOL 2113 & Lab, BIOL 2114 & LAB, ENGL 1101, MATH 1111, PHYS 1101 & Lab, and PSYC In order to graduate from the PTA program, you must achieve at least a B in the following courses: ALHS 1090: Medical Terminology ENGL 1101: Composition and Rhetoric PSYC 1101: Introduction of Psychology MATH 1111: College Algebra PHYS 1110: Conceptual Physics PHYS 1110L: Conceptual Physics Lab BIOL 2113 and BIOL 2114 with Labs: Anatomy & Physiology I and II For students who have not taken college level courses: Weighting will be assigned to High School Graduates overall GPA, MATH and SCIENCE courses. Requirements for transferring courses from another approved institution includes ensuring BIOL 2113 & Lab, BIOL 2114 & Lab, PHYS 1110 & Lab, are less than five (5) years old. Valid COMPASS, ASSET, SAT, or ACT test scores comparable to the Associate Degree level. Must have AVERAGE or above average score on the HOBET test within the last three (3) years. Must be identified as Program Ready by Atlanta Technical College for the Physical Therapist Assistant Program. Additional Requirements for the competitive admissions process: Attend a Physical Therapist Assistant program advisement session in the year for which admission is sought. Complete a total of forty (40) hours of volunteer, observation, or work experience ideally in more than one physical therapy setting. Attend a mandatory interview with the Physical Therapist Assistant panel on designated dates. No make-up dates or times available. The program requires a full-time commitment from the student as classes are scheduled daily from 8:00am-6:00pm with some evening and/or weekend time commitments. *If the above criteria are not met, an applicant s file cannot be processed for selection into the Physical Therapist Assistant Program.* Blood and Airborne Pathogens: Students enrolled in Category I and II programs at Atlanta Technical College will be performing tasks in which there is a normal occurrence for exposure to blood, other potentially infectious body materials, and airborne pathogens. These tasks will be performed in the classroom, laboratory, and clinical activities for each occupational training program/course. Students will be required to present documentation of Hepatitis B and Tuberculosis immunizations as a result of potential occupational exposure. Students should contact their program directors for more information on policies and procedures regarding blood and airborne pathogens. COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum General Education Courses 27 Area I Language Arts/Communication ENGL 1101 Composition and Rhetoric Credits

256 Area II - Social/Behavioral Sciences PSYC 1101 Introductory Psychology 3 PSYC 2103 Human Development 3 Area III - Natural Sciences/Mathematics MATH 1111 College Algebra 3 BIOL 2113 Anatomy and Physiology I 3 BIOL 2113L Anatomy and Physiology Lab I 1 BIOL 2114 Anatomy and Physiology II 3 BIOL 2114L Anatomy and Physiology Lab II 1 PHYS 1110 Conceptual Physics 3 PHYS 1110L Conceptual Physics Lab 1 Area IV - Humanities/Fine Arts HUMN 1101 Introduction to Humanities 3 Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses 53 COMP 1000 Introduction to Computers 3 ALHS 1090 Medical Terminology for Allied Health 2 PHTA 1110 Introduction to Physical Therapy 2 PHTA 1120 Patient Care Skills 2 PHTA 1130 Functional Anatomy & Kinesiology I 3 PHTA 1140 Physical Therapy Procedures I 4 PHTA 2110 Pathology I 4 PHTA 2120 Rehabilitation I 3 PHTA 2130 Physical Therapy Procedures II 4 PHTA 2140 Clinical Education I 4 PHTA 2150 Pathology II 4 PHTA 2160 Rehabilitation II 3 PHTA 2170 Kinesiology II 3 PHTA 2180 Clinical Education II 4 PHTA 2190 Clinical Education III 7 255

257 PHTA 2200 Physical Therapy Seminar 1 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 80 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 5 Estimated Program Cost $9,

258 PLUMBING DIVISION: INDUSTRIAL & TRANSPORTATION TECHNOLOGIES PLUMBING Diploma PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: PL12 The Plumbing Technology program of study is a sequence of courses that prepares student for careers in plumbing and related fields. Learning opportunities develop academic, technical, and professional knowledge and skills required for job acquisition, retention, and advancement. The program emphasis a combination of plumbing theory and practical application necessary for successful employment. Program graduates receive a Plumbing Technology diploma and have the qualification of an apprentice plumber. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS * Must be 16 years of age * Completion of high school or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply * Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math * Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum Credits Basic Skills (General Core) Courses 8 ENGL 1010 Fundamentals of English I 3 EMPL 1000 Interpersonal Relations and Professional Development 2 MATH 1012 Foundations of Mathematics 3 Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses 39 COMP 1000 Introduction to Computers 3 PLBG 1000 Introduction to Plumbing 3 PLBG 1160 Plumbing Drawings 3 PLBG 1210 Pipes, Valves, and Fittings 3 PLBG 1220 Drainage Systems 3 PLBG 1240 Water Supply Systems 3 PLBG 1260 Plumbing Fixtures and Appliances 3 PLBG 1280 Gas Piping, Venting and Appliances 3 PLBG 1310 Special Plumbing Systems 3 PLBG 1320 Plumbing Services 3 257

259 PLBG 1330 Plumbing Codes 3 Completion of 6 Credit Hours from the Following List of Electives PLBG 1070 Physical Science and Mechanics for the Pipe Trades 3 PLBG 1500 Backflow Prevention and Cross Connection Control 3 PLBG 2160 Advanced Drawings and Plan Reading 3 PLBG 2330 Advanced Plumbing Code Applications 3 PLBG 2500 Plumbing Technology Practicum/Internship 3 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 47 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 3 Estimated Program Cost $5,620 PLUMBING SERVICE AND SYSTEMS SPECIALIST Technical Certificate of Credit Program PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: PS41 The Plumbing Service and Systems Specialist program offers students skills in inspecting, maintaining, and repairing plumbing systems. Topics include special plumbing systems, plumbing services, and code interpretation. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS * Must be 16 years of age * Completion of high school or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply * Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math * Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses PLBG 1310 Special Plumbing Systems 3 PLBG 1320 Plumbing Services 3 PLBG 1330 Plumbing Codes 3 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 9 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 1 Estimated Program Cost $1,659 RESIDENTIAL/COMMERCIAL PLUMBING TECHNICIAN Technical Certificate of Credit Program PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: RP11 The Residential/Commercial Plumber certificate program offers students basic skills in plumbing technology, construction, maintenance, and repair. Students completing the certificate program are prepared for entry level employment as a plumbing technician. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS * Must be 16 years of age * Completion of high school or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply * Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math * Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar 258

260 Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses PLBG 1000 Introduction to Plumbing 3 PLBG 1160 Plumbing Drawings 3 PLBG 1210 Pipes, Valves, and Fittings 3 PLBG 1220 Drainage Systems 3 PLBG 1240 Water Supply Systems 3 PLBG 1260 Plumbing Fixtures and Appliances 3 PLBG 1280 Gas Piping, Venting, and Appliances 3 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 21 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 2 Estimated Program Cost $2,

261 RADIOLOGIC TECHNOLOGY DIVISION: HEALTH & PUBLIC SAFETY TECHNOLOGIES RADIOLOGIC TECHNOLOGY Associate Degree Program PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: RT23 The Radiologic Technology associate degree program is a sequence of courses that prepares students for positions in radiology departments and related businesses and industries. Learning opportunities develop academic, technical, and professional knowledge and skills required for job acquisition, retention, and advancement. The program emphasizes a combination of didactic and clinical instruction necessary for successful employment. Program graduates receive an associate of applied science degree, have the qualifications of a radiographer, and are eligible to sit for a national certification examination for radiographers. Admission Requirements: Students must meet all admission requirements of the college and have reached the age of 18. Students who intend to apply for the Radiologic Technology program must enroll in the Health Sciences Certificate program to complete the associate degree level pre-requisite courses. The completion of the pre-requisite courses does not guarantee admission into the Radiologic Technology program. Admission into the Radiologic Technology program is competitive, and the program does not maintain a waiting list. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS Must be 18 years of age Official high school or GED transcript is required to apply. Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, Language, and Math Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar. Blood and Airborne Pathogens: Students enrolled in Category I and II programs at Atlanta Technical College will be performing tasks in which there is a normal occurrence for exposure to blood, other potentially infectious body materials, and airborne pathogens. These tasks will be performed in the classroom, laboratory, and clinical activities for each occupational training program/course. Students will be required to present documentation of Hepatitis B and Tuberculosis immunizations as a result of potential occupational exposure. Students should contact their program directors for more information on policies and procedures regarding blood and airborne pathogens. COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum Credits General Education Courses 15 Area I Language Arts/Communication ENGL 1101 Composition and Rhetoric 3 Area II - Social/Behavioral Sciences PSYC 1101 Introductory Psychology 3 Area III - Natural Sciences/Mathematics 260

262 MATH 1111 College Algebra 3 Area IV - Humanities/Fine Arts Humanities Elective Any 3 Credit hours 3 Program-Specific General Education 3 SPCH 1101 Introduction to Speech 3 Program-Specific General Education 8 BIOL 2113 Anatomy & Physiology I 3 BIOL 2113L Anatomy & Physiology Lab I 1 BIOL 2114 Anatomy & Physiology II 3 BIOL 2114L Anatomy & Physiology Lab II 1 Technical Courses 69 ALHS 1090 Medical Terminology for Allied Health Sciences 2 COMP 1000 Introduction to Computers 3 RADT 1320 Clinical Radiologic Technology I 4 RADT 1030 Radiographic Procedures I 3 RADT 1070 Principles of Imaging I 6 RADT 1010 Introduction to Radiology 4 RADT 1060 Radiographic Procedures II 3 RADT 1160 Principles of Imaging II 6 RADT 1330 Clinical Radiologic Technology II 7 RADT 2090 Radiographic Procedures III 2 RADT 2340 Clinical Radiograph III 6 RADT 1200 Principles of Radiation Biology and Protection 2 RADT 2350 Clinical Radiologic Technology IV 7 RADT 2190 Radiographic Pathology 2 RADT 2260 Radiographic Technology Review 3 RADT 2360 Clinical Radiologic Technology V 9 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 92 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms including Pre-requisites 7 Estimated Program Cost $7,

263 SIX SIGMA DIVISION: ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT SIX SIGMA QUALITY ASSURANCE SPECIALIST Technical Certificate of Credit Program PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: QA31 The Quality Assurance Specialist program will acquaint the learner with the philosophy of Six Sigma. The Six Sigma methodology provides a framework and a strongly branded corporate initiative for an organization to train its people to focus on key performance areas, understand where the organization wants to go such as its strategy related to its marketplace, understand the services that the organization s customers need most, understand and better organize main business processes that deliver these customer requirements, and measure and improve the effectiveness of these processes. Six Sigma is known to the management system as a top-down method initiated at the CEO-level for executing business strategy by using and optimizing processes of aligning critical improvement efforts to business strategy, mobilizing teams to attack high-impact projects, accelerating the improvement of business results, and governing efforts of teams and people to achieve and sustain improvements. The Six Sigma methodologies increase the clarity of business strategy and the metrics that most reflect success within it. Other more recognizable terms for these might be KRA s (Key Results Areas) and KPI s (Key Performance Indicators). This certificate will equip individuals to serve as the leader of the Six Sigma team in addition to their regularly assigned duties and it will also prepare them to sit for the Six Sigma Green Belt certification exam. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS * Must be 16 years of age * Completion of high school or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply * Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math * Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum Credits Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses 9 MGMT 1310 Introduction to Quality Assurance 3 MGMT 1315 Define and Measure 3 MGMT 1320 Analyze, Improve, Control 3 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 9 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 1 Estimated Program Cost $1,

264 SIX SIGMA QUALITY ASSURANCE PROFESSIONAL Technical Certificate of Credit Program PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: QA21 The Quality Assurance Professional program will acquaint the learner with the philosophy of Six Sigma. The Six Sigma methodology provides a framework and a strongly branded corporate initiative for an organization to train its people to focus on key performance areas, understand where the organization wants to go such as its strategy related to its marketplace, understand the services that the organization s customers need most, understand and better organize main business processes that deliver these customer requirements, and measure and improve the effectiveness of these processes. Six Sigma is known to the management system as a top-down method initiated at the CEO-level for executing business strategy by using and optimizing processes of aligning critical improvement efforts to business strategy, mobilizing teams to attack high-impact projects, accelerating the improvement of business results, and governing efforts of teams and people to achieve and sustain improvements. The Six Sigma methodologies increase the clarity of business strategy and the metrics that most reflect success within it. Other more recognizable terms for these might be KRA s (Key Results Areas) and KPI s (Key Performance Indicators). This certificate will equip individuals to serve as the leader of the Six Sigma team in addition to their regularly assigned duties and it will also prepare them to sit for the Six Sigma Black Belt certification exam. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS * Must be 16 years of age * Completion of high school or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply * Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math * Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum Credits Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses 9 MGMT 1340 Quality Assurance Philosophy 3 MGMT 1350 Quality Assurance Tools 3 MGMT 1360 Advanced Quality Assurance Process 3 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 9 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 1 Estimated Program Cost $1,

265 SURGICAL TECHNOLOGY DIVISION: HEALTH & PUBLIC SAFETY TECHNOLOGIES SURGICAL TECHNOLOGY Associate of Applied Science Degree PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: ST13 The Surgical Technology Program prepares students for employment in a variety of positions in the surgical field. The Surgical Technology program provides learning opportunities which introduce, develop, and reinforce academic and technical knowledge, skills, and attitudes required for job acquisition, retention, and advancement. The program admits 10 students once a year, with an application deadline of May 1st. The program is offered on a full-time basis during daytime hours. There is no online option. Additionally, the program provides opportunities to upgrade present knowledge and skills or to retrain in Surgical Technology. Students are wholly responsible for all transportation to and from clinical facilities and are financially responsible for their clinical uniforms and laboratory clothing. Once admitted, students must maintain current CPR certification and maintain a B average or better to remain in good standing Graduates of the program receive a Surgical Technology degree and are qualified for employment as surgical technologists. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS Must be 17 years of age Complete and sign application for admission and pay a nonrefundable fee to Atlanta Technical College Admissions Office. Complete a Surgical Technology Program application for admission. Submit letter of Intent/application to the ATC Surgical Technology Program. This form is included inside the ST application packet. Upon conditional acceptance into the program the student must submit criminal background check, Drug Test and Physical. Provide a copy of valid American Heart Association CPR card (needs to be valid for program duration) along with application documents. Criminal background checks and drug screen will be required at various intervals throughout the program as designated by the program faculty. Attend Program Information Sessions (mandatory). The Surgical Technology Program will host Information Sessions with detailed description of the program and the admission process. Student will gain useful information regarding program costs, program requirements, program course information etc. Submit official High-School or GED transcripts and/or official college transcripts from all colleges attended in the past to the Admissions Office (see General Admissions Requirements). Selection Process: Weighting will be assigned to students who have completed college courses, and have a minimum grade of (B) in BIOL 2113 & Lab, BIOL 2114 & Lab, BIOL 2117 & Lab, ENGL 1101 and MATH 1111 For students who have not taken college level courses: Weighting will be assigned to High School Graduates overall GPA, MATH and SCIENCE courses. Requirements for transferring courses from another approved institution includes ensuring BIOL 2113 & Lab, BIOL 2114 & Lab, BIOL 2117 & Lab, MATH 1111, are less than five (5) years old. Valid COMPASS, ASSET, SAT, or ACT test scores comparable to the Associate Degree level. Must have AVERAGE or above average score on the HOBET test within the last three (3) years. Must be identified as Program Ready by Atlanta Technical College for the Surgical Technology Program. Additional Requirements for the competitive admissions process: Attend a Surgical Technology program advisement session in the year for which admission is sought. Complete a total of sixteen (16) hours of volunteer, observation, or work experience ideally in more than one medical setting. The program requires a full-time commitment from the student as classes are scheduled daily from 8:00am-4:00pm 264

266 *If the above criteria are not met, an applicant s file cannot be processed for selection into the Surgical Technology Program.* Blood and Airborne Pathogens: Students enrolled in Category I and II programs at Atlanta Technical College will be performing tasks in which there is a normal occurrence for exposure to blood, other potentially infectious body materials, and airborne pathogens. These tasks will be performed in the classroom, laboratory, and clinical activities for each occupational training program/course. Students will be required to present documentation of Hepatitis B and Tuberculosis immunizations as a result of potential occupational exposure. Students should contact their program directors for more information on policies and procedures regarding blood and airborne pathogens. COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum Credits General Education Courses 18 Area I Language Arts/Communications ENGL 1101 Composition and Rhetoric 3 COMP 1000 Intro to Computers 3 SPCH 1101 Public Speaking (Elective) 3 Area II - Social/Behavioral Sciences PSYC 1101 Introductory Psychology 3 Area III - Natural Sciences/Mathematics MATH 1111 College Algebra 3 Area IV - Humanities/Fine Arts HUMN 1101 Introductory to Humanities 3 Program-Specific General Education Course Requirements 12 BIOL 2113 Anatomy and Physiology I (associated with Health Care Science TCC) 3 BIOL 2113L Anatomy and Physiology Lab I (associated with Health Care Science TCC) 1 BIOL 2114 Anatomy and Physiology II (associated with Health Care Science TCC) 3 BIOL 2114L Anatomy and Physiology Lab II (associated with Health Care Science TCC) 1 BIOL 2117 Introductory Microbiology (associated with Health Care Science TCC) 3 BIOL 2117L Introductory Microbiology Lab (associated with Health Care Science TCC) 1 Occupational Courses 43 SURG 1010 Introduction to Surgical Technology 8 265

267 SURG 1100 Surgical Pharmacology 2 SURG 1020 Principles of Surgical Technology 7 SURG 1080 Surgical Microbiology 2 SURG 2110 Surgical Technology Clinical I 3 SURG 2120 Surgical Technology Clinical II 3 SURG 2030 Surgical Procedures I 4 SURG 2130 Surgical Technology Clinical III 3 SURG 2140 Surgical Technology Clinical IV 3 SURG 2040 Surgical Procedures I 4 SURG 2240 Seminar in Surgical Technology 2 ALHS 1090 Medical Terminology for Allied Health Sciences (associated with Health Care Science TCC) 2 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 73 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 5 Estimated Program Cost $8,

268 TECHNICAL SPECIALIST DIVISION: ARTS AND SCIENCES TECHNICAL SPECIALIST Technical Certificate of Credit Program PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: TC31 This program includes a strong foundation in the core competencies that provide students with the writing and analytical reasoning skills that will enable them to remain competitive in a global workforce. The program also provides students with an added advantage of transferring their courses to a four-year institution. Students completing the Technical Specialist Certificate are strongly encouraged to continue their studies and complete an associate degree. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS Must be 16 years of age Completion of high school or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum General Education Courses 18 Area I Language Arts/Communication ENGL 1101 Composition and Rhetoric 3 Area II - Social/Behavioral Sciences Select Two Courses ECON 1101 Principles of Economics 3 ECON 2105 Macroeconomics 3 HIST 1111 World History I 3 PSYC 1101 Introductory Psychology 3 SOCI 1101 Introduction to Sociology 3 Area III - Natural Sciences/Mathematics Select One Course MATH 1101 Mathematical Modeling Credits

269 MATH 1111 College Algebra 3 BIOL 1111 Biology I 3 BIOL 1111L Biology Lab I 1 CHEM 1211 Chemistry I 3 CHEM 1211L Chemistry Lab I 1 PHYS 1110 Conceptual Physics 3 PHYS 1110L Conceptual Physics Lab 1 Area IV - Humanities/Fine Arts Select Two Courses ARTS 1101 Art Appreciation 3 ENGL 2130 American Literature 3 HUMN 1101 Introduction to Humanities 3 XXXX XXXX General Education Core Electives 6 Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses COMP 1000 Introduction to Computers 3 XXXX XXXX Occupational Guided Electives 9 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 36 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 4 Estimated Program Cost $4,

270 WELDING AND JOINING TECHNOLOGY DIVISION: INDUSTRIAL & TRANSPORTATION TECHNOLOGIES WELDING AND JOINING TECHNOLOGY Diploma PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Major Code: WAJ2 The Welding and Joining Technology diploma is designed to prepare students for careers in the welding industry. Program learning opportunities develop academic, technical, professional knowledge and skills required for job acquisition, retention, and advancement. The program emphasizes welding theory and practical application necessary for successful employment. Program graduates receive a Welding and Joining Technology diploma, have the qualifications of a welding and joining technician, and are prepared to take qualifications tests. ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS Must be 16 years of age Completion of high school or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate. COURSE OUTLINE Curriculum Basic Skills (General Core) Courses 8 ENGL 1010 Fundamentals of English I 3 EMPL 1000 Interpersonal Relations and Professional Development 2 MATH 1012 Foundations of Mathematics 3 Essential Fundamental Occupational Courses 42 COMP 1000 Introduction to Computers 3 WELD 1000 Introduction to Welding Technology 3 WELD 1010 Oxyfuel Cutting 3 WELD 1030 Blueprint Reading for Welding Technology 3 WELD 1040 Flat Shielded Metal Arc Welding 4 WELD 1050 Horizontal Shielded Metal Arc Welding 4 WELD 1060 Vertical Shielded Metal Arc Welding 4 Credits 269

271 WELD 1070 Overhead Shielded Metal Arc Welding 4 WELD 1090 Gas Metal Arc Welding 4 WELD 1110 Gas Tungsten Arc Welding 4 WELD 1120 Preparation for Industrial Qualification 3 WELD xxx Advisor Approved Elective 3 Minimum Semester-hour Credits Required for Graduation 50 Minimum Program Length in Semester Terms 3 Estimated Program Cost $4,

272 COURSE DESCRIPTIONS ACCT 1100 FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING I Introduces the basic financial accounting concepts of the complete accounting cycle and provides the student with the necessary skills to maintain a set of books for a sole proprietorship. Topics include: accounting vocabulary and concepts, the accounting cycle for a personal service business, the accounting cycle for a merchandising business, inventory, cash control and receivables. Laboratory work demonstrates theory presented in class. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3750 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 ACCT 1105 FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING II Introduces intermediate financial accounting concepts that provide students with the necessary skills that are needed to maintain a set of books for a partnership and corporation. Topics include: Fixed and Intangible Assets, Current and Long-Term Liabilities (Notes Payable), Payroll, Accounting for a Partnership, Accounting for a Corporation, Statement of Cash Flows, and Financial Statement Analysis, Laboratory work demonstrates theory presented in class. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3750 Pre-requisites: ACCT 1100 Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 ACCT 1110 MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING Emphasizes the interpretation of data by management in planning and controlling business activities. Topics include Managerial Accounting Concepts, Manufacturing Accounting using a Job Order Cost System, Manufacturing Accounting using a Process Cost System, Cost Behavior and Cost-Volume-Profit, Budgeting and Standard Cost Accounting, Flexible Budgets, Standard Costs and Variances, and Capital Investment Analysis and Budgeting. Laboratory work demonstrates theory presented in class. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3000 Pre-requisites: ACCT 1105 Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 ACCT 1115 COMPUTERIZED ACCOUNTING Emphasizes operation of computerized accounting systems from manual input forms. Topics include: company creation (service and merchandising), chart of accounts, customers transactions, vendors transactions, banking activities, merchandise inventory, employees and payroll, and financial reports. Laboratory work includes theoretical and technical application. Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 3000 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3750 Pre-requisites: ACCT 1100; COMP 1000 Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 ACCT 1120 SPREADSHEET APPLICATIONS This course covers the knowledge and skills to use spreadsheet software through course demonstrations, laboratory exercises and projects. Topics and assignments will include: spreadsheet concepts, creating and manipulating data, formatting data and content, creating and modifying formulas, presenting data visually and collaborating and securing data. Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 3000 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3750 Pre-requisites: COMP 1000 Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 ACCT 1125 INDIVIDUAL TAX ACCOUNTING Provides instruction for the preparation of individual federal income tax returns. Topics include: taxable income, income adjustments, schedules, standard deductions, itemized deductions, exemptions, tax credits, and tax calculations. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3000 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 ACCT 1130 PAYROLL ACCOUNTING Provides an understanding of the laws that affect a company's payroll structure and practical application skills in maintaining payroll records. Topics include: payroll tax laws, payroll tax forms, payroll and personnel records, computing wages and salaries, taxes affecting employees and employers, and analyzing and journalizing payroll transactions. 271

273 Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3000 Pre-requisites: ACCT 1100 Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 ACCT 2100 ACCOUNTING INTERNSHIP I Introduces the application and reinforcement of accounting and employability principles in an actual job setting. Acquaints the student with realistic work situations and provides insights into accounting applications on the job. Topics include appropriate work habits, acceptable job performance, application of accounting knowledge and skills, interpersonal relations, and development of productivity. The half-time accounting internship is implemented through the use of written individualized training plans, written performance evaluation, and weekly documentation or seminars and/or other projects as required by the instructor. Lecture: Lab 2: Lab 3: 9000 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 9000 Pre-requisites: All non-elective courses required for program completion. Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 ACCT 2105 ACCOUNTING INTERNSHIP II Introduces the application and reinforcement of accounting and employability principles in an actual job setting. Acquaints the student with realistic work situations and provides insights into accounting applications on the job. Topics include: appropriate work habits, acceptable job performance, application of accounting knowledge and skills, interpersonal relations, and development of productivity. The full-time accounting internship is implemented through the use of written individualized training plans, written performance evaluation, and weekly documentation or seminars and/or other projects as required by the instructor. Lecture: Lab 2: Lab 3: Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: Pre-requisites: All non-elective courses required for program completion. Co-requisites: None Credits: 8 ACCT 2120 BUSINESS TAX ACCOUNTING Provides instruction for preparation of both state and federal partnership, corporation and other business tax returns. Topics include: organization form, overview of taxation of partnership, special partnership issues, corporate tax elections, adjustments to income and expenses, tax elections, forms and schedules, tax credits, reconciliation of book and tax income, tax depreciation methods, and tax calculations. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3000 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: ACCT 1125 Credits: 3 ACCT 2125 CAPSTONE REVIEW OF ACCOUNTING PRINCIPLES Guides the student in dealing with ethics, internal control, fraud and financial statement analysis in the accounting environment which will require students to confront and resolve accounting problems by integrating and applying skills and techniques acquired from previous courses. Will prepare students in developing a personal code of ethics by exploring ethical dilemmas and pressures they will face as accountants. Will help the student understand financial statement analysis and the relation to fraud, and fraud detection. Will prepare the student for the ACAT Comprehensive Examination for Accreditation in Accountancy. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3000 Pre-requisites: ACCT 1105, ACCT 1125, ACCT 1130 Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 ACCT 2135 INTRODUCTION TO GOVERNMENTAL AND NONPROFIT ACCOUNTING Provides an introduction to financial reporting and accounting principles for state/local governments and nonprofit entities. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: ACCT 1105 Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 ACCT 2140 LEGAL ENVIRONMENT OF BUSINESS Introduces law and its relationship to business. Topics include: legal ethics, legal processes, business contracts, business torts and crimes, real and personal property, agency and employment, risk-bearing devices, and Uniform Commercial Code. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 ACCT 2145 PERSONAL FINANCE Introduces practical applications of concepts and techniques used to manage personal finance. Topics include: cash management, time value of money, credit, major purchasing decisions, insurance, investments, retirement, and estate planning. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total:

274 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 ACRP 1000 INTRODUCTION TO AUTO COLLISION REPAIR This course provides instruction in procedures and practices necessary for safe and compliant operation of auto collision repair facilities. It introduces the structural configuration and identification of the structural members of various unibodies and frames used for automobiles as well as equipment and hand tools used in collision repair tasks. Lecture: 2700 Lab 2: 600 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3300 Pre-requisites: Provisional Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 ACRP 1005 AUTOMOBILE COMPONENT REPAIR AND REPLACEMENT This course provides instruction in removal and replacement methods of a variety of non-structural cosmetic and safety features of the automobile as well as bolt-on body panels. Lecture: 1310 Lab 2: 2140 Lab 3: 1850 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 5300 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: ACRP 1000 Credits: 4 ACRP 1010 FOUNDATIONS OF COLLISION REPAIR This course introduces the materials, tools, and operations required to repair minor collision damage and it provides instruction in nonmetallic auto body repair techniques. Lecture: 1450 Lab 2: 2700 Lab 3: 2850 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 7000 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: ACRP 1000, ACRP 1005 Credits: 5 ACRP 1015 FUNDAMENTALS OF AUTOMOTIVE WELDING This course introduces welding and cutting procedures used in auto collision repair. Emphasis will be placed on MIG welding techniques through a variety of different procedures. Lecture: 1730 Lab 2: 1970 Lab 3: 850 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 4550 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: ACRP 1000 Credits: 4 ACRP 1017 MECHANICAL AND ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS I This course introduces suspension and steering, braking, and drive train systems found on vehicles typically requiring repair of damages incurred through automobile collisions. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 3000 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 4500 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: ACRP 1000 Credits: 4 ACRP 1019 MECHANICAL AND ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS II This course introduces the various electrical, heating and AC, engine cooling, fuel and intake, and restraint systems found on vehicles typically requiring repair of damages incurred through automobile collisions. Lecture: 2000 Lab 2: 3500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 5500 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: ACRP 1000 Credits: 5 ACRP 2001 INTRODUCTION TO AUTO PAINTING AND REFINISHING The course introduces the spray gun equipment, materials, and techniques used in the application of special paints. Emphasis will be placed on automotive refinishing theories and procedures. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 2750 Lab 3: 381 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 5381 Pre-requisites: Provisional Admission Co-requisites: ACRP 1000, ACRP 1010 Credits: 5 ACRP 2002 PAINTING AND REFINISHING TECHNIQUES This course further expands on the spray gun equipment, materials, and techniques used in the application of special paints to automobile finishes introduced in Fundamentals of Refinishing I. Emphasis will be placed on blending, tinting, and matching colors. Lecture: 0 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: Pre-requisites: Provisional Admission Co-requisites: ACRP 1000, ACRP 2001 Credits: 273

275 ACRP 2009 REFINISHING INTERNSHIP Provides occupation-based learning opportunities for students pursuing the Paint and Refinishing specialization. Students will be mentored by qualified professional technicians as they experience working in the Automotive Collision Repair profession in an industry standard commercial repair facility or industry standard simulated on-campus facility. Topics include: sanding, priming, and paint preparation; special refinishing applications; urethane enamels; tint and match colors; and detailing. Lecture: 0 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 4500 Practicum/Internship: 4500 Clinical: 0 Total: 4500 Pre-requisites: ACRP 1000 Co-requisites: ACRP 2001, ACRP 2002 Credits: 3 ACRP 2010 MAJOR COLLISION REPAIR This course introduces procedures and resources used in the identification and assessment of automotive collision damages. This course provides instruction on the hydraulic systems and for the diagnosis, straightening, measuring and alignment of automobile frames and bodies. Lecture: 2185 Lab 2: 2765 Lab 3: 550 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 5500 Pre-requisites: ACRP 1000 Co-requisites: ACRP 1005 Credits: 5 ACRP 2015 MAJOR COLLISION REPLACEMENT This course provides instruction in conventional/unibody automobile body structural panel repairs emphasizing a variety of removal and replacement techniques. Lecture: 2350 Lab 2: 2800 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 5150 Pre-requisites: ACRP 1000 Co-requisites: ACRP 2010 Credits: 5 ACRP 2019 MAJOR COLLISION REPAIR INTERNSHIP Provides occupation-based learning opportunities for students pursuing the Major Collision Repair specialization. Qualified professional technicians will mentor students as they experience working in the Automotive Collision Repair profession in an industry standard commercial repair facility or industry standard simulated on-campus facility. Topics include: conventional frame repair, unibody damage identification and analysis, unibody measuring and fixturing systems, unibody straightening systems and techniques, unibody welding techniques, unibody structural panel repair and replacement, conventional body structural panel repair, unibody suspension and steering systems, and bolt-on body panel removal and replacement. Lecture: 0 Lab 2: Lab 3: 4500 Practicum/Internship: 4500 Clinical: 0 Total: 4500 Pre-requisites: ACRP 1000 Co-requisites: ACRP 2010, ACRP 2015 Credits: 2 AIRC 1005 REFRIGERATION FUNDAMENTALS Introduces the basic concepts, theories, and safety regulations and procedures of refrigeration. Topics include an introduction to OSHA, safety, first aid, laws of thermodynamics, pressure and temperature relationships, heat transfer, the refrigerant cycle, refrigerant identification, and types of AC systems. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: Lab 3: 2250 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 4500 Pre-requisites: Provisional Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 AIRC 1010 REFRIGERATION PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICES This course introduces the student to basic refrigeration system principles and practices, and the major component parts of the refrigeration system. Topics include refrigeration tools, piping practices, service valves, leak testing, refrigerant recovery, recycling, and reclamation, evacuation, charging, and safety. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 2250 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 4500 Pre-requisites: AIRC 1005 Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 AIRC 1020 REFRIGERATION SYSTEMS COMPONENTS This course provides the student with the skills and knowledge and skills to install, test, and service major components of a refrigeration system. Topics include compressors, condensers, evaporators, metering devices, service procedures, refrigeration systems and safety. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: Lab 3: 2250 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total:

276 Pre-requisites: AIRC 1005 Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 AIRC 1030 HVACR ELECTRICAL FUNDAMENTALS This course provides an introduction to fundamental electrical concepts and theories as applied to the air conditioning industry. Topics include AC and DC theory, electric meters, electrical diagrams, distribution systems, electrical panels, voltage circuits, code requirements, and safety. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: Lab 3: 2250 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 4500 Pre-requisites: Provisional Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 AIRCS 1040 HVACR ELECTRICAL MOTORS This course provides the student with the skills and knowledge necessary for application and service of electric motors commonly used by the refrigeration and air conditioning industry. Topics include diagnostic techniques, capacitors, installation procedures, types of electric motors, electric motor service, and safety. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: Lab 3: 2250 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 4500 Pre-requisites: AIRC 1030 Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 AIRC 1050 HVACR ELECTRICAL COMPONENTS AND CONTROLS Provides instruction in identifying, installing, and testing commonly used electrical components in an air conditioning system. Topics include: pressure switches, transformers, other commonly used controls, diagnostic techniques, installation procedures, solid state controls, and safety. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: Lab 3: 2250 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 4500 Pre-requisites: Co-requisites: AIRC 1030 Credits: 4 AIRC 1060 AIR CONDITIONING SYSTEMS APPLICATION AND INSTALLATION Provides instruction on the installation and service of residential air conditioning systems. Topics include: installation procedures, split-systems, add-on systems, packaged systems, system wiring, control circuits, and safety. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: Lab 3: 2250 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 4500 Pre-requisites: Co-requisites: AIRC 1010, AIRC 1030 Credits: 4 AIRC 1070 GAS HEAT This course introduces principles of combustion and service requirements for gas heating systems. Topics include servicing procedures, electrical controls, piping, gas valves, venting, code requirements, principles of combustion, and safety. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: Lab 3: 2250 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 4500 Pre-requisites: AIRC 1030 Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 AIRC 1080 HEAT PUMPS AND RELATED SYSTEMS This course provides instruction on the principles, applications, and operation of a residential heat pump system. Topics include installation and servicing procedures, electrical components, geothermal ground source energy supplies, dual fuel, valves, and troubleshooting techniques. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: Lab 3: 2250 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 4500 Pre-requisites: AIRC 1010 Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 AIRC 1090 TROUBLESHOOTING AIR CONDITIONING SYSTEMS This course provides instruction on the troubleshooting and repair of major components of a residential air conditioning system. Topics include troubleshooting techniques, electrical controls, air flow, the refrigeration cycle, electrical servicing procedures, and safety. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 2250 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 4500 Pre-requisites: AIRC 1010, AIRC 1030 Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 ALHS 1010 INTRODUCTION TO ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY 275

277 Provides a study of medical terminology and the basic study of structure and function of the human body. It provides an overview of the functions of each body system and the medical terminology associated with each system. This course is intended for students in non-medical programs and is designed to provide medical terminology and basic knowledge of anatomy and physiology. Lecture: 3000 Lab 2: Lab 3: Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3000 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 ALHS 1011 STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION OF THE HUMAN BODY Focuses on basic normal structure and function of the human body. Topics include general plan and function of the human body, integumentary system, skeletal system, muscular system, nervous and sensory systems, endocrine system, cardiovascular system, lymphatic system, respiratory system, digestive system, urinary system, and reproductive system. Lecture: 3750 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3750 Pre-requisites: Regular Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 5 ALHS 1015 BASIC INORGANIC CHEMISTRY Introduces chemical concept principles, laws, and techniques applicable to the medical laboratory. Topics include laboratory safety, fundamental principles of chemistry, weight and measures, solutions, and basic laws of chemistry. Lecture: Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: Co-requisites: None Credits: 2 ALHS 1040 INTRODUCTION TO HEALTH CARE Introduces a grouping of fundamental principles, practices, and issues common in the health care profession. In addition to the essential skills, students explore various delivery systems and related issues. Topics include: basic life support/cpr, basic emergency care/first aid and triage, vital signs, infection control/blood and air-borne pathogens. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2:0 Lab 3: 2250 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3750 Pre-requisites: Provisional Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 ALHS 1090 MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY FOR ALLIED HEALTH SCIENCES Introduces the elements of medical terminology. Emphasis is placed on building familiarity with medical words through knowledge of roots, prefixes, and suffixes. Topics include: origins (roots, prefixes, and suffixes), word building, abbreviations and symbols, and terminology related to the human anatomy. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: Lab 3: Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 1500 Pre-requisites: Provisional Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 2 ARTS 1101 ART APPRECIATION Explores the visual arts and the relationship to human needs and aspirations. Students investigate the value of art, themes in art, the elements and principles of composition, and the materials and processes used for artistic expression. Well-known works of visual art are explored. The course encourages student interest in the visual arts beyond the classroom. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: Lab 3: Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: Appropriate Degree Level Writing (English) and Reading Placement Test Scores. Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 AUTT 1010 AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGY INTRODUCTION Introduces basic concepts and practices necessary for safe and effective automotive shop operations. Topics include: safety procedures; legal/ethical responsibilities; general service; hand tools; shop organization, management, and work flow systems. Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3:0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: Provisional Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 2 AUTT 1020 AUTOMOTIVE ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS Introduces automotive electricity, emphasizes the basic principles, diagnosis, and service/repair of batteries, starting systems, starting system components, alternators and regulators, lighting system, gauges, horn, wiper/washer, and accessories. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 9000 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: AUTT 1010 Credits: 7 276

278 AUTT 1030 AUTOMOTIVE BRAKE SYSTEMS Introduces brake systems theory and its application to automotive systems and anti-lock brake system (ABS) to include ABS components and ABS operation, testing, and diagnosis. Topics include: hydraulic system diagnosis and repair; drum brake diagnosis and repair; disc brake diagnosis and repair; power assist units diagnosis and repair; miscellaneous brake components (wheel bearings, parking brakes, electrical, etc.) diagnosis and repair; test, diagnose, and service electronic brake control system. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 2250 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 5250 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: AUTT 1010 Credits: 4 AUTT 1040 AUTOMOTIVE ENGINE PERFORMANCE Introduces basic engine performance systems which support and control four stroke gasoline engine operations and reduce emissions. Topics include: general engine diagnosis, computerized engine controls and diagnosis, ignition system diagnosis and repair, fuel and air induction, exhaust systems, emission control systems diagnosis and repair, and other related engine service. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 2500 Lab 3: 7500 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: Pre-requisites: AUTT 1020 Co-requisites: None Credits: 7 AUTT 1050 AUTOMOTIVE SUSPENSION AND STEERING SYSTEMS Introduces students to principles of steering, suspension, wheel alignment, electronic steering, and electronic active suspension. Topics include: general suspension and steering systems diagnosis; steering systems diagnosis and repair; suspension systems diagnosis and repair; related suspension and steering service; wheel alignment diagnosis, adjustment and repair, wheel and tire diagnosis and repair. Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 2500 Lab 3: 3000 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 6250 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: AUTT 1010 Credits: 4 AUTT 1060 AUTOMOTIVE CLIMATE CONTROL SYSTEMS Introduces the theory and operation of automotive heating and air conditioning systems. Students attain proficiency in inspection, testing, service, and repair of heating and air conditioning systems and related components. Topics include: a/c system diagnosis and repair; refrigeration system component diagnosis and repair; heating, ventilation, and engine cooling systems diagnosis and repair; operating systems and related controls diagnosis and repair; refrigerant recovery, recycling, and handling. Lecture: 2500 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 1500 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 5500 Pre-requisites: AUTT 1020 Co-requisites: None Credits: 5 AUTT 2010 AUTOMOTIVE ENGINE REPAIR This course introduces the student to automotive engine theory and repair, placing emphasis on inspection, testing, and diagnostic techniques for both 2 cycle and 4 cycle internal combustion engines. Topics include general engine diagnosis; removal and reinstallation; cylinder heads and valve trains diagnosis and repair; engine blocks assembly diagnosis and repair; lubrication and cooling systems diagnosis and repair. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 3500 Lab 3: 3750 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 8750 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: AUTT1010 Credits: 6 AUTT 2020 AUTOMOTIVE MANUAL DRIVE TRAIN AND AXLES This course introduces basics of rear-wheel drive, front-wheel drive, and four-wheel drive line related operation, diagnosis, service and related electronic controls. Topics include: drive shaft and half shaft, universal and constant-velocity (CV) joint diagnosis and repair; ring and pinion gears and differential case assembly; limited slip differential; drive axle shaft; four-wheel drive/all-wheel drive component diagnosis and repair. The course also introduces the basics of front and rear-wheel drive, as well as clutch operation, diagnosis and service. Electronic controls related to transmission/transaxles operation are discussed. Topics include: clutch diagnosis and repair; transmission/transaxles diagnosis and repair. Lecture: 1590 Lab 2: 1560 Lab 3: 1900 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 5050 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: AUTT 1010 Credits: 4 AUTT 2030 AUTOMOTIVE AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSIONS AND TRANSAXLES Introduces students to the basic automatic transmission/transaxle theory, operation, inspection, service and repair procedures, as well as electronic diagnosis and repair. Topics include: general automatic transmission and transaxle diagnosis; in vehicle and off vehicle transmission and transaxle maintenance, adjustment and repair. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 3000 Lab 3: 2250 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total:

