IDENTIFICATION OF ORGANISMS

Save this PDF as:
 WORD  PNG  TXT  JPG

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "IDENTIFICATION OF ORGANISMS"

Transcription

1 reflect Take a look at the pictures on the right. Think about what the two organisms have in common. They both need food and water to survive. They both grow and reproduce. They both have similar body organs such as lungs and a heart. Are these similarities enough to classify the organisms into the same group? If you answered yes, you are correct! Both organisms are classifi ed as animals. If you answered no, you are also correct! The organisms have differences that scientists use to further classify these animals into smaller, different groups. The elephant is classifi ed as a mammal, and the lizard is classified as a reptile. What process do scientists use to classify all forms of life? Organizing Life Forms Scientists organize living things using taxonomy, a systematic approach to categorizing organisms into a hierarchy. Taxonomy creates groups based on similarities and differences between organisms. All living things share the trait of life. The fi rst major division among living things is the Domain, which is the broadest classification group. There are three Domains: Bacteria, Archaea, and Eukarya. Organisms within the same Domain have some shared traits, or characteristics. For example, all organisms in Domains Bacteria and Archaea are prokaryotes. All organisms in Domain Eukarya are eukaryotes. Many organisms in Domain Archaea live in extreme environments (high heat, salt, acid, etc.), such as hot springs, while organisms in Domain Bacteria are found all over Earth. prokaryote: an organism lacking a nucleus eukaryote: an organism that contains genetic material within a nucleus Within each Domain, there are six smaller groups called Kingdoms. The Domain Bacteria has only one kingdom, the Kingdom Bacteria. This is also true for the Domain Archaea. Its kingdom is called Kingdom Archaea. The Domain Eukarya has four kingdoms: Protista, Plantae, Fungi, and Animalia. 1

2 Kingdom Protista includes eukaryotic organisms that are primarily unicellular ( one-celled ) and simple, multicellular ( many-celled ) organisms such as algae. Eukaryotes that get their nutrients by decomposing organic matter, such as mushrooms, are in the Kingdom Fungi. Multicellular eukaryotes that make their own food (autotrophs) are in the Kingdom Plantae. This kingdom includes mosses, trees, and flowering plants. The Kingdom Animalia includes multicellular, heterotrophic eukaryotes. Insects, reptiles, birds, and mammals are in Kingdom Animalia. heterotrophic: a characteristic of an organism; it cannot make its own food and feeds on other organisms These four kingdoms are broken down into smaller and smaller classification groups. The entire system for organizing living things from biggest to smallest groups is: Domain, Kingdom, Phylum, Class, Order, Family, Genus, and Species. The smaller the group, the more characteristics the organisms in that group have in common. For example, two organisms that belong to the same genus have more in common than two organisms that belong to the same family, but not the same genus. what do you think? Look at the chart below. It lists the taxonomic groups for three different organisms, beginning with Order. Which two organisms are most similar to one another? Explain your reasoning. Common Name Order Family Genus Species Human Primate Hominidae Homo sapiens Eastern gorilla Primate Hominidae Gorilla beringei Ring-tailed lemur Primate Lemuridae Lemur catta Dichotomous Keys Identifying an organism s taxonomic group or common name sometimes requires a dichotomous key. A dichotomous key is a key used to sort organisms. The key is based on questions about the traits and structures of the organisms. The word dichotomous means cut in two. When using a dichotomous key to identify an organism, cut in two means that a choice must be made about a characteristic at each two-fork branch in the key. 2

3 Basically you have two options, and you have to decide one way or another. The characteristics get more specific at each branch of the key. Dichotomous keys may be either written, as shown below on the left, or graphic, as shown on the right. Let s take a closer look at the graphic dichotomous key. It shows the method for identifying four different organisms by common name: duck, hen, lizard, and snake. The fi rst step of the key, at the top, refers to the question, Does the organism have feathers? If the answer is yes, move to the left side of the key; if the answer is no, move to the right side of the key. Following the left side of the key, the next branch refers to the question, Does the organism with feathers swim? If the answer is yes, the organism is a duck. If the answer is no, the organism is a hen. Following the right side of the key, the next branch refers to the question, Does the organism without feathers have legs? If the answer is yes, the organism is a lizard. If the answer is no, the organism is a snake. Any type of dichotomous key must be detailed enough in order for the user to be able to observe an organism and determine which branch choice is the best match to the organism. The dichotomous keys shown above are very basic. However, some dichotomous keys are quite complex and contain numerous questions to help identify an organism s binomial classifi cation. Binomial classification is the system of naming an organism (starting with its kingdom) by its genus and species. So many different species exist within a particular kingdom or phylum. Therefore, the best dichotomous keys focus on a specifi c bioregion. For example, a dichotomous key may be developed only for the types of organisms that live in oceans. You can see an example of binomial classifi cation for a single species on the next page. 3

4 The binomial classification of the animal shown here is Panthera pardus. Panthera is the genus name, and pardus is the species name. look out! Organisms have two main types of physical traits: those that are inherited and those that are not inherited. An inherited trait is a trait that is passed from a parent to its offspring during reproduction. Eye color and leaf shape are examples of inherited traits. On the other hand, a torn leaf and a scar from an injury are not inherited traits. They were not passed from a parent to offspring. It is important to only use inherited traits when using a dichotomous key to identify an organism. Many groups of organisms demonstrate unique variations and inherited traits, which have gradually changed over time as they were passed from one generation to the next. Therefore, it is also important to remember that dichotomous keys must refl ect these variations. For example, a type of mouse called a deer mouse typically has dark brown fur. physical trait: typically an external characteristic of an organism that can be observed The tear on the left side of this leaf is NOT an inherited trait. The general leaf shape and vein pattern are inherited traits. 4

5 However, in an area within the state of Nebraska, deer mouse have evolved to have a lighter, sand-colored fur. The lighter coloration helps the mice blend in with the sandy environment so they can hide from predators. This trait for light coloration has been passed from parents to offspring over many years and eventually led to an entire population of light-colored mice. Career Corner: Tropical Botanist A botanist is a scientist who studies plants. Some botanists work in education as professors or as museum instructors. Many botanists work in the field conducting research about different plants and how the plants play a role in their environment. These botanists work to protect wildlife and educate the public about the importance of conserving Earth s diverse plant-life. Tropical botanists focus on plants that grow in tropical regions, such as Costa Rica. They collect plants and use dichotomous keys to identify them. These areas Tropical areas are rich with plant-life! are so rich and diverse with plant-life that many botanists believe there are still many plant species that have yet to be discovered. Tropical botanists work to discover new plant species. With help from other scientists, new species are classified and given a species name. The new discovery is then published in various scientific journals. This is one of the reasons that dichotomous keys are always changing! 5

6 What do you know? Study the pictures of the insects at the right. Then use the dichotomous key below to identify the binomial classification of each insect. Write your answers on the line next to each insect. Ant: Butterfl y: 6

7 connecting with your child IDENTIFICATION OF ORGANISMS Creating a Dichotomous Key for Identifying Plants To help your child learn more about the identifi cation of organisms, work together to create a dichotomous key that can be used to identify various plants. For this activity, search for images of different plants on the Internet or in old magazines. Try to fi nd at least six different plants with varying characteristics (such as a pine tree, a palm tree, a strawberry plant, etc.), and print out pictures of each plant. If you are not able to print the images, have your child draw sketches of each plant. Write down at least fi ve distinguishing characteristics for each plant. Characteristics to consider include: leaf shape, leaf vein pattern, presence or absence of a trunk, habitat (land or water; jungle or desert; etc.), and any other defi ning characteristics you would use when describing the plant to another person. If possible, write down the binomial classifi cation (genus and species name) of each plant as well. If you are not able to find the binomial classification, write down the common name of each plant. Next, create a list of yes-no questions that address the characteristics identified in at least one plant. Using index cards or construction paper cut into squares, write the name (genus and species or common name) and a description of a single species on each card. Next, write the yes-no questions on another set of index cards, one question per card. It might be useful to use a different color pen for the questions. Using the yes-no questions as a guide, start sorting the piles into a branching tree. Be sure that each branch only has two options for answers. You may need to rearrange your questions until you arrive at a dichotomous key in which the questions become increasingly restrictive and the plants make up the bottom row. Once you are satisfied with your key, draw it on a piece of paper. As you perform this activity, you may wish to discuss the following questions with your child: Why are only inherited traits used to classify the plants? Look at the final dichotomous key. Did you end up grouping any plants together? If so, do these plants have any differences? How are dichotomous keys helpful to scientists when they discover what they think might be a new species? 7

4. Why are common names not good to use when classifying organisms? Give an example.

4. Why are common names not good to use when classifying organisms? Give an example. 1. Define taxonomy. Classification of organisms 2. Who was first to classify organisms? Aristotle 3. Explain Aristotle s taxonomy of organisms. Patterns of nature: looked like 4. Why are common names not

More information

Break down material outside their body and then absorb the nutrients. Most are single-celled organisms Usually green. Do not have nuclei

Break down material outside their body and then absorb the nutrients. Most are single-celled organisms Usually green. Do not have nuclei Name Date Class CHAPTER 9 REINFORCEMENT WORKSHEET Keys to the Kingdom Complete this worksheet after you have finished reading Chapter 9, Section 2. Patty dropped her notes while she was studying the six

More information

Name: Class: Date: Multiple Choice Identify the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question.

Name: Class: Date: Multiple Choice Identify the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question. Name: Class: Date: Chapter 17 Practice Multiple Choice Identify the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question. 1. The correct order for the levels of Linnaeus's classification system,

More information

3.1 Types of Living Things

3.1 Types of Living Things CHAPTER 3 CLASSIFYING LIVING THINGS 3.1 Types of Living Things Look around you. What types of living things do you see? You probably see plants and animals. What would you see if you could shrink down

More information

Classification Why Things are Grouped classify Methods of Classification

Classification Why Things are Grouped classify Methods of Classification Classification What features do biologists use to group living things? You know that most plants are green and do not more around. You also know that most animals are not green and do move around. The

More information

Name Class Date. binomial nomenclature. MAIN IDEA: Linnaeus developed the scientific naming system still used today.