279 Pre-requisites: AUTT 1020 Co-requisites: None Credits: 5 AVIO 1010 BASIC ELECTRONICS Provides a review of the basic theory and application of electronics with a primary focus on use in avionic systems. Topics include: atomic theory, DC circuits, AC circuits, alternating current, inductance and transformers, capacitance, resonance and filters, vacuum tubes, and solid state devices. Lecture: 2000 Lab 2: 1000 Lab 3: 1500 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 4500 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 AVIO 1020 AVIONICS MAINTENANCE PRACTICES Provides practical experience in maintaining avionics systems. Topics include: solder/solderless connecting, use of test instruments, component installation/removal techniques, repair procedures, and troubleshooting techniques. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 3000 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 4500 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: AVIO 1010 Credits: 3 AVIO 1030 ADVANCED ELECTRONICS Introduces the theory and application of radio frequency transmission and reception. Topics include: power supplies, oscillators, amplifiers, transmitters, amplitude modulation, AM receivers, frequency modulation, and antenna systems. Lecture: 2000 Lab 2: 1000 Lab 3: 1500 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 4500 Pre-requisites: AVIO 1010 Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 AVIO 1040 DIGITAL ELECTRONICS Introduces the theory and application of digital electronics with a primary focus on their use in avionic systems. Topics include: numbering system, logic gates, Boolean algebra, flip-flops, and registers and counters. Lecture: 2000 Lab 2: 1000 Lab 3: 1500 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 4500 Pre-requisites: AVIO 1010 Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 AVIO 1060 AIRCRAFT LOGIC SYSTEMS Focuses on microprocessor based computers used in avionics systems. Topics include: memory, mass storage, computer systems, data bases, and logic systems repair procedures. Lecture: 2000 Lab 2: 1000 Lab 3: 1500 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 4500 Pre-requisites: AVIO 1040 Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 AVIO 1070 AIRCRAFT COMMUNICATION SYSTEMS Continues the study of avionics maintenance practices with emphasis on aircraft communication systems. Topics include: component operation, component location, integration, analysis, maintenance, and ACARS. Lecture: 2500 Lab 2: 1000 Lab 3: 1500 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 5000 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: AVIO 1040 Credits: 5 AVIO 1080 NAVIGATION SYSTEMS Continues the study of avionics maintenance practices with emphasis on aircraft navigational systems. Topics include: bridges and monitors, synchros, gyros, and navigation systems. Lecture: 2500 Lab 2: 1000 Lab 3: 1500 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 5000 Pre-requisites: AVIO 1040 Co-requisites: AVIO 1070 Credits: 5 AVIO 1090 FLIGHT DIRECTOR AND AUTOPILOT SYSTEMS Continues the study of avionics maintenance practices with emphasis on flight director and autopilot systems. Topics include: flight director systems, autopilot systems, and avionics line maintenance test equipment. Lecture: 2000 Lab 2: 1000 Lab 3: 1500 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 4500 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: AVIO 1080 Credits: 4 AVMT 1000 AVIATION MATHEMATICS 278

280 Aviation Mathematics provides students with the knowledge necessary to use and apply mathematical procedures and processes that are applicable to aviation maintenance functions. Topics include: perform algebraic operations; extract roots and raise numbers to a given power; determine area and volume of geometrical shapes; and solve ratio, proportion, and percentage problems. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: Lab 3: Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 1500 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 2 AVMT 1010 AIRCRAFT MAINTENANCE REGULATIONS This course provides students with the knowledge and skills necessary to select and use FAA and manufacturer s specifications, data sheets, manuals, related regulations, and technical data; to write descriptions of aircraft conditions, record work performed, and complete maintenance forms and inspection reports; and to interpret federal regulations regarding mechanic privileges and limitations. Topics include maintenance publications, maintenance forms and records, and mechanic privileges and limitations. Lecture: 1000 Lab 2: Lab 3: 1500 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2500 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 2 AVMT 1020 AIRCRAFT APPLIED SCIENCES I Provides students with the fundamentals of aircraft materials and processes, ground operations and servicing, as well as aircraft cleaning and corrosion control. Lecture: 2800 Lab 2: Lab 3: 2950 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 5750 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 5 AVMT 1025 AIRCRAFT APLLIED SCIENCES II Provides students with the fundamentals of aircraft drawings, weight and balance, and fluid lines and fittings. Lecture: 2200 Lab 2: Lab 3: 2050 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 4250 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 AVMT 1030 AIRCRAFT ELECTRICITY AND ELECTRONICS Basic Electricity and Electronics provides a study of the relationships of voltage, current, and resistance in aircraft electrical systems, and the use of meters. Alternators; generators; starters; motors; charging systems; basic AC and DC systems; and semiconductor, solid state, and integrated circuit fundamentals are introduced. Topics include: basic electricity; determine the relationship of voltage, current, and resistance in electrical circuits; read and interpret electrical circuit diagrams; measure voltage, current, resistance, and continuity; calculate and measure electrical power; calculate and measure capacitance and inductance; inspect and service batteries; and solid state devices applications. Lecture: 2500 Lab 2: 2500 Lab 3: Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 5000 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: AVMT 1000 Credits: 5 AVMT 1210 AVIATION PHYSICS Provides students with an introduction to the theory and application of physics to aerospace vehicles and their subsystems. Topics include: temperature and heat; pressure, temperature, and volume of air mass; basic aerodynamics and theory of flight; physical factors affecting engine output; relationship of pressure, area, and force; origin of sound; principles of simple machines; and centrifugal and centripetal force. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: Lab 3: Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 1500 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: AVMT 1000 Credits: 2 AVMT 2010 AIRCRAFT AIRFRAME STRUCTURES This course presents a survey of aircraft airframe structures used in aircraft. Topics include: wood structures, aircraft covering, and aircraft finishes. Lecture: 1000 Lab 2: Lab 3: 1500 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total:

281 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 2 AVMT 2020 AIRFRAME SHEET METAL AND NON-METALLIC STRUCTURES Provides a study of metal and non-metallic tube and riveted sheet monocoque or semi-monocoque. Topics include: sheet metal structures introduction; install conventional rivets and fasteners; sheet metal form, lay out, and bend; inspect and repair sheet metal structures; identify non-metallic structures; inspect bonded structures; fiberglass structures; plastic structures; composite and honeycomb structures; inspect, check, and repair windows, doors, and interior furnishings; and laminated structures. Lecture: 2500 Lab 2: Lab 3: 3500 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 6000 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 5 AVMT 2030 AIRFRAME WELDING Provides an introduction to welding skills and tasks used on airframes. Topics include: welding principles; soldering, brazing, gaswelding, and arc-welding steel; welding aluminum and stainless steel; fabricating tubular structures; soldering stainless steel; and welding titanium and magnesium. Lecture: 500 Lab 2: Lab 3: 1500 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2000 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 1 AVMT 2040 AIRFRAME ASSEMBLY AND RIGGING This course provides a study of aircraft assembly and rigging configurations. Topics include: use assembly and rigging hand tools and equipment; rig fixed wing aircraft; rig rotary wing aircraft; check alignment of structures; assemble aircraft components, including flight control surfaces; balance, rig, and inspect movable primary and secondary control surfaces; and jack aircraft. Lecture: 1000 Lab 2: Lab 3: 1500 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2500 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 2 AVMT 2050 AIRFRAME INSPECTION This course provides instruction for performing airframe inspections with emphasis on developing the skills related to conformity and air worthiness evaluations. Topics include: perform airframe conformity inspection, and perform airframe air worthiness inspection. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 3500 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 5000 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: AVMT 1010, AVMT 1020, AVMT 1025, AVMT 2010 Credits: 4 AVMT 2060 AIRCRAFT HYDRAULIC AND PNEUMATIC SYSTEMS This course provides a study of the principles of generation, distribution, and management of hydraulic and pneumatic power throughout the aircraft. Topics include: identify hydraulic fluids; repair hydraulic and pneumatic power system components; inspect, check, service, troubleshoot, and repair hydraulic and pneumatic power systems; hydraulic and pneumatic position and warning systems; and inspect, check, troubleshoot, service, and repair aircraft position and warning systems. Lecture: 1000 Lab 2: Lab 3: 1500 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2500 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 2 AVMT 2070 AIRCRAFT LANDING GEAR SYSTEMS This course provides a study of aircraft landing gear systems with emphasis on inspection and maintenance procedures of hydraulic and pneumatic power throughout the aircraft structure. Topics include: inspect, check, service, and repair landing gear retraction systems and shock struts; inspect, check, service, and repair brakes, wheels, and tires; and inspect, check, service, and repair steering systems. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: Lab 3: 2500 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 4000 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 AVMT 2080 AIRCRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL SYSTEMS This course provides a study of aircraft environmental control systems. Topics include: inspect, check, troubleshoot, service, and repair cabin atmosphere control systems; inspect, check, troubleshoot, service, and repair ice and rain control systems; and inspect, check, troubleshoot, service, and repair fire protection systems. 280

282 Lecture: 1750 Lab 2: Lab 3: 2250 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 4000 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 AVMT 2085 AIRCRAFT FUEL AND INSTRUMENT SYSTEMS This course provides a study of airframe fuel and instrument systems. Topics include: inspect, check, troubleshoot, service and repair aircraft fuel systems; and inspect, check, troubleshoot, service and repair aircraft instrument systems. Lecture: 2000 Lab 2: Lab 3: 1500 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3500 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: AVMT 2090 AIRCRAFT ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS This course provides a study of aircraft electrical systems. Topics include: install, check, and service airframe electrical wiring, controls, switches, indicators and protective devices; inspect, check, troubleshoot, service and repair alternating, and direct current elec5trical systems; repair and inspect aircraft electrical system components, crimp and splice wiring to manufacturer s specifications, and repair pins and sockets of aircraft connectors; inspect, check, and troubleshoot constant speed and integrated speed drive generators. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 2750 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 5000 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: AVMT 1030 Credits: 4 AVMT 2095 AIRCRAFT COMMUNICATION AND NAVIGATION SYSTEMS This course provides a study of aircraft communication and navigation systems. Topics include: inspect, check, and troubleshoot autopilot servos and approach coupling systems; inspect, check, and service aircraft electronic communication and navigation systems including VHF passenger address interphones and static discharge devices, aircraft VOR, ILS LORAN, radar beacon transponders, flight management computers, and GPWS; and inspect and repair antenna and electronic equipment installations. Lecture: 1250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 1250 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2500 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: AVMT 1030 Credits: 2 AVMT 2210 RECIPROCATING ENGINE POWERPLANTS I This course provides a study of piston engine theory and maintenance including air and water cooled aircraft engines. Topics include: aircraft reciprocating engine theory, and inspect and repair radial engines. Lecture: 2500 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2500 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 AVMT 2220 RECIPROCATING ENGINE POWERPLANTS II This course continues a study of piston engine theory and maintenance including air and water cooled aircraft engines. Topics include: overhaul a reciprocating engine; inspect, check, service, and repair reciprocating engines and engine installations; and install, troubleshoot, and remove reciprocating engines. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 6000 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 7500 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: AVMT 2210 Credits: 5 AVMT 2230 GAS TURBINE POWERPLANTS I This course provides a study of the fundamentals and evolution of the jet engine and jet propulsion. Topics include: aircraft gas turbine engine theory, and inspect and troubleshoot unducted fan systems and components. Lecture: 2500 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2500 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 AVMT 2240 GAS TURBINE POWERPLANTS II This course continues a study of the fundamentals and evolution of the jet engine and jet propulsion. Topics include: overhaul a turbine engine; install, troubleshoot, and remove turbine engines; and inspect, check, service, and repair turbine engines and turbine engine installations. Lecture: 1200 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 3800 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 5000 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: AVMT 2230 Credits: 3 AVMT 2250 AIRCRAFT ENGINE INSPECTION 281

283 This course provides students with the knowledge and skills to perform aircraft engine inspections. Topics include: perform an aircraft power plant conformity and airworthiness inspection. Lecture: 500 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 1000 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 1500 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: AVMT 1010 Credits: 1 AVMT 2260 AIRCRAFT ENGINE FUEL AND FUEL METERING SYSTEMS This course provides a study of aircraft engine fuel and fuel metering systems. Topics include: repair engine fuel system components; inspect, check, service, troubleshoot, and repair engine fuel systems; troubleshoot and adjust turbine engine fuel metering systems and electronic engine fuel controls; inspect check, service, troubleshoot, and repair reciprocating and turbine engine fuel metering systems; overhaul carburetors; repair engine fuel metering system components; and inspect, check, and service water injection systems. Lecture: 2500 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 3500 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 6000 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 AVMT 2270 POWERPLANT INSTRUMENTS, FIRE PROTECTION AND ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS This course provides a study of powerplant instruments, fire protection and electrical systems. Topics include: troubleshoot, service, and repair electrical and mechanical fluid rate-of-flow indicating systems; inspect, check, service, troubleshoot, and repair electrical and mechanical engine temperature, pressure, and R.P.M. indicating systems; inspect, check, service, troubleshoot, and repair engine fire detection and extinguishing systems; install, check, and service engine electrical wiring, controls, switches, indicators, and protective devices; and repair engine electrical system components. Lecture: 1800 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 1950 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3750 Pre-requisites: AVMT 1030 Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 AVMT 2275 POWERPLANT IGNITION AND STARTING SYSTEMS This course provides a study of powerplant ignition and starting systems. Topics include: overhaul magneto and ignition harness; inspect, service, troubleshoot, and repair reciprocating and turbine engine ignition systems and components; inspect, service, troubleshoot, and repair turbine electrical starting systems; and inspect, service, and troubleshoot turbine engine pneumatic starting systems. Lecture: 2150 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 1600 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3750 Pre-requisites: AVMT 1030 Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 AVMT 2280 AIRCRAFT POWERPLANT ACCESSORY SYSTEMS This course provides a study of aircraft powerplant accessory systems. Topics include: inspect and maintain aircraft engine lubrication systems; inspect and maintain aircraft engine induction systems; inspect and maintain aircraft engine cooling systems; and inspect and maintain aircraft engine exhaust systems. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 1250 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2750 Pre-requisites: AVMT 2210, AVMT 2230 Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 AVMT 2285 AIRCRAFT PROPELLER SYSTEMS This course provides a study of aircraft propeller systems. Topics include: propeller theory and fundamentals; inspect and maintain propellers; and install, troubleshoot, and remove propellers. Lecture: 1400 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 3350 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 4750 Pre-requisites: AVMT 2210 Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 BARB 1000 INTRODUCTION TO BARBER/STYLING IMPLEMENTS Introduction to Barber/Styling Implements is designed to give an overview of the barbering profession. Students are also taught the fundamentals of each barber/styling implement. Emphasis will be placed on the maintenance and care of each implement. Topics include: Barbering history, personality development, professional barbering ethics, and professional barbering image, safety, and reception and telephone techniques, nomenclature, types and sizes, proper use and care, and maintenance. 282

284 Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3000 Pre-requisites: Provisional Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 BARB 1010 SCIENCE, STERILIZATION, SANITATION AND BACTERIOLOGY Introduces fundamental theories and practices of bacteriology, sterilization, sanitation, safety, and the welfare of the barber/stylist and patron. Topics include: sterilization, sanitation, safety, bacteriology, and Hazardous Duty Standards Act compliance. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: BARB 1000, ENGL 1000 Co-requisites: BARB 1000, ENGL 1000 Credits: 3 BARB 1020 INTRODUCTION TO HAIRCUTTING AND SHAMPOOING Introduces fundamental theories and practices of bacteriology, sterilization, sanitation, safety, and the welfare of the barber/stylist and patron. Topics include: sterilization, sanitation, safety, bacteriology, and Hazardous Duty Standards Act compliance. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: BARB 1000, ENGL 1000 Co-requisites: BARB 1000, ENGL 1000 Credits: 5 BARB 1030 HAIRCUTTING/BASIC STYLING Introduces the theory and skills necessary to apply basic haircutting techniques. Safe use of haircutting implements will be stressed. Also introduces the fundamental theory and skills required to shampoo hair. Laboratory training includes shampooing a live model. Topics include: preparation of patron, haircutting terminology, safety and sanitation, implements, and basic haircutting techniques, shampoo chemistry, patron preparation, and shampoo procedures. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 3000 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 5250 Pre-requisites: BARB 1000, BARB 1010, PSYC 1010 Co-requisites: BARB 1000, BARB 1010, PSYC 1010 Credits: 3 BARB 1040 SHAVING Introduces the theory and skills necessary to prepare and shave a patron. Simulated shaving procedures will precede practice on live models. Topics include: patron preparation, beard preparation, shaving techniques, once-over shave techniques, and safety precautions. Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 2250 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3000 Pre-requisites: BARB 1020 Co-requisites: BARB 1020 Credits: 2 BARB 1050 SCIENCE: ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY Develops knowledge of the function and care of the scalp, skin, and hair. Emphasis is placed on the function, health, and growth of these areas. Topics include: cells, skeletal system, muscular system, nervous system, circulatory system, and related systems. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: BARB 1010 Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 BARB 1060 INTRODUCTION TO COLOR THEORY/COLOR APPLICATION Introduces the fundamental theory of color, predispositions tests, color selection, and color application. Presents the application of temporary, semi-permanent, and permanent hair coloring products. Topics include: basic color concepts, skin reactions, the color wheel, color selection and application, mustache and beards, coloring products, safety precautions and tests, mixing procedures, color selection and application. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 2250 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3750 Pre-requisites: MATH 1012 Co-requisites: BARB 1050 Credits: 3 BARB 1070 CHEMICAL RESTRUCTURING OR HAIR Introduces the chemistry and chemical reactions of permanent wave solutions and relaxers. Provide instructions in the applications of permanent waves and hair relaxers. Precautions and special problems involved in applying permanent waves and relaxers will be emphasized. Application of perms and relaxers on live models is included. Topics include: permanent wave techniques, safety procedures, chemical relaxer techniques, and permanent wave and chemical relaxer, application procedures on manikins, timed permanent wave, timed relaxer applications, safety precautions, and Hazardous Duty Standard Act. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 4500 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 6750 Pre-requisites: BARB 1050, MATH 1012 Co-requisites: None Credits: 5 283

285 BARB 1080 ADVANCED HAIRCUTTING/STYLING Continues the theory and application of haircutting and styling techniques. Topics include: elevation and design cutting, introduction to hairpieces, blow-dry styling, and thermal waving and curling, advanced haircutting and styling; use of clippers, shears, and razor; hair chemical texturizing/styling; permanent waving/styling; shaving techniques; and beard trimming. Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 9000 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 9750 Pre-requisites: BARB 1030, BARB 1040, BARB 1070 Co-requisites: None Credits: 5 BARB 1090 STRUCTURES OF SKIN, SCALP, HAIR AND FACIAL TREATMENTS Introduces theory, procedures, and products used in the care and treatment of the skin, scalp, and hair. Provides instruction on theory and application of techniques in treatment of the skin, scalp, and hair; and introduces the theory and skills required in massaging the face, preparing the patron for facial treatment, and giving facial treatments for various skin conditions. Benefits of facial treatments and massage will be emphasized. Emphasis will be placed on work with live models. Topics include: treatment theory, basic corrective hair and scalp treatments, plain facial, products and supplies, disease and disorders, implements, products and supplies, diseases and disorders, corrective hair and scalp treatments, facial procedures and manipulations, and safety precautions, theory of massage, preparation of patron for massage, massage procedures, facial treatment, types of facials, and facial treatment benefits. Lecture: 753 Lab 2: 3000 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3753 Pre-requisites: BARB 1050 Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 BARB 1100 BARBERING/STYLING PRACTICUM AND INTERNSHIP Provides experience necessary for professional development and completion of requirements for state licensure. Emphasis will be placed on the display of professional conduct and positive attitudes. The requirements for this course may be met in a laboratory setting or in a combination of a laboratory setting and an approved internship facility. Topics include: haircutting/styling, hairstyling texturizing, shaving, beard trimming, thermal waving, hairpiece fitting and styling, safety precautions, and licensure preparation. Lecture: 0 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 6750 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 6750 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 BARB 1110 SHOP MANAGEMENT/OWNERSHIP Emphasizes the steps involved in opening and operating a privately owned cosmetology salon or barber/styling shop. Topics include: planning a salon/shop, business management, retailing, public relations, sales skills, client retention, and entrepreneurship. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 2250 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3750 Pre-requisites: BARB 1080 Co-requisites: BARB 1080 Credits: 3 BIOL 1111 BIOLOGY I Provides an introduction to basic biological concepts with a focus on living cells. Topics include chemical principles related to cells, cell structure and function, energy and metabolism, cell division, protein synthesis, genetics, and biotechnology. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2:0 Lab 3:0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: BIOL 1111L Credits: 3 BIOL 1111L BIOLOGY LAB I Selected laboratory exercises paralleling the topics in BIOL The laboratory exercises for this course include chemical principles related to cells, cell structure and function, energy and metabolism, cell division, protein synthesis, genetics, and biotechnology. Lecture: 0 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 2250 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: BIOL 1111 Credits: 1 BIOL 2113 ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY I Introduces the anatomy and physiology of the human body. Emphasis is placed on the development of a systemic perspective of anatomical structures and physiological processes. Topics include body organization, cell structure and functions, tissue classifications, integumentary system, skeletal system, muscular system, and nervous and sensory systems. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: BIOL 2113L, ENGL 1101 Credits: 3 284

286 BIOL 2113L ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY I LAB Selected laboratory exercises paralleling the topics in BIOL The laboratory exercises for this course include body organization, cell structure and functions, tissue classifications, integumentary system, skeletal system, muscular system, and nervous sensory systems. Lecture: 0 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 2250 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: BIOL 2113 & ENGL 1101 Credits: 1 BIOL 2114 ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY I1 Continues the study of the anatomy and physiology of the human body. Topics include the endocrine system, cardiovascular system, blood and lymphatic system, immune system, respiratory system, digestive system, urinary system, and reproductive system. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: BIOL 2113, BIOL 2113L Co-requisites: BIOL 2114L Credits: 3 BIOL 2114L ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY II LAB Selected laboratory exercises paralleling the topics in BIOL The laboratory exercises for this course include the endocrine system, cardiovascular system, blood and lymphatic system, immune system, respiratory system, digestive system, urinary system, and reproductive system. Lecture: 0 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 2250 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: BIOL 2113, BIOL 2113L Co-requisites: BIOL 2114 Credits: 1 BIOL 2117 INTRODUCTORY MICROBIOLOGY Provides students with a foundation in basic microbiology with emphasis on infectious disease. Topics include microbial diversity, microbial cell biology, microbial genetics, interactions and impact of microorganisms and humans, microorganisms and human disease. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: BIOL 2113 and BIOL 2113L or BIOL 1111 and BIOL 1111L Co-requisites: BIOL 2117L Credits: 3 BIOL 2117L INTRODUCTORY MICROBIOLOGY LAB Selected laboratory exercises paralleling the topics in BIOL The laboratory exercises for this course include microbial diversity, microbial cell biology, microbial genetics, interactions and impact of microorganisms and humans, and microorganisms and human disease. Lecture: 0 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 2250 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: BIOL 2113 and BIOL 2113L or BIOL 1111 and BIOL 1111L Co-requisites: BIOL 2117 Credits: 1 BIOL 2210 CELL BIOLOGY AND IMMUNOLOGY This course addresses the composition, structure and function of cells as well as essential concepts in immunology. Lectures will discuss macromolecules, metabolism, growth, communication, development, differentiation, cell division, the cell cycle, cell-mediated and antibody mediated immune responses, vaccine immunization, and monoclonal antibodies. Additional Topics include: immunological mechanisms and special cell types. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: BIOL 2117, BIOL 2117L, BIOC 2310, BIOC 2310L Co-requisites: BIOL 2210L Credits: 3 BIOL 2210L CELL BIOLOGY AND IMMUNOLOGY LAB Students will perform experiments requiring culture and maintenance of cells, study cell types, fluorescence microscopy, metabolism, and isolate and characterize cell components and organelles. Protein Purification and Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assays (ELISAs) will also be performed. Lecture: 0 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 2250 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: BIOL 2117, BIOL 2117L, BIOC 2310 and BIOC 2310L Co-requisites: BIOL 2110 Credits: 1 285

287 BIOL 2250 APPLIED BIOTECHNOLOGY INTERNSHIP The internship experience is working 300 hours in an approved laboratory environment. The experience consists of working in the laboratory as a technician operating instruments, running samples, maintaining a laboratory notebook, etc. The intern makes detailed observations, analyzes data and interprets results. Interns prepare technical reports, summaries, protocols, and quantitative analyses. They maintain familiarity with current scientific literature and contribute to the process of the laboratory. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 6750 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 6750 Pre-requisites: BIOL 2210, BIOL 2210L Co-requisites: BIOL 2210, BIOL 2210L Credits: 3 BIOL 2300 BIOLOGICAL RESEARCH The course aims at giving students lab research experience in one or more of the following topics: molecular biology, microbiology, ecology, biochemistry, structural biology or cellular biology by introducing students to a variety of research techniques and their applications. The course is intended for biology, chemistry and bioscience students seeking to acquire basic and advanced training in life science-related fields. This course will provide instruction for understanding many biochemical and molecular techniques used in biotechnology and pharmaceutical industries. Students will be required to present their work in departmental seminars or scientific meetings, possibly publishing research outcomes in scientific journals. Lecture: 0 Lab 2:0 Lab 3: 6750 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 6750 Pre-requisites: BIOL 1111, BIOL 1111L, CHEM 1211, CHEM 1211L, CHEM 1212, CHEM 1212L Co-requisites: BIOL 2117, BIOL 117L Credits: 3 BSCI 1111 INTRODUCTION TO BIOSCIENCE Introduction to and survey of the broad range of activities in bioscience technology. Major applications and advances in pharmaceuticals, medical devices, genomics, forensics, proteomics, agriculture, and environmental science will be covered. Including an in depth examination and discussion of ethical, legal and hands-on activities based on authentic bioscience applications. There is a survey of technical and regulatory aspects of physical, chemical, radiation and biological safety in the bioscience laboratory. Lecture: 0 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 2250 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: Degree level proficiency in English and Math Co-requisites: None Credits: 1 BSCI 1211 REGULATORY COMPLIANCE An introduction to the basic concepts of federal regulation of bioscience/ biotechnology research and biomanufacturing. The structure and purview of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Environmental Protection Agency and Occupation Safety and Health Administration will be covered. This course will also focus on the regulation of product produced in the life science sector including strategic planning, compliance, validation and documentation of production. Students will gain an understanding of the role of regulatory affairs in the overall business scheme. Differences between the regulatory requirements of the U.S. market compared to the European and Asian markets will be examined. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: Degree level proficiency in English, Reading and Math Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 BSCI 1212 VALIDATION, DOCUMETNATION AND QUALITY ASSURANCE This course provides an overview of documentation and validation concepts used within a biomanufacturing facility. Emphasis will be placed on source documentation, writing and executing Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs), process and equipment validation, as well as validation of bulk starting materials. A hands-on laboratory-based course that will familiarize students with some basic procedures and techniques common to laboratories involved with work that is covered by Quality Systems Regulation (QSR) and current Good Manufacturing Practices (cgmp). The principles of Good Laboratory Practices (GLP) and effective documentation procedures will be stressed. Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 2250 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 4500 Pre-requisites: Appropriate Test Score Placement BSCI 1111, BSCI 1211 Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 BSCI 1220 FUNDAMENTALS OF BIOMANUFACTURING This course is an introduction to the steps of development of products produced by microorganisms using biotechnology and genetic engineering which include; biopharmaceuticals, vaccines, enzymes and food ingredients. It will also introduce the various career opportunities involved in bioprocessing. Lectures will emphasize: how genetically altered microorganisms are used in drug development, methods used for manufacturing of biopharmaceuticals, vaccines, enzymes and food ingredients, biopharmaceutical 286

288 process development, the design of biomanufacturing equipment and facilities, how bioprocesses are regulated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA regulatory compliance), an introduction to bionanomaterials, and an introduction to scientific, engineering, regulatory compliance and business careers in biomanufacturing. Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 2250 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 4500 Pre-requisites: Appropriate Test Score Placement BSCI 1111, BSCI 1211 Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 BSCI 1230 ENVIRONMENTAL LABORATORY TESTING METHODS This course will prepare students to understand the scope of environmental testing and the work of technologists who perform these duties. Students will learn to collect, store, and transport environmental samples, and describe the major analytical procedures applied to these samples in the environmental lab. Data reduction and reporting will be discussed. Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 2250 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 4500 Pre-requisites: Appropriate Test Score Placement BSCI 1111, BSCI 1211 Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 BSCI 1240 POLLUTION AND REMEDIATION This course provides an overview of environmental contamination and pollution. Students will define contamination and pollution issues including sources, spread, and hazards to living and non-living entities. Regulatory affairs related to these issues, including federal, state and local laws, code, and regulations will be reviewed. Current best practices in remediation of environmental contamination and pollution will be covered. Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 2250 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 4500 Pre-requisites: Appropriate Test Score Placement BSCI 1111, BSCI 1211 Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 BSCI 2220 NUCLEIC ACID CHEMISTRY AND ANALYSIS A survey of common laboratory methodologies currently used in bioscience, and how to collect, assess and analyze data from these various methods. Methods examined include nucleic acid extraction, purification and characterization, PCR, Real-time PCR, ELISA, bacterial transformation, restriction digest and analysis. Students learn to analyze sequences, select primers and utilize polymerase chain reaction as a diagnostic tool. Lecture: 0 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 6750 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 6750 Pre-requisites: BSCI 1111, CHEM 1212, CHEM 1212L Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 BSCI 2230 METHODS OF PROTEIN ANALYSIS Develop and exercise the skill of solving typical problems in executing chemical and biological laboratory procedures. This course focuses on common lab challenges and failure modes. Instruction and exercises will target the anticipation and prevention of errors. Students will receive ample hands-on experience at the bench trouble-shooting and devising solutions. Lecture: 0 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 6750 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: BSCI 1111, CHEM 1212, CHEM 1212L Co-requisites: Credits: 3 BSCI 2290 INTEGRATIVE BIOLOGY Students are introduced to major topics in biochemistry and cell biology, including biomolecules, enzymology, cellular anatomy and function, stimulus-effect coupling, molecular biology, principal topics in intermediary metabolism, plant cell structure and physiology, cancer, and a basic overview of immunology. The course establishes a working knowledge of these areas and integrates these diverse topics into a useful and comprehensive survey of mammalian and plant structure and function. The course includes a laboratory component that will familiarize students with common lab practices in biochemistry and cell biology. The entire course will emphasize critical-thinking and problem-solving skills. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 4500 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 6750 Pre-requisites: BIOL 1111, CHEM 2211, CHEM 2211L Co-requisites: Credits: 5 BUSN 1100 INTRODUCTION TO KEYBOARDING This course introduces the touch system of keyboarding placing emphasis on correct techniques. Topics include: computer hardware, computer software, file management, learning the alphabetic keyboard, the numeric keyboard and keypad, building speed and accuracy, and proofreading. Students attain a minimum of 25 GWAM (gross words a minute) on 3-minute timings with no more than 3 errors. Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 3000 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3750 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 287

289 BUSN 1180 COMPUTER GRAPHICS AND DESIGN Introduces how to: design and transmit electronic communications; create graphics on-line; and insert animation and sound to computer generated charts, graphs, and diagrams. Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3750 Pre-requisites: COMP 1000 Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 BUSN 1190 DIGITAL TECHNOLOGIES IN BUSINESS Provides an overview of digital technology used for conducting business. Students will learn the application of business activities using various digital platforms. Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: COMP 1000 Co-requisites: None Credits: 2 BUSN 1200 MACHINE TRANSCRIPTION Emphasizes transcribing mailable documents from dictation using word processing software. Topics include: equipment and supplies maintenance and usage, work area management, transcription techniques, productivity and accuracy, proofreading, and language arts skills. Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: BUSN 1440, COMP 1000, ENGL 1010 Co-requisites: None Credits: 2 BUSN1210 ELECTRONIC CALCULATORS Develops skill in the use of electronic calculators to interpret, solve, and record results of various types of problems involving the four arithmetic processes. Topics include: machine parts and features, touch system techniques, and arithmetic applications. Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: None Credits: 2 BUSN 1220 TELEPHONE TRAINING Familiarizes the student with the proper use of current telephone technology to include equipment, techniques, and attributes. Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: None Credits: 2 BUSN 1230 LEGAL TERMINOLOGY This course introduces the spelling, pronunciation, definition, and usage of basic legal terms. The course broadly covers general law terms as well as specialized legal terminology. Topics include: word origins, word building, abbreviations and symbols, correct spelling, pronunciation, and meanings of terminology related to the court system, contracts, family law, real estate, litigation, wills/probate, bankruptcy, and other areas of the law. Lecture: 0 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: Provisional Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 BUSN 1240 OFFICE PROCEDURES Emphasizes essential skills required for the business office. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3000 Pre-requisites: COMP 1000 Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 BUSN 1250 RECORDS MANAGEMENT Introduces records management concepts for use in any office environment. Topics include: Basic Records Management Concepts; Alphabetic, Numeric, Subject, and Geographic Filing; and Records Retention, Transfer, and Disposition of Records. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3750 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 BUSN 1300 INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS 288

290 Introduces organization and management concepts of the business world and in the office environment. Topics include business in a global economy, starting and organizing a business, enterprise management, marketing strategies and financial management. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 BUSN 1320 BUSINESS INTERACTION SKILLS This course equips participants with the tools to communicate and interact more effectively in person, in writing and on the telephone with both internal and external customers. Participants also learn how to work in teams to create a collaborative environment for accomplishing goals. This course consist of the following: language of business, communication skills, working with information, business writing, team and collaborative skills, and resolving interpersonal conflict. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 BUSN 1330 PERSONAL EFFECTIVENESS This course focuses on the skills needed to be effective in the corporate environment. The participants learn the importance of effectively managing time, stress and change as they relate to work behavior and quality of work. Topics include: time management, stress management, interview skills/job development, resume writing, and managing change. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 BUSN 1340 CUSTOMER SERVICE EFFECTIVENESS This course emphasizes the importance of customer service throughout all businesses. Topics include: customer service challenges and problem solving; strategies for successful customer service; effective communication and dealing with difficult customers; empowerment, motivation, and leadership; customer retention and satisfaction measurement; and excellence in customer service. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 1500 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 BUSN 1400 WORD PROCESSING APPLICATIONS This course covers the knowledge and skills required to use word processing software through course demonstrations, laboratory exercises and projects. Minimal document keying will be necessary as students will work with existing documents to learn the functions and features of the word processing application. Topics and assignments will include: word processing concepts, customizing documents, formatting content, working with visual content, organizing content, reviewing documents, sharing and securing content. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 3000 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 4500 Pre-requisites: COMP 1000 Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 BUSN 1410 SPREADSHEET CONCEPTS AND APPLICATIONS This course covers the knowledge and skills required to use spreadsheet software through course demonstrations, laboratory exercises and projects. Topics and assignments will include: spreadsheet concepts, creating and manipulating data, formatting data and content, creating and modifying formulas, presenting data visually and, collaborating and securing data. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 3000 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 4500 Pre-requisites: COMP 1000 Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 BUSN 1420 DATABASE APPLICATIONS This course covers the knowledge and skills required to use database management software through course demonstrations, laboratory exercises and projects. Topics and assignments will include: database concepts, structuring databases, creating and formatting database elements, entering and modifying data, creating and modifying queries, presenting and sharing data and, managing and maintaining databases. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 3000 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 4500 Pre-requisites: COMP 1000 Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 289

291 BUSN 1430 DESKTOP PUBLISHING AND PRESENTATION APPLICATIONS This course covers the knowledge and skills required to use desktop publishing (DTP) software and presentation software to create business publications and presentations. Course work will include course demonstrations, laboratory exercises and projects. Topics include: desktop publishing concepts, basic graphic design, publication layout, presentation design, and practical applications. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 3000 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 4500 Pre-requisites: COMP 1000 Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 BUSN 1440 DOCUMENT PRODUCTION Reinforces the touch system of keyboarding placing emphasis on correct techniques with adequate speed and accuracy and producing properly formatted business documents. Topics include: reinforcing correct keyboarding technique, building speed and accuracy, formatting business documents, language arts, proofreading, and work area management. Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 4500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 5250 Pre-requisites: BUSN 1000 or the ability to key 25 gross words a minute on 3-minute timings with no more than 3 errors. Co-requisites: COMP 1000 Credits: 4 BUSN 2160 ELECTRONIC MAIL APPLICATIONS This course provides instruction in the fundamentals of communicating with others inside and outside the organization via a personal information management program. Emphasizes the concepts necessary for individuals and workgroups to organize, find, view, and share information via electronic communication channels. Topics include: Internal and External Communication, Message Management, Calendar Management, Navigation, Contact and Task Management, and Security and Privacy. Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 4500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 5250 Pre-requisites: BUSN 1000 or the ability to key 25 gross words a minute on 3-minute timings with no more than 3 errors. Co-requisites: COMP 1000 Credits: 2 BUSN 2170 WEB PAGE DESIGN This course provides instruction in the concepts necessary for individuals to create and manage professional quality web sites. Topics include: Web Site Creation, Web Page Development and Design, Hyper link Creation, Test, and Repair, Integration, Web Site Navigation, and Web Site Management. Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: Program Admission, COMP1000 Co-requisites: None Credits: 2 BUSN 2180 SPEED AND ACCURACY KEYING Further develops speed and accuracy through analysis of keying and prescribed practice drills. Topics include: building speed and accuracy and straight-copy proofreading. Lecture: 0 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: BUSN Introduction to Keyboarding or the ability to key 25 GWAM (gross words a minute) on 3-minute timings with no more than 3 errors. Co-requisites: None Credits: 1 BUSN 2190 BUSINESS DOCUMENT PROOFREADING AND EDITING Emphasizes proper proofreading and editing for business documents. Topics include: applying proofreading techniques and proofreaders marks with business documents; proper content, clarity, and conciseness in business documents; and business document formatting. Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 3000 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3750 Pre-requisites: ENGL 1010 or ENGL 1101 Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 BUSN 2200 OFFICE ACCOUNTING Introduces fundamental concepts of the accounting cycle for a sole proprietor service business. Topics include: accounting equation, analyzing business transactions, journalizing and posting transactions, accounts receivable and accounts payable subsidiary ledgers, financial statements, cash control, and payroll concepts. 290

292 Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3750 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 BUSN 2210 APPLIED OFFICE PROCEDURES This course focuses on applying knowledge and skills learned in prior courses taken in the program. Topics include: communications skills, telecommunications skills, records management skills, office equipment/supplies, and integrated programs/applications. Serves as a capstone course. Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 3000 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3750 Pre-requisites: BUSN 1240, BUSN 1400, BUSN 1410, BUSN 1440 Co-requisites: BUSN 2200 or ACCT 1101, ACCT 1100, BUSN 2190 Credits: 3 BUSN 2220 LEGAL ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES Emphasizes essential skills required for the legal office. Topics include: legal terminology, preparation of legal documents and correspondence, ethics, and legal office tasks. Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 3000 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3750 Pre-requisites: BUSN 1230, BUSN 1440 Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 BUSN 2240 BUSINESS ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT INTERNSHIP I Provides student work experience in a professional environment. Topics include: application of classroom knowledge and skills, work environment functions, and listening/following directions. Students will be under the supervision of the Business Administrative Technology program faculty and/or persons designated to coordinate work experience arrangements. Lecture: 0 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 9000 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 9000 Pre-requisites: Must be in last semester of program. With advisor approval, may take concurrently with last semester courses. Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 BUSN 2250 BUSINESS ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT INTERNSHIP II Provides student work experience in a professional environment. Topics include: application of classroom knowledge and skills, work environment functions, and listening/following directions. Students will be under the supervision of the Business Administrative Technology program faculty and/or persons designated to coordinate work experience arrangements. Lecture: 0 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: Pre-requisites: Must be in last semester of program. With advisor approval, may take concurrently with last semester courses. Co-requisites: None Credits: 6 BUSN 2300 MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY Introduces the basic spelling and pronunciation of medical terms, and the use of these terms as they relate to anatomy, treatment, surgery, and drugs. Topics include: word analysis, word elements, spelling, pronunciation, and semantics. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 1500 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 2 BUSN 2310 ANATOMY AND TERMINOLOGY FOR THE MEDICAL ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT Introduces the structure and function of the human body, and medical terminology. Topics include information, which will provide a medical office assistant knowledge needed to communicate with office staff, physicians, and patients and to assist in completion of medical reports generated in the medical office. Topics include: body structures, body functions, and medical terminology. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 BUSN 2330 ADVANCED MEDICAL DOCUMENT PROCESSING/TRANSCRIPT Continues the development of speed and accuracy in the transcription of medical reports with emphasis on a variety of medical specialization. Topics include: equipment and supplies maintenance and usage, work area management, spelling, definitions, punctuation, processing/transcription speed and accuracy, resource utilization, pronunciation, and medical transcription work ethics. 291

293 Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 3000 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 4500 Pre-requisites: BUSN 2320 Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 BUSN 2340 MEDICAL ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES Continues the development of speed and accuracy in the transcription of medical reports with emphasis on a variety of medical specialization. Topics include: equipment and supplies maintenance and usage, work area management, spelling, definitions, punctuation, processing/transcription speed and accuracy, resource utilization, pronunciation, and medical transcription work ethics. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 3000 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 4500 Pre-requisites: BUSN 2320 Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 BUSN 2370 MEDICAL OFFICE BILLING/CODING/INSURANCE Provides an introduction to medical coding skills and applications of international coding standards for billing health care services. Provides the knowledge and skills to apply coding of diagnostic statements and procedures for billing purposes. Provides an introduction to medical coding, as it relates to health insurance. Topics include: International classification of diseases, code book formats; coding techniques; formats of the ICD and CPT manuals; health insurance; billing, reimbursement, and collections; and managed care. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3000 Pre-requisites: BUSN 2300 or ALHS 1090 AND BUSN 2310 or ALHS 1010 or ALHS 1011 Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 CARP 1070 SITE LAYOUT, FOOTINGS AND FOUNDATIONS Introduces the concepts and practices of basic site layout, footings, and foundation construction. Students will use layout equipment for onsite laboratory practice. Topics include: zoning restrictions and codes, batter board installation, builder's level, squaring methods, footings, plot plan interpretation, materials estimation, foundation types, foundation forms, edge forms, waterproofing, soil testing and excavation. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3000 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: COFC 1020, COFC 1030, COFC 1050 Credits: 3 CARP 1105 FLOOR AND WALL FRAMING This course provides instruction in floor and wall materials and materials estimation, framing production of walls and partitions, and framing production of flooring. Emphasis is placed on practical application of skills. Topics include estimation and computation procedures, rough layouts, and layout and installation procedures. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3750 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: COFC 1020, COFC 1030, COFC 1050 Credits: 4 CARP 1110 CEILING AND ROOF FRAMING COVERING This course provides instruction in the theory and practical application of skills required to construct ceiling and roof framings and coverings. Topics include systems and materials identification, layout procedures, installation procedures, cost and materials estimation, and safety precautions. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 3000 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 5250 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: COFC 1020, COFC 1030, COFC 1050 Credits: 5 CARP 1112 EXTERIOR FINISHES AND TRIM Introduces materials identification, estimation, and installation procedures for exterior finish and trim materials to include window and door units. Emphasis will be placed on competency development through laboratory practice. Topics include: doors and windows, siding types, materials identification, materials estimation, and installation procedures. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 4500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 6000 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: COFC 1020, COFC 1030, COFC 1050 Credits: 5 292

294 CARP 1114 INTERIOR FINISHES I This course introduces the procedures and methods for identifying materials, cost estimating, and installation of interior finishes and trim. Topics include material identification, cost estimating, trim, insulation, doors, gypsum wallboard, and paneling used in finishing jobs. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 3000 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 4500 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: COFC 1020, COFC 1030, COFC 1050 Credits: 4 CARP 1190 INTERIOR FINISHES II Introduces finish floor coverings for residential construction projects. Emphasis will be placed on identification, estimation and installation of various types of hard and soft floor coverings. This course introduces design, construction and installation of fireplace trim. The course also introduces locating and installing cabinets and millwork. Topics include: identification of flooring materials, flooring estimation procedures, flooring installation procedures, fireplace trim, cabinets and millwork. Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: COFC 1020, COFC 1030, COFC 1050 Credits: 2 CARP 1260 STAIRS Provides fundamental instruction in the layout, construction, and installation of various stair types. Topics include: identification of stair types, identification of stair components, riser and tread calculation, stringer layout, and fabrication and installation procedures. Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 4500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 5250 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: COFC 1020, COFC 1030, COFC 1050 Credits: 4 CARP 1310 DOORS AND DOOR HARDWARE Provides instruction in the identification and installation of a variety of doors, frames, and door hardware for commercial construction applications. Topics include: door types, door hardware, thresholds, weather-stripping, and overhead doors. Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3:0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: COFC 1020, COFC 1030, COFC 1050 Credits: 2 CARP 1320 SITE DEVELOPMENT, CONCRETE FORMING, AND RIGGING AND REINFORCING This course provides instruction in the development of construction sites with an emphasis on surveying, materials and processes for concrete forming and usage, and the various methods and materials used in the handling and rigging of steel components. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 3000 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 4500 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: COFC 1020, COFC 1030, COFC 1050 Credits: 4 CHEM 1211 CHEMISTRY I Provides an introduction to basic chemical principles and concepts which explain the behavior of matter. Topics include measurement, physical and chemical properties of matter, atomic structure, chemical bonding, nomenclature, chemical reactions, and stoichiometry and gas laws. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: MATH 1101, MATH1111 Co-requisites: CHEM 1211L Credits: 3 CHEM 1211L CHEMISTRY LAB I Selected laboratory exercises paralleling the topics in CHEM The laboratory exercises for this course include measurement, physical and chemical properties of matter, atomic structure, chemical bonding, nomenclature, chemical reactions, stoichiometry and gas laws. Lecture: 0 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 2250 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: MATH 1101, MATH 1111 Co-requisites: CHEM 1211 Credits: 1 CHEM 1212 CHEMISTRY II Continues the exploration of basic chemical principles and concepts. Topics include equilibrium theory, kinetics, thermodynamics, solution chemistry, acid-base theory, and nuclear chemistry. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: CHEM 1211, CHEM 1211L, MATH 1101, MATH

295 Co-requisites: CHEM 1212L Credits: 3 CHEM 1212L CHEMISTRY LAB II Emphasizes practical knowledge of technical communications techniques, procedures, and reporting formats used in industry and business. Topics include reference use and research, device and process description, formal technical report writing, business correspondence, and technical report presentation. Lecture: 0 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 2250 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: CHEM 1211, CHEM 1211L, MATH 1101, MATH 1111 Co-requisites: CHEM 1212 Credits: 1 CHEM 2211 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I This course is the first of a two-semester sequence on the organic chemistry of alkanes, alkenes and their substitution products, reactions, nomenclature, functional groups and electron structure. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: CHEM 1212, CHEM 1212L Co-requisites: CHEM 2211L Credits: 3 CHEM 2211L ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I LAB In this laboratory course, students perform experiments to illustrate the reactions, principles and techniques presented in Organic Chemistry I. Students gain experience in synthesis and techniques relating to isolation, purification and identification of organic compounds. Lecture: 0 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 2250 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: CHEM 1212, CHEM 1212L Co-requisites: CHEM 2211 Credits: 1 CHEM 2212 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II This course is a continuation of Organic Chemistry I. Topics includes spectroscopy, aromatic compounds, and a survey of carbonyl compounds and their reactions. Instructors emphasize bioorganic compounds as they relate to biological structure and function. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: CHEM 2211, CHEM 2211L Co-requisites: CHEM 2212L Credits: 3 CHEM 2212L ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II LAB In this laboratory course, students perform experiments to illustrate the reactions, principles and techniques presented in Organic Chemistry II. Students gain additional experience in instrumentation, synthesis and techniques relating to isolation and purification. They also expand their capabilities relating to the identification of organic compounds. Lecture: 0 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 2250 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: CHEM 2211, CHEM 2211L Co-requisites: CHEM 2212 Credits: 1 CHEM 2300 QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS This course focuses on developing a strong understanding of the principles of analytical chemistry and the applications of these principles to disciplines ranging from the life sciences to environmental science. This course presents a comprehensive assessment of the theory, application, and the strategies and calculations needed for proper data analysis regarding analytical chemistry. The course first focuses on the traditional techniques utilized in quantitative chemical analysis to quantify the amount of a particular analyte present in unknown samples. Other topics relate to the methods and techniques used for the separation and isolation of various classes of substrates. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: CHEM 1212, CHEM 1212L, MATH 1111 Co-requisites: CHEM 2300L Credits: 3 CHEM 2300L QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS LAB This laboratory course provides relative application of topics covered in CHEM The laboratory course introduces basic experimental analytical techniques and concepts associated with quantitative measurements. Laboratory activities provide hands-on training in three fundamental areas of analytical chemistry including gravimetric analysis and titrations, spectrophotometric techniques used to calculate unknown quantities of analytes in various samples, and chromatographic separation techniques used to separate and isolate various classes of substrates. 294

296 Lecture: 0 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 4500 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 4500 Pre-requisites: CHEM 1212, CHEM 1212L, MATH 1111 Co-requisites: CHEM 2300 Credits: 2 CIST 1001 COMPUTER CONCEPTS Provides an overview of information systems, computers and technology. Topics include: Information Systems and Technology Terminology, Computer History, Data Representation, Data Storage Concepts, Fundamentals of Information Processing, Fundamentals of Information Security, Information Technology Ethics, Fundamentals of Hardware Operation, Fundamentals of Networking, Fundamentals of the Internet, Fundamentals of Software Design Concepts, Fundamentals of Software, (System and Application), System Development Methodology, Computer Number Systems conversion (Binary and Hexadecimal), Mobile computing. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 3000 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 4500 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 CIST 1121 MICROSOFT TROUBLESHOOTING Emphasizes the use of system theory and diagnostic routines to isolate failures, replace the defective module or subsystem, and verify proper operations. Topics include: basic system theory, operating systems use, diagnostic programs, subsystem isolation, upgrading systems, preventive maintenance, and service reports preparation. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 3000 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 4500 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 CIST 1122 HARDWARE INSTALLATION AND MAINTENANCE This course serves to provide students with the knowledge of the fundamentals of computer technology, networking, and security along with the skills required to identify hardware, peripheral, networking, and security components with an introduction to the fundamentals of installing and maintaining computers. Students will develop the skills to identify the basic functionality of the operating system, perform basic troubleshooting techniques, utilize proper safety procedures, and effectively interact with customers and peers. This course is designed to help prepare students for the CompTIA A+ certification examination. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 2250 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 5250 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 CIST 1130 OPERATING SYSTEMS CONCEPTS Provides an overview of modern operating systems and their use in home and small business environments. Activities will utilize the graphical user interface (GUI) and command line environment (CLI This will include operating system fundamentals; installing, configuring, and upgrading operating systems; managing storage, file systems, hardware and system resources; troubleshooting, diagnostics, and maintenance of operating systems; and networking. Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 3000 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3750 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 CIST 1200 DATABASE MANAGEMENT Provides an overview of the skills and knowledge of database application systems which are used in business government and industry. Topics include: history, database terminology and concepts, database system logical organization, data manipulation, database design concepts, models, normalization, Entity Relationship diagramming, physical database, networking and databases, and database security. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 3000 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 4500 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 CIST 1210 INTRODUCTION TO ORACLE DATABASES This course provides an introduction to the Oracle database management system platform and to Structured Query Language (SQL). Topics include database vocabulary, normalization, Oracle DML and DDL statements, SQL Statements, views and constraints. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 3000 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 4500 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 CIST 1220 STRUCTURED QUERY LANGUAGE (SQL) 295

297 Includes basic database design concepts and solving database retrieval and modification problems using the SQL language. Topics include: database Vocabulary, Relational Database Design, Date retrieval using SQL, Data Modification using SQL, Developing and Using SQL Procedures. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 3000 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 4500 Pre-requisites: CIST 1001, CIST 1305, COMP 1000 Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 CIST 1305 PROGRAM DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT An introductory course that provides problem solving and programming concepts for those that develop user applications. An emphasis is placed on developing logic, troubleshooting, and using tools to develop solutions. Topics include: problem solving and programming concepts, structured programming, the four logic structures, file processing concepts, and arrays. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 CIST 1401 COMPUTER NETWORKING FUNDAMENTALS Introduces networking technologies and prepares students to take the CompTIA's broad-based, vendor independent networking certification exam, Network +. This course covers a wide range of material about networking, including local area networks, wide area networks, protocols, topologies, transmission media, and security. Focuses on operating network management systems and implementing the installation of networks. It reviews cabling, connection schemes, the fundamentals of the LAN and WAN technologies, TCP/IP configuration and troubleshooting, remote connectivity, and network maintenance and troubleshooting. Topics include: basic knowledge of networking technology, network media and topologies, network devices, network management, network tools and network security. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 3000 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 4500 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 CIST 1510 WEB DEVELOPMENT I Explores the concepts of Hypertext Markup Language (HTML), Cascading Style Sheets (CSS), XML, and XHTML following the current standards set by the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) for developing inter-linking web pages that include graphical elements, hyperlinks, tables, forms, and image maps. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3000 Pre-requisites: CIST 1305 Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 CIST 1601 INFORMATION SECURITY FUNDAMENTALS This course provides a broad overview of information security. It covers terminology, history, security systems development and implementation. Student will also cover the legal, ethical, and professional issues in information security. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3000 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 CIST 2122 A+ PREPARATION This course serves to prepare students to complete the CompTIA A+ certification examination. It will provide students with advanced knowledge of computer technology, networking, and security fundamentals. Students will possess the skills required to identify hardware, peripherals, networking components, and security components. Students will understand basic operating system functionality and troubleshooting methodology while practicing proper safety procedures and effective interaction skills with customers and peers. Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 3000 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3750 Pre-requisites: CIST 1122 Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 CIST 2212 ORACLE DATABASE ADMINISTRATION I This course enables the database student to implement and administer Oracle databases. Topics include: oracle logical architecture and administration tools, Oracle physical architecture and data dictionary views, performance monitoring and database security. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 3000 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 4500 Pre-requisites: CIST 1210 Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 296

298 CIST 2214 ORACLE DATABASE ADMINISTRATION II This course introduces participants to the critical task of planning and implementing database backup and recovery strategies. Topics include Backup and Recovery, Resource Management and Performance tuning, Globalization Support, and Diagnostic Tools. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 3000 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 4500 Pre-requisites: CIST 2212 Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 CIST 2216 ORACLE ADVANCED TOPICS This course enables the database student to integrate database content and theory. The student will use Oracle application development tools and utilities to create and manage realistic database development projects. Topics include SQL and PL/SQL, Oracle Forms, Database Reports and Integrated Database Applications. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 3000 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 4500 Pre-requisites: CIST 2214 Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 CIST 2311 VISUAL BASIC PROGRAMMING I Visual Basic I introduces event-driven programming. Common elements of Windows applications will be discussed created and manipulated using Microsoft s Visual Studio development environment. Topics include numeric data types and variables, decision making structures, arrays, validating input with strings and functions, repetition and multiple forms, test files, lists and common dialog controls. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 2250 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 5250 Pre-requisites: CIST 1305 Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 CIST 2312 VISUAL BASIC PROGRAMMING II Visual Basic II teaches client-server systems, n-tier development environments, relational databases, use of SQL to access data, the use of ADO.NET objects, methods and properties to access and update relational and XML databases. Advanced features of Visual Basic are explored. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 2250 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 5250 Pre-requisites: CIST 1305, CIST 2311 Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 CIST 2313 VISUAL BASIC PROGRAMMING III This course provides a look at advanced Web Programming techniques using Microsoft Visual Basic. Topics include class and object creation, advanced data access, communicating with server side programs, security, and advanced topics. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 2250 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 5250 Pre-requisites: CIST 2311, CIST 2312 Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 CIST 2341 C# PROGRAMMING I This course is designed to teach the basic concepts and methods of objected-oriented design and C#.Net programming. Use practical problems to illustrate C#.Net application building techniques and concepts. Develop an understanding of C#. Net vocabulary. Create an understanding of where C#.Net fits in the application development landscape. Create an understanding of the C#.Net Development Environment, Visual Studio and how to develop, debug, and run C#.Net applications using the Visual Studio. Continue to develop student's programming logic skills. Topics include: C#.NET Language History, C#.NET Variable Definitions, C#.NET Control Structures, C#.NET Functions, C#.NET Classes, C#.NET Objects, and C#.NET Graphics. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 2250 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 5250 Pre-requisites: CIST 1305 Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 CIST 2342 C# PROGRAMMING II This course is an intermediate course in C#.NET Programming. It is assumed that the student knows the C#.NET syntax, as well as basic objects oriented concepts. Intermediate C#.NET teaches client-server systems, n-tier development environments, relational databases, use of SQL to access data, the use of ADO.NET objects, methods and properties to access and update relational databases. Advanced features of C# windows programming are explored. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 2250 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 5250 Pre-requisites: CIST 2341 Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 CIST 2343 C# PROGRAMMING III 297

299 This course is an advanced course in C#.NET programming. It is assumed that the student is fairly familiar with the C#.NET programming language. The goal of this course is to help students understand how to use C# to build industry level dynamic Web based applications. The course covers in detail how to use C# to develop an Enterprise level Web Application. The students will learn how to use HTML to build the Client-Side, and how to use C# for the Server side processing of data and talking to databases. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 2250 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 5250 Pre-requisites: CIST 2342 Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 CIST 2361 C++ PROGRAMMING I Provides opportunity to gain a working knowledge of "C++" programming. Includes creating, editing, executing, and debugging "C++" programs of moderate difficulty. Topics include: basic "C++" concepts, simple I/O and expressions, I/O and control statements, arrays, pointers, structures, managing data and developing programs. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 3000 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 4500 Pre-requisites: CIST 1305 Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 CIST 2362 C++ PROGRAMMING II Develops skills for the programmer to write programs using the language of C++. Emphasis is placed on utilizing the added features of C++, which will be added to the skills mastered in Introduction to C++ Programming. Topics include: objects, classes, inheritance, overloading, polymorphism, streams, containers, and exceptions. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 3000 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 4500 Pre-requisites: CIST 2361 Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 CIST 2371 JAVA PROGRAMMING I This course is designed to teach the basic concepts and methods of objected-oriented design and Java programming. Use practical problems to illustrate Java application building techniques and concepts. Develop an understanding of Java vocabulary. Create an understanding of where Java fits in the application development landscape. Create an understanding of the Java Development Kit and how to develop, debug, and run Java applications using the JDK. Continue to develop student's programming logic skills. Topics include: JAVA Language History, JAVA Variable Definitions, JAVA Control Structures, JAVA Methods, JAVA Classes, JAVA Objects, and JAVA Graphics. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 3000 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 4500 Pre-requisites: CIST 1305 Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 CIST 2372 JAVA PROGRAMMING II This course is an intermediate course in Java Programming. It is assumed that the student knows the Java syntax, as well as basic objects oriented concepts. The student will use classes and objects provided by the core Java API. They will use these classes to accomplish tasks such as Database access, File access, exception handling, running threads, using sockets to talk across a network, and remotely calling methods using RMI techniques. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 3000 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 4500 Pre-requisites: CIST 2371 Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 CIST 2373 JAVA PROGRAMMING 1II This course is a course in building Web Applications using Java Enterprise Edition (JEE). It is assumed that the student knows Java Standard Edition as the concepts and techniques build on that foundation. The student will install Web, Application and Database servers. The student will learn to build Web Applications using JEE technologies, such as Servlets, Java Server Pages and Enterprise JavaBeans. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 3000 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 4500 Pre-requisites: CIST 2372 Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 CIST 2381 MOBILE APPLICATIONS DEVELOPMENT This course explores mobile guidelines, standards, and techniques. This course includes design and development techniques for multiple mobile devices, platforms, and operating systems. Students will develop mobile applications using state of practice development tools, languages and devices. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 3000 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 4500 Pre-requisites: CIST 1305 Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 298

300 CIST 2411 MICROSOFT CLIENT Provides the ability to implement, administrator, and troubleshoot Windows Professional Client as a desktop operating system in any network environment. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 3000 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 4500 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 CIST 2412 MICROSOFT SERVER DIRECTORY SERVICES Provides students with knowledge and skills necessary to install, configure, manage, support and administer Microsoft Directory Services. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 3000 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 4500 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 CIST 2413 MICROSOFT SERVER INFRASTRUCTURE Provides students with knowledge and skills necessary to install, configure, manage, support and administer Windows Server. Topics include server deployment, server management, monitor and maintain servers, application and data provisioning, and business continuity and high availability. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 3000 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 4500 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 CIST 2414 MICROSOFT SERVER ADMINISTRATION Provides students with knowledge and skills necessary to install, configure, manage, support and administer Windows Server. Topics include server deployment, server management, monitor and maintain servers, application and data provisioning, and business continuity and high availability. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 3000 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 4500 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 CIST 2431 UNIX/LINUX INTRODUCTION This course introduces the UNIX/Linux operating system skills necessary to perform entry-level user functions. Topics include: history of UNIX/Linux, login and logout, the user environment, user password change, the file system, hierarchy tree, editors, file system commands as they relate to navigating the file system tree, UNIX/Linux manual help pages, using the UNIX/Linux graphical desktop, and command options. In addition, the student must be able to perform directory and file displaying, creation, deletion, redirection, copying, moving, linking files, wildcards, determining present working directory and changing directory locations. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 3000 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 4500 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 CIST 2432 UNIX/LINUX SERVER This course covers UNIX/Linux operating system administration skills necessary to perform administrative functions. Topics include: installing UNIX/Linux, configuring and building a custom kernel, adding and removing software packages, managing run levels, managing users and groups, implementing security permissions, introduction to shell programming, managing and fixing the file system, managing memory and swap space, managing and scheduling jobs, managing system logs, understanding the boot process, system configuration files, file backup and restore, file compression, fault tolerance, and printing. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 3000 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 4500 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 CIST 2433 UNIX/LINUX ADVANCED SERVER This course covers UNIX/Linux operating system advanced administration skills necessary to perform advanced administrative functions. Topics include: understanding UNIX/Linux networking, managing network printing, configuring and troubleshooting TCP/IP on UNIX/Linux, configuring DHCP, DNS, a Web server, an FTP server, an server, and understanding NIS (yp) and NFS. Also, includes the following: understanding advanced security issues such as firewalls and NAT, using network commands, use of graphical system such as X Windows, sharing files and printers, and advanced shell programming. 299

301 Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 3000 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 4500 Pre-requisites: CIST 2432 Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 CIST 2434 UNIX/LINUX SCRIPTING Course covers UNIX/Linux shell programming techniques necessary for UNIX/Linux System Administrators to understand and create shell script programs in a UNIX/Linux environment. Topics include: shell variables, running shell script program, conditional processing, looping structures, arithmetic operators, logical operators such as AND, OR, and NOT, positional parameters and process variables, redirection, piping and standard error, use of backslash, quotes and back quotes. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 3000 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 4500 Pre-requisites: CIST 2431 Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 CIST 2451 Introduction to Networks This course teaches students the skills needed to obtain entry-level home network installer jobs. It also helps students develop some of the skills needed to become network technicians, computer technicians, cable installers, and help desk technicians. It provides a handson introduction to networking and the Internet using tools and hardware commonly found in home and business environments. Instructors are encouraged to facilitate field trips and outside-the-classroom learning experiences. Labs include PC installation, Internet connectivity, wireless connectivity, and file and print sharing. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 3000 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 4500 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 CIST 2452 ROUTING AND SWITCHING CCNA Routing and Switching provides a comprehensive overview of networking concepts and skills, from network applications to the protocols and services provided to those applications by the lower layers of the network, with an emphasis on practical application, work-force readiness, and soft-skills development. Students learn about the soft skills required for help desk and customer service positions, and the final chapter helps them prepare for the CCENT certification exam. Network monitoring and basic troubleshooting skills are taught in context. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 3000 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 4500 Pre-requisites: CIST 2451 Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 CIST 2453 CISCO SCALING NETWORKS This course describes the architecture, components, and operations of routers and switches in larger and more complex networks. Students learn how to configure routers and switches for advanced functionality. Students will configure and troubleshoot routers and switches and resolve common issues with OSPF, EIGRP, and STP in both IPv4 and IPv6 networks. Students will also learn how to implement a WLAN in a small-to-medium network. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 3000 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 4500 Pre-requisites: 2452 Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 CIST 2454 CISCO CONNECTING NETWORKS This course discusses the WAN technologies and network services required by converged applications in a complex network. Topics include introduction to WANs, private WAN technologies and protocols, Network Address Translation (NAT), public WAN technologies and protocols, network monitoring, and network troubleshooting. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 3000 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 4500Prerequisites: 2453 Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 CIST 2921 IT ANALYSIS, DESIGN, AND PROJECT MANAGEMENT IT Analysis, Design, and Project Management will provides a review and application of systems life cycle development methodologies and project management. Topics include: Systems planning, systems analysis, systems design, systems implementation, evaluation, and project management. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 3000 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 4500 Pre-requisites: CIST 1305 Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 CMTT 2010 RESIDENTIAL ESTIMATING REVIEW 300

302 This course introduces the complete estimating process from excavation to completed residence. Topics include the sequencing of construction, materials calculation, blueprint interpretation methods of construction, working with subcontractors, and final estimate assembly. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 CMTT 2020 CONSTRUCTION DRAFTING I This course provides instruction in producing residential floor plans and elevations using computer-aided drafting and design (CAD) software. Topics include system setup and system management, software menus and basic functions, prototype drawings, and two and three dimensional drafting and dimensioning. Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 3000 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3750 Pre-requisites: COMP 1000 Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 CMTT 2050 RESIDENTIAL CODE REVIEW This course covers building codes as they apply to typical residential applications. Topics include international residential codes, working with building inspectors, permits and inspections, and site visits. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3000 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 CMTT 2130 COMPUTERIZED CONSTRUCTION SCHEDULING This course provides instruction in the use of application software for scheduling construction work. The use of contemporary construction scheduling and management software is emphasized. Topics include software overview, scheduling methods and requirements, and computerized scheduling of a simulated construction job. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3:0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3000 Pre-requisites: COMP 1000 Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 CMTT 2170 CONSTRUCTION CONTRACTING This course provides an in depth study of the contractual relationship between the parties involved in building construction contracting. Topics include bonds, insurance, bidding, awarding, and subcontracting types and conditions. Lecture: 3000 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3:0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3000 Pre-requisites: CMTT 2130 Co-requisites: None Credit: 4 COFC 1000 SAFETY This course provides a review of general safety rules and practices giving students information about state and federal regulations including OSHA Hazard Communication Standards and Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS). Emphasis is placed on electrical, fire, lifting, and ladder and scaffolding practices. Lecture:1500 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 1500 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: None Credits: 2 COFC 1011 OVERVIEW OF BUILDING CONSTRUCTION PRACTICES This course covers the introduction to a residential construction project from start to finish. Topics to include preparing to build, tools and equipment, building foundations, wood frame construction, completing the structure, finish carpentry and construction specialties. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 1500 Pre-requisites: Provisional Admission None Co-requisites: None Credits: 2 COFC 1020 PROFESSIONAL TOOL USE AND SAFETY This course provides instruction in the use of professional tools for the construction trades. Emphasis will be placed on the safe use of each tool discussed. Topics include layout and measuring tools, cutting tools, sawing tools, drilling and boring tools, finishing and fastening tools, general shop tool use, and job site setup. 301

303 Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 3000 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3750 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 COFC 1030 MATERIALS AND FASTENERS This course introduces the fundamental array of building materials used in residential and commercial construction. Topics include fasteners, wood products, concrete, brick and block, plumbing materials, finishing materials, manufactured products and an introduction to construction cost estimation. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 1500 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: None Credits: 2 COFC 1050 CONSTRUCTION PRINT READING FUNDAMENTALS This course introduces the reading and interpretation of prints and architectural drawings for all of the construction trades. Topics include types of plans, scales, specifications, conventions, and schedules. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 COLL 1000 COLLEGE SUCCESS AND SURVIVAL SKILLS This course is designed to provide tools to assist students to acquire skills necessary to achieve academic and professional success in their chosen occupational/technical program of study. Topics include: Getting off to a Good Start, Learning and Personality Styles, Time and Money Management, Study and Test Taking Skills, Stress Management and Wellness, Communication Skills, and Career Exploration. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 1500 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: None Credits: 2 COMP 1000 INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTERS Introduces the fundamental concepts, terminology, and operations necessary to use computers. Emphasis is placed on basic functions and familiarity with computer use. Topics include an introduction to computer terminology, the Windows environment, Internet and , word processing software, spreadsheet software, database software, and presentation software. Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 3000 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3750 Pre-requisites: Provisional Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 COSM 1000 INTRODUCTION TO COSMETOLOGY THEORY Introduces fundamental both theory and practices of the cosmetology profession. Emphasis will be placed on professional practices and safety. Topics include: state rules, and regulations; state regulatory agency, image; bacteriology; decontamination and infection control, chemistry fundamentals, safety, Hazardous Duty Standards Act compliance, and anatomy and physiology. Lecture: 3000 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3000 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 COSM 1010 CHEMICAL TEXTURE SERVICES Provides instruction in the chemistry and chemical reactions of permanent wave solutions and relaxers, application of permanent waves and relaxers. Precautions and special problems involved in applying permanent waves and relaxers will be emphasized. Topics include: permanent wave techniques, chemical relaxer techniques, chemistry, physical and chemical change, safety procedures, permanent wave and chemical relaxer application procedures, hair analysis, scalp analysis, permanent wave procedures (in an acceptable time frame), relaxer application (in an acceptable time frame), and Hazardous Duty Standards Act Compliance. Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 2250 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 4500 Pre-requisites: COSM 1000 Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 COSM 1020 HAIR CARE AND TREATMENT Introduces the theory, procedures and products used in the care and treatment of the scalp and hair, disease and disorders and their treatments and the fundamental theory and skills required to shampoo, condition, and recondition the hair and scalp. Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: COSM 1000 Co-requisites: None Credits: 2 302

304 COSM 1030 HAIRCUTTING VERSION 3 Introduces the theory and skills necessary to apply haircutting techniques, advanced haircutting techniques, proper safety and decontamination precautions, hair design elements, cutting implements, head, hair and body analysis, and client consultation. Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 4500 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 5250 Pre-requisites: COSM 1000 Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 COSM 1040 STYLING Introduces the fundamental theory and skills required to create shapings, pin curls, finger waves, roller placement, blow dry styling, thermal curling, thermal pressing, thermal waving, artificial hair and augmentation, and comb-outs. Laboratory training includes styling training on manikin. Topics include: braiding/intertwining hair, styling principles, pin curls, roller placement, finger waves, skip waves, ridge curls, blow dry styling, thermal curling, thermal pressing, thermal waving, artificial hair and augmentation, combouts, and safety precautions. Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 2250 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 4500 Pre-requisites: COSM 1000 Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 COSM 1050 HAIR COLOR Introduces the theory and application of temporary, semi-permanent, demi-permanent-deposit only, and permanent hair coloring, hair lightening, and color removal products and application. Topics include: principles of color theory, hair structure, color, tone, classifications of color, hair lightening, color removal, application procedures, safety precautions, client consultation, product knowledge, hair color challenges, corrective solutions, and special effects. Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 2250 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 4500 Pre-requisites: COSM 1000 Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 COSM 1060 FUNDAMENTALS OF SKIN CARE This course provides a comprehensive study in care of the skin for theory and practical application. Emphasis will be placed on client consultation, safety precautions, skin conditions, product knowledge, basic facials, facial massage, corrective facial treatments, hair removal, and make-up application. Other topics in this course include advanced skin treatments in electrotherapy, light therapy, galvanic current, high frequency, and microdermabrasion. Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 4500 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 5250 Pre-requisites: COSM 1000 Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 COSM 1070 NAIL CARE AND ADVANCED TECHNIQUES Provides training in manicuring, pedicuring and advanced nail techniques. Topics include: implements, products and supplies, hand and foot anatomy and Physiology, diseases and disorders, manicure techniques, pedicure techniques, nail product chemistry, safety precautions and practices, and advanced nail techniques (wraps/tips/acrylics). Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 4500 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 5250 Pre-requisites: COSM 1000 Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 COSM 1080 COSMETOLOGY PRACTICUM I Provides laboratory experiences necessary for the development of skill levels required to be a competent cosmetologist. The allocation of time to the various phases of cosmetology is required by the Georgia State Board of Cosmetology. This course includes a portion of the required hours for licensure. Topics include: permanent waving and relaxers; various hair color techniques, foiling and lightening; skin, scalp, and hair treatments; haircutting; styling; manicure/pedicure/advanced nail techniques; dispensary; reception; safety precautions/decontamination; and Hazardous Duty Standards Act compliance. Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 6750 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 7500 Pre-requisites: COSM 1010, COSM 1020, COSM 1030, COSM 1040, COSM 1050, Co-requisites: COSM 1070 Credits: 4 COSM 1090 COSMETOLOGY PRACTICUM II Provides laboratory experiences necessary for the development of skill levels required to be a competent cosmetologist. The allocation of time to the various phases of cosmetology is prescribed by the Georgia State Board of Cosmetology. This course includes a portion of the hours required for licensure. Topics include: permanent waving and relaxers; hair color, foiling, lightening, skin, scalp, and hair treatments; haircutting; clipper design, precision cutting, styling; dispensary; manicure/pedicure/advanced nail techniques; reception; 303

305 safety precautions/decontamination; Hazardous Duty Standards Act compliance; product knowledge, customer service skills, client retention, State Board Rules and Regulations guidelines, and State Board foundation prep. Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 6750 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 7500 Pre-requisites: COSM 1080 Co-requisites: COSM 1100 Credits: 4 COSM 1100 COSMETOLOGY PRACTICUM III Provides experience necessary for professional development and completion of requirements for state licensure. Emphasis will be placed on the display of professional conduct and positive attitudes. The appropriate number of applications for completion of state board service credit requirements for this course may be met in a laboratory setting. Topics include: texture services; permanent waving and relaxers; hair color and lightening; skin, scalp, and hair treatment; haircutting; styling; dispensary; manicure/pedicure/advanced nail techniques; reception; safety precautions/decontamination; and Hazardous Duty Standards Act compliance. Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 6750 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 7500 Pre-requisites: COSM 1090 Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 COSM 1110 COSMETOLOGY PRACTICUM IV Provides experience necessary for professional development and completion of requirements for state licensure. Emphasis will be placed on the display of professional conduct and positive attitudes. The requirements for this course may be met in a laboratory setting. Topics include: permanent waving and relaxers; hair color and bleaching; skin, scalp, and hair treatments; haircutting; dispensary; styling; manicure/pedicure/advanced nail techniques; reception; safety precautions/decontamination; Hazardous Duty Standards Act compliance; and state licensure preparation. Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 6750 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 7500 Pre-requisites: COSM 1100 Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 COSM 1120 SALON MANAGEMENT Emphasizes the steps involved in opening and operating a privately owned salon. Topics include: law requirements regarding employment, tax payer education / federal and state responsibilities, law requirements for owning and operating a salon business, business management practices, and public relations and career development. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: COSM 1000 Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 CRJU 1010 INTRODUCTION TO CRIMINAL JUSTICE Introduces the development and organization of the criminal justice system in the United States. Topics include: the American criminal justice system; constitutional limitations; organization of enforcement, adjudication, and corrections; and career opportunities and requirements. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 CRJU 1030 CORRECTIONS Provides an analysis of all phases of the American correctional system and practices, including its history, procedures, and objectives. Topics include: history and evolution of correctional facilities; legal and administrative problems; institutional facilities and procedures; probation, parole, and prerelease programs; alternative sentencing; rehabilitation; community involvement; and staffing. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 CRJU 1040 PRINCIPLES OF LAW ENFORCEMENT This course examines the principles of the organization, administration, and duties of federal, state and local law enforcement agencies. Topics include: history and philosophy of law enforcement, evaluation of administrative practices, problems in American law enforcement agencies, emerging concepts, professionalism, and community crime prevention programs. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 CRJU 1043 PROBATION AND PAROLE 304

306 This course will cover the history of both juvenile and adult probation as well as the history of parole. The probation and parole systems will be covered generally with a special emphasis on the Georgia systems and related laws. Topics include: history and philosophy of probation and parole; function of the probation and parole systems; Georgia law related to probation and parole; characteristics and roles of probation and parole officers; and special issues and programs of probation and parole. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 CRJU 1052 CRIMINAL JUSTICE ADMINISTRATION This course explores the managerial aspects of effective and efficient police administration. Emphasis is directed towards increasing organizational skills and overcoming interdepartmental and inter-agency non-communication. Topics include: environmental management, human resources, and organizational concerns. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 CRJU 1062 METHODS OF CRIMINAL INVESTIGATION This course presents the fundamentals of criminal investigation. The duties and responsibilities of the investigator both in field and in the courtroom are highlighted. Emphasis is placed on techniques commonly utilized by investigative personnel as well as the procedures used for investigating various crimes. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 CRJU 1063 CRIME SCENE PROCESSING This course presents students with practical exercises dealing with investigating crime scenes and gathering various forms of physical evidence. Emphasis is placed on crime scene assessment, search, fingerprinting, and evidence collection. Topics include: crime scene management, evidence characteristics, identification, documentation and collection as well as techniques for developing and lifting latent fingerprints. Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 3000 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3750 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 CRJU 1068 CRIMINAL LAW FOR CRIMINAL JUSTICE This course introduces criminal law in the United States, but emphasizes the current specific status of Georgia criminal law. The course will focus on the most current statutory contents of the Official Code of Georgia Annotated (O.C.G.A.) with primary emphasis on the criminal and traffic codes. Topics include: historic development of criminal law in the United States; statutory law, Georgia Code (O.C.G.A.) Title 16 Crimes and Offenses; statutory law, Georgia Code (O.C.G.A.) Title 40 Motor Vehicle and Traffic Offenses; and Supreme Court rulings that apply to criminal law. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 CRJU 1072 INTRODUCTION TO FORENSIC SCIENCE The origin, history and role of forensic science in the investigative process. Philosophical, rational and practical framework that supports a case investigation will be outlined. The unifying principles of forensic science, the rooting of forensic science in the pure sciences, and the unique ways in which a forensic scientist must think will also be discussed. The special areas of forensic science will be explored. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 CRJU 1400 ETHICS AND CULTURAL PERSPECTIVES FOR CRIMINAL JUSTICE This course provides an exploration of ethics and cultural perspectives in criminal justice. In presenting ethics, both the individual perspective and the organizational standpoint will be examined. Four areas of ethical decision making opportunities are studied including: law enforcement ethics; correctional ethics; legal profession ethics; and policymaking ethics. The presentation of cultural perspectives is designed to aid law enforcement officers to better understand and communicate with members of other cultures with whom they come in contact in the line of duty. Topics include: defining and applying terms related to intercultural attitudes, role-play activities related to intercultural understanding, developing interpersonal/intercultural communication competence, and development of personal intercultural growth plan. 305

307 Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 CRJU 2020 CONSTITUTIONAL LAW FOR CRIMINAL JUSTICE This course emphasizes those provisions of the Bill of Rights which pertain to criminal justice. Topics include: characteristics and powers of the three branches of government; principles governing the operation of the U.S. Constitution, the Bill of Rights and the Fourteenth Amendment. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 CRJU 2050 CRIMINAL PROCEDURE Introduces the procedural law of the criminal justice system which governs the series of proceedings through which government enforces substantive criminal law. The course offers an emphasis on the laws of arrest and search and seizure; the rules of evidence, right to counsel, and the rights and duties of both citizens and officers. The course covers in depth appropriate Case Law and court rulings that dictate criminal procedure on the State and Federal Level. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 CRJU 2070 JUVENILE JUSTICE Analyzes the nature, extent, and cause of juvenile delinquency, and examines processes in the field of juvenile justice. Topics include: survey of juvenile law, comparative analysis of adult and juvenile justice systems, and prevention and treatment of juvenile delinquency. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 CRJU 2100 CRIMINALJUSTICE EXTERNSHIP Provides experiences necessary for further professional development and exposure to related agencies in the criminal justice field. The student will pursue an externship in a related agency supervised by the instructor. Topics include: criminal justice theory applications. Lecture: 0 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 6750 Practicum/Internship: 6750 Clinical:0 Total: 6750Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 CTDL 1010 FUNDAMENTALS OF COMMERCIAL DRIVING Fundamentals of Commercial Driving introduce students to the transportation industry, federal and state regulations, records and forms, industrial relations, and other non-driving activities. This course provides an emphasis on safety that will continue throughout the program. Lecture: 2500 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2500 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: None Credits: 2 CTDL 1020 COMBINATION VEHICLE BASIC OPERATION AND RANGE WORK This course familiarizes students with truck instruments and controls and performing basic maneuvers required to drive safely in a controlled environment and on the Driving Range. Each student must receive 12 hours behind the wheel (BTW) instructional time in range operations such as operating a tractor trailer through clearance maneuvers, backing, turning, parallel parking and coupling/uncoupling. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 1000 Lab 3: 1500 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 4000 Pre-requisites: CTDL 1010 Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 CTDL 1030 COMBINATION VEHICLE ADVANCED OPERATIONS Advanced Operations develops students' driving skills under actual road conditions. The classroom part of the course stresses following safe operating practices. These safe operating practices are integrated into the development of driving skills on the road. Each student must receive at least twelve (12) hours behind-the-wheel (BTW) instructional time on the street/road. In addition the student must have a minimum program total of forty four (44) hours BTW instructional time in any combination (with CTDL 1020) of range and street/road driving. Note: state law requires that whenever a combination vehicle is operated on public roads an instructor must be present in the vehicle while the student is driving. 306

308 Lecture: 500 Lab 2: 5000 Lab 3: 6000 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 7000 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: CTDL 1020 Credits: 4 CTDL 1040 COMMERCIAL DRIVING INTERNSHIP Commercial Driving Internship provides the opportunity for an individual to complete his/her training with a company. The internship takes the place of CTDL-1030, Advanced Operations. Working closely with the school a company provides the advanced training which focuses on developing students' driving skills. Each student must receive at least twelve (12) hours behind-the-wheel (BTW) instructional time on the street/road. In addition the student must have a minimum program total of forty-four (44) hours BTW instructional time in any combination (with CTDL 1020) or range and street/road driving. Note: State law requires that whenever a vehicle is operated on public roads an instructor must be present in the truck while the student is driving. Lecture: 0 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 7500 Practicum/Internship: 7500 Clinical: 0 Total: 7500 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: CTDL 1020 Credits: 3 CUUL 1000 FUNDAMENTALS OF CULINARY ARTS Provides an overview of the professionalism in culinary arts, culinary career opportunities, chef s history, pride, and espirit d corp. Introduces principles and practices necessary to food, supply, and equipment selection, procurement, receiving, storage, and distribution. Topics include: cuisine, food service organizations, career opportunities, food service styles, basic culinary management techniques, professionalism, culinary work ethics, quality factors, food tests, pricing procedures, cost determination and control, selection, procurement, receiving, storage, and distribution. Laboratory demonstration and student experimentation parallel class work. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3750 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: Math Credits: 4 CUUL 1110 CULINARY SAFETY AND SANITATION Emphasizes fundamental kitchen and dining room safety, sanitation, maintenance, and operation procedures. Topics include: cleaning standards, O.S.H.A. M.S.D.S. guidelines, sanitary procedures following SERV-SAFE guidelines, HACCAP, safety practices, basic kitchen first aid, operation of equipment, cleaning and maintenance of equipment, dishwashing, and pot and pan cleaning. Laboratory practice parallels class work. Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 2250 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3000 Pre-requisites: Provisional Admission Co-requisites: Provisional Admission Credits: 2 CUUL 1120 PRINCIPLES OF COOKING This course introduces fundamental food preparation terms, concepts, and methods. Course content reflects American Culinary Federation Educational Institute apprenticeship training objectives. Topics include: weights and measures, conversions, basic cooking principles, methods of food preparation, recipe utilization, and nutrition. Laboratory demonstrations and student experimentation parallel class work. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 3000 Lab 3: 4500 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 9000 Pre-requisites: CUUL 1110 Co-requisites: CUUL 1110 Credits: 6 CUUL 1129 FUNDAMENTALS OF RESTAURANT OPERATIONS Introduces the fundamentals of dining and beverage service and experience in preparation of a wide variety of quantity foods. Course content reflect American Culinary Federation Education Institute apprenticeship training objectives. Topics include: dining service/guest service, dining service positions and functions, international dining services, restaurant business laws, preparation and setup, table side service, and beverage service and setup, kitchen operational procedures, equipment use, banquet planning, recipe conversion, food decorating, safety and sanitation, and production of quantity food. Laboratory practice parallels class work. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 2250 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 5250 Pre-requisites: CUUL 1120 Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 CUUL 1170 INTRODUCTION TO CULINARY NUTRITION This course is an orientation for school nutrition employees that will introduce students to proper sanitation and food handling, equipment safety, first aid, meal pattern requirements, quantity food production, merchandising, communication, and basic nutrition knowledge. The course will help school nutrition employees develop skills that will result in improved nutrition programs and service 307