Name Class Date. binomial nomenclature. MAIN IDEA: Linnaeus developed the scientific naming system still used today. Section 1: The Linnaean System of Classification 17.1 Reading Guide KEY CONCEPT Organisms can be classified based on physical similarities. VOCABULARY taxonomy taxon binomial nomenclature genus MAIN IDEA:

More information

KEY CONCEPT Organisms can be classified based on physical similarities. binomial nomenclature

KEY CONCEPT Organisms can be classified based on physical similarities. binomial nomenclature Section 17.1: The Linnaean System of Classification Unit 9 Study Guide KEY CONCEPT Organisms can be classified based on physical similarities. VOCABULARY taxonomy taxon binomial nomenclature genus MAIN

More information

How Scientists Classify Living Things. on Earth. Fill the board or a large sheet of paper with the names of organisms.

How Scientists Classify Living Things. on Earth. Fill the board or a large sheet of paper with the names of organisms. How Scientists Classify Living Things 2.4 TRY THIS: CLASSIFY LIVING THINGS Skills Focus: classifying, communicating How would you classify living things? 1. As a class, brainstorm all the different types

More information

Matter and Energy in Ecosystems

Matter and Energy in Ecosystems Matter and Energy in Ecosystems The interactions that take place among biotic and abiotic factors lead to transfers of energy and matter. Every species has a particular role, or niche, in an ecosystem.

More information

ENVIRONMENTAL CHANGES

ENVIRONMENTAL CHANGES reflect How do you respond to environmental changes? Maybe you wear different types of clothes in different seasons. Maybe you only ride your bike during certain times of the year. What if you moved to

More information

Practice Questions 1: Evolution

Practice Questions 1: Evolution Practice Questions 1: Evolution 1. Which concept is best illustrated in the flowchart below? A. natural selection B. genetic manipulation C. dynamic equilibrium D. material cycles 2. The diagram below

More information

Georgia Performance Standards Framework for Science GRADE 7 DICHOTOMOUS KEYS AND CLASSIFICATION

Georgia Performance Standards Framework for Science GRADE 7 DICHOTOMOUS KEYS AND CLASSIFICATION The following instructional plan is part of a GaDOE collection of Unit Frameworks, Performance Tasks, examples of Student Work, and Teacher Commentary. Many more GaDOE approved instructional plans are

More information

Question Bank Five Kingdom Classification

Question Bank Five Kingdom Classification Question Bank Five Kingdom Classification 1. Who proposed Five Kingdom Classification? Give the bases of classification. Ans. Whittaker in 1969 proposed five kingdom classification based on :- (i) Cell

More information

Lesson Title: Constructing a Dichotomous Key and Exploring Its Relationship to Evolutionary Patterns

Lesson Title: Constructing a Dichotomous Key and Exploring Its Relationship to Evolutionary Patterns Lesson Title: Constructing a Dichotomous Key and Exploring Its Relationship to Evolutionary Patterns NSF GK-12 Fellow: Tommy Detmer Grade Level: 4 th and 5 th grade Type of Lesson: STEM Objectives: The

More information

Introduction to Animals

Introduction to Animals Introduction to Animals Unity and Diversity of Life Q: What characteristics and traits define animals? 25.1 What is an animal? WHAT I KNOW SAMPLE ANSWER: Animals are different from other living things

More information

Unit: Plants & Animals (Grade 2)

Unit: Plants & Animals (Grade 2) Unit: Plants & Animals (Grade 2) Content Area: Science Course(s): Science Time Period: 8 weeks Length: Weeks Status: Published Unit Overview Students will determine the life cycles of plants and animals

More information

Ecology 1 Star. 1. Missing from the diagram of this ecosystem are the

Ecology 1 Star. 1. Missing from the diagram of this ecosystem are the Name: ate: 1. Missing from the diagram of this ecosystem are the 5. ase your answer(s) to the following question(s) on the diagram below and on your knowledge of biology.. biotic factors and decomposers.

More information

Activity Sheet A - Getting Sorted (Cont) Diet (in the wild) Herbivore Carnivore Omnivore Habitat Terrestrial/ground dwelling Arboreal/tree living Aqua

Activity Sheet A - Getting Sorted (Cont) Diet (in the wild) Herbivore Carnivore Omnivore Habitat Terrestrial/ground dwelling Arboreal/tree living Aqua Activity Sheet A - Getting Sorted Duration: 45 minutes Locate the animals listed below and find out their scientific name. Remember that the scientific name is usually written in italics or is underlined.

More information

Dichotomous Keys. Lab Exercise. Contents. Objectives. Introduction

Dichotomous Keys. Lab Exercise. Contents. Objectives. Introduction Lab Exercise Dichotomous Keys Contents Objectives 1 Introduction 1 Activity.1 Key to the Animal Kingdom 4 Activity.2 Creating a Key 6 Resutls Section 7 Objectives - Understand the concept of classification

More information

Biological Science, 5e (Freeman) Chapter 1 Biology and the Tree of Life

Biological Science, 5e (Freeman) Chapter 1 Biology and the Tree of Life Biological Science, 5e (Freeman) Chapter 1 Biology and the Tree of Life 1) Pasteur s experiments proved that A) Cells cannot survive in swan necked flasks B) In order to grow, cells need to be supplied

More information

Title: Create A New Animal. Grade Level: 3 rd -5 th. Subject: Biology. Time: 60-90 minutes

Title: Create A New Animal. Grade Level: 3 rd -5 th. Subject: Biology. Time: 60-90 minutes Title: Create A New Animal Grade Level: 3 rd -5 th Subject: Biology Time: 60-90 minutes Objective: Students will better understand physical adaptations of certain animals, and how those adaptations increase

More information

Classification and Evolution

Classification and Evolution Classification and Evolution Starter: How many different ways could I split these objects into 2 groups? Classification All living things can also be grouped how do we decide which groups to put them into?

More information

Station #1: Taxonomy

Station #1: Taxonomy Station #1: Taxonomy Examine the table showing the classification of four organisms. The answer the questions. Taxon Green Frog Mountain Lion Domestic Dog Human Kingdom Phylum Class Order Family Genus

More information

D.U.C. Assist. Lec. Faculty of Dentistry Medical Biology Ihsan Dhari. Kingdoms of life

D.U.C. Assist. Lec. Faculty of Dentistry Medical Biology Ihsan Dhari. Kingdoms of life Kingdoms of life The earliest classification system recognized only two kingdoms : plants and animals but the use of microscope led to discovery of microorganisms, so the two kingdoms system was no longer

More information

Principles of Ecology

Principles of Ecology 2 Principles of Ecology section 1 Organisms and Their Relationships Before You Read On the lines below, list the organisms that you have encountered today. You share the same environment with these organisms.

More information

The Art of the Tree of Life. Catherine Ibes & Priscilla Spears March 2012

The Art of the Tree of Life. Catherine Ibes & Priscilla Spears March 2012 The Art of the Tree of Life Catherine Ibes & Priscilla Spears March 2012 from so simple a beginning endless forms most beautiful and most wonderful have been, and are being, evolved. Charles Darwin, The

More information

7.1 What Are Cells? You are made of cells. A cell is the basic unit of structure and function in a living thing. CHAPTER 7

7.1 What Are Cells? You are made of cells. A cell is the basic unit of structure and function in a living thing. CHAPTER 7 CELL STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION 7.1 What Are Cells? Look closely at the skin on your arm. Can you see that it is made of cells? Of course not! Your skin cells are much too small to see with your eyes. Now

More information

4THE UNIVERSITY OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK

4THE UNIVERSITY OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 4THE UNIVERSITY OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK GRADE 4 ELEMENTARY-LEVEL SCIENCE TEST WRITTEN TEST JUNE 6, 2011 Student Name School Name Print your name and the name of your school on the lines above. The test

More information

FOOD CHAINS, FOOD WEBS AND ECOLOGICAL PYRAMIDS

FOOD CHAINS, FOOD WEBS AND ECOLOGICAL PYRAMIDS FOOD CHAINS, FOOD WEBS AND ECOLOGICAL PYRAMIDS SECTION 1 In an ecosystem, plants capture the sun's energy and use it to convert inorganic compounds into energy-rich organic compounds. This process of using

More information

Biological Classification Worksheet

Biological Classification Worksheet Name Score Five-Kingdom System Biological Classification Worksheet Animal Kingdom Invertebrates (without backbones) and vertebrates (with backbones), multicellular, no cell walls, obtain energy through

More information

TEACHER BACKGROUND INFORMATION LIVING ORGANISMS

TEACHER BACKGROUND INFORMATION LIVING ORGANISMS TEACHER BACKGROUND INFORMATION LIVING ORGANISMS CHAPTER S BIG IDEAS All living organisms have common characteristics: o Cellular organization o Response to environment o Reproduction and heredity o Growth

More information

ECOSYSTEM RESPONSES. reflect

ECOSYSTEM RESPONSES. reflect reflect There is a saying, No man is an island, which means that people need one another in order to survive. Everyone on Earth is interconnected in some way. This is not only true of human beings, but

More information

Lab 2/Phylogenetics/September 16, 2002 1 PHYLOGENETICS

Lab 2/Phylogenetics/September 16, 2002 1 PHYLOGENETICS Lab 2/Phylogenetics/September 16, 2002 1 Read: Tudge Chapter 2 PHYLOGENETICS Objective of the Lab: To understand how DNA and protein sequence information can be used to make comparisons and assess evolutionary

More information

5.1 Ecosystems, Energy, and Nutrients

5.1 Ecosystems, Energy, and Nutrients CHAPTER 5 ECOSYSTEMS 5.1 Ecosystems, Energy, and Nutrients Did anyone ever ask you the question: Where do you get your energy? Energy enters our world from the Sun but how does the Sun s energy become

More information

Materials and Resources:

Materials and Resources: Keywords: class classification family genus invertebrates kingdom order phylum species 1. Engage: Introduction: Students investigate different questioning techniques through a classification game. Materials

More information

Assign: Unit 1: Preparation Activity page 4-7. Chapter 1: Classifying Life s Diversity page 8

Assign: Unit 1: Preparation Activity page 4-7. Chapter 1: Classifying Life s Diversity page 8 Assign: Unit 1: Preparation Activity page 4-7 Chapter 1: Classifying Life s Diversity page 8 1.1: Identifying, Naming, and Classifying Species page 10 Key Terms: species, morphology, phylogeny, taxonomy,

More information

Animal Adaptations Investigation (K-3)

Animal Adaptations Investigation (K-3) Animal Adaptations Investigation (K-3) At a glance Students explore the Zoo in search of animals that fit certain categories and discover their adaptations. Time requirement One Zoo visit of at least 60

More information

Identifying Vertebrates Using Classification Keys

Identifying Vertebrates Using Classification Keys Name Class Date Chapter 18 Classification Identifying Vertebrates Using Classification Keys Introduction Organisms such as vertebrates (animals with backbones) are classified into groups according to certain