309 to customers. Basic nutrition concepts will focus on Iron, Fats, Saturated Fat, and Cholesterol, Protein, Fiber, Sugar, and Sodium, Calories, Calcium, Vitamin A, and Vitamin C. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 CUUL 1220 BAKING PRINCIPLES Baking Principles presents the fundamental terms, concepts, and methods involved in preparation of yeast and quick breads and baked products. Emphasis is placed on conformance of sanitation and hygienic work habits with health laws. Course content reflects American Culinary Federation Educational Institute cook and pastry apprenticeship training objectives, along with Retail Bakery Association training program. Topics include: baking principles; Science and use of baking ingredients for breads, desserts, cakes, pastries; weights, measures, and conversions; preparation of baked goods, baking sanitation and hygiene, baking supplies and equipment. Laboratory demonstrations and student experimentation parallel class work. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 3000 Lab 3: 2250 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 6750 Pre-requisites: CUUL 1120 Co-requisites: None Credits: 5 CUUL 1320 GARDE MANGER Introduces basic pantry manger principles, utilization, preparation, and integration into other kitchen operations. Course content reflects American Culinary Federation Educational Institute apprenticeship pantry, garnishing, and presentation training objectives. Topics include: pantry functions; garnishes, carving, and decorating; buffet presentation; cold preparations; hot/cold sandwiches; salads, dressings and relishes; breakfast preparation; hot/cold hors d'oeuvres; chaudfroids, gelees, and molds; and pates and terrines. Laboratory practice parallels class work. Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 4500 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 6750 Pre-requisites: CUUL 1120 Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 CUUL 1370 CULINARY NUTRITION AND MENU DEVELOPMENT This course emphasizes menu planning for all types of facilities, services, and special diets. Topics include: menu selection, menu development and pricing, nutrition, special diets, cooking nutritional foods, and organics. Laboratory demonstrations and student management and supervision parallel class work. Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 2250 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 4500 Pre-requisites: CUUL 1120 Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 CUUL 1400 BASIC NUTRITION This course will emphasize nutrients and nutritional needs. Special needs and diets will be explored with an emphasis on manipulating meal components in order to meet the needs of these diets. Nutrition for different phases of the life cycle and current trends in nutrition will also be explored. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 CUUL 1420 MARKETING AND CUSTOMER SERVICE This course focuses on skills necessary to promote sales and incorporate strategies to meet customer needs. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 CUUL 1450 FOOD SERVICE MANAGER IN TRAINING I Introduction to culinary nutrition management including menu management, production, service, and customer relations Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 CUUL 1460 FOOD SERVICE MANAGER IN TRAINING II Introduction to Culinary Nutrition Management that emphasizes the role of the manager, leadership, personnel, and program accountability. 308

310 Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: CUUL 1450 Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 CUUL 2130 CULINARY PRACTICUM This course provides students with the opportunity to gain management/supervisory experience in an actual job setting. Students will be placed in an appropriate restaurant, catering, or other food service business for four days per week throughout the semester. Onthe-job training topics include restaurant management/on-off premise, catering/food service business, supervisory training, and management training, on-off premise catering, hotel kitchen organization, kitchen management, restaurant kitchen systems, institutional food systems, kitchen departmental responsibilities productivity. Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: Pre-requisites: CUUL Co-requisites: None Credits: 6 CUUL 2140 ADVANCED BAKING AND INTERNATIONAL CUISINE This course introduces international cuisine and acquisition of advanced cookery techniques. Course content reflects American Culinary Federation Educational Institute cook apprenticeship training objectives and provides background for those aspiring to become chefs. Topics include: international cuisine, advanced grill cookery, advanced vegetable cookery, advanced meat cookery, advanced line cookery, advanced fry cookery and nutrition. Laboratory practice parallels class work. ***Provides in-depth experience in preparing many types of baked goods commonly found in restaurants and hotels. Course content reflects American Culinary Federation and Retail Bakery Association training objectives and provides background for those aspiring to become pastry chefs or bakery supervisors. Topics include: breads, pies, cakes, pastry dough, puff pastry, icing, filling, and candy. Laboratory practice parallels class work. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 3000 Lab 3: 4500 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 9000 Pre-requisites: CUUL Co-requisites: None Credits: 6 CUUL 2160 CONTEMPORARY CUISINE This course emphasizes all modern cuisine and introduces management concepts necessary to the functioning of a commercial kitchen. Topics include: international cuisine, cuisine trends, kitchen organization, kitchen management, kitchen supervision, competition entry, nutrition, menu selection, layout and design, and on/off premise catering. Laboratory demonstration and student experimentation parallel class work. Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 4500 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 6750 Pre-requisites: CUUL Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 CUUL 2190 PRINCIPLES OF CULINARY LEADERSHIP Familiarizes the student with principles, skills, methods, and behaviors necessary for sound leadership of people in their job responsibilities. Emphasis will be placed on real-life concepts, personal skill development, applied knowledge, and managing human resources. Course content is intended to help leaders, managers, and supervisors deal with a dramatically changing workplace that is affected by technology changes a more competence and global market place, corporate restructuring and the changing nature of work and the workforce, Topics include: Leadership relative to the Function of Management; Decision Making Process; Building and Effect Organizational Culture; Human Resource Management; and Delegating Management; Organization, and Control. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: Lab 3: Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: Provisional Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 DELA 1000 ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY OF HEAD AND NECK Focuses on normal head and neck anatomy. Topics include: osteology of the skull, muscles of mastication and facial expression, temporal mandibular joint, blood lymphatic and nerve supply of the head, salivary glands and related structures and structures of the head and neck. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 1500 Pre-requisites: Provisional Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 2 DELA 1010 INTRODUCTION TO DENTAL TECHNOLOGY This course provides students with an overview of dentistry and dental technology. Topics include: historical aspects of dentistry; ethics and jurisprudence related to the dental laboratory; classification, structure, and behavior of pathogenic microbes; body's defense 309

311 and immunity; modes of disease transmission; CDC, NADL, USPH, and OSHA guidelines for infection control; introduction to equipment; and dental materials. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3000 Pre-requisites: Provisional Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 DELA 1020 PHYSICS AND CHEMISTRY AND DENTAL MATERIALS Introduces the student to the materials used in the dental office and dental laboratory. General chemical and physical science are discussed and applied to the selection and use of materials in the laboratory. Topics include: general chemistry and physics, impression materials, gypsum products, waxes, metallurgy, resins and ceramics, and dental abrasives and polishes. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3000 Pre-requisites: Provisional Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 DELA 1030 TOOTH MORPHOLOGY Focuses on oral anatomy, dental anatomy, and occlusion with the emphasis on dental morphology. Laboratory exercises incorporate waxing procedures. Topics include: dental terminology, tooth morphology and waxing procedures, and primary and mixed dentition. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 2250 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 5250 Pre-requisites: Provisional Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 DELA 1040 PRINCIPLES OF OCCLUSION Emphasizes advanced techniques in waxing of restorations. Laboratory exercises incorporate waxing of cusp-fossa and cusp-ridge centric occlusion on adjustable articulators. Topics include: tooth landmarks, TMJ functions, dental articulators, and positive waxing techniques. Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: DELA 1000, DELA 1010, DELA 1020, DELA 1030 Co-requisites: None Credits: 2 DELA 1110 REMOVABLE PARTIAL DENTURES Introduces the materials and techniques used in the fabrication of removable partial dentures. Topics include: materials used in removable partial dentures, preparatory procedures, removable partial denture fabrication procedures, and post-fabrication procedures. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 2250 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 5250 Pre-requisites: DELA 1010, DELA 1020, DELA 1030 Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 DELA 1130 COMPLETE DENTURES Focuses on complete denture fabrication from the preliminary impression to the finished denture. Topics include: materials used in complete dentures, preparatory procedures for complete dentures, complete denture fabrication procedures, and post-fabrication procedures. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 2250 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 5250 Pre-requisites: DELA 1000, DELA 1010, DELA 1020, DELA 1030 Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 DELA 1150 ORTHODONTICS/PEDODNTICS Introduces the principles of orthodontic treatment with removable appliances. Topics include: principles of occlusion and malocclusion, materials and instruments, orthodontic model preparation, design of orthodontic appliances, and advances in orthodontic treatment. Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: DELA 1000, DELA 1010, DELA 1020, DELA 1030 Co-requisites: DELA 1040 Credits: 2 DELA 1160 FIXED PROSTHODONTICS PRACTICUM This course introduces students to the application and reinforcement of basic fixed prosthodontic principles in an actual job setting or practicum experience. Students are acquainted with occupational responsibilities through realistic work situations on the job. Topics include, but are not limited to: problem solving, adaptability to the job setting, use of proper interpersonal skills, interpretation of work authorizations, application of basic fixed prosthodontic techniques, and professional development. The occupation-based instruction is implemented through the use of written individualized training plans, written performance evaluation, and required practicum or onthe-job training. 310

312 Lecture: Lab 2: Lab 3: Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: Pre-requisites: DELA 1120, DELS1140, DELA 1150 Co-requisites: DELA 1150 Credits: 7 DELA 1170 REMOVABLE PROSTHODONTICS PRACTICUM This course introduces students to the application and reinforcement of basic removable prosthodontic principles in an actual job setting or practicum experience. Students are acquainted with occupational responsibilities through realistic work situations on the job. Topics include, but are not limited to: problem solving, adaptability to the job setting, use of proper interpersonal skills, interpretation of work authorizations, application of basic removable prosthodontic techniques, and professional development. The occupation-based instruction is implemented through the use of written individualized training plans, written performance evaluation, a required weekly seminar, and required practicum or on-the-job training. Lecture: 0 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: Pre-requisites: DELA 1110, DELA 1130, DELA 1150 Co-requisites: DELA 1150 Credits: 7 DELA 2010 PRINCIPLES OF LABORATORY MANAGEMENT Focuses on the necessary information and techniques needed to manage a dental laboratory. Topics include: dental laboratory ownership, organization, and management; marketing; personnel management; production management; finances; and continuous quality improvement. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3000 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 DELA 2020 ADVANCED REMOVABLE PARTIAL DENTURES This course focuses on skills in advanced concepts in removable partial dentures. Topics include: research in removable partial dentures, removable partial denture preparatory procedures, removable partial denture fabrication procedures, and advanced concepts in removable partial dentures. Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 4500 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 5250 Pre-requisites: DELA 1110, DELA 1130, DELA 1150 Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 DELA 2030 ADVANCED CROWN AND BRIDGE This course focuses on skills in advanced concepts in crown and bridge. Topics include: research in crown and bridge; crown and bridge preparatory procedures; crown and bridge fabrication procedures; and advanced concepts in crown and bridge. Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 4500 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 5250 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 DELA 2040 ADVANCED COMPLETE DENTURES This course focuses on skills in advanced concepts in complete dentures. Topics include: research in complete dentures; complete denture preparatory procedures; complete denture fabrication procedures; and advanced concepts in complete dentures. Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 4500 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 5250 Pre-requisites: DELA 1130 Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 DELA 2050 ADVANCED DENTAL CERAMICS This course focuses on skills in advanced concepts in dental ceramics. Topics include: research in complete ceramics; dental ceramics preparatory procedures; dental ceramics fabrication procedures; and advanced concepts in dental ceramics. Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 4500 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 5250 Pre-requisites: DELA 1120, DELA 1140 Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 DENA 1010 BASIC HUMAN BIOLOGY Focuses on basic normal structure and function of the human body with an emphasis on organ systems. Topics include: medical terminology as it relates to the normal human body; and normal structure and function of the human body - cells and tissues, organs and systems, and homeostatic mechanisms. 311

313 Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 750 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 1 DENA 1030 PREVENTIVE DENTISTRY Provides students with theory and clinical experience in the area of preventive and public health dentistry. Topics include: etiology of dental disease; patient education techniques; plaque control techniques; types and use of fluoride; diet analysis for caries control; and dietary considerations for the dental patient. Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: DENA 1080, DENA 1340 Co-requisites: DENA 1080, DENA 1340 Credits: 2 DENA 1050 MICROBIOLOGY AND INFECTION CONTROL Introduces fundamental microbiology and infection control techniques. Topics include: classification, structure, and behavior of pathogenic microbes; mode of disease transmission; body s defense and immunity; infectious diseases; and infection control procedures in accordance with CDC recommendations and OSHA guidelines. Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 2 DENA 1070 ORAL PATHOLOGY AND THERAPEUTICS Focuses on the diseases affecting the oral cavity and pharmacology as it relates to dentistry. Topics include: identification and disease process; signs/symptoms of oral diseases and systemic diseases with oral manifestations; developmental abnormalities of oral tissues; basic principle of pharmacology; drugs prescribed by the dental profession; drugs that may contraindicate treatment; and applied pharmacology (regulations, dosage, and applications. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 1500 Pre-requisites: DENA 1010, DENA 1080 Co-requisites: None Credits: 2 DENA 1080 DENTAL BIOLOGY Focuses on normal head and neck anatomy and the development and functions of oral anatomy. Topics include: dental anatomy; oral histology; oral embryology; osteology of the skull; muscles of mastication and facial expression; temporal mandibular joint; blood lymphatic nerve supply of the head; and salivary glands and related structures. Lecture: 3750 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3750 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 5 DENA 1090 DENTAL ASSISTING NATIONAL BOARD EXAMINATION PREPARATION Reviews information concerning all didactic areas tested by the Dental Assisting National Board (DANB). Topics include: collecting and recording clinical data; dental Radiologic Technology; chairside dental procedures; prevention of disease transmission; patient education and oral health management; office management procedures; and test taking skills. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 1500 Pre-requisites: Program Instructor Approval Co-requisites: None Credits: 2 DENA 1340 DENTAL ASSISTING I: GENERAL CHAIRSIDE Introduces student to ethics and jurisprudence for the dental assistant and to chair-side assisting with diagnostic and operative procedures. Topics include: ethics and jurisprudence in the dental office; four-handed dentistry techniques; clinical data collection techniques; introduction to operative dentistry; and dental material basics. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 4500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 6750 Pre-requisites: DENA 1050, DENA 1080 Co-requisites: DENA 1050, DENA 1080 Credits: 6 DENA 1350 DENTAL ASSISTING II: DENTAL SPECIALITIES AND EFDA SKILLS Focuses on chairside assisting with dental specialty procedures. Topics include: prosthodontic procedures (fixed and removable); orthodontics; pediatric dentistry; periodontic procedures; oral and maxillofacial surgery procedures; endodontics procedures; management of dental office emergencies; medically compromised patients and expanded functions approved by law for performance by dental assistants in the state of Georgia. Student will pass a comprehensive examination and successfully perform all required clinical skills to receive EFDA certification. 312

314 Lecture: 3000 Lab 2: 4500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 7500 Pre-requisites: DENA 1340 Co-requisites: None Credits: 7 DENA 1390 DENTAL RADIOLOGY After completion of the course the student will be able to provide radiation safety for patient and self, expose x-rays, process x-rays, and prepare dental films for the dental office. Topics include: fundamentals of radiology and radiation safety; radiographic anatomy and interpretation; intraoral and extraoral radiographic techniques; and quality assurance techniques. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3750 Pre-requisites: DENA 1080 Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 DENA 1400 DENTAL PRACTICE MANAGEMENT Emphasizes procedures for office management in dental practices. Topics include: oral and written communication; records management; appointment control; dental insurance form preparation; accounting procedures; supply and inventory control; employability skills and basic computer skills. A computer lab provides basic skills in computer use and utilization of these skills to perform office procedures on a microcomputer. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3000 Pre-requisites: DENA 1340 Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 DENA 1460 DENTAL PRACTICUM I Practicum focuses on infection control in the dental office and assisting with diagnostic and simple operative procedures. Topics include: infection control procedures; clinical diagnostic procedures; and general dentistry procedures. Lecture: 0 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 2250 Practicum/Internship: 2250 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: DENA 1050, DENA 1340, DENA 1350, DENA 1390 Co-requisites: None Credits: 1 DENA 1470 DENTAL PRACTICUM II Practicum focuses on advanced general dentistry procedures and chairside in dental specialties with special emphasis on nonsurgical specialties. Topics include: advanced general dentistry and specialties. Lecture: 0 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 2250 Practicum/Internship: 2250 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: DENA 1480 Co-requisites: DENA 1480 Credits: 1 DENA 1480 DENTAL PRACTICUM III Practicum continues to focus on assisting chair-side with advanced general dentistry procedures with emphasis on dental office management, preventive dentistry, and expanded functions. Topics include: advanced general dentistry procedures; preventive dentistry; dental office management; expanded functions; chairside in specialties; and management of dental office emergencies. Lecture: 0 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: Practicum/Internship: Clinical: 0 Total: Pre-requisites: DENA 1460, DENA 1470 Co-requisites: DENA 1460, DENA 1470 Credits: 5 DFTG 1015 PRACTICAL GEOMETRY AND TRIGONOMETRY This course introduces and develops basic geometric and trigonometric concepts. Course content will emphasize geometric concepts and trigonometric concepts as they pertain to drafting/cad. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: MATH 1013 or MATH 1012 Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 DFTG 1101 CAD FUNDAMENTALS Establishes safety practices as they relate to a drafting environment. Introduces basic CAD functions while presenting essential principles and practices for line relationships, scale, and geometric construction. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 3000 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 4500 Pre-requisites: Provisional Admission Co-requisites: COMP 1000 Credits: 4 DFTG 1103 MULTIVIEW/BASIC DIMENSIONING 313

315 Multiview/Basic Dimensioning provides multiview and pictorial sketching, orthographic drawing and fundamental dimensioning methods necessary to develop 2D and 3D views that completely describe machine parts for manufacture using intermediate CAD software techniques. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 3000 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 4500 Pre-requisites: DFTG 1101 Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 DFTG D Mechanical Modeling In the 3D Mechanical Modeling course, the student becomes acquainted with concepts of the software related to Parametric modeling for mechanical drafting. The student will develop the skills necessary to create 3D models and presentation/working drawings. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 3000 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 4500 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 DFTG 1107 TECHNICAL DRAWING II Technical Drawing II continues dimensioning skill development and introduces tools for precision measurement and sectional views. Lecture: 1000 Lab 2: 2500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3500 Pre-requisites: DTFG 1103 Co-requisites: DFTG 1105 and DFTG 1127 Credits: 4 DFTG 1109 TECHNICAL DRAWING III Introduces techniques necessary for auxiliary view drawings, surface development, and developing sheet metal parts. Topics include: primary auxiliary views, secondary auxiliary views, surface development, and developing sheet metal parts. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 3000 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 4500 Pre-requisites: DTFG 1105 Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 DFTG 1125 ARCHITECTURAL FUNDAMENTALS Introduces architectural fundamental principles and practices associated with architectural styles and drawing. Fundamentals residential and commercial practices will be covered. Topics include: specifications and materials; architectural styles, construction drawing practices and procedures, dimensioning and scales. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 3000 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: DFTG 1103 Credits: 4 DFTG 1127 ARCHITECTURAL 3D MODELING In the Architectural 3D Modeling course, the student becomes acquainted with concepts of the software related to Parametric modeling for Architectural drafting. The student will develop the skills necessary to create 3D models and presentation/constructions drawings. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 3000 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 4500 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 DFTG 1129 RESIDENTIAL DRAWING I Introduces the essential skills necessary for assessing the expected materials, labor requirements and costs for given structures or products also students will be introduce to architectural drawing skills necessary to produce a basic set of construction drawings given floor plan information. Topics include: material take-offs; footing and foundation; floor plans; exterior elevations; site plans; and construction drawing techniques/practices. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 3000 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 4500 Pre-requisites: DFTG 1125 Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 DFTG 1131 RESIDENTIAL DRAWING II Continues in-depth architectural drawing practice and develops architectural design skills. Plans are designed to meet applicable codes. Topics include: material take-offs; footing and foundation; floor plans; exterior elevations; site plans; and construction drawing techniques/practices. 314

316 Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 3000 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 4500 Pre-requisites: DFTG 1129 Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 DFTG 1133 COMMERCIAL DRAWING I Introduces commercial drawing skills necessary to produce construction drawings given floor plan information. Topics include: structural steel detailing, reflected ceiling plans, rebar detailing, and commercial construction drawings. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 3000 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 4500 Pre-requisites: DFTG 1125 Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 DIET 1000 INTRODUCTION TO DIESEL TECHNOLOGY, TOOLS, AND SAFETY This course introduces basic knowledge and skills the student must have to succeed in the Diesel Equipment Technology field. Topics include an overview of diesel powered vehicles, diesel technology safety skills, basic tools and equipment, reference materials, measuring instruments, shop operation, mechanical fasteners, welding safety, and basic welding skills. Classroom and lab experiences on safety, precision measuring, and basic shop practices are highly emphasized. Lecture: 1030 Lab 2: 1415 Lab 3: 1530 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3975 Pre-requisites: Provisional Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 DIET 1010 DIESEL ELECTRICAL AND ELECTRONIC SYSTEMS This course introduces students to electrical and electronic systems used on medium/heavy duty trucks and heavy equipment. Topics include: general electrical system diagnosis, battery diagnosis and repair, starting system diagnosis and repair, charging system diagnosis and repair, lighting system diagnosis and repair, gauges and warning devices, and an introduction and familiarization with electrical and electronic systems. Lecture: 1830 Lab 2: 3170 Lab 3: 5500 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: DIET 1000 Credits: 7 DIET 1020 PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE This course introduces preventive maintenance procedures pertaining to medium/heavy duty trucks and heavy equipment. Topics include: engine systems; cab and hood; heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC); electrical and electronics; frame and chassis. Lecture: 2350 Lab 2: 1400 Lab 3: 2300 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 6050 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: DIET 1010 Credits: 5 DIET 1030 DIESEL ENGINES This course introduces diesel engines used in medium/heavy duty trucks and heavy equipment. Topics include: general engine diagnosis, cylinder head and valve train, engine block, engine lubrication system, hydraulic pumps, engine cooling, air induction, exhaust, fuel supply systems, electronic fuel management, and engine brakes. Using and interpreting test and measuring equipment is highly emphasized. Lecture: 1940 Lab 2: 2900 Lab 3: 5570 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: DIET 1010 Credits: 7 DIET 1040 DIESEL TRUCK AND HEAVY EQUIPMENT HVAC SYSTEMS This course introduces systems used in medium/heavy duty trucks and heavy equipment. Classroom instruction on HVAC theory and operation along with local, state, and federal regulations are strongly emphasized. Topics include: HVAC safety, HVAC system theory and operation, A/C system component diagnosis and repair, HVAC system diagnosis and repair, HVAC operating systems and related controls, and refrigeration recovery, recycling, and handling procedures. Lecture: 950 Lab 2: 680 Lab 3: 2870 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 4500 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: DIET 1010 Credits: 3 DIET 2000 TRUCK STEERING AND SUSPENSION SYSTEMS 315

317 This course introduces steering and suspension systems used on medium/heavy trucks. Classroom instruction on Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards (FMVSS) is strongly emphasized. Topics include: hydraulic assist steering systems; suspension systems; wheel alignment diagnosis, adjustment, and repair; wheels and tires; and frame and coupling devices. Lecture: 1660 Lab 2: 1140 Lab 3: 2300 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 5100 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: DIET 1000 Credits: 4 DIET 2010 TRUCK BRAKE SYSTEMS This course introduces air and hydraulic brake systems used on medium/heavy duty trucks. Classroom theory on brake systems along Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards (FMVSS) is strongly emphasized. Topics include: introduction to hydraulic systems and safety; air brakes air supply and system service; air brakes mechanical service; parking brakes; hydraulic brake system and service; hydraulic brakes mechanical service; hydraulic brakes power assist units; anti-lock brake systems (ABS) and automatic traction control (ATC); and wheel bearings. Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 2300 Lab 3: 3300 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 6350 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: DIET 1000, DIET 1010 Credits: 4 DIET 2020 TRUCK DRIVE TRAINS This course introduces power train systems used on medium/heavy duty trucks. Topics include: introduction to power trains, clutches and flywheels, powertrain electronic systems, auto-shift mechanical transmissions, power take-offs, truck drive lines, differentials and final drives, torque converters, and automatic transmissions. Lecture: 2700 Lab 2: 1200 Lab 3: 3600 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 7500 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: DIET 1000, DIET 1010 Credits: 6 DHYG 1000 TOOTH ANATOMY AND ROOT MORPHOLOGY Provides the student with a thorough knowledge of external and internal morphological characteristics of human primary and secondary dentition. Also introduces the student to various tooth identification systems, classifications of occlusion and dental anomalies. Topics include: oral cavity anatomy, dental terminology, external and internal tooth anatomy, tooth nomenclature and numbering systems, individual tooth and root morphology, occlusion and dental anomalies. Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: Total 2250 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits 2 DHYG 1010 ORAL EMBRYOLOGY AND HISTOLOGY Focuses on the study of cells and tissues of the human body with emphasis on those tissues that compose the head, neck, and oral cavity. Topics include: cellular structure and organelles; histology of epithelium; histology of connective tissue; histology of muscle tissue; histology of nerve tissue; histology of oral mucosa and orofacial structures; embryological development of the head and neck; tooth development; and development of tooth supporting structures. Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 750 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 2 DHYG 1040 PRECLINICAL HYGIENE LECTURE Provides fundamental skills to be utilized in the delivery of optimum patient care by the dental hygienist. Topics include: patient assessment, instrumentation, charting, occlusion, caries, emergencies, ethics and professionalism, asepsis, and patient and clinician positioning. Lecture: 1500 lab 2:0 Lab 3:0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Total: Clinical: 0 Total: 1500 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: DHYG 1050 Credits: 2 DHYG 1050 PRECLINICAL DENTAL HYGIENE LECTURE Provides fundamental skills to be utilized in the delivery of optimum patient care by the dental hygienist. Topics include: asepsis, ethics and professionalism, emergencies, patient assessment, patient and clinician positioning, instrumentation, charting, occlusion and caries. Lecture: 0 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 4500 Practicum/Internship: Clinical: 0 Total: 4500 Pre-requisite: Program Admission Co-requisites: DHYG 1040 Credits 2 DHYG 1020 HEAD AND NECK ANATOMY Focuses on anatomy of the head and neck. Emphasis is placed on those structures directly affected by the practice of dentistry. Topics include: terminology; anatomic landmarks; osteology of the skull; temporomandibular joint; muscles of mastication; muscles of facial expression; nervous system; blood supply of the head and neck; lymphatic system and immunology; endocrine and exocrine glands of 316

318 the head and neck; nasal and paranasal sinuses; facial spaces and the spread of dental infections; and anatomy concerning local anesthesia. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2:0 Lab 3:0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 4500 Pre-requisite: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits 2 DHYG 1030 DENTAL MATERIALS Focuses on the nature, qualities, composition and manipulation of materials used in dentistry. The primary goal of this course is to enhance the student's ability to make clinical judgments regarding the use and care of dental materials based on how these materials react in the oral environment. Topics include: dental materials standards, dental materials properties, impression materials, gypsum products, mouth guards and whitening systems, dental bases, liners and cements, temporary restorations, classifications for restorative dentistry, direct restorative materials, and indirect restorative materials, polishing procedures for dental restorations, removable dental prostheses, sealants, and implants. Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisite: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 2 DHYG 1070 RADIOLOGY LECTURE Emphasizes the application of radiology principles in the study of the teeth and their surrounding structures. Topics include: radiation physics principles; radiation biology; radiation safety; radiographic quality assurance; imaging theory; radiographic interpretation; radiographic need; legal issues of dental Radiologic Technology; and digital Radiologic Technology techniques and principles. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical:0 Total: 1500 Pre-requisite: Program Admission Co-requisites: DHYG 1020 Credits: 2 DHYG 1090 RADIOLOGY LAB Emphasizes the application of radiology principles in the study of the teeth and their surrounding structures. Topics include: radiation safety, radiographic quality assurance, imaging theory, radiographic interpretation, radiographic need, and digital Radiologic Technology principles and techniques. Lecture: 0 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 2250 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisite: Program Admission Co-requisite: DHYG 1020 Credits: 1 DHYG 1110 CLINICAL DENTAL HYGIENE I LECTURE Continues the development of knowledge in patient care. Topics include: prevention, instrumentation, patient management, dental appliances, and treatment planning. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 1500 Pre-requisite: DHYG 1040 Co-requisite: DHYG 1111 Credits: 2 DHYG 1111 CLINICAL DENTAL HYGIENE I LAB Continues the development of knowledge in patient care. Topics include: prevention, instrumentation, patient management, dental appliances, treatment planning, and applied techniques. Lecture: 0 Lab 2: Lab 3: 6750 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 6750 Pre-requisite: DHYG 1050 Co-requisite: DHYG 1110 Credits: 3 DHYG 1206 PHARMACOLOGY AND PAIN CONTROL Introduces principles of basic pharmacology as they pertain to the practice of dentistry and dental hygiene. Emphasizes actions and reactions of medications commonly used in the dental office or taken by dental patients. Topics include: pharmaceutical referencing; legal and ethical considerations; drug effects; contraindications; drug related emergencies; dental related anesthesia; and pain control. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisite: Program Admission Co-requisite: None Credits: 3 DHYG 2050 ORAL PATHOLOGY Prerequisites: DHYG 1010, DHYG 1020 Introduces pathology as a specialty of dentistry and includes the etiology, pathogenesis and recognition of various pathological conditions. Emphasis is placed on oral and paraoral pathology and systemic conditions affecting the head and neck. Topics include: terminology and biopsy procedures; inflammation, repair, and regeneration; soft tissue and dental anomalies; pathogenesis of caries and pulpal pathology; cysts and tumors of the head and neck; systemic conditions that affect the oral structures; infectious diseases; diseases of the salivary glands; diseases of bone; blood dyscrasias; vesiculo-erosive and autoimmune diseases; and genetic diseases and syndromes of the head and neck. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total:

319 Pre-requisite: DHYG 1010, DHYG 1020 Co-requisite: None Credit: 3 DHYG 2070 COMMUNITY DENTAL HEALTH Provides students with a broad understanding of the healthcare system and an objective view of the significant social, political, psychological and economic forces directing the system. Prepares students to promote oral health and prevent oral disease in a community, by meeting specific dental health needs of community groups. Topics include: epidemiology; community dental care assessment; community dental care provision; preventive counseling for groups; group oral health education; terminology; dental care systems; biostatistics; and concepts of dental research. Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 3000 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3750 Pre-requisites: DHYG 1110 Co-requisite: None Credits: 3 DHYG 2010 CLINICAL DENTAL HYGIENE II LECTURE Continues the development of student knowledge in treating patients and preventing oral disease. Topics include: instrument sharpening; patient assessment; antimicrobial use; pulp vitality testing; treatment of hypersensitivity; whitening; implant care; tobacco cessation; pit and fissure sealants, scaling, debridement and root planing; ultrasonics and air polishing and dietary analysis. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2:0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 1500 Pre-requisite: DHYG 1070, DHYG 1110, Co-requisite: DHYG 2020 Credits: 2 DHYG 2020 CLINICAL DENTAL HYGIENE II LAB Continues the development of student knowledge in treating patients and preventing oral disease. Topics include: instrument sharpening; patient assessment; antimicrobial use; pulp vitality testing; treatment of hypersensitivity; whitening; implant care; tobacco cessation; pit and fissure sealants; scaling, debridement and root planing; ultrasonics and air polishing; dietary analysis, and applied techniques. Lecture: 0 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 4500 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 1500 Total: 4500 Pre-requisite: DHYG 1070, DHYG 1110 Co-requisite: DHYG 2010 Credits: 2 DHYG 2090 CLINICAL DENTAL HYGIENE III LAB Continues the development of student skills necessary for treatment and prevention of oral disease. Topics include: special needs patients and applied techniques. Lecture: 0 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 9000 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 9000 Pre-requisite: DHYG 2020 Co-requisite: 2080 Credit: 4 DHYG 2080 CLINICAL DENTAL HYGIENE III DENTAL LECTURE Continues the development of student knowledge necessary for treatment and prevention of oral diseases. Topics include: treatment of patients with special needs. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 1500 Pre-requisite: DHYG 2010 Co-requisite: DHYG 2090 Credits: 2 DHYG 2110 BIOCHEMISTRY/NUTRITION FUNDAMENTALS FOR DENTAL HYGIENIST Continues the development of student knowledge in treating patients and preventing oral disease. Topics include: instrument sharpening; patient assessment; antimicrobial use; pulp vitality testing; treatment of hypersensitivity; whitening; implant care; tobacco cessation; pit and fissure sealants, scaling, debridement and root planning; ultrasonics and air polishing and dietary analysis. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisite: DHYG 1070, DHYG 1110 Co-requisite: DHYG 2020 Credits: 3 DHYG 2130 CLINICAL DENTAL HYGIENE IV LECTURE Focuses on the dental hygiene field and presents the fundamental concepts and principles necessary for successful participation in the dental profession. Topics include: employability skills; State of Georgia Dental Practice Act; office management; expanded duties; legal aspects; ethics; dental hygiene practice settings; and dentistry and dental hygiene regulation. Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 750 Pre-requisite: DHYG 2080 Co-requisite: DHYG 2140 Credits: 1 DHYG 2140 CLINICAL DENTAL HYGIENE IV LAB Continues the development of student skills necessary for treatment and prevention of oral disease. Topics include: applied techniques and time management. Lecture: 0 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 9000 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 9000 Pre-requisite: DHYG 2090 Co-requisite: DHYG 2130 Credits: DHYG 2200 PERIODONTOLOGY Provides fundamental information on periodontal anatomy, pathogenesis of the periodontal diseases, and an introduction to modern rational periodontal therapy, including preventive, non-surgical, and surgical methods. Topics include: tissues of the periodontium; 318

320 periodontal pathology; periodontal diseases; assessment and treatment planning; periodontal disease therapy; and periodontal emergencies. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisite: DHYG 1010 Co-requisite: None Credits: 3 DMPT 1000 INTRODUCTION TO DESIGN AND MEDIA PRODUCTION Covers the basics of computer terminology, operating systems, and input and output devices, file formatting, file management, and overview of software. Introduces students to the fundamentals of design concepts, including design, composition and layout, color theory and typography. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 4500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 6750 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: None Credits: 6 DMPT 1005 VECTOR GRAPHICS This course is an introduction to the creation of vector imagery. Students will learn to draw illustrations, transform objects, work with layers, patterns, brushes, and filters, use effects and create graphics for the various applications. The focus will be on learning the essential tools, basic operation and commands used in the creation of vector graphics used in different media fields. Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 6000 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 6750 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: None Credits: 5 DMPT 1010 RASTER IMAGING In the Raster Imaging course, the student becomes acquainted with the concepts and software related raster image manipulation. The student is introduced to the workspace and tools used in an image editing software and will learn basic image editing techniques. Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 6000 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 6750 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: None Credits: 5 DMPT 1015 DRAWING Introduces beginning students to basic drawing techniques. Students will complete drawings using various techniques and media. Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 4500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 5250 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 DMPT 1020 INTRODUCTION TO PHOTOGRAPHY Introduces student to an overview of photography. Students will be introduced to parts of a camera, photography processes and lighting setup, and will complete various projects using a camera. Lecture: 1000 Lab 2: 4000 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 5000 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 DMPT 1025 PRODUCTION PHOTOGRAPHY Students will produce photographs using a variety of commercial lighting techniques and common studio setups and compositing practices. Students will be required to produce a portfolio of their photography in a variety of formats. Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 4500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 5250 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 DMPT 1600 INTRODUCTION TO VIDEO PRODUCTION This course is an introduction to the creative and technical aspects of video production. Students will learn the basic terminology and techniques of video production through analysis of produced video works as well as hands-on experience. Students will be introduced to basic digital video production including: pre-production and planning, camera operation and framing, lighting, sound, and postproduction with basic editing. Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 4500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 5250 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 DMPT 2100 IDENTITY DESIGN 319

321 This course focuses on the design challenges associated with the development of symbol systems, logos, environmental graphics and information graphics. Students will use their knowledge of vector and raster applications for further study into the use of typographic treatment and graphic images. Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 4500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 5250 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 DMPT 2105 PAGE LAYOUT This course is an introduction to graphic design production using page layout software. Students will be introduced to the essential terminology, tools, and stages of workflow in the graphic design process. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 3000 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 4500 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 DMPT 2110 PUBLICATION DESIGN Using skills learned in the page layout course, students will design projects relating to the challenges associated with multiple page formats. Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 4500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 5250 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 DMPT 2115 ADVERTISING AND PROMOTIONAL DESIGN Using skills learned in the page layout course, students will design projects for advertising and promotion of products and services. Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 4500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 5250 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 DMPT 2120 PREPRESS AND OUTPUT This course is an in-depth introduction to the graphic prepress production process. Through hands-on projects, the student will experience the challenges involved in successful graphic prepress production. Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 4500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 5250 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 DMPT 2125 ADVANCED RASTER IMAGING The student will refine imaging skills and apply concepts in advanced techniques of raster imaging. Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 4500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 5250 Pre-requisites: DMPT 1010 Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 DMPT 2130 ADVANCED VECTOR Students will learn how to use advance vector imagery techniques for communicating creative concepts in different media fields. They will study a variety of digital illustration styles and begin to develop a personal style of their own. Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 3750 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 4500 Pre-requisites: DMPT 1005 Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 DMPT 2135 DOCUMENTARY PHOTOGRAPHY This course is designed to provide an introduction to the principles and theories of photojournalism. It concentrates on the principles of personal and social documentary photography. It is also designed to increase the understanding of photography as a communication tool and to train the student to translate ideas and information into photographic form. Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 4500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 5250 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 DMPT 2400 BASIC 3D MODELING AND ANIMATION An introduction to 3D Animation software and component visualization. Students will be introduced to software and basic techniques to begin creating models and material for animation projects. Students will also be introduced to basic lighting and animation concepts so that they will be able to develop a complete animation using 3D software at the end of this course. 320

322 Minutes Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 4500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 5250 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 DMPT 2405 INTERMEDIATE 3D MODELING This course covers the fundamentals of computer geometry by creating the basic elements that make computer models: surfaces, NURBS, polygon, mesh and subdivisions. Students will also be introduced to production techniques that include preparing reference images for modeling aid, rendering and output of models. Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 4500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 5250 Pre-requisites: All Required, DMPT 2400 Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 DMPT 2410 DIGITAL, TEXTURE AND LIGHTING Introduces the students to concepts for creating textures and lighting for 3D computer graphics. Students will explore indepth the various ways to create and apply texture and lighting to the 3D models. Minutes Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 4500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 5250 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 DMPT D PRODUCTION AND ANIMATION This course will focus on tying together all the various stages of production, including concept development, materials creation, rigging and animation, and post-production. Minutes Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 3000 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 4500 Pre-requisites: DMPT 2400 Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 DMPT 2425 EFFECTS ANIMATION Introduces the student to the creation of visual effects for animation. Students learn to use procedural techniques to drive the movemen t of geometry creating simulations of a variety of natural phenomena. Minutes Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 4500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 5250 Pre-requisites: DMPT 2400 Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 DMPT 2450 ANIMATED SHORT FILM PRODUCTION I This course is the first part of a series of classes which provide the student an opportunity to produce a more comprehensive animated film. Minutes Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 9000 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 9750 Pre-requisites: Student must be a graduate of the Design and Media Production Technology degree or diploma, Animation Specialization program; DMPT 2930 Co-requisites: None Credits: 5 DMPT 2455 ANIMATED SHORT FILM PRODUCTION II This course is the second part of a series of classes which provide the student an opportunity to produce a more comprehensive animated film. Minutes Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 9000 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 9750 Pre-requisites: Student must be a graduate of the Design and Media Production Technology degree or diploma, Animation Specialization program; DMPT 2930 Co-requisites: None Credits: 5 DMPT 2600 BASIC VIDEO EDITING An introduction to basic audio and video editing techniques used in digital video production with non-linear software. Students will be introduced to the primary feature set and interface of video editing software and will learn to perform basic editing functions that include setup, adjusting and customizing preferences and settings, capturing video and audio, various editing and trimming techniques and tools, audio editing and audio creation, finishing and output. Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 4500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 5250 Pre-requisites: DMPT 1005, DMPT1010, DMPT1600Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 DMPT 2605 INTRODUCTION TO VIDEO COMPOSITING AND BROADCAST ANIMATION 321