More information

2. Name of Inquiry: Where do I belong? : An Introduction to the Use of Dichotomous Keys (Part 1)

2. Name of Inquiry: Where do I belong? : An Introduction to the Use of Dichotomous Keys (Part 1) ECOS Inquiry 1. Contributor s Name: Sarah Bisbing 2. Name of Inquiry: Where do I belong? : An Introduction to the Use of Dichotomous Keys (Part 1) 3. Goals and Objectives: a. Inquiry Questions: Why do

More information

Animal Classification K-4

Animal Classification K-4 Animal Classification K-4 Introduction: The theme of this self-guided experience is classification of animals. Students will learn to use body coverings as an aid to classification. As the group tours

More information

Name Class Date. Adapting to the Environment Adaptations and Survival

Name Class Date. Adapting to the Environment Adaptations and Survival CHAPTER 3 4 SECTIN Adapting to the Environment Adaptations and Survival EFRE YU READ After you read this section, you should be able to answer these questions: What adaptations help animals survive? What

More information

Silent, Nighttime Hunters By Guy Belleranti

Silent, Nighttime Hunters By Guy Belleranti By Guy Belleranti Owls are raptors, or birds of prey. They are carnivores who quickly and silently swoop down on their prey from above. Most raptors such as eagles, hawks and falcons are day hunters. They

More information

2 nd Grade Science Unit B: Life Sciences Chapter 3: Plants and Animals in Their Environment Lesson 1: How are plants and animals like their parents?

2 nd Grade Science Unit B: Life Sciences Chapter 3: Plants and Animals in Their Environment Lesson 1: How are plants and animals like their parents? 2 nd Grade Science Unit B: Life Sciences Chapter 3: Plants and Animals in Their Environment Lesson 1: How are plants and animals like their parents? offspring Offspring are young plants and animals. Offspring

More information

Cherokee County School District Student Performance Standards Unit Guides - Science: Fifth Grade

Cherokee County School District Student Performance Standards Unit Guides - Science: Fifth Grade Characteristics of Science 1 Cherokee County School District Habits of Mind S5CS1. Students will be aware of the importance of curiosity, honesty, openness, and skepticism in science and will exhibit these

More information

Botanical Illustration for the Classroom

Botanical Illustration for the Classroom Botanical Illustration for the Classroom Bringing Art to Science... Partially supported with funds provided by the American Society of Botanical Artists Applying botanical illustration techniques to teach

More information

nucleus cytoplasm membrane wall A cell is the smallest unit that makes up living and nonliving things.

nucleus cytoplasm membrane wall A cell is the smallest unit that makes up living and nonliving things. 1 In nature there are living things and nonliving things. Living things depend on three basic life processes: nutrition, sensitivity and reproduction. Living things are made up of cells. 1. Match the two

More information

The animals at higher levels are more competitive, so fewer animals survive. B.

The animals at higher levels are more competitive, so fewer animals survive. B. Energy Flow in Ecosystems 1. The diagram below shows an energy pyramid. Which of the following best explains why the number of organisms at each level decreases while moving up the energy pyramid? The

More information

GCSE BITESIZE Examinations

GCSE BITESIZE Examinations GCSE BITESIZE Examinations General Certificate of Secondary Education AQA SCIENCE A BLY1B Unit Biology B1b (Evolution and Environment) AQA BIOLOGY Unit Biology B1b (Evolution and Environment) FOUNDATION

More information

Cells in Biology. Lesson 1.

Cells in Biology. Lesson 1. Lesson 1. Cells in Biology. Jump-Start Your Learning. Before you begin reading, take a piece of paper and write ''Cells'' across the top. Then, as fast as you can, jot down any notes, facts, opinions or

More information

17.1. The Tree of Life CHAPTER 17. Organisms can be classified based on physical similarities. Linnaean taxonomy. names.

17.1. The Tree of Life CHAPTER 17. Organisms can be classified based on physical similarities. Linnaean taxonomy. names. SECTION 17.1 THE LINNAEAN SYSTEM OF CLASSIFICATION Study Guide KEY CONCEPT Organisms can be classified based on physical similarities. VOCABULARY taxonomy taxon binomial nomenclature genus MAIN IDEA: Linnaeus

More information

The Origin of Life. The Origin of Life. Reconstructing the history of life: What features define living systems?

The Origin of Life. The Origin of Life. Reconstructing the history of life: What features define living systems? The Origin of Life I. Introduction: What is life? II. The Primitive Earth III. Evidence of Life s Beginning on Earth A. Fossil Record: a point in time B. Requirements for Chemical and Cellular Evolution:

More information

Use this diagram of a food web to answer questions 1 through 5.

Use this diagram of a food web to answer questions 1 through 5. North arolina Testing Program EO iology Sample Items Goal 4 Use this diagram of a food web to answer questions 1 through 5. coyotes 3. If these organisms were arranged in a food pyramid, which organism

More information

the!sun!to!sugars.!this!is!called!! photosynthesis.!the!byproduct!of!those! Nucleus! sugars!is!our!oxygen.!

the!sun!to!sugars.!this!is!called!! photosynthesis.!the!byproduct!of!those! Nucleus! sugars!is!our!oxygen.! Cytoplasm ANIMAL CELL Vacuoles Mitochondria Chromosomes GolgiApparatus Chloroplast+ TheChloroplastiswhatmakesthefood inthecell.they reonlyfoundinplant cellsandsomeprotists.everygreen plantyouseeisconvertingenergyfrom

More information

Food Chains (and webs) Flow of energy through an ecosystem Grade 5 Austin Carter, Dale Rucker, Allison Hursey

Food Chains (and webs) Flow of energy through an ecosystem Grade 5 Austin Carter, Dale Rucker, Allison Hursey Food Chains (and webs) Flow of energy through an ecosystem Grade 5 Austin Carter, Dale Rucker, Allison Hursey References: Columbus Public Schools Curriculum Guide- Grade 5 GK-12 Biological Science Lesson

More information

6. Which of the following is not a basic need off all animals a. food b. *friends c. water d. protection from predators. NAME SOL 4.

6. Which of the following is not a basic need off all animals a. food b. *friends c. water d. protection from predators. NAME SOL 4. NAME SOL 4.5 REVIEW - Revised Habitats, Niches and Adaptations POPULATION A group of the same species living in the same place at the same time. COMMUNITY-- All of the populations that live in the same

More information

The main source of energy in most ecosystems is sunlight.

The main source of energy in most ecosystems is sunlight. Energy in Ecosystems: Ecology: Part 2: Energy and Biomass The main source of energy in most ecosystems is sunlight. What is the amount of energy from the sun? 100 W/ft 2 The energy gets transferred through

More information

Introduction to Ecology

Introduction to Ecology Introduction to Ecology Ecology is the scientific study of the interactions between living organisms and their environment. Scientists who study ecology are called ecologists. Because our planet has many

More information

Grassland Food Webs: Teacher Notes

Grassland Food Webs: Teacher Notes Grassland Food Webs: Teacher Notes Alan Henderson ecosystem Objectives After completing this activity students will be able to: Create a food web and identify producers and consumers. Assign organisms

More information

MS. Structure, Function, and Information Processing

MS. Structure, Function, and Information Processing MIDDLE SCHOOL LIFE SCIENCE Alignment with National Science Standards Use the chart below to find Science A-Z units that best support the Next Generation Science Standards* for Middle School Life Science,

More information

Introduction to Medical Microbiology

Introduction to Medical Microbiology Introduction to Medical Microbiology Course Medical Microbiology Unit I Introduction to Microbiology Essential Question What is Medical Microbiology? TEKS 130.207(c) 2A, 3D Prior Student Learning n/a Estimated

More information

Zoo Connections Curriculum

Zoo Connections Curriculum Zoo Connections Curriculum We Like to Move It, Move It: Classifying animals by features 1 st grade Curriculum is aligned with the Mississippi Academic Framework. Lessons and support material are provided

More information

Understanding by Design. Title: BIOLOGY/LAB. Established Goal(s) / Content Standard(s): Essential Question(s) Understanding(s):

Understanding by Design. Title: BIOLOGY/LAB. Established Goal(s) / Content Standard(s): Essential Question(s) Understanding(s): Understanding by Design Title: BIOLOGY/LAB Standard: EVOLUTION and BIODIVERSITY Grade(s):9/10/11/12 Established Goal(s) / Content Standard(s): 5. Evolution and Biodiversity Central Concepts: Evolution

More information

Evolution by Natural Selection 1

Evolution by Natural Selection 1 Evolution by Natural Selection 1 I. Mice Living in a Desert These drawings show how a population of mice on a beach changed over time. 1. Describe how the population of mice is different in figure 3 compared

More information

Summary. 16 1 Genes and Variation. 16 2 Evolution as Genetic Change. Name Class Date

Summary. 16 1 Genes and Variation. 16 2 Evolution as Genetic Change. Name Class Date Chapter 16 Summary Evolution of Populations 16 1 Genes and Variation Darwin s original ideas can now be understood in genetic terms. Beginning with variation, we now know that traits are controlled by

More information

Taxonomy and Classification

Taxonomy and Classification Taxonomy and Classification Taxonomy = the science of naming and describing species Wisdom begins with calling things by their right names -Chinese Proverb museums contain ~ 2 Billion specimens worldwide

More information

Copyright The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for reproduction or display

Copyright The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for reproduction or display The Living World Chapter 1: The Science of Biology Specific Learning Outcomes: 1.1 List the major properties of life. 1.2 Explain how science is distinguished from other ways of seeking understanding of

More information

ELEMENTARY-LEVEL SCIENCE TEST

ELEMENTARY-LEVEL SCIENCE TEST 4THE UNIVERSITY OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK SPRING 2008 GRADE 4 ELEMENTARY-LEVEL SCIENCE TEST WRITTEN TEST Student Name School Name Print your name and the name of your school on the lines above. The test

More information

Classification: Spots and stripes

Classification: Spots and stripes Biology Classification: Spots and stripes Zebras have a distinctive pattern that makes them easily recognisable to most people, but they also display features common to other animals. So how can we easily

More information

3.1 Measuring Biodiversity

3.1 Measuring Biodiversity 3.1 Measuring Biodiversity Every year, a news headline reads, New species discovered in. For example, in 2006, scientists discovered 36 new species of fish, corals, and shrimp in the warm ocean waters