323 This course introduces how to create and animate motion graphics. Students will learn to create dynamic animated titles and logos, animate raster and vector image file graphics, composite and edit multi-layered special effects using footage, work with shapes and masks, work with 3D elements, apply and animate various effect filters, and analyze and compress digital video for different output specifications. Students will be exposed to compositing concepts, techniques, and terminology used in finalizing a video or animation project. Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 4500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 5250 Pre-requisites: DMPT 1010 Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 DMPT 2610 INTERMEDIATE VIDEO COMPOSITING AND BROADCAST ANIMATION This course will expose students to advanced techniques used in finalizing a video or animation project using compositing software. The class will reinforce compositing concepts, workflow techniques and terminology that students have learned in previous classes. More advanced tools and techniques will be introduced to focus on overall project workflow. Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 4500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 5250 Pre-requisites: DMPT 2605 Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 DMPT 2615 INTERMEDIATE VIDEO EDITING This course will focus on more advanced editing and finishing techniques. Students will explore different editing styles and techniques different genres and learn how to use these techniques to create more complex compositions with polished transitions, fix screen direction errors, and manage clips and media. Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 4500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 5250 Pre-requisites: DMPT 2600 Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 DMPT 2625 DVD AUTHORING This course will provide design techniques and strategies for authoring DVDs. Students will create interactive navigational interfaces for their own projects. Students will "author" a DVD by crating buttons, interactive links, and slideshows. Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 4500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 5250 Pre-requisites: DMPT 1010, DMPT 2600, DMPT 2605 Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 DMPT 2700 PORTRAITURE Provides instruction in the techniques of portrait photography. The students will be able to perform creative use of lighting, including available and studio lighting. Introduces techniques in posing portrait subjects, critical positioning of lighting, and techniques used in the field. Students develop skills for critical evaluation of a portrait photograph. Topics include: tools for indoor and outdoor photography, posing individuals and groups, manipulating natural light and flash, critique and portfolio building. Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 4500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 5250 Pre-requisites: DMPT 1020 Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 DMPT 2705 PHOTOGRAPHY II Students continue the study of Photography through technical skills and theory. Topics include exposure control, advanced lighting techniques, and portfolio building. This class emphasizes creative skills, practical exercises and photography projects. Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 4500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 5250 Pre-requisites: DMPT 1020 Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 DMPT 2800 INTERMEDIATE VIDEO PRODUCTION This course will expose students to advanced techniques in digital cinematography and production audio. Students will gain hands on experience in camera operation, shot composition, camera movement, lighting, and production sound. Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 4500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 5250 Pre-requisites: DMPT 1600 Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 DMPT 2805 NARRATIVE FILMMAKING This course will take students through the entire process of creative a narrative short film, with particular emphasis on skills that are specific to fictional, scripted material. 322

324 Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 4500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 5250 Pre-requisites: DMPT 1600, DMPT 2800, DMPT2600 Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 DMPT 2810 DOCUMENTARY FILMMAKING This course will take students through the entire process of creating a documentary short film, with particular emphasis on skills that are specific to unscripted or partially scripted, non-fiction material. Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 4500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 5250 Pre-requisites: DMPT 1600, DMPT 2800, DMPT2600 Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 DMPT 2905 PRACTICUM/INTERNSHIP II Provides an approved industry-like setting where the student develops and sharpens skills. Emphasis is placed on production standards achievement and quality control. Lecture: 0 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 9000 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 9000 Pre-requisites: Program Instructor Approval Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 DMPT 2930 EXIT REVIEW Emphasis is placed on student's production of portfolio-quality pieces. Focuses on the preparation for entry into the job market. Lecture: 0 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 9000 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 9000 Pre-requisites: Program Instructor Approval Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 ECCE 1101 INTRODUCTION TO EARLY CHILDHOOD CARE AND EDUCATION Introduces concepts relating the responsibilities and procedures involved in a variety of early childhood care situations. Topics include historical perspectives; professionalism; guidance; developmentally appropriate practices; learning environment (including all children); cultural diversity; and licensing, accreditation, and credentialing. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: Provisional Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 ECCE 1103 CHILD GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT Introduces the student to the physical, social, emotional, and cognitive development of the young child (prenatal through 12 years of age). The course provides for competency development in observing, recording, and interpreting growth and development stages in the young child; advancing physical and intellectual competence; supporting social and emotional development; and examining relationships between child development and positive guidance. Topics include developmental characteristics, prenatal through age 12, developmental guidance applications, observing and recording techniques, ages and stages of development, and introduction to children with special needs. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: Provisional Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 ECCE 1105 HEALTH, SAFETY AND NUTRITION Introduces the theory, practices, and requirements for establishing and maintaining a safe, healthy learning environment. Topics include CPR and first aid, health issues, safety issues, child abuse and neglect, and nutritional needs of children. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3000 Pre-requisites: Provisional Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 ECCE 1112 CURRICULUM AND ASSESSMENT Provides student with an understanding of developmentally effective approaches to teaching, learning, observing, documenting and assessment strategies that promote positive development for young children. The course will enable the student to establish a learning environment appropriate for young children and to identify the goals, benefits, and uses of assessment in the development of curriculum for young children. Topics include observing, documenting, and assessing; learning environments; development of curriculum plans and materials; curriculum approaches; and instructional media. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total:

325 Pre-requisites: ECCE1103 Co-requisites: ECCE1103 Credits: 3 ECCE 1113 CREATIVE ACTIVITIES FOR CHILDREN Introduces the concepts related to creativity in art, music, movement and creative drama, and facilitating children's creative expression across the curriculum. Topics include concepts of creativity and expression; theories of young children's creative development; facilitation of children's creative expression, media, methods and materials across the curriculum; appreciation of children's art processes and products; appreciation of children's creativity in music, movement and dance; appreciation of children's creative expression in play and creative drama; and art and music appreciation. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3000 Pre-requisites: Provisional Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 ECCE 1121 EARLY CHILDHOOD CARE AND EDUCATION PRACTICUM Provides the student with the opportunity to gain a supervised experience in a practicum placement site allowing demonstration of techniques obtained from course work. Practicum topics include promoting child development and learning; building family and community relationships; observing, documenting, and assessing to support young children and families; teaching and learning; becoming a professional; and guidance techniques and classroom management. Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 4500 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 5250 Pre-requisites: ECCE 1105 Co-requisites: ECCE 1105 Credits: 3 ECCE 2115 LANGUAGE AND LITERACY Develops knowledge, skills, and abilities in supporting young children's literacy acquisition and development, birth through age twelve. Topics include developmental continuum of reading and writing, literacy acquisition birth to five years of age, literacy acquisition in kindergarten, literacy acquisition in early grades, and literacy acquisition in children who are culturally and linguistically diverse. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3000 Pre-requisites: ECCE 1103 Co-requisites: ECCE 1103 Credits: 3 ECCE 2116 MATH AND SCIENCE Presents the process of introducing math and science concepts to young children. Includes planning and implementation of developmentally appropriate activities and development of math and science materials, media and methods. Topics include inquiry approach to learning; cognitive stages and developmental processes in developing math and science concepts with children birth to five; cognitive stages and developmental processes in developing math and science concepts with children in kindergarten and primary grades; planning math and science activities; and development of math and science materials, media and methods. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3000 Pre-requisites: ECCE 1103 Co-requisites: ECCE 1103 Credits: 3 ECCE 2201 EXCEPTIONALITIES Provides for the development of knowledge and skills that will enable the student to understand individuals with special needs and appropriately guide their development. Special emphasis is placed on acquainting the student with programs and community resources that serve families with children with special needs. Topics include inclusion/least restrictive environment (LRE), physical and motor impairments, gifted/talented, intellectual and cognitive disabilities, emotional and behavioral disorders, communication disorders in speech and language, autism spectrum disorders, visual impairments, deaf and hard of hearing, health impairments, multiple disabilities, and community resources. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: ECCE 1103 Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 ECCE 2202 SOCIAL ISSUES AND FAMILY INVOLVEMENT Enables the student to value the complex characteristics of children's families and communities and to develop culturally responsive practices which will support family partnerships. Students use their understanding to build reciprocal relationships which promote children's development and learning. Students are introduced to local programs and agencies that offer services to children and families within the community. Topics include professional responsibilities, family/social issues, community resources, family education and support, teacher-family communication, community partnerships, social diversity and anti-bias concerns, successful transitions, and school-family activities. 324

326 Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: Provisional Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 ECCE 2203 GUIDANCE AND CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT Examines effective guidance practices in group settings based upon the application of theoretical models of child development and of developmentally appropriate practices. Focus will be given to individual, family, and cultural diversity. Topics will include developmentally appropriate child guidance (birth through 12); effective classroom management, including preventive and intervention techniques; understanding challenging behaviors; and implementing guidance plans. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: ECCE 1103 Co-requisites: ECCE 1103 Credits: 3 ECCE 2240 EARLY CHILDHOOD CARE AND EDUCATION INTERNSHIP Provides the student with the opportunity to gain a supervised experience in an actual or simulated work site allowing demonstration of techniques obtained from course work. Practicum topics include promoting child development and learning; building family and community relationships; observing, documenting, and assessing to support young children and families; teaching and learning; becoming a professional; and guidance techniques and classroom management. Lecture: 0 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: Pre-requisites: ECCE 1101, ECCE 1103, ECCE 1105 Co-requisites: ECCE 1105 Credits: 12 ECCE 2310 PARAPROFESSIONAL METHODS AND MATERIALS Develops instructional skills to enable the student to work as a paraprofessional with in a program for kindergarten through elementary age children. Topics include assessment and curriculum, instructional techniques, and methods for instruction in a learning environment. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: ECCE 1103 Co-requisites: ECCE 1103 Credits: 3 ECCE 2312 PARPROFESSIONAL ROLES AND PRACTICES Develops skills to enable the student to work as a paraprofessional in a program for kindergarten through elementary aged children. Topics include professional qualifications, professional and ethical conduct, professionalism and employment, and paraprofessional roles and responsibilities. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: ECCE 1103 Co-requisites: ECCE 1103 Credits: 3 ECCE 2320 PROGRAM ADMINISTRATION AND FACILITY MANAGEMENT Provides training in planning, implementation, and maintenance of an effective early childhood program and facility. Topics include organization, mission, philosophy, goals of a program; types of programs; laws, rules, regulations, accreditation, and program evaluation; needs assessment; administrative roles and board of directors; anti-bias program development; child development and developmentally appropriate practices; marketing, public and community relations, grouping, enrollment and retention; working with families; professionalism and work ethics; space management; money management; and program, equipment, and supplies management. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: Provisional Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 ECCE 2322 PERSONAL MANAGEMENT Provides training in early childhood personnel management. Topics include staff records; communication; personnel policies; managing payroll; recruitment, interviewing, selection, hiring, motivating, and firing; staff retention; staff scheduling; staff development; staff supervision; conflict resolution; staff evaluations; ethical responsibilities to employees; and time and stress management. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: Provisional Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 ECCE 2330 INFANT/TODDLER DEVELOPMENT 325

327 Introduces the three developmentally meaningful age periods during infancy. Provides knowledge, grounded in brain and attachment research, about how children learn and the skills and attitudes necessary to support optimum social/emotional, cognitive, and physical development for children from birth to three. Principles of brain development and language and communication will be explored in depth. Special emphasis is placed on experiential learning to show caregivers practical ways of meeting the fundamental needs of all infants in group care settings and helping them learn the lessons that every infant comes into the world eager to learn. The needs of infants and toddlers with established disabilities as well as those at risk for developmental problems will be examined from the perspective of early intervention and inclusion. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: Provisional Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 ECCE 2332 INFANT/TODDLER GROUP CARE AND CURRICULUM Provides the knowledge, skills and attitudes necessary to meet the fundamental needs of children from birth to three in group care settings. Establishes a foundation for a responsive, relationship-based curriculum for children birth to three who are in group care settings. Introduces the philosophy behind primary care, continuity of care, and respectful care. Explores ways of creating environments for infant/toddler group care which foster optimum social/emotional, physical and cognitive development, promote cultural sensitivity and encourage positive parent caregiver relations. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: Provisional Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 ECCE 2340 FAMILY CHILD CARE PROGRAM MANAGEMENT Provides the guidelines, responsibilities, and appropriate practices needed for successful management of a Family Child Care Home. Provides guidelines and responsibilities for professional business practices associated with the successful establishment and administration of a Family Child Care Home. Topics include business plans, budgeting, taxes, marketing, record keeping, and professional qualifications. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: Provisional Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 ECCE 2360 CLASSROOM STRATEGIES FOR EXCEPTIONAL CHILDREN Prepares child care providers and paraprofessionals with knowledge and skills in the areas of working effectively with children with a disability; working with families as partners; examining the laws and regulations; exploring resources, service providers, and agencies that may assist the child and his/her family; examining the adaptations and modifications to facilities and environments; reviewing the referral process; implementing inclusion; modifying instruction to accommodate the child with special needs; and investigating ways to document and chart observations. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: ECCE 2201 Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 ECCE 2362 EXPLORING YOUR ROLE IN THE EXCEPTIONAL ENVIRONMENT Prepares child care providers and paraprofessionals with knowledge and skills for screening and assessing purposes; and explores resources, service providers, and agencies that may assist the child and families in educational or natural settings. Examines adaptations, accommodations, and modifications to environments; reviews the referral process; implements inclusion and modifies instruction to accommodate the child with special needs. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 2250 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3750 Pre-requisites: ECCE 2201 Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 ECON 1101 PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS Provides a description and analysis of economic operations in contemporary society. Emphasis is placed on developing an understanding of economic concepts and policies as they apply to everyday life. Topics include basic economic principles; economic forces and indicators; capital and labor; price, competition, and monopoly; money and banking; government expenditures, federal and local; fluctuations in production, employment, and income; and United States economy in perspective Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 326

328 ECON 2105 MACROECONOMICS Provides a description and analysis of macroeconomic principles and policies. Topics include basic economic principles, macroeconomic concepts, equilibrium in the goods and money markets, macroeconomic equilibrium and the impact of fiscal and monetary policies. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 ECON 2106 MICROECONOMICS Provides an analysis of the ways in which consumers and business firms interact in a market economy. Topics include basic economic principles, consumer choice, behavior of profit maximizing firms, modeling of perfect competition, monopoly, oligopoly and monopolistic competition. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 ELCR 1005 SOLDERING TECHNOLOGY Develops the ability to solder and desolder connectors, components, and printed circuit boards using industry standards. Topics include: safety practices, soldering, desoldering, anti-static grounding, and surface mount techniques. Lecture: 0 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 1500 Pre-requisites: Provisional Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 1 ELCR 1010 DIRECT CURRENT CIRCUITS This course provides instruction in the theory and practical application of simple and complex direct current circuitry. Topics include laboratory safety practices and procedures, electrical laws and principles, DC test equipment basic series, parallel and combination circuits, complex series and parallel circuits, and DC theorems. Lecture: 3000 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 4500 Pre-requisites: MATH 1013, MATH 1111 Co-requisites: None Credits: 5 ELCR 1020 ALTERNATING CURRENT CIRCUITS This course introduces the theory and application of varying sine wave voltages and current, and continues the development of AC concepts with emphasis on constructing, verifying, and troubleshooting reactive circuits using RLC theory and practical application. Topics include AC wave generation, frequency and phase relationship, impedance, admittance, and conductance power factors, reactive components simple RLC circuits, AC circuit resonance, passive filters, and non-sinusoidal wave forms. Lecture: 3750 Lab 2: 3000 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 6750 Pre-requisites: ELCR 1010 Co-requisites: None Credits: 7 ELCR 1030 SOLID STATE DEVICES This course provides instruction in the theory and application of solid state devices in the electronics industry. Emphasis is placed on the physical characteristics and uses of solid state devices. Topics include PN diodes, power supplies, voltage regulation, bipolar junction theory and application, field effect transistors, and special applications. Lecture: 3000 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 4500 Pre-requisites: ELCR 1020 Co-requisites: None Credits: 5 ELCR 1040 DIGITAL AND MICROPROCESSOR FUNDAMENTALS This course is designed to provide sufficient coverage of digital electronics and microprocessor fundamentals. Digital fundamentals will introduce basic topics such as binary topics such as binary arithmetic, logic gates and truth tables, Boolean algebra and minimization techniques, logic families, and digital test equipment. Upon completion of the foundational digital requirements, a more advanced study of digital devices and circuits will include such topics as flip-flops, counters, multiplexers and de-multiplexers, encoding and decoding, displays, and analog to digital and digital to analog conversions. Students will also explore the basic architecture and hardware concepts of the microprocessor. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 3000 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 5250 Pre-requisites: ELCR 1020 Co-requisites: ELCR 1030 Credits: 5 ELCR 1060 LINEAR INTEGRATED CIRCUITS 327

329 Provides in-depth instruction on the characteristics and applications of linear integrated circuits. Topics include: operational amplifiers, timers, and three-terminal voltage regulators. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3000 Pre-requisites: ELCR 1020 Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 ELCR 2170 COMPUTER HARDWARE Description goes here Provides an introduction to the fundamentals of installing, configuring, upgrading, troubleshooting and repairing microcomputer systems. Topics include installation, configuration, upgrading, diagnosing, troubleshooting, preventative maintenance, basic hardware, printers, and basic networking. Lecture: Lab 2: Lab 3:0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 5250 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 5 ELCR 2190 NETWORKING I Provides an introduction to networking technologies. Covers a wide range of material about networking from careers in networking to local area networks, wide area networks, protocols, topologies, transmission media, and security. Focuses on operating network management systems and implementing the installation of networks. The course reviews cabling, connection schemes, the fundamentals of LAN and Wan technologies, TCP/IP configuration and troubleshooting, remote connectivity, and network maintenance and troubleshooting. Topics include: media and topologies, protocols and standards, network implementation, and network support. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2:1500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3000 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 ELCR 2600 TELECOM AND DATA CABLING Introduces the basic of cable installation from the initial site survey to splicing cable and making connections. Through laboratory activities, students perform the basic tasks of a cable installer. Topics include: basic standards and practices, cable rating and performance cable installation and management, testing and troubleshooting, industry standards, pulling cable, and understanding blueprints. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2:1500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3000 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 ELCR 2620 TELCOME SYSTEM INSTALLATION PROGRAM AND DATA TRANSMISSION This course provides instruction in the installation, programming, testing, and repair of simple and complex telephone systems. An introduction is also given to basic concepts on telecommunication and data transmission. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2:0 Lab 3: 2250 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 4500 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: ELCR2600 Credits: 4 ELCR 2590 FIBER OPTIC SYSTEMS Introduces the fundamentals of fiber optics and explores the application of the fiber optic transmission systems. Laboratory exercises give students hands on experience with fiber optic devices and test equipment. Topics includes fundamentals of fiber optics, types of optical fibers, fiber materials and manufacture, cable, light sources/transmitters/receivers, connectors, splicing, test measurement, and fiber optic system design. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2:1500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3000 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 ELCR 2800 EMBEDDED SYSTEMS CAPSTONE PROJECT This course will require students to either individually, or as a team, design a project by applying knowledge acquired in classroom/lab activities in program and core courses. Lecture: 0 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 2250 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: Program Advisor Approval Co-requisites: None Credits: 1 328

330 ELTR 1020 ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS BASIC I Introduces the theory and application of varying sine wave voltages and current. Topics include: magnetism, AC wave generation, AC test equipment, inductance, capacitance, and basic transformers. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3000 Pre-requisites: IDFC 1101, MATH 1012 Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 ELTR 1060 ELECTRICAL PRINTS, SCHEMATICS, AND SYMBOLS Introduces electrical symbols and their use in construction blueprints, electrical schematics, and diagrams. Topics include: electrical symbols, component identification, print reading and scales and measurement. Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: Provisional Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 2 ELTR 1080 COMMERCIAL WIRING I This course introduces commercial wiring practices and procedures. Topics include: industrial safety procedures, the National Electrical Code, commercial load calculations, three-phase power systems, and fundamentals of AC motor control. Lecture: 3000 Lab Lab 2: Lab 3: Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 4500 Pre5250 PrePre-requisites: None Co-requisites: None Credits: 5 ELTR 1090 COMMERCIAL WIRING II This course is a continuation of the study in commercial wiring practices and procedures. Topics include: transformer connections, an introduction to low voltage systems, conduit design and installation practices, and system design concepts. Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 3000 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3750 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 ELTR 1110 ELECTRICAL MOTORS Introduces the fundamental theories and applications of single-phase motors. Topics include: motor theory/operating principles, motor terminology, motor identification, NEMA standards, motor efficiencies, preventive maintenance, troubleshooting/failure analysis, and NEC requirements. Lecture: 2400 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 1800 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 4200 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 ELTR 1180 ELECTRICAL CONTROLS Introduces line and low voltage switching circuits, manual and automatic controls and devices, and circuits. Emphasis will be placed on switching circuits, manual and automatic controls and devices, line and low voltage switching circuits, and operation, application and ladder diagrams. Topics include: ladder and wire diagrams, switching circuits, manual controls and devices, automatic controls and devices, and application and operation of controllers and controls, and variable speed controls. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 3000 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 4500 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 ELTR 1205 RESIDENTIAL WIRING I Introduces residential wiring practices and procedures. Topics include: residential circuits, print reading, National Electrical Code, wiring materials, determining the required number and location of lighting/receptacles and small appliance circuits, wiring methods (size and type conductors, box fill calculations and voltage drop), switch control of luminaries, receptacle installation including bonding, GFCI and AFCI circuits, special purposes outlets - ranges, cook tops, ovens, dryers, water heaters, sump pumps, and sizing OCPDs (circuit breakers and fuses). Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3000 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 ELTR 1210 RESIDENTIAL WIRING II Provides additional instruction on wiring practices in accordance with the National Electrical Code. Topics include: residential single family service calculations, residential two family service calculations, load balancing, sub panels and feeders, residential single 329

331 family service installation, residential two family service installation, concepts of TV and CATV installation, swimming pool installation, and remote control of lighting and intercom installation. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3000 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 ELTR 1220 INDUSTRIAL PLC S Introduces operational theory, systems terminology, PLC installations, and programming procedures for programmable logic controls. Emphasis is placed on PLC programming, connections, installations, and start-up procedures. Topics include: PLC hardware and software, PLC functions and terminology, introductory numbering systems, PLC installation and set-up, PLC programming basics, relay logic instructions, timers and counters, connecting field devices to I/O cards, and PLC safety procedures. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 2250 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 4500 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 ELTR 1260 TRANSFORMERS Provides instruction in the theory and operation of specific types of transformers. Emphasis will be placed on National Electrical Code requirements related to the use of transformers. Topics include: transformer theory, types of transformers, National Electrical Code requirements, and safety precautions. Lecture: 1650 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 1800 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3450 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 ELUT 1215 HYDRAULICS Provides instruction in fundamental concepts and theories for safely operating hydraulic components of the electrical utility industry. Topics include hydraulic theory, suction side of pumps, actuators, valves, pumps, motors, accumulators, symbols and circuitry, and fluid filters and reservoirs. Lecture:1540 Lab 2: 1420 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2960 Pre-requisites: All required, MATH 1111 Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 EMPL 1000 INTERPERSONAL RELATIONS AND PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPNMENT Emphasizes human relations and professional development in today's rapidly changing world that prepares students for living and working in a complex society. Topics include human relations skills, job acquisition skills and communication, job retention skills, job advancement skills, and professional image skills. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 1500 Pre-requisites: Provisional Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 2 EMSP 1110 INTRODUCTION TO THE EMT PROFESSION This course serves as the introductory course to the Emergency Medical Services (EMS) profession. It orients the student to the prehospital care environment, issues related to the provision of patient care in both in-hospital and out-of-hospital circumstances. It further provides foundational information upon which subsequent curriculum content is based so that successful completion of this content increases the potential for success in subsequent courses and should allow students to apply the fundamental knowledge, skills, and attitudes gained in order to effectively communicate and function safely, ethically and professionally within the emergency medical services environment. Topics include: Anatomy and Physiology, Medical Terminology, Pathophysiology, CPR for HCP, EMS Systems, Research, Workforce Safety and Wellness, Documentation, EMS System Communication, Therapeutic Communication, Medical/Legal and Ethics, Public Health, Principles of Safely Operating a Ground Ambulance, Incident Management, Multiple Casualty Incidents, Air Medical, Vehicle Extrication, HazMat, MCI due to Terrorism/Disaster, and Life Span Development. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3000 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 EMSP 1120 EMT ASSESSMENT/AIRWAY MANAGEMENT AND PHARMACOLOGY This course prepares students for initial scene management and assessment of patients as well as management of the airway. Introduction to pharmacology is also covered. Includes application of scene information and patient assessment findings (scene size up, primary and secondary assessment, patient history, and reassessment) to guide emergency management. Topics include: Scene Size-Up; Primary Assessment; History Taking; Secondary Assessment; Monitoring Devices; Reassessment; Airway Management; Respiration; Artificial Ventilation; Principles of Pharmacology; Medication Administration; and Emergency Medications. 330

332 Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3000 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 EMSP 1130 MEDICAL EMERGENCIES FOR THE EMT This course integrates pathophysiological principles and assessment findings to formulate a field impression and implement the treatment plan of cases involving non-traumatic medical emergencies. Topics include: Medical Overview; Neurology; Abdominal and Gastrointestinal Disorders; Immunology; Infectious Disease; Endocrine Disorders; Psychiatric; Cardiovascular; Toxicology; Respiratory; Hematology; Genitourinary/Renal; Non-Traumatic Musculoskeletal Disorders; Diseases of the Eyes, Ears, Nose, and Throat; and Medical Assessments. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3000 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 EMSP 1140 SPECIAL PATIENT POPULATIONS This course provides a fundamental knowledge of growth, development, and aging and assessment findings to provide basic emergency care and transportation for a patient with special needs. Topics include: Obstetrics, Gynecology, Neonatal Care, Pediatrics, Geriatrics, Patients with Special Challenges, and Special Patient Populations - Assessments. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3000 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 EMSP 1150 SHOCK AND TRAUMA FOR THE EMT This course is designed to prepare the EMT student to apply pre-hospital emergency care to patients who have sustained injuries resulting from various mechanisms of injury including: Abdominal and Genitourinary trauma; Orthopedic trauma; Soft Tissue trauma; Head, Facial, Neck, and Spine Trauma and Nervous System trauma. Special considerations in trauma related injuries will be presented including the physiology of shock as well as multi-system trauma and environmental emergencies. Topics include: Shock and Resuscitation; Trauma Overview; Bleeding; Chest Trauma; Abdominal and Genitourinary Trauma; Orthopedic Trauma; Soft Tissue Trauma; Head, Facial, Neck, and Spine Trauma; Nervous System Trauma; Special Considerations in Trauma; Environmental Emergencies; and Multi-System Trauma. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3000 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 EMSP 1160 CLINICAL AND PRACTICAL APPLICATIONS FOR THE EMT This course provides supervised clinical experience in various clinical settings as well as opportunities to demonstrate critical thinking skills and assessment based management techniques through competency based evaluations relevant to the practice of an EMT. Topics include: Clinicals and Assessment Based Management. Lecture: 0 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 2250 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2500 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 1 EMSP 1510 ADVANCED CONCEPTS FOR THE AEMT This course serves as the introductory course to the advanced level practice of the Advanced Emergency Medical Technician (AEMT). It expands on the information attained at the EMT level. Topics include: EMS Systems; Documentation; EMS System Communication; Therapeutic Communication; Principles of Pharmacology; Medication Administration; Emergency Medications; Airway Management; Respiration; Artificial Ventilation; Primary Assessment; and Secondary Assessment. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3000 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 EMSP 1520 ADVANCED PATIENT CARE FOR THE AEMT This course provides opportunities to apply fundamental knowledge of basic and selected advanced emergency care and transportation based on assessment findings for the following: an acutely ill patient; a patient in shock, respiratory failure or arrest, cardiac failure or arrest, and post resuscitation management; and an acutely injured patient. In addition it provides a fundamental knowledge of growth, development, and aging and assessment findings to provide basic and selected advanced emergency care and transportation for a patient with special needs. Topics include: Geriatrics; Patients with Special Challenges; Medical Overview; Neurology; Immunology; Infectious Disease; Endocrine Disorders; Cardiovascular; Toxicology; Respiratory; Hematology; Genitourinary/Renal; Shock and 331

333 Resuscitation; Chest Trauma; Abdominal and Genitourinary Trauma; Orthopedic Trauma; Head, Facial, Neck, and Spine Trauma: Nervous System Trauma; and Integration of Medical/Trauma Assessments. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3000 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 EMSP 1530 CLINICAL APPLICATIONS FOR THE AEMT This course provides supervised clinical experience in various clinical settings. Topics include: Clinical. Lecture: 0 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 1500 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 1 EMSP 1540 CLINICAL AND PRACTICAL APPLICATIONS FOR THE AEMT This course provides supervised clinical experience in various clinical settings as well as opportunities to demonstrate critical thinking skills and assessment based management techniques through competency based evaluations relevant to the practice of an AEMT. Topics include: Clinical and Assessment Based Management. Lecture: 0 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 4500 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 4500 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 EMSP 2110 FOUNDATIONS OF PARAMEDICINE This course introduces the student to the role of the paramedic in today's healthcare system, with a focus on the prehospital setting. This course will also prepare the student to integrate scene and patient assessment findings with knowledge of epidemiology and pathophysiology to form a field impression. This includes developing a list of differential diagnoses through clinical reasoning to modify the assessment and formulate a treatment plan. Topics include: EMS Systems; Research; Workforce Safety and Wellness; Documentation; EMS System Communication; Therapeutic Communication; Medical/Legal and Ethics; Life Span Development; Public Health; Incident Management; Air Medical; Scene Size-Up; Primary Assessment; History Taking; Secondary Assessment; Monitoring Devices; and Reassessment. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3000 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 EMSP 2120 APPPLICATIONS OF PATHOPHYSIOLOGY FOR PARAMEDICS This course expands the concepts of pathophysiology as it correlates to disease processes. This course will enable the student to apply the general concepts of pathophysiology to the assessment and management of patients in the emergency setting. Topics include: Pathophysiology. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 EMSP 2130 ADVANCED RESUSCITATIVE SKILLS FOR PARAMEDICS This course will equip the paramedicine student with an expanded knowledge of pharmacology, as well as skills used to manage the respiratory system. Students will learn to use these advanced resuscitative skills to mitigate patient care emergencies, and to improve the overall health of the patient. Topics include: Principles of Pharmacology; Medication Administration; Emergency Medications; Airway Management; Respiration; and Artificial Ventilation. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3000 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 EMSP 2140 ADVANCED CARDIOVASCULAR CONCEPTS This course equips the paramedicine student with an expanded knowledge of the anatomy, physiology, and electrophysiology of the cardiovascular system. Students will also examine the epidemiology of cardiovascular disease, and will begin to integrate advanced assessment skills (including ECG interpretation) into the assessment of cardiac patients. Topics include: Anatomy, Physiology, and Electrophysiology of the Cardiovascular System; Epidemiology of Cardiovascular Disease; Assessment of the Cardiac Patient; Electrocardiographic (ECG) interpretation. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3750 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 332

334 EMSP 2310 THERAPEUTIC MODALITIES OF CARIOVASCULAR CARE This course will enable the student to integrate assessment findings with principles of epidemiology and pathophysiology to formulate a field impression and implement a comprehensive treatment/disposition plan for a patient experiencing a cardiovascular emergency. Topics include: Cardiovascular Emergencies and Advanced Cardiovascular Life Support (ACLS). Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3000 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 EMSP 2320 THERAPEUTIC MODALITIES OF MEDICAL CARE This course will enable the student to integrate assessment findings with principles of epidemiology and pathophysiology to formulate a field impression and implement a comprehensive treatment/disposition plan for a patient experiencing a medical emergency. Topics include: Medical Overview; Neurology; Abdominal and Gastrointestinal Disorders; Immunology; Infectious Disease; Endocrine Disorders; Psychiatric; Toxicology; Respiratory; Hematology; Genitourinary/Renal; Non-Traumatic Musculoskeletal Disorders; Diseases of the Eyes, Ears, Nose, and Throat; and Assessment of Medical Emergencies. Lecture: 3000 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 4500 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 5 EMSP 2330 THERAPEUTIC MODALITIES OF TRAUMA CARE This course will enable the student to integrate a comprehensive knowledge of causes and pathophysiology into the management of traumatic: cardiac arrest and peri-arrest states; shock, respiratory failure or arrest with an emphasis on early intervention to prevent arrest. This course will also include integrating assessment findings with principles of epidemiology and pathophysiology to formulate a field impression to implement a comprehensive treatment/disposition plan for an acutely injured patient. During this course, the student will complete a nationally recognized pre-hospital trauma course (i.e. PHTLS, ITLS, ATT, etc.). Topics include: Shock and Trauma Resuscitation; Trauma Overview; Bleeding; Chest Trauma; Abdominal and Genitourinary Trauma; Orthopedic Trauma; Soft Tissue Trauma; Head, Facial, Neck, and Spine Trauma; Nervous System Trauma; Special Considerations in Trauma; Environmental Emergencies; Multi-System Trauma; and Assessment of Trauma Emergencies. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3750 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 EMSP 2340 THERAPEUTIC MODALITIES FOR SPECIAL PATIENT POPULATIONS This course will enable the student to integrate assessment findings with principles of pathophysiology and knowledge of psychosocial needs to formulate a field impression and implement a comprehensive treatment/disposition plan for various special patient populations. During this course, the student will also complete a nationally recognized pediatric course (i.e. EPC, PALS, PEPP, etc.). Topics include: Obstetrics; Gynecology; Neonatal Care; Pediatrics; Geriatrics; and Patients with Special Challenges. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3750 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 EMSP 2510 CLINICAL APPLICATIONS FOR THE PARAMEDIC - I This course provides the paramedicine student with supervised clinical experience in various clinical settings. EMSP 2510 Clinical Applications for the Paramedic - I is one in a series of courses that also includes: EMSP 2520, EMSP 2530, EMSP 2540, EMSP 2550, EMSP 2560 and EMSP The successful completion of all of these will result in meeting all clinical standards required by the State Office of Emergency Medical Services and Trauma (SOEMST). Topics include: Clinicals. Lecture: 0 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 4500 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 4500 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 2 EMSP 2520 CLINICAL APPLICATIONS FOR THE PARAMEDIC - II This course provides the paramedicine student with supervised clinical experience in various clinical settings. EMSP 2520 Clinical Applications for the Paramedic - II is one in a series of courses that also includes: EMSP 2510, EMSP 2530, EMSP 2540, EMSP 2550, EMSP 2560 and EMSP The successful completion of all of these will result in meeting all clinical standards required by the State Office of Emergency Medical Services and Trauma (SOEMST). Topics include: Clinicals. Lecture: 0 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 4500 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total:

335 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 2 EMSP 2530 CLINICAL APPLICATIONS FOR THE PARAMEDIC - III This course provides the paramedicine student with supervised clinical experience in various clinical settings. EMSP 2530 Clinical Applications for the Paramedic - III is one in a series of courses that also includes: EMSP 2510, EMSP 2520, EMSP 2540, EMSP 2550, EMSP 2560 and EMSP The successful completion of all of these will result in meeting all clinical standards required by the State Office of Emergency Medical Services and Trauma (SOEMST). Topics include: Clinicals. Lecture: 0 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 4500 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 4500 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 2 EMSP 2540 CLINICAL APPLICATIONS FOR THE PARAMEDIC - IV This course provides the paramedicine student with supervised clinical experience in various clinical settings. EMSP 2540 Clinical Applications for the Paramedic - IV is one in a series of courses that also includes: EMSP 2510, EMSP 2520, EMSP 2530, EMSP 2550, EMSP 2560 and EMSP The successful completion of all of these will result in meeting all clinical standards required by the State Office of Emergency Medical Services and Trauma (SOEMST). Topics include: Clinicals. Lecture: 0 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 2250 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: None Credits: 1 EMSP 2550 CLINICAL APPLICATIONS FOR THE PARAMEDIC - V This course provides the paramedicine student with supervised clinical experience in various clinical settings. EMSP 2550 Clinical Applications for the Paramedic - V is one in a series of courses that also includes: EMSP 2510, EMSP 2520, EMSP 2530, EMSP 2540, EMSP 2560 and EMSP The successful completion of all of these will result in meeting all clinical standards required by the State Office of Emergency Medical Services and Trauma (SOEMST). Topics include: Clinicals. Lecture: 0 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 2250 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: Provisional Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 1 EMSP 2560 CLINICAL APPLICATIONS FOR THE PARAMEDIC - VI This course provides the paramedicine student with supervised clinical experience in various clinical settings. EMSP 2560 Clinical Applications for the Paramedic - VI is one in a series of courses that also includes: EMSP 2510, EMSP 2520, EMSP 2530, EMSP 2540, EMSP 2550 and EMSP The successful completion of all of these will result in meeting all clinical standards required by the State Office of Emergency Medical Services and Trauma (SOEMST). Topics include: Clinicals. Lecture: 0 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 2250 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 1 EMSP 2570 CLINICAL APPLICATIONS FOR THE PARAMEDIC - VII This course provides the paramedicine student with supervised clinical experience in various clinical settings. EMSP 2570 Clinical Applications for the Paramedic - VII is one in a series of courses that also includes: EMSP 2510, EMSP 2520, EMSP 2530, EMSP 2540, EMSP 2550 and EMSP The successful completion of all of these will result in meeting all clinical standards required by the State Office of Emergency Medical Services and Trauma (SOEMST). Topics include: Clinicals. Lecture: 0 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 2250 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 EMSP 2710 FIELD INTERNSHIP FOR THE PARAMEDIC Provides supervised field internship experience in the pre-hospital advanced life support setting. Topics include: Field Internship. Lecture: 0 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 4500 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 4500 Pre-requisites: Provisional Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 2 EMSP 2720 PRACTICAL APPLICATIONS FOR THE PARAMEDIC Allows opportunities to demonstrate critical thinking skills and assessment based management techniques through competency based evaluations relevant to the practice of a Paramedic. Topics include: Assessment Based Management for Paramedics. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3000 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 334

336 ENGL 0090 LEARNING SUPPORT ENGLISH This course uses a modular approach to emphasize the rules of grammar, punctuation, capitalization, subject/verb agreement, correct verb forms, spelling, writing, and revising skills for basic paragraph development. Students progress at their own pace in order to master each module. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: None ENGL 0091 Beginning Vocational English as a Second Language This course is designed to meet the needs of students with limited English proficiency. It is for students whose native language is not English. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 ENGL 0092 Advanced Beginning Vocational English as a Second Language This course is designed to increase the reading, writing and comprehension skills of ESL students and their ability to function effectively socially and at work. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: ENGL Beginning Vocational English as a Second Language Or grades between on the English Proficiency Test Developed by the University of Michigan. Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 ENGL 0093 Intermediate Vocational English as a Second Language Course is designed to meet the needs of intermediate students whose native language is not English. It will help them to build their general language proficiency. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: ENGL Advanced Beginning Vocational English as a Second Language or score between on University of Michigan English Proficiency Test. Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 ENGL Advanced Vocational English as a Second Language Course is designed to prepare advanced ESL students for the ASSET college entrance and join the mainstream college population of native English speakers. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Pre-requisites: Or score over 60 on University of Michigan English Proficiency Test. ENGL Intermediate Vocational English as a Second Language ENGL 1010 FUNDAMENTALS OF ENGLISH I Emphasizes the development and improvement of written and oral communication abilities. Topics include analysis of writing, applied grammar and writing skills, editing and proofreading skills, research skills, and oral communication skills. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: ENGL 0097, ENGL 0090, or Appropriate Placement Test Score and READ 0097, READ 0090 or Appropriate Placement Test Score. Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 ENGL 1101 COMPOSITION AND RHETORIC Explores the analysis of literature and articles about issues in the humanities and in society. Students practice various modes of writing, ranging from exposition to argumentation and persuasion. The course includes a review of standard grammatical and stylistic usage in proofreading and editing. An introduction to library resources lays the foundation for research. Topics include writing 335

337 analysis and practice, revision, and research. Students write a research paper using library resources and using a formatting and documentation style appropriate to the purpose and audience. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: ENGL 0098, ENGL 0090, or Appropriate Placement Test Score and READ 0098, READ 0090 or Appropriate Placement Test Score. Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 ENGL 1102 LITERATURE AND COMPOSITION Emphasizes the student's ability to read literature analytically and meaningfully and to communicate clearly. Students analyze the form and content of literature in historical and philosophical contexts. Topics include reading and analysis of fiction, poetry, and drama; research; and writing about literature. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: ENGL 1101 Composition and Rhetoric with a C or better Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 ENGL 1105 TECHNICAL COMMUNICATIONS Emphasizes practical knowledge of technical communications techniques, procedures, and reporting formats used in industry and business. Topics include reference use and research, device and process description, formal technical report writing, business correspondence, and technical report presentation. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: ENGL 1101 Composition and Rhetoric with a C or better Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 FRSC 1020 BASIC FIREFIGHTER EMERGENCY SERVICES FUNDAMENTALS This course provides the student with information on the applicable laws, policies, and standards that the Firefighter I course is designed, and how the course will be administered. This course will provide the student basic knowledge of where and how the fire service originated from the colonial periods to present day firefighting operations. The student will learn basic roles and responsibilities of a firefighter, how firefighters have to abide by and work from standard operating procedures and guidelines, and how the chain of command works and their position within it. The student will be provided the knowledge on how to communicate within the fire service; whether it with the fire station or on the fire ground. This course provides the emergency responder with basic principles and functions of the Incident Command System. The course will provide the necessary knowledge and skills to operate within the ICS and their role within the ICS at the fire station, at a non-emergency scene, and at emergency scenes. It will provide also provide the emergency responder with knowledge on how to perform basic skills at emergency scenes that deal with infection control, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, basic first aid measures, and using an AED. Finally, it will provide the emergency responder skills and knowledge on how to recognize the presence of and the potential for a hazardous materials release, and how and who personnel should call. Upon completion of this course the student emergency responder candidate/recruit will have the basic skills and knowledge to be able to obtain a certificate of completion or become certified through the appropriate governing agency for the following: 1. Infection Control 2. CPR 3. First Aid 4. ICS IS NPQ - Hazardous Materials for First Responders Awareness Level This course meets the requirements NFPA 1001 Standard for Fire Fighter Professional Qualifications and all other state, local, and provincial occupational health and safety regulatory requirements. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3000 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 FRSC 1030 BASIC FIREFIGHTER MODULE I This course provides the firefighter candidate/recruit with basic knowledge and skills to perform various fire ground operations as a firefighter on emergency scenes. The candidate/recruit will learn about safety during all phases of a firefighters career, the personal protective equipment that is required for training and every emergency response, and how to properly don it for use and doff it after use. The candidate/recruit will learn about the dynamics of fire through fire behavior and how to extinguish the different phases of fires with either portable fire extinguishers or through fire suppression attacks and techniques. The candidate/recruit will also learn the three tactical priorities of Life Safety, Incident Stabilization, and Property Conservation that have to be achieved on every fireground. Basic knowledge and skills will be provided to the candidate/recruit so they can achieve the tactical priorities through various fireground operations such as: response & size up, forcible entry, ladders, search & rescue, ventilation, water supply, fire hose, fire nozzles, fire streams, salvage, and overhaul. Upon completion of this course the student emergency responder candidate/recruit will have the basic skills and knowledge to be able to obtain a certificate of completion or become certified through the appropriate governing agency for the following: 1. Module I This course meets the requirements NFPA 1001 Standard for Fire Fighter Professional Qualifications and all other state, local, and provincial occupational health and safety regulatory requirements. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 3000 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total:

338 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 5 FRSC 1040 BASIC FIREFIGHTER MODULE II This course builds from the skills and knowledge in Module I and provides the knowledge and skills to support the fireground techniques learned in the previous courses. The firefighter will learn various uses of ropes & knots and how to hoist firefighting tools and equipment. The firefighter will also gain the knowledge and skills of building construction principles that will be used throughout their firefighting career to identify building conditions such as: fire spread and travel, how and where to ventilate, indications of potential building collapse, etc. The firefighter will learn survival techniques that will be used throughout their career to help keep themselves safe and how to rescue themselves or another firefighter. Firefighter rehabilitation will be discussed during this course, so that the firefighter will know how and when to properly rehab themselves before, during, after an emergency response. Knowledge of fire suppression systems will be discussed, so that the firefighter will have a basic understanding of the components of a fire detection, protection, and suppression system. Basic cause determination will be discussed so that firefighters will be aware of observations during various phases of fireground operations. Finally to complete the Firefighter I program the firefighter will participate in the following live fire scenarios in order to complete the objectives of the program. 1. Exterior Class A Fire 2. Interior Structure Attack Above Grade Level 3. Interior Structure Attack Below Grade Level 4. Vehicle Fire 5. Dumpster Fire Upon completion of this course the student emergency responder candidate/recruit will have the basic skills and knowledge to be able to obtain a certificate of completion or become certified through the appropriate governing agency for the following: 1. NPQ Fire Fighter I This course meets the requirements NFPA 1001 Standard for Fire Fighter Professional Qualifications and all other state, local, and provincial occupational health and safety regulatory requirements. Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 3000 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3750 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 FRSC 1050 FIRE AND LIFE SAFETY EDUCATOR I Most structural fires, fire deaths and fire injuries occur in the home. This course addresses some of the most important responsibilities of the modern fire service; teaching the public to prevent or if needed, escape fires and related emergencies. We have adopted the approach that we must learn from each incident then put the information to work to prevent fires and fire losses through public fire and life safety education. Topics include: general requisite knowledge, administration, planning and development, education and implementation, and evaluation. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: FRSC 1020, FRSC 1030, FRSC 1040, FRSC 1141 Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 FRSC 1060 FIRE PROTECTION, PREPAREDNESS AND MAINTENANCE This course provides the student with the necessary skills of fire prevention, emergency scene preparedness, and tool and equipment maintenance. Specifically addressed are the following topics: basic principles of building construction; knowledge of water supply systems to include pressurized systems, rural water supplies, and alternative water supplies; perform hydrant flow tests as part of water flow assessments for water supplies coming from pressurized hydrants; discuss fire detection, suppression, and suppression systems; consolidate all knowledge to perform a pre-incident plan of a facility; selection of proper tools and techniques of cleaning and proper maintenance of those tools; discuss hose lines, nozzles, and fire streams to perform hose line lays with proper nozzles attached and select the proper fire stream for the class of fire encountered on various types of fire scenes; and service testing of fire hoses. Finally, this course will conclude fire cause determination to gain necessary knowledge and skills to perform a fire investigation to determine the point of origin and the cause of a fire in a structure. To participate in this course the student must also attain national certification of Firefighter I status or successful completion of FRSC 1020, FRSC 1030, FRSC 1040 and FRSC Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3000 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 FRSC 1070 INTRODUCTION TO TECHNICAL RESCUE This course provides an awareness of the principles of technical rescue through utilization of readings from the text, classroom discussion, practical skills, and practice. This course includes Extricating a victim entrapped in a Motor Vehicle, Assisting a Rescue Team in various technical rescue operations including but not limited to Trench and Excavation, Rope Rescue, Water Rescue, Confined Space Operations, Structural Collapse, Vehicle and Machinery Rescue, and Wilderness Search and Rescue. The student will learn the application of knots, rigging principles, anchor selection criteria, system safety check procedures, rope construction and rope rescue equipment applications and limitations. This course fulfills NFPA 1001, Standard for Firefighter Professional Qualifications, 2008 Edition Chapter 6 sections 6.4.1, and NFPA 1006, Standard for Technical Rescuer Professional Qualifications,

339 Edition Chapter 5 sections 5.2, 5.3, 5.4, 5.5.1, 5.5.2, 5.5.3, 5.5.4, 5.5.5, 5.5.8, 5.5.9, , and NFPA 1670, Standard on operations and Training for Technical Search and Rescue Incidents, 2004 Edition sections 5.2.2, 6.2.2, , 9.2.3, , To participate in this course, the student must also have attained national certification of Firefighter I status or successful completion of FRSC 1020, FRSC 1030, FRSC 1040 and FRSC Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 3000 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 4500 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 FRSC 1080 FIREGROUND OPERATIONS This course will provide the student basic knowledge of the roles and responsibilities of the Firefighter II; the standard operating procedures and guidelines of firefighters; fire service communications relative to obtaining information from occupants and owners to complete an incident report can be completed accurately; Incident Command principles and their application; practical fireground hydraulics to supply proper nozzle pressures while participating in live fire scenarios. To participate in this course the student must also attain National certification of Firefighter I status or successful completion of FRSC 1020, FRSC 1030, FRSC 1040, FRSC Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 3000 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3750 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 FRSC 1100 INTRODUCTION TO THE FIRE SERVICE This course is a survey of the philosophy and history of Fire Protection, loss of property and life by fire, review of municipal fire defenses and the organization and function of the federal, state, county, city and private fire protection. Includes introduction to: fire technology education and the firefighter selection process; fire protection career opportunities; public fire protection; chemistry and physics of fire; public and private support organizations; fire department resources, fire department administration; support functions; training, fire prevention; codes and ordinances; fire protection systems and equipment; emergency incident management; and emergency operations. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 FRSC 1110 FIRE ADMINISTRATION SUPERVISION AND LEADERSHIP This course provides the necessary knowledge and skills for an emergency responder to become a successful fire officer. The student will learn how to become a responsible leader and supervisor to a crew of firefighters, how to manage a budget for the fire station, understand standard operating procedures, and be able to manage an incident. Also, an understanding of basic fire prevention methods, fire and building codes, and records systems will be covered throughout the course. Upon completion of this course the student emergency responder candidate/recruit will have the basic skills and knowledge to be able to qualify for a certificate of completion or seek certification through the appropriate governing agency for the following: 1. NFA Leadership I 2. NFA Leadership II 3. NFA Leadership III This course meets the requirements NFPA 1021 Standard for Fire Officer Professional Qualifications and all other state, local, and provincial occupational health and safety regulatory requirements. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 FRSC 1121 FIREFIGHTING STRATEGY AND TACTICS This course presents the principles of applying fire department resources to mitigate a fire or related emergency. General topics include: principles of firefighting, size up, engine company operations, hose line selection and placement, water supply, standpipe and sprinkler operations, ladder company operations, forcible entry, ventilation and search and rescue. Specific-fires reviewed will include private dwellings, multiple dwellings, commercial buildings, high-rise structures, buildings under construction, structural collapse, flammable liquid and gas fires and waterfront fires. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 FRSC 1132 FIRE SERVICE INSTRUCTOR Students will learn to analyze jobs and information, then prepare and present related training. Emphasis is placed on planning, organizing, presenting, and testing, using methodologies appropriate to the subject. Topics include: orientation to emergency services instruction, communication, planning and analysis, objectives, learning, assessment, methods of instruction, instructor materials, media, training related group dynamics, classroom management, the legal environment, and NPQ Fire Instructor I. Students will have numerous hands-on opportunities to apply what they learn. Successful completers of FRSC 1132 are qualified to test for the National Professional Qualification (NPQ) Fire Instructor I Exam. 338

340 Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3750 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 FRSC 1141 HAZARDOUS MATERIALS OPERATIONS This course provides emergency responder personnel with the information to respond safely, limit possible exposure to all personnel, and to provide information to the proper authorities as being a primary goal while reacting in the defensive mode of operation. The first responder operations level responsibilities are recognition and identification of a hazardous material scene, the gathering of information, the notification of the proper authorities, the isolation of the area by setting perimeters/zones, possible evacuation, protection by initiating the incident management system, emergency decontamination, and performing defensive actions only. Even though the first responder is a member of an emergency response service, they are not trained in specialized protective clothing or specialized control equipment. Thus, the first responder is not a member of a hazardous materials response team. This course meets the requirements of NFPA Professional Competence of First Responders to Haz Mat Incidents at the Operations Level. This course also meets the requirements of OSHA 29 CFR , EPA, USDOT, and all other appropriate state, local and provincial occupational health and safety regulatory requirements. Also required as prerequisite: NPQ FF I and NPQ Hazardous Materials Awareness Level Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3750 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 FRSC 1151 FIRE PREVENTION AND INSPECTION Emphasis is placed on the shared responsibility of all fire service personnel to prevent fires and fire losses by survey of fire prevention activities, conducting basic fire prevention inspections, practicing life safety codes, review of local and state laws regarding fire inspection, and review of applicable codes and standards. Topics include: code administration, inspection, use and occupancy, building limitations and types of construction, fire resistive construction elements, installation of fire protection systems, mean of egress, interior finish requirements, general fire safety provisions, maintenance of fire protection systems, means of egress maintenance for occupancies, hazardous materials, flammable liquids and aerosols, detonation and deflagration hazards, hazardous assembly occupancies, other storage and processing occupancies, compressed gases and cryogenic liquids, pesticides and other health hazards, and using referenced standards. Successful completion of FRSC 1151 qualifies individuals to test for the National Professional Qualification (NPQ) Inspector Level-I examination Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3750 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 FRSC 1161 FIRE SERVICE SAFETY AND LOSS CONTROL This course will provide the necessary knowledge and skills for the emergency responder to understand occupational safety and health and be able to develop safety programs. The course starts with an introduction to occupational safety and health and covers the history, national agencies that produce injury and fatality reports, and efforts that have been made to address safety and health problems in emergency service occupations. The course will review safety related regulations and standards and discuss how to implement them through risk management processes. There will be lectures and discussions on pre-incident safety, safety at fire emergencies, safety at medical and rescue emergencies, safety at specialized incidents, and post-incident safety management. Personnel roles and responsibilities will be covered, so that knowledge can be gained on the relationship to the overall safety and health program by the different responding and administrative personnel at emergency scenes. Lectures and discussions on how to develop, manage, and evaluate safety programs will be covered to provide general knowledge and basic skills on occupational health and safety programs. Finally information management and various other special topics will be covered to gain knowledge on the legal, ethical, and financial considerations that programs need to be aware of and how to collect the data and report it. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 FRSC 2100 FIRE ADMINISTRATION - MANAGEMENT This course will provide the necessary knowledge and skills for the emergency responder to become a diverse leader and manager in their department. The course starts with the history of the fire service which focuses on the historical events that have forged the fire service today. Discussions on preparing for the future are designed to provide information to develop a game plan for personal success. Leadership and Management principles will be taught to blend the academics of leadership and management research into what occurs in the fire service organization on a daily basis. Leadership styles will be discussed to help understand how to lead and manage and, as important, why it is done. The course will take an insightful look into how people handle change personally and organizationally. Discussions on ethics will be focused on the elements critical to ethical leadership and management practices. The course will explore the elements of team building and provide a depth of understanding how to blend various styles and personalities 339

341 to get the most from people. Discussions on managing emergency services will target budgeting and personnel management the support elements that are so vital to every organization. Quality of the fire service will also be looked at for methods of quality improvement and their applications to improve the services delivered to citizens every day. An in-depth overview of the changes in disaster planning and response since 9-11, and includes ways to help with community evaluation and preparedness processes. Finally, shaping the future will explore the possibilities of what may occur in the fire service and how you can play an important role in helping to shape the fire service of the future. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 FRSC 2110 FIRE SERVICE HYDRAULICS This course begins with the history and theories of the use of water for fire extinguishment then moves to practical application of the principles of hydraulics in water systems and on the fire ground. Topics include: water at rest and in motion, velocity and discharge, water distribution systems, fire service pumps, friction loss, engine and nozzle pressures, fire streams, standpipe systems, automatic sprinkler systems, firefighting foams, and the clip board friction loss system. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 FRSC 2120 FIRE PROTECTION SYSTEMS A review of fire detection and protection systems including: automatic sprinkler systems, portable fire extinguishers, restaurant/kitchen systems, special hazard systems, detection systems, and control systems. The applicable laws, codes and standards will be introduced along with regulatory and support agencies. Specific topics include: introduction to fire protection systems, water supply systems for fire protection systems, water-based suppression systems, nonwater-based suppression systems, fire alarm systems, smoke management systems, and portable fire extinguishers. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 FRSC 2130 FIRE SERVICE BUILDING CONSTRUCTION Presents building construction features from the perspective of the fire service with emphasis placed on the use of building construction information to prevent and reduce fire fighter and civilian deaths and injuries. Topics include: principles of building construction, building construction classification, building construction hazards and tactical considerations, structural loads and stresses, structural building components and functions, fire resistance and flame spread, building codes, structural failure and firefighter safety, and firefighter safety in structural and wildland firefighting. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 FRSC 2141 INCIDENT COMMAND The Incident Command course is designed to illustrate the responsibilities to use, deploy, implement, and/or function within an Incident Command System (ICS) as well as functioning within multi-jurisdictions incident under the Incident Management System (IMS). The course emphasizes the need for incident management systems, an overview of the structure and expandable nature of ICS, an understanding of the command skills needed by departmental officers to use ICS guidelines effectively, and scenario practice on how to apply ICS and IMS. The National Incident Management System (NIMS) will illustrate and provide the consistent nationwide template to enable all government, private-sectors, and non-governmental organizations to work together during virtual all domestic incidents. These course competencies will cover those objectives entailed in NIMS 100, 200, 700, and 800. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3750 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 FRSC 2170 FIRE AND ARSON INVESTIGATION Presents an introduction to Fire Investigation. Emphasis is placed upon: fire behavior, combustion properties of various materials, sources of ignition, and investigative techniques for - structures, grassland, wild land, automobiles, vehicles, ships and other types of fire investigation, causes of electrical fires, chemical fires, explosive evaluations, laboratory operation, Techniques used in fire deaths and injuries, arson as a crime, other techniques, State and Federal laws, and future trends in fire investigative technology. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3750 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 340

342 GRMN 1101 Introduction to German Language and Culture I Introduction to the German language and culture, stressing progressive acquisition of effective communication skills in both the written and spoken language and an understanding of the different aspects, practices and products of German culture. Not open to native speakers of German. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 HECT 1100 HEMODIALYSIS PATIENT CARE This course will focus on the theoretical and clinical aspects of hemodialysis, including the duties and responsibilities essential to the delivery of patient care in the chronic outpatient setting. Lecture: 3750 Lab 2: 3000 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 6750 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 7 HECT 1120 HEMODIALYSIS PRACTICUM This course will focus on the theoretical and clinical aspects of hemodialysis, including the duties and responsibilities essential to the delivery of patient care in the chronic outpatient setting. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 4500 Practicum/Internship: 4500 Clinical: 0 Total: 6000 Pre-requisites: HECT 1100 Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 HIMT 1100 INTRODUCTION TO HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY This course focuses on orienting the student to health information management. Topics include introducing students to the structure of healthcare in the United States and its providers, and the structure and function of the American Health Information Management Association (AHIMA). Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 HIMT 1150 COMPUTER APPLICATIONS IN HEALTHCARE Designed to provide students with computer and software skills used in medical offices. Topics include hardware and software components of computers for medical record applications; database software and information management; specialized information management systems in healthcare; methods of controlling confidentiality and patient rights; accuracy and security of health information data in computer systems as well as future directions of information technology in healthcare. Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: COMP 1000 Co-requisites: None Credits: 2 HIMT 1200 LEGAL ASPECTS OF HEALTHCARE This course focuses on the study of legal principles applicable to health information, patient care and health records. Topics include: working of the American Legal System, courts and legal procedures, principles of liability, patient record requirements, access to health information, confidentiality and informed consent, the judicial process of health information, specialized patient records, risk management and quality assurance, HIV information, and the electronic health record. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 1500 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 2 HIMT 1250 HEALTH RECORD CONTENT AND STRUCTURE This course provides a study of content, storage, retrieval, control, retention, and maintenance of health information. Topics include: health data structure, content and standards, healthcare information requirements and standards. Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: None Credits: 2 HIMT 1350 PHARMACOTHERAPY 341

343 Introduces drug therapy with emphasis on safety, classification of drugs, their action, side effects, and/or adverse reactions. Also introduces the basic concept used in the administration of drugs. Topics include: introduction to pharmacology, sources and forms of drugs, drug classification, and drug effects on the body systems. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 1500 Pre-requisites: BUSN 2300 or ALHS 1090 Co-requisites: None Credits: 2 HIMT 1400 CODING AND CLASSIFICATION I ICD CODING This course provides the student an introduction to Medical Coding & Classification of diseases, injuries, encounters, and procedures using standard applications of Medical Coding Guidelines to support reimbursement of healthcare services. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 3000 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 4500 Pre-requisites: BIOL 2114 or ALHS 1011 and ALHS 1090 or BUSN 2300, HIMT 1350 Co-requisites: MAST 1120 Credits: 4 HIMT 1410 CODING AND CLASSIFICATION II ADVANCED CODING This course is a continuation of HIT 1400 (Coding and Classification I). This course provides the student with case studies for indepth review of inpatient and outpatient record formats as found in current healthcare settings. Advanced coding skills and use of industry applications to apply coding and billing standards will be the focus to develop auditing and compliance strategies in the work setting. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3000 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 HIMT 2150 HEALTHCARE STATISTICS This course analyzes the study of methods and formulas used in computing and preparing statistical reports for health care services and vital records. It also focuses on the study of methods and techniques used in presenting statistical data. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 1500 Pre-requisites: MATH 1111 Co-requisites: None Credits: 2 HIMT 2200 PERFORMANCE IMPROVEMENT This course introduces the students to the peer review and the role health information plays in evaluating patient care. The course investigates the components of performance improvement programs in health care facilities, including quality assessment, utilization management, risk management, and critical clinical pathways. State and local standards are included as well as review of the federal government s role in health care and accreditation requirements of various agencies. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 1500 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: None Credits: 2 HIMT 2300 HEALTHCARE MANAGEMENT This course will engage in the functions of a manager, planning, organizing, decision making, staffing, leading or directing, communication and motivating. Further study will include principles of authority/ responsibility, delegation and effective communication, organization charts, job descriptions, policies and procedures, employee motivation, discipline and performance evaluation. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 HIMT 2400 CODING AND CLASSIFICATION III CPT/HCPCS CODING This course provides an introduction to, and application of, codes using CPT/HCPCS system. Codes will be applied to workbook exercises, case studies, and actual outpatient charts. Codes will be assigned manually as well as by an encoder. Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 3000 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3750 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 HIMT 2410 REVENUE CYCLE MANAGEMENT This course focuses on how the revenue cycle is impacted by various departments within the facility such as patient access/registration, case management/quality review, health information management, and patient accounting. Subjects include 342

344 insurance plans, medical necessity, claims processing, accounts receivable, chargemaster, DRGs, APCs, edits, auditing and review. ICD and CPT coding as they relate to the billing function will be reviewed. The importance of revenue cycle management for fiscal stability is emphasized. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 1500 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: None Credits: 2 HIMT 2460 HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY PRACTICUM This course will allow students to perform advanced functions of a health information management (HIM) department. Students will work in realistic work environments in either a traditional, non-traditional, or lab setting. Activities will include application of all HIMT coursework. The student will also learn professional skills to prepare them for employment in the HIM career field. Lecture: 0 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 6750 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 6750 Pre-requisites: HIMT 1200, HIMT 1250 Co-requisites: HIMT 2400 Credits: 3 HIMT 2500 CERTIFICATION SEMINAR This course provides students with the opportunity to review for the certification exam. Students are also afforded the opportunity to develop a portfolio as they seek to make the transition into the workforce. Topics include: searching the job market; preparing the portfolio; stress management and burnout; test-taking strategies; and reviewing for the certification exam. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 3000 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 4500 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 HIST 1111 WORLD HISTORY I Emphasizes the study of intellectual, cultural, scientific, political, and social contributions of the civilizations of the world and the evolution of these civilizations during the period from the prehistoric era to early modern times. Topics include the Prehistoric Era the Ancient Near East, Ancient India, Ancient China, Ancient Rome, Ancient Africa, Islam, the Americas, Japan, Ancient Greece, the Middle Ages, and the Renaissance. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: Appropriate Degree Level Writing (English) and Reading Placement Test Scores Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 HIST 1112 WORLD HISTORY II Emphasizes the study of the intellectual, cultural, scientific, political, and social contributions of the civilizations of the world and the evolution of these civilizations during the period from early modern times to the present. Topics include transitions to the Modern World, scientific revolution and the Enlightenment, political modernization, economic modernization, imperialism, and the Twentieth Century. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: Appropriate Degree Level Writing (English) and Reading Placement Test Scores Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 HIST 2111 U.S. HISTORY I Emphasizes the study of U. S. History to 1877 to include the post-civil War period. The course focuses on the period from the Age of Discovery through the Civil War to include geographical, intellectual, political, economic and cultural development of the American people. It includes the history of Georgia and its constitutional development. Topics include colonization and expansion; the Revolutionary Era; the New Nation; nationalism, sectionalism, and reform; the Era of Expansion; and crisis, Civil War, and reconstruction. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: Appropriate Degree Level Writing (English) and Reading Placement Test Scores Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 HIST 2112 U.S. HISTORY II Emphasizes the study of the social, cultural, and political history of the United States from 1865 to the beginning of the twenty-first century and will equip the student to better understand the problems and challenges of the contemporary world in relation to events and trends in modern American history. The course also provides an overview of the history of Georgia and the development of its constitution. Topics include the Reconstruction Period; the great West, the new South, and the rise of the debtor; the Gilded Age; the 343

345 progressive movement; the emergence of the U. S. in world affairs; the Roaring Twenties; the Great Depression; World War II; the Cold War and the 1950's; the 1960's and 1970's; and America since Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: Appropriate Degree Level Writing (English) and Reading Placement Test Scores Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 HRTM 1100 INTRODUCTION TO HOTEL, RESTAURANT, AND TOURISM MANAGEMENT Provides the student with an overview of occupations in the hospitality industry. Emphasizes the various segments of each occupation and the interrelated responsibilities for customer service which exist across the hospitality industry. Topics include: development of the hospitality industry, food and beverage services, hotel services, meeting and convention services, management's role in the hospitality industry, and hospitality industry trends. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 HRTM 1110 TRAVEL INDUSTRY AND TRAVEL GEOGRAPHY Introduces students to the importance of the travel agent in the hospitality industry and provides an understanding of international, national, state, major cities and their points of interest to the travel customer. Emphasis is placed on career options, industry trends, travel documents, identifying why people travel and how geography is linked to their needs. Topics include: terminology, agency operations, travel reference guides, airline industry, other transportation modes, hotels and resorts, individual travel needs, travel and tourism careers, miscellaneous services, geographical and physical aspects of the Americas and Greenland, Europe, Middle East and Africa, Far East, Australia, New Zealand and Pacific Islands, and travel regulations and documents needed to travel internationally. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 HRTM 1120 TOUR AND CRUISE MANAGEMENT Provides students with an orientation to the duties and responsibilities of the tour operator and an overview of the cruise industry. The course also gives students an opportunity to gain the technical knowledge and skills needed to utilize computerized reservation and information systems. Emphasis is placed on the operator's role in planning and conducting tours and cruises as well as accessing data bases and identifying options which satisfy customer's needs. Topics include: planning individual tours, planning group tours, transportation arrangements, accommodation options, entertainment options, foreign country tours, and manager's on-tour responsibilities the ship, living quarters, amenities, shipboard activities, and marketing, selling of cruises, agency computer hardware, computer reservation systems, automated travel information, back-room accounting, and trends in automated travel data systems. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 HRTM 1130 BUSINESS ETIQUETTE AND COMMUNICATION This course focuses on professionalism in a variety of business settings. Topics include professional image and conduct at work, telephone etiquette, table manners, oral and written communication skills, and diversity in the hospitality industry. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 HRTM 1140 HOTEL OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT This course focuses on the organization and management of lodging operations. It covers day-to-day operations of each department in a hotel and helps students to understand what seasoned managers do. Emphasis is placed on the rooms division. Topics include corporate structures, departmental responsibilities, hotel services and staff, decision making, and industry trends. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: Provisional Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 HRTM 1150 EVENT PLANNING This course introduces students to event planning requirements. Topics include fundamentals of event planning; selecting event dates and venues; developing agendas, time lines, budgets, and contracts; marketing events, and facilitating events. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total:

346 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 HRTM 1160 FOOD AND BEVERAGE MANAGEMENT Provides students with a study of food and beverage operations and management. Emphasis is placed on the successful operation of a food and beverage establishment. Topics include restaurants, owners, locations, and concepts; business plans, financing, and legal and tax matters; menus, kitchens, and purchasing; restaurant operations and management. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 HRTM 1170 HOSPITALITY, INDUSTRY ACCOUNTING AND FINANCIAL ANALYSIS This course provides students with the fundamental knowledge to interpret and analyze the key reports and financial statements used daily in the hospitality industry. Focusing on Profit and Loss statements, students learn to use numbers to assess the performance of individual departments and the overall operation. These numbers are the basis for managerial decisions that increase revenues and control costs. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 HRTM 1201 HOSPITALITY MARKETING Introduces students to marketing techniques associated with hotel/restaurant/tourism fields with emphasis on identifying and satisfying needs of customers. Topics include: marketing introduction, research and analysis, marketing strategies, marketing plans, social media marketing, branding, positioning, sales and advertising. Because of the constant change in marketing strategies in the hospitality industry, this course will also focus on new marketing techniques that are being used in the hospitality industry. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 HRTM 1210 HOSPITALITY LAW Introduces the student to local, state, federal, and international laws which govern the hospitality industry. Emphasis is placed on creating a workplace where compliance with the law, adherence to ethical standards, and stressing security and loss prevention are the basis for every decision. Topics include civil law, the structure of hospitality enterprises, government agencies that impact the hospitality industry, preventative legal management, contracts, employee selection and management, duties and obligations to employees and guests, and crisis management. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 HRTM 1220 SUPERVISION AND LEADERSHIP IN THE HOSPITALITY INDUSTRY This course focuses on the principles of good supervision and leadership as they apply to day-to-day hospitality operations. Topics include recruiting, selection, orientation, compensation and benefits, motivation, teamwork, coaching, employee training and development, performance standards, discipline, employee assistance programs, health and safety, conflict management, communicating and delegating, and decision making and control. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 HRTM 1230 INTERNSHIP Introduces students to the application and reinforcement of hotel/restaurant/travel operational principles, in an actual job placement or practicum experience. Students are acquainted with occupational responsibilities through realistic work situations and are provided with insights into management applications on the job. Topics include: problem solving, adaptability to the job setting, use of proper interpersonal skills, application of hotel/restaurant/travel management techniques, and professional development. The occupationbased instruction is implemented through the use of a practicum or internship and all of the following: written individualized training plans, written performance evaluation, and a required weekly seminar. Lecture: 0 Lab 2: 750 Lab 3: 6000 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 6750 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 345

347 HUMN 1101 INTRODCTION TO HUMANITIES Explores the philosophic and artistic heritage of humanity expressed through a historical perspective on visual arts, music, and literature. The humanities provide insight into people and society. Topics include historical and cultural developments, contributions of the humanities, and research. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: ENGL 1101 Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 ICET 1120 INDUSTRIAL CONTROL MODELING (MATLAB/SIMULINK) This course is designed to employ MATLAB and Simulink blocks functional environments to simulate industrial practical applications. The course focuses on 2D and 3D graphical systems modeling and exploit control systems toolbox. Topics to be covered include built-in functions, variables, fundamental matrices operational manipulation, and computation of plant systems transfer functions to simulate modern industrial automation problems. Upon completion students should be able to simulate, analyze industrial processes, and predict optimal production stability for cost-effective industrial solutions. Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 4500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 5250 Pre-requisites: Program Admission, MATH 1113 Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 ICET 1130 INDUSTRIAL NETWORK PROTOCOL This course is designed for students understanding of fundamental distributed industrial network control currently use in modern global industries. The focus is on traditional fieldbus and emerging EtherNet protocols. Topics to be covered include fieldbus: popular Profibus,DeviceNet, CAN, while EtherNet protocol comprises: established EtherNet\IP, ProfiNet, EtherCAT, Modbus, and Network Troubleshooting. Upon completion students should understand, manage, and troubleshoot distributed industrial sensing, industrial network protocols, connectivity, and the inherent network security.lecture: 750 Lab 2: 4500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 5250 Pre-requisites: Program Admission, CIST 1401 ICET 1140 INDUSTRIAL PROCESSES SIMULATIONS This course is designed for students understanding of industrial plant dynamic processes. The topics to be covered include fundamental of industrial control, control strategies, embedded control instrumentation, firmware controllers of process dynamics, efficient use of materials, fault finding, work flow graphing, PLC programming and PID tuned controllers, and real-time network controllers applications. Upon completion students should have adequate skills able to fine-tune the plant controllers, implement preventive maintenance, and able to manage specific process control industry. Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 4500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 5250 Pre-requisites: Program Admission, MATH 1113 Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 ICET 1150 INDUSTRIAL CONTROLLERS This course introduces application of real-time data acquisition through well-established industrial standard graphical firmware- LabVIEW. The course focuses on using virtual instrumentation to acquire data, model, and implement distributed industrial processes and productions. Topics to be covered include basic event-driven programming connectivity, graphical users interface, input and output embedded functions in data acquisition and signal conditioning, virtual industrial systems control, reporting and data visualization. Upon completion students should be able to model, simulate, and implement distributed industrial factory processes and optimal productions. Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 4500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 5250 Pre-requisites: Program Admission, MATH 1113 Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 ICET 1170 INDUSTRIAL SYSTEM ANALYSIS The course is designed to enable the student to understand industrial plant processes and productions employing systems approach. Topics to be covered include subsystems analyses in cascade and parallel, plant floor management, strategic controls of human-human interactions and human-machine interactions, fundamental industrial system structure, statistical distributions and Taguchi quality control. Upon completion students should be able to analyze industrial plant subsystems, effectively manage industrial work processes and procedures. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: Program Admission, MATH 1113 Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 ICET 1190 REALIBILITY ENDINEERING 346

348 This course introduces students to assessment of industrial plant procedures and products reliability. The focus is on engineering systems reliability and basic statistical failure analysis. The topics to be covered include reliability of mechanical, electrical, and software industrial system products, their respective failure mode, statistical profiles as Weibull, Poisson, and Binomial distributions, effect analysis (FMEA,critical FMECA), mean time between failures (MTBF), to failure (MTTB), and products failure rates. Upon completion students should be able to implement industrial products reliability, assess plant processes, products failure modes, and their quality control. Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 4500 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 5250 Pre-requisites: Program Admission, MATH 1113 Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 IDFC 1007 Industrial Safety Procedures This course provides an in-depth study of the health and safety practices required for maintenance of industrial, commercial, and home electrically operated equipment. Topics include: introduction to OSHA regulations; safety tools, equipment and procedures; and first aid and cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 2 IDSY 1101 DC Circuit Analysis This course introduces direct current (DC) concepts and applications. Topics include: electrical principles and laws; batteries; DC test equipment; Series, parallel and simple combination circuits; and laboratory procedures and safety practices. Lecture: 2500 Lab 2: 500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2500 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 IDSY 1105 AC Circuit Analysis This course introduces alternating current concepts, theory and application of varying sine wave voltages and current, and the physical characteristics and applications of solid state devices. Topics include, but are not limited to, electrical laws and principles, magnetism, inductance and capacitance. Lecture: 2000 Lab 2: 500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2500 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 IDSY 1110 Industrial Motor Controls I This course introduces the fundamental concepts, principles and devices involved in industrial motor controls, theories and applications of single and three-phase motors, wiring control circuits, and magnetic starters and braking. Topics include, but are not limited to motor theory and operating principles, control devices, symbols and schematic diagrams, NEMA standards, Article 430 NEC and preventative maintenance and troubleshooting. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 4500 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 7500 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 5 IDSY 1120 Basic Industrial PLC s This course introduces the operational theory, systems terminology, PLC installation, and programming procedures for Programmable Logic Controllers. Emphasis is placed on PLC programming, connections, installation and start-up procedures. Other topics include timers and counters, relay logic instructions, and hardware and software applications. Lecture: 375 Lab 2: 6000 Lab 3: 1125 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 7500 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 5 IDSY 1130 Industrial Wiring Teaches the fundamental concepts of industrial wiring with an emphasis on installation procedures. Topics include: grounding, raceways, three-phase systems, transformers (three-phase and single-phase), wire sizing, overcurrent protection, NEC requirements, industrial lighting systems and switches, receptacles and cord connectors. Lecture: 1315 Lab 2: 2250 Lab 3: 3935 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total:

349 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 5 IDSY 1170 Industrial Mechanics This course introduces and emphasizes the basic skills necessary for mechanical maintenance personnel. Instruction is also provided in the basic physics concepts applicable to the mechanics of industrial production equipment, and the application of mechanical principles with additional emphasis on power transmission and specific mechanical components. Lecture: 1850 Lab 2: 100 Lab 3: 5550 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 7500 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 5 IDSY 1190 Fluid Power and Piping Systems This course provides instruction on the fundamentals of safely operating hydraulic, pneumatic, and pump and piping systems. Theory and practical application concepts are discussed. Topics include: hydraulic system principles and components, pneumatic system principles and components, and the installation, maintenance, and troubleshooting of pump and piping systems. Lecture: 1875 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 5625 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 7500 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 5 IDSY 1210 Industrial Motor Controls II This course introduces the theory and practical application for two-wire control circuits, advanced motor controls, and variable speed motor controls. Emphasis is placed on circuit sequencing, switching and installation, maintenance and troubleshooting techniques. Lecture: 1875 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 5625 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 7500 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 5 IDSY 1220 Intermediate Industrial PLC s This course provides hands on development of operational skills in the maintenance and troubleshooting of industrial control systems and automated equipment. Topics include: data manipulation, math instructions and introduction to HMI, analog control, and troubleshooting discrete IO devices. Lecture: 650 Lab 2: 4900 Lab 3: 1950 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 7500 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 5 IDSY 1230 Industrial Instrumentation This course provides instruction on the principles and practices of instrumentation for industrial process and control systems, with an emphasis on industrial maintenance techniques for production equipment. Topics include: instrument tags; process documentation; basic control theory; sensing pressure, flow, level and temperature; instrument calibration; and loop tuning. Lecture: 1875 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 5625 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 7500 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 5 MAST 1010 LEGAL AND ETHICAL CONCERNS IN THE MEDICAL OFFICE Introduces the basic concept of medical assisting and its relationship to the other health fields. Emphasizes medical ethics, legal aspects of medicine, and the medical assistant's role as an agent of the physician. Provides the student with knowledge of medical jurisprudence and the essentials of professional behavior. Topics include: introduction to medical assisting; introduction to medical law; physician/patient/assistant relationship; medical office in litigation; as well as ethics, bioethical issues and HIPAA. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 1500 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 2 MAST 1030 PHARMACOLOGY IN THE MEDICAL OFFICE Introduces medication therapy with emphasis on safety; classification of medications; their actions; side effects; medication and food interactions and adverse reactions. Also introduces basic methods of arithmetic used in the administration of medications. Topics include: introductory pharmacology; dosage calculation; sources and forms of medications; medication classification; and medication effects on the body systems. Lecture: 3000 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total:

350 Pre-requisites: Program Admission, MATH 1012 Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 MAST 1060 MEDICAL OFFICE PROCEDURES Emphasizes essential skills required for the medical practice. Topics include: office protocol, time management, appointment scheduling, medical office equipment, medical references, mail services, medical records, and professional communication. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3750 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 MAST 1080 MEDICAL ASSISTING SKILLS I Introduces the skills necessary for assisting the physician with a complete history and physical in all types of medical practices. The course includes skills necessary for sterilizing instruments and equipment and setting up sterile trays. The student also explores the theory and practice of electrocardiography. Topics include: infection control and related OSHA guidelines; prepare patients/assist physician with age and gender-specific examinations and diagnostic procedures; vital signs/mensuration; medical office surgical procedures and electrocardiography Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 4500 Practicum/Internship: 4500 Clinical: 0 Total: 6750 Pre-requisites: Program Admission, ALHS 1011, ALHS 1090 Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 MAST 1090 MEDICAL ASSISTING SKILLS II Furthers student knowledge of the more complex activities in a physician's office. Topics include: collection/examination of specimens and CLIA regulations/risk management; urinalysis; venipuncture; hematology and chemistry evaluations; advanced reagent testing (Strep Test, HcG etc); administration of medications; medical office emergency procedures and emergency preparedness; respiratory evaluations; principles of IV administration; rehabilitative therapy procedures; principles of radiology safety and maintenance of medication and immunization records. Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 4500 Practicum/Internship: 4500 Clinical: 0 Total: 6750 Pre-requisites: Program Admission, ALHS 1011, ALHS 1090 Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 MAST 1100 MEDICAL INSURANCE MANAGEMENT Emphasizes essential skills required for the medical practice. Topics include: managed care, reimbursement, and coding. Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 2250 Practicum/Internship: 2250 Clinical: 0 Total: 3000 Pre-requisites: Program Admission, ALHS 1011, ALHS 1090, BUSN 1100, COMP 1000, ENGL 1010 MAST 1110 ADMINISTRATIVE PRACTICE MANAGEMENT Emphasizes essential skills required for the medical practice. Topics include: managed care, reimbursement, and coding. Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 2250 Practicum/Internship: 2250 Clinical: 0 Total: 3000 Pre-requisites: Program Admission, ALHS 1011, ALHS 1090, BUSN 1100, COMP 1000, ENGL 1010 Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 MAST 1120 HUMAN PATHOLOGICAL CONDITIONS IN THE MEDICAL OFFICE Emphasizes essential skills required for the medical practice in the areas of computers and medical transcription. Topics include: medical transcription/electronic health records; application of computer skills; integration of medical terminology; accounting procedures; and application of software. Lecture: Lab 2: Lab 3: Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: Pre-requisites: Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 MAST 1170 MEDICAL ASSISTING EXTERNSHIP Provides students with an opportunity for in-depth application and reinforcement of principles and techniques in a medical office job setting. This clinical practicum allows the student to become involved in a work setting at a professional level of technical application and requires concentration, practice, and follow-through. Topics include: application of classroom knowledge and skills and functioning in the work environment. Lecture: 0 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: Total: Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 6 349

351 MAST 1180 MEDICAL ASSISTING SEMINAR Seminar focuses on job preparation and maintenance skills and review for the certification examination. Topics include: letters of application, resumes, completing a job application, job interviews, follow-up letter/call, letters of resignation and review of program competencies for employment and certification. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 MATH 0090 LEARNING SUPPORT MATH This course uses the modular approach to emphasize in-depth arithmetic skills, basic and intermediate algebra skills. Topics include number theory, whole numbers, fractions, decimals, percent s, ratio/proportion, measurement, geometry, application problems, introduction to real numbers, algebraic expressions, solving linear equations, graphs of linear equations, polynomial operations, polynomial factoring, inequalities, rational expressions and equations, linear graphs, slope, systems of equations, radical expressions and equations, and quadratic equations, and applications involving previously listed topics. Students progress at their own pace to master each module. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 MATH 1011 BUSINESS MATH Emphasizes mathematical concepts found in business situations. Topics include basic mathematical skills, mathematical skills in business related problem solving, mathematical information for documents, graphs, and mathematical problems. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: MATH 0090 (1-6 Modules Completion), MATH 0097,or COMPASS-PreAlgebra Score 26 or higher. Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 MATH 1012 FOUNDATIONS OF MATHEMATICS Emphasizes the application of basic mathematical skills used in the solution of occupational and technical problems. Topics include fractions, decimals, percents, ratios and proportions, measurement and conversion, formula manipulation, technical applications, and basic statistics. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: MATH 0090 (1-6 Modules Completion), MATH 0097, or COMPASS-PreAlgebra Score 26 or higher. Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 MATH 1013 ALGEBRAIC CONCEPTS Emphasizes concepts and operations which are applied to the study of algebra. Topics include basic mathematical concepts, basic algebraic concepts, and intermediate algebraic concepts. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: MATH 0090 (1-15 Modules Completion), MATH 098, or Appropriate algebra placement test score. Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 MATH 1015 GEOMETRY AND TRIGONOMETRY Emphasizes basic geometric and trigonometric concepts. Topics include measurement conversion, geometric terminology and measurements, and trigonometric terminology and functions. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: MATH 1013 Algebraic Concepts with a C or better. Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 MATH 1100 QUANTITATIVE SKILLS AND REASONING Emphasizes algebra, statistics, and mathematics of finance. Topics include fundamental operations of algebra, sets and logic, probability and statistics, geometry, mathematics of voting and districting, and mathematics of finance. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: Appropriate algebra placement test score or MATH 0090 (1-15 Modules Completion). Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 350