More information

Exhibit Inquiry. Rainforest. Aug 11

Exhibit Inquiry. Rainforest. Aug 11 Exhibit Inquiry Exhibit Inquiry Have students look for the following exhibits related to living things during their visit to the Ontario Science Centre: Where to go: (Level 6) What it's about: Tropical

More information

reflect What about other living things? Do all animals look the same as their parents?

reflect What about other living things? Do all animals look the same as their parents? reflect Look at the boy and his father. How do they look the same? They both have two arms and two legs. They both have eyes and a nose. They look a lot alike! People can look like their parents. We get

More information

Building a Dichotomous Key: Take home Assignment. - Copy of Aliens Handout - Question Sheet - Dichotomous Key Sheet

Building a Dichotomous Key: Take home Assignment. - Copy of Aliens Handout - Question Sheet - Dichotomous Key Sheet Materials: uilding a Dichotomous Key: Take home Assignment - Copy of Aliens Handout - Question Sheet - Dichotomous Key Sheet Introduction: A dichotomous key is a very useful tool. It helps you identify

More information

Classification of Microorganisms (Chapter 10) Lecture Materials for Amy Warenda Czura, Ph.D. Suffolk County Community College Eastern Campus

Classification of Microorganisms (Chapter 10) Lecture Materials for Amy Warenda Czura, Ph.D. Suffolk County Community College Eastern Campus Classification of Microorganisms (Chapter 10) Lecture Materials for Amy Warenda Czura, Ph.D. Suffolk County Community College Eastern Campus Primary Source for figures and content: Tortora, G.J. Microbiology

More information

a. a population. c. an ecosystem. b. a community. d. a species.

a. a population. c. an ecosystem. b. a community. d. a species. Name: practice test Score: 0 / 35 (0%) [12 subjective questions not graded] The Biosphere Practice Test Multiple Choice Identify the letter of the choice that best completes the statement or answers the

More information

Basic Biological Principles Module A Anchor 1

Basic Biological Principles Module A Anchor 1 Basic Biological Principles Module A Anchor 1 Key Concepts: - Living things are made of units called cells, are based on a universal genetic code, obtain and use materials and energy, grow and develop,

More information

2. What kind of energy is stored in food? A. chemical energy B. heat energy C. kinetic energy D. light energy

2. What kind of energy is stored in food? A. chemical energy B. heat energy C. kinetic energy D. light energy Assessment Bank Matter and Energy in Living Things SC.8.L.18.4 1. What is energy? A. anything that takes up space B. anything that has mass C. the ability to conduct current D. the ability to do work 2.

More information

food webs reflect look out! what do you think?

food webs reflect look out! what do you think? reflect Imagine for a moment that you stay after school one day to clean up the classroom. While cleaning, you move some plants away from the sunny windows. A week later, you remember to move the plants

More information

Animal Colors and Shapes Teacher s Guide

Animal Colors and Shapes Teacher s Guide Teacher s Guide Grade Level: K 2 Curriculum Focus: Math, Science Lesson Duration: 1 2 class periods Program Description Animals come in all colors, shapes, and sizes. Learn about the shapes animals have

More information

Worksheet: The theory of natural selection

Worksheet: The theory of natural selection Worksheet: The theory of natural selection Senior Phase Grade 7-9 Learning area: Natural Science Strand: Life and living Theme: Biodiversity, change and continuity Specific Aim 1: Acquiring knowledge of

More information

Rain Forests. America's. Web of Life. Rain Forest Ecology. Prince William Network's OVERVIEW OBJECTIVES SUBJECTS

Rain Forests. America's. Web of Life. Rain Forest Ecology. Prince William Network's OVERVIEW OBJECTIVES SUBJECTS Rain Forest Ecology National Science Education Standards Standard C: Life Sciences Populations and ecosystems. Standard C: Life Sciences Diversity and adaptation of organisms. Standard F: Science in Personal

More information

Lesson 3 Biodiversity

Lesson 3 Biodiversity Biodiversity CachalĂș Biological Reserve, Colombia Concept Rainforests are comprised of an extraordinary diversity of plants and animals. Diversity of life is an essential ingredient to healthy ecosystems

More information

What activities do you think an organism would use bioluminescence for?

What activities do you think an organism would use bioluminescence for? Relationships for Survival: The Role of Bioluminescence overview In these activities, students will focus on ecological relationships and investigate the many ways that species might interact using bioluminescence.

More information

Lesson Overview. Biodiversity. Lesson Overview. 6.3 Biodiversity

Lesson Overview. Biodiversity. Lesson Overview. 6.3 Biodiversity Lesson Overview 6.3 6.3 Objectives Define biodiversity and explain its value. Identify current threats to biodiversity. Describe how biodiversity can be preserved. THINK ABOUT IT From multicolored coral

More information

Desert Communities Third Grade Core: Standard 2 Objective 2 Describe the interactions between living and nonliving things in a small environment.

Desert Communities Third Grade Core: Standard 2 Objective 2 Describe the interactions between living and nonliving things in a small environment. Desert Communities Third Grade Core: Standard 2 Objective 2 Describe the interactions between living and nonliving things in a small environment. (Discovering Deserts NatureScope: page 40, 43, 44) Objective:

More information

Unit: Healthy Habits Grade: 1

Unit: Healthy Habits Grade: 1 Unit: Healthy Habits 5.3b Good health habits include hand washing, personal cleanliness; avoiding harmful substances; eating a balanced diet; engaging in regular eercise ways to stay healthy Wash hands

More information

Asexual Reproduction Grade Six

Asexual Reproduction Grade Six Ohio Standards Connection: Life Sciences Benchmark B Describe the characteristics of an organism in terms of a combination of inherited traits and recognize reproduction as a characteristic of living organisms

More information

This hands-on activity incorporates observing, classifying, predicting, sequencing, formulating models, and drawing conclusions.

This hands-on activity incorporates observing, classifying, predicting, sequencing, formulating models, and drawing conclusions. SCIENCE Science and the Environment 4 th Grade FOOD CHAINS Overview: All organisms, or living things, depend on other organisms for nutrients. The movement of nutrients through an environment is visualized

More information

Grade 5 Standard 5 Unit Test Heredity. 1. In what way will a kitten always be like its parents? The kitten will...

Grade 5 Standard 5 Unit Test Heredity. 1. In what way will a kitten always be like its parents? The kitten will... Grade 5 Standard 5 Unit Test Heredity Multiple Choice 1. In what way will a kitten always be like its parents? The kitten will... A. be the same color. B. learn the same things. C. have the same body structures.

More information

Student worksheet. Bugs. Complete metamorphosis Dung Beetle lifecycle. Incomplete metamorphosis Leafhopper lifecycle

Student worksheet. Bugs. Complete metamorphosis Dung Beetle lifecycle. Incomplete metamorphosis Leafhopper lifecycle Complete metamorphosis Dung Beetle lifecycle Incomplete metamorphosis Leafhopper lifecycle Museum Victoria Bugs Classroom Activities Section 3 6 A Diving Beetle s story Museum Victoria Bugs Classroom Activities

More information

COWLEY COLLEGE & Area Vocational Technical School

COWLEY COLLEGE & Area Vocational Technical School COWLEY COLLEGE & Area Vocational Technical School COURSE PROCEDURE FOR GENERAL BIOLOGY II BIO4135 5 Credit Hours Student Level: This course is open to students on the college level in either the freshman

More information

Life Science Study Guide. Environment Everything that surrounds and influences (has an effect on) an organism.

Life Science Study Guide. Environment Everything that surrounds and influences (has an effect on) an organism. Life Science Study Guide Environment Everything that surrounds and influences (has an effect on) an organism. Organism Any living thing, including plants and animals. Environmental Factor An environmental

More information

The Toledo Zoo Aviary

The Toledo Zoo Aviary The Toledo Zoo Aviary Look at the Birdie Bird Adaptations Lesson Learning Strategies Background Knowledge Vocabulary Comprehension Application/ Extension Problem Solution Guide Personal Clues Questions

More information

The Seven Characteristics of Life

The Seven Characteristics of Life Jennifer Hepner Maureen Frandsen Fall 2003 Grade Level: 3 rd grade The Seven Characteristics of Life Abstract: The purpose of this lesson is for students to learn the characteristics of living organisms.

More information

ENERGY FLOW THROUGH LIVING SYSTEMS

ENERGY FLOW THROUGH LIVING SYSTEMS reflect Enter the word domino as a search term on the Internet; you can fi nd some amazing domino runs. You can make your own by setting up a series of dominoes in a line. When you push the fi rst domino

More information

NOTE TO TEACHER: It is appropriate to introduce the mitochondria (where energy is made) as a major structure common to all cells.

NOTE TO TEACHER: It is appropriate to introduce the mitochondria (where energy is made) as a major structure common to all cells. 5.2.1 Recall the cell as the smallest unit of life and identify its major structures (including cell membrane, cytoplasm, nucleus, and vacuole). Taxonomy level: 1.1 and 1.2-A Remember Factual Knowledge

More information

Focused Learning Lesson Science Grades 10-12 LS-H-C4

Focused Learning Lesson Science Grades 10-12 LS-H-C4 Focused Learning Lesson Science Grades 10-12 LS-H-C4 Overview: This lesson is to be used to help students to understand how to use a dichotomous key in classification. Students will use a dichotomous key

More information

Cell Division Simulation: Bacteria Activity One

Cell Division Simulation: Bacteria Activity One Cell Division Simulation: Bacteria Activity One Introduction All living things are made of cells. Some living things, like plants and animals, are made of millions of cells. But some living things are

More information

www.lakeshorelearning.com

www.lakeshorelearning.com Get kids excited about science with this fun-filled quiz game! We ve provided 20 sample questions covering a variety of engaging topics. Just download the free game cards and follow the instructions below

More information

Build Vocabulary Students will have a more successful lab experience if they understand these terms.

Build Vocabulary Students will have a more successful lab experience if they understand these terms. Chapter 18 Lab Dichotomous Keys Open-Ended Inquiry Design Your Own Lab Problem Can you construct a dichotomous key that could be used to identify organisms? Introduction In May 2007, scientists and other

More information

Pre-lab homework Lab 2: Reproduction in Protists, Fungi, Moss and Ferns

Pre-lab homework Lab 2: Reproduction in Protists, Fungi, Moss and Ferns Pre-lab homework Lab 2: Reproduction in Protists, Fungi, Moss and Ferns Lab Section: Name: 1. Last week in lab you looked at the reproductive cycle of the animals. This week s lab examines the cycles of

More information