352 MATH 1101 MATHEMATICAL MODELING Emphasizes functions using real-world applications as models. Topics include fundamental concepts of algebra; functions and graphs; linear, quadratic, polynomial, exponential and logarithmic functions and models; systems of equations; and optional topics in algebra. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: Appropriate algebra placement test score or MATH 0090 (1-15 Modules Completion). Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 MATH 1111 COLLEGE ALGEBRA Emphasizes techniques of problem solving using algebraic concepts. Topics include fundamental concepts of algebra, equations and inequalities, functions and graphs, and systems of equations; optional topics include sequences, series, and probability or analytic geometry. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: Appropriate algebra placement test score, MATH 0099, or MATH 0090 (1-15 Modules Completion). Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 MATH 1112 COLLEGE TRIGONOMETRY Emphasizes techniques of problem solving using trigonometric concepts. Topics include trigonometric functions, properties of trigonometric functions, vectors and triangles, inverse of trigonometric functions and graphing of trigonometric functions, logarithmic and exponential functions, and complex numbers. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: Regular Admission and MATH 1111 with C or better. Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 MATH 1113 PRECALCULUS Prepares students for calculus. The topics discussed include an intensive study of polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions and their graphs. Applications include simple maximum and minimum problems, exponential growth and decay. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: Regular Admission and MATH 1111 with C or better OR appropriate math placement test score. Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 MATH 1127 INTRODUCTION TO STATISTICS Emphasizes the concepts and methods fundamental to utilizing and interpreting commonly used statistics. Topics include descriptive statistics, basic probability, discrete and continuous distributions, sampling distributions, hypothesis testing chi square tests, and linear regression. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: Appropriate algebra placement test score, MATH 0099, or MATH 0090 (1-15 Modules Completion). Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 MGMT 1100 PRINCIPLES OF MANAGEMENT Develops skills and behaviors necessary for successful supervision of people and their job responsibilities. Emphasis will be placed on real life concepts, personal skill development, applied knowledge and managing human resources. Course content is intended to help managers and supervisors deal with a dramatically changing workplace being affected by technology changes, a more competitive and global market place, corporate restructuring and the changing nature of work and the workforce. Topics include: Understanding the Managers Job and Work Environment; Building an Effective Organizational Culture; Leading, Directing, and the Application of Authority; Planning, Decision-Making, and Problem-Solving; Human Resource Management, Administrative Management, Organizing, and Controlling. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: Provisional Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 MGMT 1105 ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR 351

353 Provides a general knowledge of the human relations aspects of the senior-subordinate workplace environment. Topics include employee relations principles, problem solving and decision making, leadership techniques to develop employee morale, human values and attitudes, organizational communications, interpersonal communications, and employee conflict. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: Provisional Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 MGMT 1110 EMPLOYMENT LAW Provides a general knowledge of the human relations aspects of the senior-subordinate workplace environment. Topics include employee relations principles, problem solving and decision making, leadership techniques to develop employee morale, human values and attitudes, organizational communications, interpersonal communications, and employee conflict. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: Provisional Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 MGMT 1115 LEADERSHIP This course familiarizes the student with the principles and techniques of sound leadership practices. Topics include: Characteristics of Effective Leadership Styles, History of Leadership, Leadership Models, The Relationship of Power and Leadership, Team Leadership, The Role of Leadership in Effecting Change. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: Provisional Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 MGMT 1120 INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS This course is designed to provide the student with an overview of the functions of business in the market system. The student will gain an understanding of the numerous decisions that must be made by managers and owners of businesses. Topics include: the market system, the role of supply and demand, financial management, legal issues in business, employee relations, ethics, and marketing. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: Provisional Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 MGMT 1125 BUSINESS ETHICS Provides students with an overview of business ethics and ethical management practices with emphasis on the process of ethical decision-making and working through contemporary ethical dilemmas faced by business organizations, managers and employees. The course is intended to demonstrate to the students how ethics can be integrated into strategic business decisions and can be applied to their own careers. The course uses a case study approach to encourage the student in developing analytical, problem-solving, critical thinking and decision-making skills. Topics include: An overview of business ethics; moral development and moral reasoning; personal values, rights, and responsibilities; frameworks for ethical decision-making in business; justice and economic distribution; corporations and social responsibility; corporate codes of ethics and effective ethics programs; business and society: consumers and the environment; ethical issues in the workplace; business ethics in a global and multicultural environment; business ethics in cyberspace; and business ethics and the rule of law. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: Provisional Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 MGMT 1135 MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING AND FINANCE The focus of this course is to acquire the skills and concepts necessary to use accounting information in managerial decision making. Course is designed for those who will use, not necessarily prepare, accounting information. Those applications include the use of information for short and long term planning, operational control, investment decisions, cost and pricing products and services. An overview of financial accounting and basic concepts of finance provides an overview of financial statement analysis. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 MGMT 1310 INTRODUCTION TO QUALITY ASSURANCE This course will provide an introduction to Six Sigma quality improvement methodology and philosophy designed to reduce product and or service failure rates to near perfection. An emphasis will be made on a disciplined, data driven approach to work toward the 352

354 elimination of defects across every business area. Course blends theoretical concepts and practical ideas from proven applications of the Six Sigma methodology and will help you understand a methodical approach to problem resolution and problem prevention. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 MGMT 1315 DEFINE AND MEASURE This course will introduce the student to the first two phases of the Six Sigma process which are define and measure. The material will emphasize the importance of developing a clear definition of the scope of any Six Sigma process and use the SIPOC in determining that scope, as well as the use of certain tools in that process. The course will also illustrate the use of selected tools in the measure phase of the Six Sigma process and the statistical models used in these tools. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 MGMT 1320 ANALYZE, IMPROVE AND CONTROL This course will provide the necessary tools to develop data analysis techniques for a particular process. It will suggest specific methodologies for improvement utilizing the information derived from determining process capability and will offer specific techniques designed to enable the student to sustain and maintain process improvement solutions. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 MGMT 1340 QUALITY ASSURANCE PHILOSPHY This course will present the historical basis for Six Sigma in America business and industry. The course will blend theoretical and practical ideas from proven applications of the Six Sigma methodology, enabling the student to demonstrate the use of the basic tools and techniques of Six Sigma improvement. The relationship between Lean and Six Sigma will be evaluated as a means for the overall reduction of waste and the improvement of quality through elimination of defects in products and services. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 MGMT 1350 QUALITY ASSURANCE TOOLS This course will introduce the data collection, analysis and statistical tools that are necessary for use in Six Sigma projects. The student will be provided with opportunities to apply these tools as well as interpreting the results. Hypothesis testing will be emphasized in its relation to overall improvement of processes. A methodical approach to problem resolution and prevention will be provided. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 MGMT 1360 ADVANCED QUALITY ASSURANCE PROCESS This course will emphasize the tools and techniques necessary to implement change in processes to maximize ROI and to improve overall effectiveness and efficiency. Emphasis will be made on the role of control charting in maintaining changes in processes. The role of communicating the rationale and methodology of changes will be included. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 MGMT 2115 HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT This course is designed as an overview of the Human Resource Management (HRM) function and of the manager and supervisors role in managing the career cycle from organizational entry to exit. It acquaints the student with the authority, responsibility, functions, and problems of the human resource manager, with an emphasis on developing familiarity with the real world applications required of employers and managers who increasingly are in partnership with HRM generalists and specialists in their organizations. Topics include: strategic human resource management, contemporary issues in HRM: ethics, diversity and globalization; the human resource/supervisor partnership; human resource planning and productivity; job description analysis, development, and design: recruiting, interviewing, and selecting employees; performance management and appraisal systems; employee training and 353

355 development: disciplinary action and employee rights; employee compensation and benefits; labor relations and employment law; and technology applications in HRM. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: Provisional Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 MGMT 2120 LABOR MANAGEMENT RELATIONS This course is designed as an overview of the Human Resource Management (HRM) function and of the manager and supervisors role in managing the career cycle from organizational entry to exit. It acquaints the student with the authority, responsibility, functions, and problems of the human resource manager, with an emphasis on developing familiarity with the real world applications required of employers and managers who increasingly are in partnership with HRM generalists and specialists in their organizations. Topics include: strategic human resource management, contemporary issues in HRM: ethics, diversity and globalization; the human resource/supervisor partnership; human resource planning and productivity; job description analysis, development, and design: recruiting, interviewing, and selecting employees; performance management and appraisal systems; employee training and development: disciplinary action and employee rights; employee compensation and benefits; labor relations and employment law; and technology applications in HRM. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: Provisional Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 MGMT 2125 PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT Develops an understanding of how fostering employer/employee relationships in the work setting improves work performance. Develops legal counseling and disciplinary techniques to use in various workplace situations. Topics include: the definitions of coaching, counseling, and discipline; importance of the coaching relationship; implementation of an effective counseling strategy; techniques of effective discipline; and performance evaluation techniques. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: Provisional Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 MGMT 2130 EMPLOYEE TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT Addresses the challenges of improving the performance and career potential of employees, while benefiting the student in their own preparation for success in the workplace. The focus is on both training and career and personal development. Shows the student how to recognize when training and development is needed and how to plan, design, and deliver an effective program of training for employees. Opportunities are provided for the student to develop their own career plans, assess their work-related skills, and practice a variety of skills desired by employers. Topics include: developing a philosophy of training; having systems approach to training and development; the context of training; conducting a needs analysis; critical success factors for employees: learning principles; designing and implementing training plans; conducting and evaluating training; human resource development and careers; personal career development planning; and applications in interpersonal relationships and communication. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: Provisional Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 MGMT 2140 RETAIL MANAGEMENT Develops a working knowledge of managing a retail business from a variety of perspectives with an emphasis on store management. The emphasis is on contemporary issues in retailing, particularly the process of supervising customer service and dealing with the changing demographics of retailing. An application focus on the use of information technologies, the internet, and electronic retailing is intended to give the student hands-on experience in retail management. Topics include: strategic retail management; store, nonstore, and nontraditional retailing; retail human resource management; developing a customer-focused service strategy; managing customer service; retail operations and financial management; merchandise management; buying and inventory management; global, cataloging, and electronic retail management, information technology applications in retailing. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: Provisional Admission Co-requisites: COMP 1000 Credits: 3 MGMT 2210 PROJECT MANAGEMENT Provides a basic understanding of project management functions and processes. Topics include: team selection and management; project planning, definition and scheduling of tasks; resource negotiation, allocation, and leveling; project control, monitoring, and reporting; computer tools for project planning and scheduling; managing complex relationships between project team and other organizations; critical path methodology; and total quality management. 354

356 Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: Provisional Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 MGMT 2215 TEAM PROJECT This course utilizes team methodologies to study the field of management. It encourages students to discuss their perception of management practices which have been studied during the management program. Topics include: current issues and problems in management and supervision and state-of-the-art management and leadership techniques. Students will be put into teams, will work on team projects to demonstrate their understanding of the competencies of this course, and will do peer evaluation. Potential team projects could include authoring a management book covering the competencies, videos, web sites, bulletin boards, and slide presentations amongst others. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 MKTG 1100 PRINCIPLES OF MARKETING This course emphasizes the trends and the dynamic forces that affect the marketing process and the coordination of the marketing functions. Topics include effective communication in a marketing environment, role of marketing, knowledge of marketing principles, marketing strategy, and marketing career paths. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 MKTG 1130 BUSINESS REGULATIONS AND COMPLIANCE This course introduces the study of contracts and other legal issues and obligations for businesses. Topics include: creation and evolution of laws, court decision processes, legal business structures, sales contracts, commercial papers, Uniform Commercial Code, and risk-bearing devices. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 MKTG 1160 PROFESSIONAL SELLING This course introduces professional selling skills and processes. Topics include: professional selling, product/sales knowledge, customer analysis/relations, selling process, sales presentations, and ethics of selling. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 MKTG 1161 SERVICE INDUSTRY BUSINESS ENVIRONMENT This course introduces the learner to the service industry. Topics include: an introduction to the service industry business environment, an introduction to life-long learning, work ethic and positive behavior required for exceptional customer service, an introduction to customer relations, working together successfully on teams, and basic business principles. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 1500 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: None Credits: 2 MKTG 1162 CUSTOMER CONTACT SKILLS This course provides students with skills necessary to communicate with customers and successfully manage that relationship in both telephone and face-to-face situations. Topics include: skills to effectively communicate with customers, developing rapport with customers, problem-solving in customer service, telephone skills, sales skills in the service environment, managing the difficult customer, and managing the multicultural customer. Computer-Based Training (CBT) is used to allow students to practice skills using simulated business situations. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3750 Pre-requisites: MKTG 1161 Co-requisites: MKTG Credits: 4 MKTG 1163 COMPUTERS SKILLS FOR CUSTOMER SERVICE 355

357 Provides students with the fundamentals of computer skills used in a customer service environment. Topics include: introduction to computer technology, introduction to the Windows environment, introduction to word processing, introduction to spreadsheets, introduction to databases and introduction to . Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: MKTG 1162 Co-requisites: None Credits: 2 MKTG 1164 BUSINESS SKILLS FOR THE CUSTOMER Provides students with the fundamentals of basic business skills used in the customer service environment. Topics include: introduction to business correspondence, basic business calculations, change management, managing multiple tasks and priorities, and tolls for team problem-solving and service improvement. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 1500 Pre-requisites: MKTG 1163 Co-requisites: None Credits: 2 MKTG 1165 PERSONAL EFFECTIVENESS IN CUSTOMER SERVICE Provides students with skills that will allow them to present a positive image to both co-workers and customers. Topics include: personal wellness and stress management, positive image, and job interview skills. Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 750 Pre-requisites: MKTG 1164 Co-requisites: None Credits: 1 MKTG 1190 INTEGRATED MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS This course introduces the fundamental principles and practices associated with promotion and communication. Topics include: purposes of promotion and IMC, principles of promotion and Integrated Marketing Communication (IMC), budgeting, regulations and controls, media evaluation and target market selection, integrated marketing plans, trends in promotion, and promotion and communication career paths. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 MKTG 1210 SERVICES MARKETING This course provides students with skills necessary to communicate with customers and successfully manage that relationship in both telephone and face-to-face situations. Topics include: skills to effectively communicate with customers, developing rapport with customers, problem-solving in customer service, telephone skills, sales skills in the service environment, managing the difficult customer, and managing the multicultural customer. Computer-Based Training (CBT) is used to allow students to practice skills using simulated business situations. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3750 Pre-requisites: MKTG 1161 Co-requisites: MKTG 1161 Credits: 3 MKTG 1270 VISUAL MERCHANDISING This course focuses on the components of the visual merchandising of goods and services. Topics include: design and color principles, tools and materials of the trade, lighting and signs, installation of displays, store planning, safety, and related areas of visual merchandising and display. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3000 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 MKTG 1280 INTRODUCTION TO SPORTS AND RECREATION MANAGEMENT This course introduces the sociological, philosophical, economic, and historical aspects of the sports and recreation industry. Topics include: nature of sports and recreation management, sports management landscape, research and trends, programming in sports and recreation management, employee training, Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 356

358 MKTG 1370 CONSUMER BEHAVIOR This course analyzes consumer behavior and applicable marketing strategies. Topics include: the nature of consumer behavior, influences on consumer behavior, consumer decision-making process, role of research in understanding consumer behavior, and marketing strategies. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 MKTG 2000 GLOBAL MARKETING This course introduces opportunities and international strategies employed in the global marketplace. Topics include: the environment of international marketing, analyze international marketing opportunities, international market entries, design an international marketing strategy, and career paths in international marketing. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: MKTG 1100 Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 MKTG 2010 SMALL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT This course introduces competencies required in managing a small business. Topics include: nature of small business management, business management and organizational change, marketing strategies, employee relations, financial planning, and business assessment and growth. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 MKTG 2060 MARKETING CHANNELS Emphasizes the design and management of marketing channels. Topics include: role of marketing channels, channel design and planning, supply chain management, logistics, and managing marketing channels. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 MKTG 2070 BUYING AND SELLING Develops buying and merchandising skills required in retail or e-business. Topics include: principles of merchandising, inventory control, merchandise plan, assortment planning, buying merchandise, and pricing strategies. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 MKTG 2080 REGULATIONS AND COMPLIANCE IN SPORTS This course introduces the legal principles involved in sports. Topics include: nature of sports law, sports law and change, sports law environment, court decision processes, and sports contracts. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 MKTG 2090 MARKETING RESEARCH This course conveys marketing research methodology. Topics include: role of marketing research, marketing research process, ethics in marketing research, research design, collection data analysis, reporting, application of marketing research, and marketing research career paths. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: MKTG 1100 Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 MKTG 2160 ADVANCED SELLING This course emphasizes advanced sales presentation skills needed in professional selling. Topics include: managing effective customer relationships, self-management, sales force training, sales force development, and career paths in professional selling. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total:

359 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 MKTG 2180 PRINCIPLES OF SPORTS MARKETING This course applies the principles of marketing utilized in the sports industry. Topics include: nature of sports marketing, role of sports marketing, marketing principles specific to sports, marketing mix to achieve goals, and electronic landscape and media in sports. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 MKTG 2210 ENTREPRENEURSHIP This course provides an overview of the steps in establishing a business. A formal business will be created. Topics include planning, location analysis, financing, developing a business plan, and entrepreneurial ethics and social responsibility. Lecture: 3000 Lab 2: 3000 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 6000 Pre-requisites: Provisional Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 MKTG 2280 SPORTS MANAGEMENT This course emphasizes leadership and management in the sports marketing industry. Topics include: leadership, budgeting, project management, event management, contract negotiation, and international sports marketing. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2:0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: MKTG 1280 Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 MKTG 2290 MARKETING OCCUPATION BASED INSTRUCTION This course applies and reinforces marketing and employability skills in an actual job placement or practicum experience. Topics include: problem solving, adaptability to the job setting, use of proper interpersonal skills, application of marketing skills, and professional development. Lecture: 0 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 6750 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 6750 Pre-requisites: Program Instructor Approval Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 MKTG 2300 MARKETING MANAGEMENT This course reiterates the program outcomes for marketing management through the development of a marketing plan. Topics include: the marketing framework, the marketing plan, and preparing a marketing plan for a new product. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3000 Pre-requisites: MKTG 1100 Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 MKTG 2500 EXPLORING SOCIAL MEDIA This course explores the environment and current trends of social media as it relates to marketing functions. Topics include: history of the internet and social media, social media dashboards, legal issues of social media, outsourcing vs. in-house administration, and the current social media ecosystem including applications in the following areas: communication, collaboration/authority building, multimedia, reviews and opinions, and entertainment. Lecture:2250 Lab 2:0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: Program Admission, MKTG 1100 Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 MKTG 2550 ANALYZING SOCIAL MEDIA This course analyzes the application of social media to an integrated marketing communication plan. Topics include technical writing for social media, social media auditing, Social Media ROI, trend analysis, social media analytics, and Customer Experience Management(CEM). Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3000 Pre-requisites: MKTG 1100 Co-requisites: MKTG 2550 Credits: 3 MUSC 1101 MUSIC APPRECIATION Explores the formal elements of musical composition, musical form and style, and the relationship of music to historical pieces. The course includes listening and analysis of well-known works of music. This course encourages student interest in musical arts beyond the classroom. 358

360 Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: ENGL 0098, ENGL 0090, or Appropriate Placement Test Score and READ 0098, READ 0090 or Appropriate Placement Test Score. Co-requisites: None NAST 1100 NURSE AIDE FUNDAMENTALS Introduces student to the role and responsibilities of the Nurse Aide. Emphasis is placed on understanding and developing critical thinking skills, as well as demonstrating knowledge of the location and function of human body systems and common disease processes; responding to and reporting changes in a residents /patient s condition, nutrition, vital signs; nutrition and diet therapy; disease processes; vital signs; observing, reporting and documenting changes in a residents condition; emergency concerns; ethics and legal issues and governmental agencies that influence the care of the elderly in long term care settings; mental health and psychosocial well-being of the elderly; use and care of mechanical devices and equipment; communication and interpersonal skills and skills competency based on federal guidelines. Specific topics include: roles and responsibilities of the Nurse Aide; communication and interpersonal skills; topography, structure, and function of the body systems; injury prevention and emergency preparedness; residents rights; basic patient care skills; personal care skills; and restorative care. Lecture: 3000 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 2250 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 6750 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 6 PARA 1100 INTRODUCTION TO LAW AND ETHICS Emphasizes the American legal system, the role of the lawyer and legal assistant within that system, and the ethical obligations imposed upon attorneys and legal assistants. Topics include: survey of American jurisprudence, code of professional responsibility and ethics overview, and introduction to areas of law and legal vocabulary. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: Provisional Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 PARA 1105 LEGAL RESEARCH AND LEGAL WRITING I Introduces the student to the process of locating statutory, judicial, administrative and secondary sources on both a state and federal level. The student will utilize both print and electronic research resources. Focuses on the application and reinforcement of basic writing skills, familiarizes the student with types of writing typically engaged in by lawyers and legal assistants, and prepares the student for legal writing tasks. The student learns to write business letters as well as advisory documents. Topics include: legal analysis and legal correspondence and composition. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: ENGL 1101, PARA 1100 Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 PARA 1110 LEGAL RESEARCH AND LEGAL WRITING II Builds on competencies acquired in PARA 1105 and continues the process of locating statutory, judicial, administrative and secondary sources on both a state and federal level. The student will conduct a wider range of research in both print and electronic research resources. Emphasis will be placed on preparation of legal documents. Criminal case documents will be examined, but most of the emphasis will be on civil matters. The student will be presented factual scenarios, and utilizing these facts, research and develop a case from intake to trial. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: ENGL 1101, PARA 1100, PARA 1105 Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 PARA 1115 FAMILY LAW Introduces the student to the issues which may arise in family law cases and to the role of the paralegal in assisting the attorney in the development and presentation of such cases. Topics include: issues associated with client and witness interviews, marriage validity and dissolution, litigation support in family law matters, issues concerning children, special matters in family law, and attorney and paralegal ethical obligations. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: PARA 1100 Credits: 3 PARA 1120 REAL ESTATE LAW Introduces the student to the basic concepts of real property law as they pertain to common types of real estate transactions. Additionally, emphasis will be placed on practical skills such as document preparation and title examination. Topics include: real 359

361 estate contracts, plat reading and legal descriptions, types and purposes of deeds, title searches, common real estate mortgages and documentation, real estate closing and closing statements, recordation statutes and requirements, and elements of the lease. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: PARA 1100 Credits: 3 PARA 1125 CRIMINAL LAW AND CRIMINAL PROCEDURE Introduces the student to the basic concepts of substantive criminal law and its procedural aspects with an emphasis on the constitutionally protected rights of the accused in the criminal justice system. Topics include: substantive criminal law and procedure and criminal litigation support. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: PARA 1100 Credits: 3 PARA 1130 CIVIL LITIGATION Emphasizes competencies and concepts of civil litigation in both federal and state courts. Topics include: federal and state litigation; trial and pretrial proceedings; litigation ethics; and litigation documents, exhibits, investigations, and interviews. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: PARA 1100 Credits: 3 PARA 1135 WILLS, TRUSTS, PROBATE, AND ADMINISTRATION Provides a general framework of the substantive theory of wills, trusts, and estates. Topics include: wills, trusts, and powers of attorney; probate of wills and administration of estates; document preparation for other probate proceedings; general jurisdiction of the probate court; terminology of wills and estate practice; client interviews; and document preparation. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: PARA 1100 Credits: 3 PARA 1140 TORT LAW Introduces the student to the basic concepts of substantive tort law. Topics include: concepts of intentional torts, negligence and product liability; causation and liability concepts; damages and defenses; and special tort actions and immunities. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: PARA 1100 Credits: 3 PARA 1145 LAW OFFICE MANAGEMENT Introduces the student to common forms of law practice. The student will be exposed to methods of billing and time-keeping, automation in the law office, the law office library, the appropriate role of support staff in the law office, and ethical concerns relevant to law office management. Topics include: forms of law practice and insurance needs, support systems, support staff, and ethical responsibilities. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: PARA 1100 Credits: 3 PARA 1150 CONTRACTS, COMMERCIAL LAW AND BUSINESS ORGANIZATIONS Introduces the student to the basic concepts of legal rules commonly applicable in commercial settings, to the basic concepts of substantive contract law and to the formulation and operation of sole proprietorships, general partnerships, limited partnerships, and corporations. Additionally, the course explores the basic concepts of agency law. Topics include Constitutional law and its impact on business, the essential elements of a contract and related legal principles and the Uniform Commercial Code, sole proprietorships, partnerships, professional associations and other business organizations, corporations and tax implications of different organizations. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: PARA 1100 Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 PARA 1200 BANKRUPTCY/DEBTOR CREDITOR RELATIONS 360

362 Introduces the student to the purpose and application of the Federal Bankruptcy Code and Rules, as well as applicable state law related to bankruptcy and debtor-creditor issues. Topics include: the Bankruptcy Code and Rules, Bankruptcy Court procedures, the preparation of bankruptcy forms and documents, state law workouts and collection, and the role of the paralegal in a bankruptcy practice. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: Completion of 1100 Numbered ( ) Paralegal courses within one s program of study. Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 PARA 1205 CONSTITUTIONAL LAW Explains the major legal principles and concepts of the U.S. Constitution including governmental powers and structure, and civil liberties. Additionally, this course includes an exploration of the history of the Constitution and case law interpreting it. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: PARA 1100 Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 PARA 1210 LEGAL AND POLICY ISSUES IN HEALTHCARE Provide an overview of the legal issues involved in the delivery of healthcare and the issues relating to Elder Law. Students will recognize the fundamentals of the healthcare treatment relationship, liability issues, patient care decisions and the human condition of sickness. They will explore the complexities of health care financing, health care access, governmental regulations and privacy issues. Topics will also include access to care, informed consent, patient care decisions, the doctor-patient relationship, end-of-life decision making, legal problems of the elderly, law and mental health, AIDS and the law and the privatization of health care facilities. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: PARA 1100 Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 PARA 2210 PARALEGAL INTERNSHIP I Focuses on the application and reinforcement of paralegal skills in an actual workplace environment, or at the discretion of the instructor, in a school practicum with simulated work experiences. Students are acquainted with occupational responsibilities through realistic work situations and are provided with insights into paralegal applications on the job. Topics include: problem solving, adaptability to the job setting, use of proper interpersonal skills, application of paralegal skills in a workplace setting, and professional development. Lecture: 0 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: Pre-requisites: Must be in last semester of program. With advisor approval, may take concurrently with last semester courses. Co-requisites: None Credits: 6 PARA 2215 PARALEGAL INTERNSHIP II This course continues the focus on the application and reinforcement of paralegal skills in an actual workplace environment, or at the discretion of the instructor, in a school practicum with simulated work experiences. Realistic work situations are used to provide students with insights into paralegal applications on the job. Topics include: problem solving, adaptability to the job setting, use of proper interpersonal skills, application of paralegal skills in a workplace setting, and professional development. Lecture: 0 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: Pre-requisites: Must be in last semester of program. With advisor approval, may take concurrently with last semester courses. Co-requisites: None Credits: 6 PHAR 1000 PHARMACEUTICAL CALCULATIONS This course develops knowledge and skills in pharmaceutical calculations procedures. Topics include: systems of measurement, medication dispensing calculations, pharmacy mathematical procedures, and calculation tools and techniques. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3750 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 PHAR 1010 PHARMACY TECHNOLOGY FUNDAMENTALS Provides an overview of the pharmacy technology field and develops the fundamental concepts and principles necessary for successful participation in the pharmacy field. Topics include: safety, orientation to the pharmacy technology field, Fundamental principles of chemistry, basic laws of chemistry, ethics and laws, definitions and terms, and reference sources. Lecture: 3000 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 4500 Pre-requisites: Provisional Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 5 361

363 PHAR 1020 PRINCIPLES OF DISPENSING MEDICATIONS The course introduces the students to principles and knowledge about all classifications of medication. Topics include: disease states and treatment modalities, pharmaceutical side effects and drug interactions, control substances, specific drugs, and drug addiction and abuse. Lecture: 3000 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3000 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 PHAR 1030 PRINCIPLES OF STERILE MEDICATION PREPARATION Continues the development of student knowledge and skills in preparing medication, processing glassware, and maintaining an aseptic environment. Topics include: aseptic and sterile techniques, parenteral admixtures, hyperalimentation, chemotherapy, filtering, disinfecting, contamination, ophthalmic preparations, infection control, and quality control. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 2250 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 4500 Pre-requisites: PHAR 1000, PHAR 1010 Co-requisites: PHAR 1020, PHAR 1050 Credits: 4 PHAR 1040 PHARMACOLOGY The course introduces the students to principles and knowledge about all classifications of medication. Topics include: disease states and treatment modalities, pharmaceutical side effects and drug interactions, control substances, specific drugs, and drug addiction and abuse. Lecture: 3000 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3000 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 PHAR 1050 PHARMACY TECHNOLOGY PRACTICUM Orients students to the clinical environment and provides experiences with the basic skills necessary for the pharmacy technician. Topics include: storage and control, documentation, inventory and billing, community practice, institutional practice, and communication, Lecture: 0 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: Practicum/Internship: Clinical: 0 Total: Pre-requisites: PHAR 1010 Co-requisites: PHAR 1020 Credits: 5 PHAR 1055 PHARMACY ASSISTANT PRACTICUM This course orients students to the clinical environment and provides experiences with the basic skills necessary for the pharmacy assistant. Topics include: purchasing, packaging and labeling drugs; distribution systems; pharmacy policies and procedures; documentation; inventory and filing systems; compounding; contamination control; storage and control; pharmacy equipment, and health care organizational structures. Lecture: 0 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: Practicum/Internship: Clinical: 0 Total: 4500 Pre-requisites: ALHS 1011, ALHS 1090, MATH 1012, PHAR 1000, PHAR 1010, PHAR 1020, PHAR 1040 Co-requisites: None Credits: 5 PHAR 2060 ADVANCED PHARMACY TECHNOLOGY PRINCIPLES This course presents the advanced concepts and principles needed in the pharmacy technology field. Topics include: physician orders, patient profiles, pharmacy data systems, job readiness, legal requirements, inventory and billing, pharmaceutical calculations review and pharmacology review. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3000 Pre-requisites: COMP 1000, PHAR 1030, PHAR 1050 Co-requisites: PHAR 2070 Credits: 3 PHAR 2070 ADVANCED PHARMACY TECHNOLOGY PRACTICUM Continues the development of student knowledge and skills applicable to pharmacy technology practice. Topics include: dispensing responsibilities, physician orders, controlled substances, hyperalimentation, chemotherapy, patient profiles, pharmacy data systems, ophthalmic preparations, and hospital/retail/home health pharmacy techniques. Lecture: 0 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: Practicum/Internship: Clinical: 0 Total: Pre-requisites: COMP 1000, PHAR 1030, PHAR 1050 Co-requisites: PHAR 2060 Credits: 5 PHTA 1110 INTRODUCTION TO PHYSICAL THERAPY 362

364 This course integrates knowledge from the liberal arts, behavioral and social sciences, and introduces students to the profession of physical therapy. Topics include professional responsibilities and core values; legal and ethical responsibilities in physical therapy practice; current trends in physical therapy; communication skills; cultural competency, health disparities and research and evidencebased practice. Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/ Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Prerequisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 2 PHTA 1120 PATIENT CARE SKILLS This course integrates knowledge from the liberal arts behavioral and social, and introduces students to basic patient care skills and administrative tasks in physical therapy. Topics include patient care skills; principles of teaching and learning; documentations skills; and administrative and management tasks. Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 2250 Practicum/ Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3000 Prerequisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 2 PHTA 1130 FUNCTIONAL ANATOMY AND KINESIOLOGY I This course introduces the basic concepts of functional anatomy and the study of human movement. This course also consolidates knowledge gained in physics, anatomy and physiology in the core sciences. Topics include an overview of kinesiology and the principles of biomechanics; examination of the neuro-muscular and musculo-skeletal systems; a review of muscle attachments, actions, and innervations; and instruction in assessment techniques for measuring joint range of motion. Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 2250 Practicum/ Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 4500 Prerequisites: PHTA 1110, PHTA 1120 Co-requisites: PHTA 1140 Credits: 3 PHTA 1140 PHYSICAL THERAPY PROCEDURES I This course introduces the principles and application techniques for various physical therapy interventions. Topics include superficial and deep thermal physical agents; athermal agents and electromagnetic radiation; therapeutic massage techniques; wound care and personal protection; and instruction in assessment techniques for sensory response. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 4500 Practicum/ Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 6000 Prerequisites: PHTA 1110, PHTA 1120 Co-requisites: PHTA 1130 Credits: 4 PHTA 2110 PATHOLOGY I This course provides a survey of injuries and diseases commonly treated by physical therapist assistants. Topics include review of systems; an examination of musculoskeletal system disorders and diseases; examination of general medical disorders and diseases; examination of circulation, respiration, and ventilation; recognition and response procedures for changes in physiologic status; and an overview of pharmacology for pain, musculoskeletal, endocrine, and GI system management. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 3000 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/ Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 4500 Prerequisites: PHTA 1130, PHTA 1140 Co-requisites: PHTA 2120, PHTA 2130 Credits: 4 PHTA 2120 REHABILITATION I This course provides instruction in exercises and rehabilitation techniques commonly utilized by physical therapist assistants. Topics include functional mobility and training; rehabilitation techniques for musculoskeletal disorders; gait training and assistive devices; home management, community, and work reintegration; and health promotion, wellness and prevention. Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 4500 Practicum/ Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 5250 Prerequisites: PHTA 1130, PHTA 1140 Co-requisites: PHTA 2110, PHTA 2130 Credits: 3 PHTA 2130 PHYSICAL THERAPY PROCEDURES II This course provides continued instruction in the principles and application techniques for various physical therapy interventions. Topics include pain theories and assessment techniques; mechanical physical agents; electrotherapeutic physical agents; and adaptive, protective, and supportive devices. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 4500 Practicum/ Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 6000 Prerequisites: PHTA 1130, PHTA 1140 Co-requisites: PHTA 2110, PHTA 2120 Credits: 4 PHTA 2140 CLINICAL EDUCATION I 363

365 This course provides students with the opportunity to observe and practice skills learned in the classroom and laboratory [PHTA 1110, PHTA 1120, PHTA 1130, PHTA 1140, PHTA 2110, PHTA 2120, PHTA 2130] at various clinical settings for physical therapy practice. Students will be supervised by a clinical instructor who is either a licensed physical therapist or licensed physical therapist assistant. Topics include preparation of patients, treatment areas, and equipment; vital signs and sensory assessment; wound care and personal protection; transfers, body mechanics, and assistive devices; application of physical agents; goniometric measurements; therapeutic massage; interpersonal and communication skills; principles of teaching and learning; documentation; and modification of interventions within the plan of care. Lecture: 0 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/ Internship: 0 Clinical: 9000 Total: 9000 Prerequisites: PHTA 2110, PHTA 2120, PHTA 2130 Co-requisites: PHTA 2150, PHTA 2160, PHTA 2170 Credits: 4 PHTA 2150 PATHOLOGY II This course provides continued instruction on diseases and conditions commonly treated by physical therapist assistants with an emphasis on neurological conditions. Topics include a review of neuro-anatomy and physiology; examination of neurological disorders and diseases; examination of pediatric disorders and diseases; limb deficiency disorders; and pharmacology for spinal cord injuries, traumatic brain injuries, and cardiac and pulmonary system management. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 2250 Practicum/ Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 5250 Prerequisites: PHTA 2110, PHTA 2120, PHTA 2130 Co-requisites: PHTA 2140, PHTA 2160, PHTA 2170 Credits: 4 PHTA 2160 REHABILITATION II This course provides continued instruction in exercises and rehabilitation techniques commonly utilized by physical therapist assistants. Topics include rehabilitation of the neurological patient; rehabilitation of the pediatric patient; cardiac rehabilitation and chest physical therapy techniques; prosthetic and orthotic training; and the assessment of arousal, attention, and cognition. Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 4500 Practicum/ Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 5250 Prerequisites: PHTA 2110, PHTA 2120, PHTA 2130 Co-requisites: PHTA 2140, PHTA 2150, PHTA 2170 Credits: 3 PHTA 2170 KINESIOLOGY II This course provides continued instruction in the study of human movement. Topics include posture and equilibrium; gait, locomotion, and balance; advanced gait training techniques; and the assessment of muscle performance. Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 2250 Practicum/ Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 4500 Prerequisites: PHTA 2110, PHTA 2120, PHTA 2130 Co-requisites: PHTA 2140, PHTA 2150, PHTA 2160 Credits: 3 PHTA 2180 CLINICAL EDUCATION II This course provides continued opportunity for clinical education under the supervision of a licensed physical therapist or licensed physical therapist assistant in various health care facilities. Topics include therapeutic exercise; interventions for neurological conditions; mechanical and electrotherapeutic physical agents; gait and posture analysis; advanced gait training techniques; manual muscle testing; interventions for limb deficiency disorders; identification of architectural barriers; interpersonal and communication skills; principles of teaching and learning; documentation; and modification of interventions within the plan of care. Lecture: 0 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/ Internship: 0 Clinical: 9000 Total: 9000 Prerequisites: PHTA 2140, PHTA 2150, PHTA 2160, PHTA 2170 Co-requisites: PHTA 2190, PHTA 2200, PHTA 2160 Credits: 4 PHTA 2190 CLINICAL EDUCATION III This course provides continued opportunity for clinical education under the supervision of a licensed physical therapist or licensed physical therapist assistant in various health care facilities. Topics include therapeutic exercise; interventions for neurological conditions; mechanical and electrotherapeutic physical agents; gait and posture analysis; advanced gait training techniques; manual muscle testing; interventions for limb deficiency disorders; identification of architectural barriers; interpersonal and communication skills; principles of teaching and learning; documentation; and modification of interventions within the plan of care. Lecture: 0 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/ Internship: 0 Clinical: Total: Prerequisites: PHTA 2140, PHTA 2150, PHTA 2160, PHTA 2170 Co-requisites: PHTA 2180, PHTA 2200, PHTA 2160 Credits: 7 PHTA 2200 PHYSICAL THERAPIST ASSISTANT SEMINAR 364

366 This seminar course prepares students for entry into the field of physical therapy as physical therapist assistants. Topics include review for the licensure examination; presentation of a case study; and overview of career development and commitment to lifelong learning. Lecture: 0 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/ Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 1500 Prerequisites: PHTA 2140, PHTA 2150, PHTA 2160, PHTA 2170 Co-requisites: PHTA 2180, PHTA 2190 Credits: 1 PHLT 1030 INTRODUCTION TO VENIPUNCTURE Provides an introduction to blood collecting techniques and processing specimens. Emphasis is placed on the knowledge and skills needed to collect all types of blood samples from hospitalized patients. Topics include: venipuncture procedure, safety and quality assurance; isolation techniques, venipuncture problems, and definitions; lab test profiles and patient care areas; other specimen collections and specimen processing; test combinations, skin punctures and POCT; professional ethics and malpractice; and certification and licensure. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3000 Pre-requisites: ALHS 1011, ALHS 1090, ENGL 1010 Co-requisites: ALHS 1040, COMP 1000 Credits: 3 PHLT 1050 CLINICAL PRACTICE Provides work experiences in a clinical setting. Emphasis is placed on enhancing skills in venipuncture techniques. Topics include: introduction to clinical policies and procedures and work ethics; routine collections: adult, pediatric, and newborn; and special procedures. Lecture: 0 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: Practicum/Internship: Clinical: 0 Total: Pre-requisites: ALHS 1040, COMP 1000, PHLT 1030 Co-requisites: None Credits: 5 PHYS 1110 CONCEPTUAL PHYSICS Introduces some of the basic laws of physics. Topics include systems of units and conversion of units, vector algebra, Newtonian mechanics, fluids and thermodynamics, heat, light, and optics, mechanical waves, electricity and magnetism, and modern physics. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: ENGL 1101, MATH 1101 OR MATH 1111 Co-requisites: PHYS 1110L Credits: 3 PHYS 1110L CONCEPTUAL PHYSICS LAB I Selected laboratory exercises paralleling the topics in PHYS The laboratory exercises for this course include systems of units and systems of measurement, vector algebra, Newtonian mechanics, fluids and thermodynamics, heat, light, and optics, mechanical waves, electricity and magnetism, and modern physics. Lecture: 0 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 2250 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: ENGL 1101, MATH 1101 OR MATH 1111 Co-requisites: PHYS 1110 Credits: 1 PLBG 1000 INTRODUCTION TO PLUMBING This course provides an introduction to the Plumbing construction trade. The knowledge and skills required to succeed in the Plumbing industry are emphasized. Topics include general safety rules and practices, introduction to construction and the pipe trades, and work ethics, communication, and affective skills and practices. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: Provisional Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 PLBG 1070 PHYSICAL SCIENCE AND MECHANICS FOR THE PIPE TRADES Explores the science of materials and the mechanics related to the pipe trades. Topics include: properties and characteristics of water, hydraulics and pneumatics; mechanics; metals, alloys, and synthetics; corrosion; and basic electrical theory. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: PLBG 1000 Credits: 3 PLBG 1160 PLUMBING DRAWINGS This course introduces the reading and interpretation of sets of building drawings. Topics include types of plans, scales, specifications, conventions, and schedules. 365

367 Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 3000 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3750 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: PLBG 1000 Credits: 3 PLBG 1210 PIPES, VALVES, AND FITTINGS This course introduces the student to the materials, pipes, valves, fittings, and joining methods used in the plumbing trade. Topics include pipes, fittings, and valves, hangers and supports, and joining techniques. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3000 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: PLBG 1000 Credits: 3 PLBG 1220 DRAINAGE SYSTEMS Provides an introduction to the treatment, design and materials used in plumbing, drainage systems. Applicable plumbing codes are also discussed. Topics include: public and private sewage systems and treatment; materials, fittings, and valves; traps, venting, and grade; ejector and sump pumps; design, sizing, and installation of drainage systems. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3000 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: PLBG 1000 Credits: 3 PLBG 1240 WATER SUPPLY SYSTEMS Provides an introduction to the sources, treatment, design, and materials used in residential cold and hot water distribution systems. Applicable plumbing codes are also discussed. Topics include: public and private water systems; materials and fittings; valves; water treatment; water mains and services; hot water supply; design and installation of water supply systems. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3000 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: PLBG 1160 Credits: 3 PLBG 1260 PLUMBING FIXTURES AND APPLIANCES This course introduces the identification, theory, application and installation of residential plumbing fixtures, trim and appliances. Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 3000 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3750 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: PLBG 1000 Credits: 3 PLBG 1280 GAS PIPING, VENTING, AND APPLIANCES This course provides instruction in the materials and design of building gas supply systems and the installation of gas appliances. Emphasis is placed in conformance with applicable gas codes. Topics include types of gas, safety, materials and fittings, valves, design and size gas systems, gas appliances and controls, and gas venting. Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 3000 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3750 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: PLBG 1000 Credits: 3 PLBG 1310 SPECIAL PLUMBING SYSTEMS This course provides information and instruction in the design, use of materials, and purpose of special plumbing systems. Applicable plumbing codes are also discussed. Topics include special water systems, special drain systems, and boiler and sprinkler systems. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: PLBG 1000 Credits: 3 PLBG 1320 PLUMBING SERVICES Provides instruction in the repair and maintenance of plumbing fixtures, appliances, and systems. There is an emphasis on analysis, problem solving, and planning in performing service work. Bidding, invoicing, and working with the customer are also included. Requirements include 20 hours of demonstration lab. Topics include: plumbing fixtures and controls, appliances, servicing water systems, servicing gas systems, planning service work, bidding and invoicing, and customer relations. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3000 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: PLBG 1000 Credits: 3 366

368 PLBG 1330 PLUMBING CODES This course provides an introduction to the plumbing codes for local, national, and international applications. Topics include the history, purpose, and construction of codes, model and international codes, local codes and amendments, and code applications. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: PLBG 1000 Credits: 3 PLBG 1500 BACKFLOW PREVENTION AND CROSS CONNECTION CONTROL This course provides guidelines for acceptable practice for testing, inspection, and repair of backflow prevention assemblies used in cross-connection control installations. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: PLBG 1000 Credits: 3 PLBG 2160 ADVANCED DRAWINGS AND PLAN READING Advanced instruction in reading and interpreting various plans used in the construction industry. Topics include: specifications, site plans, architectural plans, structural plans, plumbing plans, electrical plans, mechanical plans, material take-off and bill of materials, isometric drawing and sleeve drawings. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: Program Advisor Approval, PLBG 1160 Co-requisites: PLBG 1160 Credits: 3 PLBG 2330 ADVANCED PLUMBING CODE APPLICATIONS This course provides an in depth study of the plumbing codes and amendments used in Georgia. Emphasis is placed on code applications. Topics include code definitions, regulations, table and sizing charts, drawings. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: Program Advisor Approval, PLBG 1330 Co-requisites: PLBG 1330 Credits: 3 PLBG 2500 PLUMBING TECHNOLOGY PRACTICUM/INTERNSHIP This course is designed to give the student the opportunity to refine the knowledge and skills developed by successfully completing a special lab project agreed upon by the student and advisor, or to participate in an internship with local business and industry. Lecture: 0 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 6750 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 6750 Pre-requisites: Program Advisor Approval Co-requisites: All Occupational and General Core Courses Credits: 3 PNSG 1020 PHARMACOLOGY FOR CLINICAL CALCULATIONS Uses basic mathematical concepts and includes basic drug administration. Emphasizes critical thinking skills. Topics include: systems of measurement, calculating drug problems, resource materials usage, basic pharmacology, administering medications in a simulated clinical environment, principles of IV therapy techniques, and client education. Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 2250 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3000 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 2 PNSG 1030 CLINICAL NUTRITION A study of the nutritional needs of the individual. Topics include: nutrients, standard and modified diets, enteral and parenteral nutrition, nutrition throughout the lifespan, and client education. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 1500 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 2 PNSG 1100 NURSING FUNDAMENTALS An introduction to the nursing process. Topics include: nursing as a profession; ethics and law; client care which is defined as using the nursing process, using critical thinking, and providing client education and includes principles and skills of nursing practice, documentation, and an introduction to physical assessment; geriatrics; customer/client relationships; and standard precautions. Lecture: 3000 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 6750 Practicum/Internship: 6750 Clinical: 0 Total: 9750 Pre-requisites: ALHS 1011, ALHS ALHS 1090, ENGL 1010, MATH 1012, PSYC 1010 Co-requisites: None Credits: 7 367

369 PNSG 1120 MEDICAL SURGICAL NURSING I Focuses on health management and maintenance and the prevention of illness, care of the individual as a whole, and deviations from the normal state of health. The definition of client care includes using the nursing process, performing assessments, using critical thinking, and providing client education. Topics include: health management and maintenance; prevention of illness; care of the individual as a whole; pathological disorders and deviations from the normal state of health in the cardiovascular, respiratory, endocrine, urinary, and gastrointestinal systems; client care, treatment, pharmacology, and nutritional aspects related to the cardiovascular, respiratory, endocrine, urinary, and gastrointestinal systems; and standard precautions related to the cardiovascular, respiratory, endocrine, urinary, and gastrointestinal systems. Lecture: 5250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 5250 Pre-requisites: PNSG 1020, PNSG 1030, PNSG 1100 Co-requisites: None Credits: 7 PNSG 1122 MEDICAL SURGICAL NURSING PRACTICUM I Focuses on the clinical patient care aspects of health management and maintenance and the prevention of illness, care of the individual as a whole, and deviations from the normal state of health. The definition of client care includes using the nursing process, performing assessments, using critical thinking, and providing client education. Topics include: health management and maintenance; prevention of illness; care of the individual as a whole; pathological disorders and deviations from the normal state of health in the cardiovascular, respiratory, endocrine, urinary, and gastrointestinal systems; client care, treatment, pharmacology, medication administration, and diet therapy related to the cardiovascular, respiratory, endocrine, urinary, and gastrointestinal systems; and standard precautions. Lecture: 0 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: Pre-requisites: PNSG 1020, PNSG 1030, PNSG 1100 Co-requisites: PNSG 1120 Credits: 6 PNSG 1130 MEDICAL SURGICAL NURSING II Focuses on the clinical patient care aspects of health management and maintenance and the prevention of illness, care of the individual as a whole, and deviations from the normal state of health. The definition of client care includes using the nursing process, performing assessments, using critical thinking, and providing client education. Topics include: health management and maintenance; prevention of illness; care of the individual as a whole; pathological disorders and deviations from the normal state of health in the cardiovascular, respiratory, endocrine, urinary, and gastrointestinal systems; client care, treatment, pharmacology, medication administration, and diet therapy related to the cardiovascular, respiratory, endocrine, urinary, and gastrointestinal systems; and standard precautions. Lecture: 0 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: Pre-requisites: PNSG 1020, PNSG 1030, PNSG 1100 Co-requisites: PNSG 1120 Credits: 7 PNSG 1132 MEDICAL SURGICAL NURSING PRACTICUM II Focuses on the clinical patient care aspects of health management and maintenance and the prevention of illness, care of the individual as a whole, pathological disorders and deviations from the normal state of health. The definition of client care includes using the nursing process, performing assessments, using critical thinking, and providing client education. Topics include: health management and maintenance; and prevention of illness; care of the individual as a whole; and deviations from the normal state of health in the musculoskeletal, neurological, integumentary, and sensory systems, mental health, and oncology; client care, treatment, pharmacology; and diet therapy related to the musculoskeletal, neurological, integumentary, and sensory systems, mental health, and oncology; and standard precautions. Lecture: 0 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: Pre-requisites: PNSG 1120, PNSG 1122 Co-requisites: PNSG 1030 Credits: 6 PSNG 2120 PEDIATRIC NURSING Focuses on health management and maintenance and the prevention of illness, care of the child as a whole, and deviations from the normal state of health. The definition of client care includes using the nursing process, performing assessments, using critical thinking, and providing client education. Topics include: health management and maintenance and prevention of illness, care of the child as a whole, and deviations from the normal state of health in the pediatric client; client care, treatments, pharmacology, and diet therapy of the pediatric client; growth and development; and standard precautions. Lecture: 3000 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3000 Pre-requisites: PNSG 1020, PNSG 1030, PNSG 1100 Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 PSNG 2122 PEDIATRIC NURSING PRACTICUM 368

370 Focuses on the clinical patient care aspects of health management and maintenance and the prevention of illness, care of the family as a whole, care of the child as a whole, and deviations from the normal state of health. The definition of client care includes using the nursing process, performing assessments, using critical thinking, and providing client education. Topics include: health management and maintenance and prevention of illness, care of the child as a whole, and deviations from the normal state of health in the pediatric client; client care, treatment, pharmacology, medication administration, and diet therapy of the pediatric client; growth and development; and standard precautions. Lecture: 0 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 2250 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: PNSG 1020, PNSG 1030, PNSG 1100 Co-requisites: PNSG 2120 Credits: 1 PSNG 2130 OBSTETRIC NURSING Focuses on health management and maintenance and the prevention of illness, care of the individual as a whole, and deviations from the normal state of health. The definition of client care includes using the nursing process, performing assessments, using critical thinking, and providing client education. Topics include: health management and maintenance and prevention of illness, care of the individual as a whole, and deviations from the normal state of health in the reproductive system, pathological and non-pathological concerns in obstetric clients, and the newborn; client care, treatments, pharmacology, and diet therapy related to the reproductive system, obstetric clients, and the newborn; and standard precautions. Lecture: 3000 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3000 Pre-requisites: PNSG 1020, PNSG 1030, PNSG 1100 Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 PSNG 2132 OBSTETRIC NURSING PRACTICUM Focuses on health management and maintenance and the prevention of illness, care of the individual as a whole, and deviations from the normal state of health. The definition of client care includes using the nursing process, performing assessments, using critical thinking, and providing client education. Topics include: health management and maintenance and prevention of illness, care of the individual as a whole, and deviations from the normal state of health in the reproductive system, pathological and non-pathological concerns in obstetric clients, and the newborn; client care, treatments, pharmacology, and diet therapy related to the reproductive system, obstetric clients, and the newborn; and standard precautions. Lecture: 3000 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3000 Pre-requisites: PNSG 1020, PNSG 1030, PNSG 1100 Co-requisites: None Credits: 2 PNSG 2150 NURSING LEADERSHIP Builds on the concepts presented in prior nursing courses and develops the skills necessary for successful performance in the job market. Topics include: application of the nursing process, supervisory skills, client education methods, group dynamics and conflict resolution. Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 750 Pre-requisites: PNSG 1020, PNSG 1030, PNSG 1100 Co-requisites: None Credits: 1 PNSG 2152 NURSING LEADERSHIP PRACTICUM Builds on the concepts presented in prior nursing courses and develops the skills necessary for successful performance in the job market, focusing on practical applications. Topics include: application of the nursing process, critical thinking, supervisory skills, client education methods, and group dynamics. Lecture: 0 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 4500 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 4500 Pre-requisites: PNSG 1020, PNSG 1030, PNSG 1100 Co-requisites: PNSG 2150 Credits: 2 POLS 1101 AMERICAN GOVERNMENT Emphasizes study of government and politics in the United States. The focus of the course will provide an overview of the Constitutional foundations of the American political processes with a focus on government institutions and political procedures. The course will examine the constitutional framework, federalism, civil liberties and civil rights, public opinion, the media, special interest groups, political parties, and the election process along with the three branches of government. In addition, this course will examine the processes of Georgia state government. Topics include foundations of government, political behavior, and governing institutions. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: - ENGL 0098, ENGL 0090, or Appropriate Placement Test Score and READ 0098, READ 0090 or Appropriate Placement Test Score. Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 369

371 PSYC 1010 BASIC PSYCHOLOGY Presents basic concepts within the field of psychology and their application to everyday human behavior, thinking, and emotion Emphasis is placed on students understanding basic psychological principles and their application within the context of family, work and social interactions. Topics include an overview of psychology as a science, the nervous and sensory systems, learning and memory, motivation and emotion, intelligence, lifespan development, personality, psychological disorders and their treatments, stress and health, and social psychology. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: Provisional Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 PSYC 1101 INTRODUCTORY PSYCHOLOGY Introduces the major fields of contemporary psychology. Emphasis is on critical thinking and fundamental principles of psychology as a science. Topics include research design, the organization and operation of the nervous system, sensation and perception, learning and memory, motivation and emotion, thinking and intelligence, lifespan development, personality, psychological disorders and treatment, stress and health, and social psychology. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: ENGL 0098, ENGL 0090, or Appropriate Placement Test Score and READ 0098, READ 0090 or Appropriate Placement Test Score. Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 PSYC 2103 HUMAN DEVELOPMENT Emphasizes changes that occur during the human life cycle beginning with conception and continuing through late adulthood and death and emphasizes the scientific basis of our knowledge of human growth and development and the interactive forces of nature and nurture. Topics include but are not limited to theoretical perspectives and research methods, prenatal development and child birth, stages of development from infancy through late adulthood, and death and dying. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: PSYC 1101 Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 RADT 1010 INTRODUCTION TO RADIOLOGY Introduces a grouping of fundamental principles, practices, and issues common to many specializations in the health care profession. In addition to the essential skills, students explore various delivery systems and related issues. Provides the student with an overview of Radiologic Technology and patient care. Students will be oriented to the radiographic profession as a whole. Emphasis will be placed on patient care with consideration of both physical and psychological conditions. Introduces a grouping of fundamental principles, practices, and issues common to many specializations in the health care profession. In addition to the essential skills, students explore various delivery systems and related issues. Topics include: ethics, medical and legal considerations, Right to Know Law, professionalism, basic principles of radiation protection, basic principles of exposure, equipment introduction, health care delivery systems, hospital and departmental organization, hospital and technical college affiliation, medical emergencies, pharmacology/contrast agents, media, OR and mobile procedures patient preparation, death and dying, body mechanics/transportation, basic life support/cpr, and patient care in radiologic sciences. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3750 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: RADT 1030, RADT 1320 Credits: 4 RADT 1030 RADIOGRAPHIC PROCEDURES I Introduces the knowledge required to perform radiologic procedures applicable to the human anatomy. Emphasis will be placed on the production of quality radiographs, and laboratory experience will demonstrate the application of theoretical principles and concepts. Topics include: introduction to radiographic procedures; positioning terminology; positioning considerations; procedures, anatomy, and topographical anatomy related to body cavities, bony thorax, upper extremities, shoulder girdle; and lower extremities. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 2250 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3750 Pre-requisites: Prerequisites for diploma students are Program Admission, ALHS Prerequisites for degree students are Program Admission, BIOL 2114, and BIOL 2114L. RADT 1010 must be taken as either a Prerequisite or Corequisite Co-requisites: RADT 1010 ALHS 1011, BIOL 2114, BIOL 2114L, RADT 1010 Credits: 3 RADT 1060 RADIOGRAPHIC PROCEDURES II Continues to develop the knowledge required to perform radiographic procedures. Topics include: anatomy and routine projections of the pelvic girdle; anatomy and routine projections of the spine, gastrointestinal (GI) procedures; genitourinary (GU) procedures; biliary system procedures; and minor procedures. 370

372 Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 2250 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3750 Pre-requisites: RADT 1010, RADT 1030 Co-requisites: RADT 1330 Credits: 3 RADT 1070 PRINCIPLES OF IMAGING I Content is designed to establish a basic knowledge of atomic structure and terminology. Also presented are the nature and characteristics of radiation, x-ray production and the fundamentals of photon interactions with matter. Factors that govern the image production process, film imaging with related accessories, and a basis for analyzing radiographic images. Included are the importance of minimum imaging standards, discussion of a problem-solving technique for image evaluation and the factors that can affect image quality. Actual images will be included for analysis. Lecture: 3750 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 5250 Pre-requisites: Prerequisites for diploma students are Program Admission and MATH Prerequisites for degree students are Program Admission and MATH 1111 Program Admission, MATH 1013, MATH 1111 Co-requisites: None Credits: 6 RADT 1160 PRINCIPLES OF IMAGING II Content is designed to impart an understanding of the components, principles and operation of digital imaging systems found in diagnostic radiology. Factors that impact image acquisition, display, archiving and retrieval are discussed. Guidelines for selecting exposure factors and evaluating images within a digital system assist students to bridge between film-based and digital imaging systems, with a knowledge base in radiographic, fluoroscopic, mobile and tomographic equipment requirements and design. This content also provides a basic knowledge of quality control, principles of digital system quality assurance and maintenance are presented. Content is designed to provide entry-level Radiologic Technology students with principles related to computed tomography (CT) imaging, and other imaging modalities (i.e., MRI, US, NM, Mammography) in terms of purpose, principles, equipment/material, and procedure. Topics include: imaging equipment, digital image acquisition and display, and basic principles of CT and other imaging modalities. Topics include: imaging equipment, digital image acquisition and display, and basic principles of CT and other imaging modalities Lecture: 3750 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 5250 Pre-requisites: RADT 1070 Co-requisites: None Credits: 6 RADT 1200 PRINCIPLES OF RADIATION BIOLOGY AND PROTECTION Provides instruction on the principles of cell radiation interaction. Radiation effects on cells and factors affecting cell response are presented. Acute and chronic effects of radiation are discussed. Topics include: radiation detection and measurement; patient protection; personnel protection; absorbed dose equivalencies; agencies and regulations; introduction to radiation biology; cell anatomy, radiation/cell interaction; and effects of radiation. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 RADT 1320 CLINICAL RADIOLOGIC TECHNOLOGY I Introduces students to the hospital clinical setting and provides an opportunity for students to participate in or observe radiographic procedures. Topics include: orientation to hospital areas and procedures; orientation to mobile/surgery; orientation to Radiologic Technology and fluoroscopy; participation in and/or observation of procedures related to body cavities, the shoulder girdle, and upper extremities. Activities of students are under direct supervision. Lecture: 0 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 9000 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 9000 Pre-requisites: RADT 1030 Co-requisites: RADT 1030 Credits: 4 RADT 1330 CLINICAL RADIOLOGIC TECHNOLOGY II Continues introductory student learning experiences in the hospital setting. Topics include: equipment utilization; exposure techniques; attend to and/or observation of routine projections of the lower extremities, pelvic girdle, and spine; attend to and/or observation of procedures related to the gastrointestinal (GI), genitourinary (GU), and biliary systems; and attend to and/or observation of procedure related to minor radiologic procedures. Execution of radiographic procedures will be conducted under direct and indirect supervision. Lecture: 0 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: Pre-requisites: RADT 1010, RADT 1030, RADT 1320 Co-requisites: RADT 1060 Credits: 7 RADT 2090 RADIOGRAPHIC PROCEDURES II 371

373 Continues to develop the knowledge required to perform radiographic procedures. Topics include: anatomy and routine projections of the cranium; anatomy and routine projections of the facial bones; anatomy and routine projections of the sinuses; sectional anatomy of the head, neck, thorax and abdomen. Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 2250 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3000 Pre-requisites: RADT 1060 Co-requisites: RADT 1330, RADT 2340 Credits: 2 RADT 2190 RADIOGRAPHIC PATHOLOGY Content is designed to introduce the student to concepts related to disease and etiological considerations. Pathology and disease as they relate to various radiographic procedures are discussed with emphasis on radiographic appearance of disease and impact on exposure factor selection. Topics include: fundamentals of pathology, trauma/physical injury, and systematic classification of disease. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: Clinical: 0 Total: 1500 Pre-requisites: ALHS 1011, BIOL 2114, BIOL 2114L Co-requisites: None Credits: 2 RADT 2260 RADIOLOGIC TECHNOLOGY REVIEW Provides a review of basic knowledge from previous courses and helps the student prepare for national certification examinations for radiographers. Topics include: image production and evaluation; radiographic procedures; anatomy, physiology, pathology, and terminology; equipment operation and quality control; radiation protection; and patient care and education. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: RADT 1160, RADT 1200, RADT 2090, RADT 2350 Co-requisites: RADR 2360 Credits: 3 RADT 2340 CLINICAL RADIOLOGRAPHY III Provides students with continued hospital setting work experience. Students continue to develop proficiency in executing procedures introduced in Radiographic Procedures. Topics include: patient care; behavioral and social competencies; performance and/or observation of minor special procedures, special equipment use, and participation in and/or observation of cranial and facial Radiologic Technology. Execution of radiographic procedures will be conducted under direct and indirect supervision. Lecture: 0 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: Pre-requisites: RADT 1330 Co-requisites: None Credits: 6 RADT 2350 CLINICAL RADIOLOGRAPHY IV Provides students with continued hospital setting work experience. Students continue to develop proficiency in executing procedures introduced in Radiographic Procedures. Topics include: sterile techniques; participation in and/or observation of minor special procedures, special equipment use, and genitourinary system procedures; and participation in and/or observation of cranial and facial Radiologic Technology; and competency completion evaluation. Execution of radiographic procedures will be conducted under direct and indirect supervision. Lecture: 0 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: Pre-requisites: RADT 1010, RADT 2090, RADT 2340 Co-requisites: None Credits: 7 RADT 2360 CLINICAL RADIOLOGRAPHY V Provides students with continued hospital setting work experience. Students demonstrate increased proficiency levels in skills introduced in all of the radiographic procedures courses and practiced in previous clinical Radiologic Technology courses. Topics include: patient care; behavioral and social competency; advanced radiographic anatomy; equipment utilization; exposure techniques; sterile techniques; integration of procedures and/or observation of angiographic, interventional, minor special procedures; integration of procedures and/or observation of special equipment use; integration of procedures and/or observation of routine and special radiographic procedures; and final completion of all required clinical competencies. Execution of radiographic procedures will be conducted under direct and indirect supervision. Minutes Lecture: 0 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: Pre-requisites: RADT Clinical Radiologic Technology IV Co-requisites: RADT Radiologic Technology Review Credits: 9 READ 0090 LEARNING SUPPORT READING This course uses a modular approach to emphasize the strengthening of fundamental reading competencies, vocabulary, comprehension skills, critical reading skills, study skills, and content area reading skills. Students progress at their own pace to master each module. Minutes Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total:

374 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 RNSG 1300 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE I: FUNDAMENTALS OF NURSING Using classroom, laboratory, and clinical experiences, this course focuses on the implementation of the nursing process. Program content examines selected predictable stressors causing illness in adult clients in the context of the Orem s Theory and outcomes and competencies of associate degree graduates. Emphasis is on normal aging, as well as system instability in the perioperative clients and alterations in health patterns of clients experiencing common predictable respiratory, cardiovascular, endocrine, neurological, musculoskeletal, integumentary, and acid-base stressors. Students discuss the effects of chronic illness and strategies for coping with these illnesses. Students are taught an approach to nursing care which takes into consideration client centered health care, human diversity, safe and effective care environment and effective organizational transitions. Pharmacologic concepts include medication administration and the use of pharmacologic agents in the treatment of system instability. Student clinical assignments focus on adult clients experiencing selected predictable stressors causing illness. Lecture: 3000 Clinical: 6750 Total: 9750 Prerequisites: BIO 2113, BIOL 2114, BIOL 2117, COMP 1000, ENGL1101, ENGL 1102, MATH 1101, PSYC 1101, SPCH 1101, HUMN 1101 RNSG 1302 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE II: HEALTH ASSESSMENT This course is developed utilizing Orem s Self-Care theory as the conceptual basis for the nursing care of clients across the life span. The purpose of this course is to develop the skills necessary for the Associate of Science (AS) nursing student to complete a holistic assessment including physiological, spiritual, cultural, psychological, and developmental components. The course focuses on the role of the AS nurse as patient/family/community advocate; provider of safe, quality care; and educator. Emphasis is placed on the skills and clinical reasoning necessary to assess diverse clients/patients across the lifespan. Students are provided with a variety of learning experiences for initiating and implementing change in nursing approaches to client care. Students will integrate this knowledge in the provision of client centered care, human diversity, as well as safe and effective care environments for clients and their families in the practice setting. All clinical laboratories are under supervision of professional nurse faculty; clinical laboratory preceded and followed by group seminar. Theoretical concepts and clinical nursing skills contained in this course are consistent with the skills standards developed for the State of Georgia. Writing assignments, as appropriate to the discipline, are part of the course. Lecture: 750 Clinical: 0 Lab: 4500 Total: 5250 Prerequisites: BIO 2113, BIOL 2114, BIOL 2117, COMP 1000, ENGL 1101, MATH 1101, PSYC 1101, SPCH 1101, HUMN 1101 RNSG 1304 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE III: PHARMACOLOGY This course introduces foundational knowledge and skills needed to understand pharmacological principles in client care. Emphasis is placed on the theoretical aspects of pharmacology required by nurses to meet the educative-developmental and partial compensatory self-care needs of clients across the life span. Lecture: 2250 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Prerequisites: BIO 2113, BIOL 2114, BIOL 2117, COMP 1000, ENGL1101, ENGL 1102, MATH 1101,PSYC 1101, SPCH 1101, HUMN 1101 RNSG 1308 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE IV : MEDICAL-SURGICAL NURSING I This course focuses on the implementation of the nursing process with adult clients requiring partial compensatory and total compensatory nursing care as described by Orem. Program content examines selected predictable stressors causing illness in adult clients in the context of the Orem s Self-Care Theory. Normal aging is emphasized to assist the learner in recognizing deviations from normal. Systems instability in the perioperative clients and alterations in client health patterns related to common and predictable respiratory, cardiovascular, endocrine, neurological, musculoskeletal, integumentary, and acid-base stressors are discussed. The effects of chronic illness and strategies for coping with these illnesses are also presented. Students learn an approach to nursing care that incorporates a client-centered approach, respect for human diversity, and provision of a safe and effective care environment. Student Clinical assignments focus on the nursing care of adult clients with illnesses experiencing selected related to predictable stressors. Lecture: 3000 Clinical:9000 Total: Prerequisites: BIO 2113, BIOL 2113L, BIOL 2114, BIOL 2114L, BIOL 2117, BIOL 2117L, COMP 1000, ENGL 1102, MATH 1101, PSYC 1101, SPCH 1101,HUMN 1101 & RNSG 1300 RNSG 1312 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE V: PSYCHO-SOCIAL HEALTH AND ILLNESS 373

375 This course provides the learner with basic knowledge of the dynamics of human behavior and the commonly occurring functional and organic mental disorders. Psychosocial concepts introduced during the prior nursing course are expanded. The student s ability to apply the nursing process is further expanded in identification of the promotion, maintenance, and restoration of mental health for clients from diverse populations. The roles and functions of the nurse are expanded to include collaboration with interdisciplinary team members and community agencies when caring for clients with alterations in mental health. Emphasis is placed on behavioral and pharmacological interventions used with clients experiencing commonly occurring functional and organic mental disorders. A variety of clinical and simulated learning experiences are provided to reinforce theoretical content and enhance critical thinking. Lecture: 1500 Clinical: 4500 Total: 6000 Prerequisites: BIO 2113, BIOL 2113L, BIOL 2114, BIOL 2114L, BIOL 2117, BIOL 2117L, COMP 1000, ENGL 1102, MATH 1101, PSYC 1101, SPCH 1101,HUMN 1101 & RNSG 1304 RNSG 2300 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE VI THE CHILDBEARING FAMILY This course is based on Orem s Self-Care theory as applied to the nursing care of the childbearing family and newborn infant. Emphasis is placed on the theory and clinical practice experiences required to meet the educative-developmental and partial compensatory self-care needs of women, newborn infants, and families. Theory addresses normal and abnormal physiological and psychosocial processes and the influence of cultural practices related to pregnancy, fetal development, labor & birth, postpartum, newborn transition to extrauterine environment and the family system and the care required to assure positive client outcomes. Students have opportunities to apply the nursing process with antepartum, intrapartum, postpartum, and newborn clients and their families in a variety of practice settings. Lecture: 1500 Clinical: 4500 Total: 6000 Prerequisites: BIO 2113, BIOL 2114, BIOL 2117, COMP 1000, ENGL 1101, ENGL 1102, MATH 1101, PSYC 1101, SPCH 1101, HUMN 1101, RNSG 1304, RNSG 1300, RNSG 1302, RNSG RNSG 2302 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE VII: THE CHILDREARING FAMILY Professional Practice V is developed utilizing Orem s Self-Care theory as the conceptual basis for the nursing care of the childrearing family. Emphasis is placed on the theory and clinical experience required to meet the educative-developmental, partial compensatory and total compensatory self-care needs of the child and family. Consideration is given to various stages of growth and development across the life cycle where clients and families are adapting to stressors. Students are provided with a variety of learning experiences for initiating and implementing change in nursing approaches to client care. Students will integrate this knowledge in the provision of client centered care, human diversity, as well as safe and effective care environments for clients and their families in the pediatric practice setting. All clinical laboratories are under supervision of professional nurse faculty; clinical laboratory preceded and followed by group seminar. Theoretical concepts and clinical nursing skills contained in this course are consistent with the skills standards developed for the State of Georgia. Writing assignments, as appropriate to the discipline, are part of the course. Lecture: 1500 Clinical: 4500 Total: 6000 Prerequisites: BIO 2113, BIOL 2114, BIOL 2117, COMP 1000, ENGL 1101, ENGL 1102, MATH 1101, PSYC 1101, SPCH 1101, HUMN 1101, RNSG 1304, RNSG 1300, RNSG 1302 RNSG RNSG 2306 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE VIII: MEDICAL-SURGICAL NURSING II This course uses the Orem s Self-Care theory and roles of the associate degree nurse to guide students implementation of the nursing process with adult clients experiencing complex predictable stressors. The course emphasizes partial and total compensatory care of adult clients with alterations in health status arising from the pathophysiological changes in respiratory, cardiovascular, burns, neurologic, sensory, and renal stressors. Students integrate this knowledge in the provision of client centered health care, human diversity, safe and effective care environment for clients in the critical care practice setting with assigned faculty. Lecture: 3000 Clinical: 6750 Total: 9750 Prerequisites: BIO 2113, BIOL 2114, BIOL 2117, COMP 1000, ENGL 1101, ENGL 1102, MATH 1101, PSYC 1101, SPCH 1101, HUMN 1101, RNSG 1304, RNSG 1300, RNSG 1302, RNSG 2300 RNSG 2308 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE XI: TRANSITION, LEADERSHIP AND MANAGEMENT IN NURSING Professional Practice XI is developed utilizing Orem s Self-Care theory as the conceptual basis for the nursing care of the adult client. This course is a continuation of role development as provider of care, manager of care and advocate with utilization/implementation of the nursing process in the care of various adult clients. Emphasis is placed on the theory and clinical experience required to meet the educative-developmental and partial compensatory self-care needs of the client. Consideration is given to various stages of growth and development across the life cycle where clients and families are adapting to stressors. Students are provided with a variety of learning experiences for initiating and implementing change in nursing approaches to client care. All clinical laboratories are under supervision of professional nurse faculty; clinical laboratory preceded and followed by group seminar. Lecture: 1500 Clinical: 6750 Total:

376 Prerequisites: BIO 2113, BIOL 2114, BIOL 2117, COMP 1000, ENGL 1101, ENGL 1102, MATH 1101, PSYC 1101, SPCH SCMA 1003 INTRODUCTION TO TRANSPORTATION AND LOGISTICS MANAGEMENT Businesses today cannot be competitive without a good transportation and logistics network. This course introduces the five basic forms of transportation and provides an understanding of the economic fundamentals underlying each mode. Students then discuss ways in which today's supply chain manager can use these transportation modes to achieve efficiencies and cost effectiveness necessary for a company to survive in today's global markets. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: MKTG 1100 None Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 SCMA 1007 BASICS OF NEGOTIATIONS Negotiation is a process in which two or more parties with common and conflicting interests come together to put forth and discuss explicit proposals for the purpose of reaching agreement. This course will explore the concept of negotiation in both the national and international environments. Attention will be paid to topics such as strategies and tactics, non- verbal communication, and ethical and cultural aspects. Other forms of dispute resolution used in business, such as mediation and arbitration will also be addressed, and the design of conflict management programs will be examined. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: None Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 SCMA 2103 SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT CONCEPTS Logistics and Supply Chain Management today represents a great challenge as well as a tremendous opportunity for most firms. This course will view the supply chain from the point of view of a front-line supervisor. Logistics and Supply Chain Management is all about managing hand-offs in a supply chain, hand-offs of either information or product. Phrases like logistics management, supply chain management and demand chain management will be used interchangeably in order to provide an understanding on how logistical decisions impact the performance of the firm as well as the entire supply chain. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: SCMA 1003 Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 SCMA 2105 PROCUREMENT METHODOLOGIES This course teaches an overview of the procurement function in a supply chain and a corporation. It covers the major elements of the procurement process and operation including sourcing principles, procurement policies, purchasing processes and systems, and procurement's value and role in the corporation. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: SCMA 2103 Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 SCMA 2106 KEY ISSUES IN THE GLOBAL INTEGRATED SUPPLY CHAIN This course examines the issues and challenges a corporation faces in designing and implementing a globally integrated supply chain. Topics include social responsibility in the supply chain, geo-political impacts, outsourcing and off shoring of supply chain functions, and how companies manage risk in their supply chains. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: SCMA 2105 Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 SCMA 2108 GLOBAL SOURCING This course provides an overview of how a company decides who to purchase goods and services from and the techniques they use to do so. It examines supplier selection decisions, sourcing techniques, competitive bid processes, competitive evaluation, and common business controls when it comes to working with suppliers. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: SCMA 2105 Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 SOCI 1101 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY 375

377 Explores the sociological analysis of society, its culture, and structure. Sociology is presented as a science with emphasis placed on its methodology and theoretical foundations. Topics include basic sociological concepts, socialization, social interaction and culture, social groups and institutions, deviance and social control, social stratification, social change, and marriage and family. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: ENGL 0098, ENGL 0090, or Appropriate Placement Test Score and READ 0098, READ 0090 or Appropriate Placement Test Score. Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 SPCH 1101 PUBLIC SPEAKING Introduces the student to the fundamentals of oral communication. Topics include selection and organization of materials, preparation and delivery of individual and group presentations, analysis of ideas presented by others, and professionalism. Lecture: 2250 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: ENGL 0098, ENGL 0090, or Appropriate Placement Test Score and READ 0098, READ 0090 or Appropriate Placement Test Score. Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 SURG 1010 INTRODUCTION TO SURGICAL TECHNOLOGY Provides an overview of the surgical technology profession and develops the fundamental concepts and principles necessary to successfully participate on a surgical team. Topics include: orientation to surgical technology; biomedical principles; asepsis and the surgical environment; basic instrumentation and equipment; principles of the sterilization process; application of sterilization principles; and minimally invasive surgery. (There are surgical procedures that are similar as far as procedural steps, instrumentation, supplies, patient position, etc. This is referred to as the "Co-Related Procedures Concept." The purpose of using the Co-Related Procedures Concept is to provide the instructor additional time to teach surgical procedures as well as avoid repetition). Lecture: 3000 Lab 2: 3000 Lab 3: 4500 Practicum/Internship: 4500 Clinical: 0 Total: Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 8 SURG 1020 PRINCIPLES OF SURGICAL TECHNOLOGY Provides continued study of surgical team participation by wound management and technological sciences for the operating room. Topics include: biophysical diversities and needs; pre-operative routine; intra-operative routine; wound management; post-operative patient care; and outpatient surgical procedures. (There are surgical procedures that are similar as far as procedural steps, instrumentation, supplies, patient position, etc. This is referred to as the "Co-Related Procedures Concept." The purpose of using the Co-Related Procedures Concept is to provide the instructor additional time to teach surgical procedures as well as avoid repetition). Lecture: 3750 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 4500 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 8250 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 7 SURG 1100 SURGICAL PHARMACOLGY Introduces the concepts of pharmacology and anesthesia. Topics include: terminology; medication measurement; medications used in surgery; care and handling of medications and solutions; and anesthesia. Lecture: 750 Lab 2: 1500 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 2250 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 2 SURG 1080 SURGICAL MICROBIOLOGY Introduces the fundamentals of surgical microbiology. Topics include: cell structure; introduction to microbiology; microorganisms; process of infection; hypersensitivity; fluid movement concepts; and immunologic defense mechanisms. Lecture: 1500 Lab 2:0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 1500 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 2 SURG2110 SURGICAL TECHNOLOGY CLINICAL I Orients students to the clinical environment and provides experience with basic skills necessary to the surgical technologist. Topics include, but are not limited to: scrubbing, gowning, gloving, and draping; assistance with patient care; processing of instruments and supplies; maintenance of a sterile field; and environmental sanitation. In addition, introduces the development of surgical team participation through clinical experience. Emphasis is placed on observation and/or participation in routine procedures for core and specialty surgery. Topics include: general surgery (to include gastrointestinal), cardiothoracic surgery, otorhinolaryngologic surgery (ENT), ophthalmic surgery (Eye), genitourinary surgery, neurological surgery, obstetrical and gynecological surgery, oral and maxillofacial surgery, orthopedic surgery, peripheral vascular surgery, plastic and reconstructive surgery, and procurement/transplant 376

378 surgery. The total number of cases the student must complete is 120. Students are required to complete 30 cases in the General Surgery specialty. Twenty of the cases must be in the First Scrub Role. Students are required to complete 90 cases in various surgical specialties. Sixty of the cases must be in the First Scrub Role and evenly distributed between a minimum of 5 surgical specialties. However, 15 is the maximum number of cases that can be counted in any one surgical specialty. Diagnostic endoscopy cases and vaginal delivery cases are not mandatory, but up to 10 diagnostic endoscopic cases and 5 vaginal delivery cases can be counted toward the maximum number of Second Scrub Role cases. Cases that are in the Observation role must be documented but do not count towards the minimum of 120 total cases. Lecture: 0 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 6750 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 6750 Pre-requisites: Program Admission Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 SURG 2120 SURGICAL TECHNOLOGY CLINICAL II Orients students to the clinical environment and provides experience with basic skills necessary to the surgical technologist. Topics include, but are not limited to: scrubbing, gowning, gloving, and draping; assistance with patient care; processing of instruments and supplies; maintenance of a sterile field; and environmental sanitation. In addition, introduces the development of surgical team participation through clinical experience. Emphasis is placed on observation and/or participation in routine procedures for core and specialty surgery. Topics include: general surgery (to include gastrointestinal), cardiothoracic surgery, otorhinolaryngologic surgery (ENT), ophthalmic surgery (Eye), genitourinary surgery, neurological surgery, obstetrical and gynecological surgery, oral and maxillofacial surgery, orthopedic surgery, peripheral vascular surgery, plastic and reconstructive surgery, and procurement/transplant surgery. The total number of cases the student must complete is 120. Students are required to complete 30 cases in the General Surgery specialty. Twenty of the cases must be in the First Scrub Role. Students are required to complete 90 cases in various surgical specialties. Sixty of the cases must be in the First Scrub Role and evenly distributed between a minimum of 5 surgical specialties. However, 15 is the maximum number of cases that can be counted in any one surgical specialty. Diagnostic endoscopy cases and vaginal delivery cases are not mandatory, but up to 10 diagnostic endoscopic cases and 5 vaginal delivery cases can be counted toward the maximum number of Second Scrub Role cases. Cases that are in the Observation role must be documented but do not count towards the minimum of 120 total cases. Lecture: 0 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 6750 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 6750 Pre-requisites: SURG 2110 Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 SURG 2030 SURGICAL PROCEDURES I Introduces the core general procedures, including the following: incisions; wound closure; operative pathology; and common complications as applied to general and specialty surgery. Topics include: introduction to surgical procedures; general surgery and special techniques; obstetrical and gynecological surgery; gastrointestinal surgery; genitourinary surgery; otorhinolaryngologic surgery; and orthopedic surgery. (There are surgical procedures that are similar as far as procedural steps, instrumentation, supplies, patient position, etc. This is referred to as the "Co-Related Procedures Concept." The purpose of using the Co-Related Procedures Concept is to provide the instructor additional time to teach surgical procedures as well as avoid repetition). Lecture: 3000 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3000 Pre-requisites: SURG 1010, SURG 1020 Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 SURG 2040 SURGICAL PROCEDURES II Continues development of student knowledge and skills applicable to specialty surgery areas. Topics include: ophthalmic surgery; thoracic surgery; vascular surgery; cardiovascular surgery; neurosurgery; and plastic and reconstructive surgery. (There are surgical procedures that are similar as far as procedural steps, instrumentation, supplies, patient position, etc. This is referred to as the "Co- Related Procedures Concept." The purpose of using the Co- Related Procedures Concept is to provide the instructor additional time to teach surgical procedures as well as avoid repetition). Lecture: 3000 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 0 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 3000 Pre-requisites: SURG 2030 Co-requisites: None Credits: 4 SURG 2130 SURGICAL TECHNOLOGY CLINICAL III Orients students to the clinical environment and provides experience with basic skills necessary to the surgical technologist. Topics include, but are not limited to: scrubbing, gowning, gloving, and draping; assistance with patient care; processing of instruments and supplies; maintenance of a sterile field; and environmental sanitation. In addition, introduces the development of surgical team participation through clinical experience. Emphasis is placed on observation and/or participation in routine procedures for core and specialty surgery. Topics include: general surgery (to include gastrointestinal), cardiothoracic surgery, otorhinolaryngologic surgery (ENT), ophthalmic surgery (Eye), genitourinary surgery, neurological surgery, obstetrical and gynecological surgery, oral and maxillofacial surgery, orthopedic surgery, peripheral vascular surgery, plastic and reconstructive surgery, and procurement/transplant 377

379 surgery. The total number of cases the student must complete is 120. Students are required to complete 30 cases in the General Surgery specialty. Twenty of the cases must be in the First Scrub Role. Students are required to complete 90 cases in various surgical specialties. Sixty of the cases must be in the First Scrub Role and evenly distributed between a minimum of 5 surgical specialties. However, 15 is the maximum number of cases that can be counted in any one surgical specialty. Diagnostic endoscopy cases and vaginal delivery cases are not mandatory, but up to 10 diagnostic endoscopic cases and 5 vaginal delivery cases can be counted toward the maximum number of Second Scrub Role cases. Cases that are in the Observation role must be documented but do not count towards the minimum of 120 total cases. Orients students to the clinical environment and provides experience with basic skills necessary to the surgical technologist. Topics include: scrubbing, gowning, gloving, and draping; assistance with patient care; processing of instruments and supplies; maintenance of a sterile field; and environmental sanitation. In addition, introduces the development of surgical team participation through clinical experience. Emphasis is placed on observation/participation in routine procedures and procedures for core and specialty surgery. Topics include: general surgery, gastrointestinal surgery, obstetrical and gynecological surgery, genitourinary surgery, otorhinolaryngologic surgery, plastic and reconstructive surgery, orthopedic surgery, ophthalmic surgery, oral and maxillofacial surgery, cardiothoracic surgery, peripheral vascular surgery, and neurosurgical procedures. Utilization of minutes allotted to specialty areas are at the discretion of the program. Lecture: 0 Lab 2: 0 Lab 3: 6750 Practicum/Internship: 0 Clinical: 0 Total: 6750 Pre-requisites: SURG 2120 Co-requisites: None Credits: 3 SURG 2140 SURGICAL TECHNOLOGY CLINICAL IV Orients students to the clinical environment and provides experience with basic skills necessary to the surgical technologist. Topics include, but are not limited to: scrubbing, gowning, gloving, and draping; assistance with patient care; processing of instruments and supplies; maintenance of a sterile field; and environmental sanitation. In addition, introduces the development of surgical team participation through clinical experience. Emphasis is placed on observation and/or participation in routine procedures for core and specialty