2011 Clinical Staffing and Recruiting Survey. Indian Health Service The Reyes Building, 801 Thompson Avenue, Ste 400, Rockville, MD

Save this PDF as:
 WORD  PNG  TXT  JPG

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "2011 Clinical Staffing and Recruiting Survey. Indian Health Service The Reyes Building, 801 Thompson Avenue, Ste 400, Rockville, MD 20852 www.ihs."

Transcription

1 2011 Clinical Staffing and Recruiting Survey A survey of Indian Health program facility administrators examining their clinical staffing needs and recruiting patterns Indian Health Service The Reyes Building, 801 Thompson Avenue, Ste 400, Rockville, MD Conducted by Merritt Hawkins, an AMN Healthcare company

2 2011 Clinical Staffing and Recruiting Survey A survey of Indian Health program facility administrators examining their clinical staffing needs and recruiting patterns IN THIS REPORT introduction METHODOLOGY Key Findings QUESTIONS ASKED AND RESPONSES RECEIVED TRENDS AND OBSERVATIONS SURVEY RESPONDENTS NEEDS, ACCESS AND QUALITY RECRUITING PATTERNS TURNOVER RATES SALARIES AND REVENUE Administrator comments COMMENT RECEIVED FROM INDIAN HEALTH SERVICE ADMINISTRATORS KEY PRIORITIES CONCLUSION AND RECOMMENDATIONS ABOUT MERRITT HAWKINS Page 3 Page 4 Pages 5-6 Pages 7-23 Pages Page 25 Pages Pages Pages Pages Pages Pages Page 44 Pages Page 47 Indian Health Service The Reyes Building, 801 Thompson Avenue, Ste 400, Rockville, MD

3 INTRODUCTION What types of physicians and other clinicians are Indian health program facilities seeking? What challenges are they facing in recruiting these clinicians? What methods are they using to recruit, and which are the most effective? How long does the recruitment process take and what are the typical cost/ benefits involved? Dr. Yvette Roubideaux Director, Indian Health Service Through Merritt Hawkins, a national physician search and consulting firm, the Indian Health Service (IHS) initiated its 2011 Clinical Staffing and Recruiting Survey to provide answers to these and related questions. The goal of the survey is to identify common recruiting patterns at Indian health program facilities, to place these patterns in the context of the general clinical recruiting market, and to identify how Indian health program facility administrators believe IHS can assist them with their recruiting needs. To this end, the survey asked Indian health program facility administrators to provide data and commentary regarding their clinical staffing requirements, challenges, and incentives, and to suggest ways in which IHS can assist them in their recruiting and retention efforts. IHS/Key Priorities IHS is the principal federal health care provider and health advocate for Indian people providing a comprehensive health service delivery system for over 50 years. Indian health program facilities deliver health services directly to patients, many living in small, rural communities or urban areas that traditionally have been undeserved, thereby raising the health of American Indians and Alaska natives. The survey was conducted in support of IHS key priorities: 1. To renew and strengthen our partnership with tribes 2. To reform IHS strategies and processes 3. To improve quality and access to care for Indian health program patients 4. To make all of our work accountable, transparent, fair and inclusive This report includes results of the survey and an analysis by Merritt Hawkins regarding the survey s findings and implications, as well as a summary regarding how the survey acts to forward IHS key priorities outlined above. 3

4 METHODOLOGY IHS provided Merritt Hawkins with a list of some 400 Indian health program facilities and organizations to contact. In some cases, the list included the names of administrators affiliated with the facilities. In others, no names were attached to the facilities. A Merritt Hawkins representative refined this list by calling each facility to obtain the names and s of two administrators, where possible. In some cases, facilities on this list were community relations or general information offices only and do not provide clinical care. Surveys were not sent to administrators at these facilities. In other cases, facilities on the list have closed. In additional cases, facilities were branch offices of larger facilities administrated by the same person or persons. Merritt Hawkins representative identified the most appropriate person or persons to which to send the survey at each facility. Where two administrators were not present or were otherwise unavailable or unwilling to be contacted, one administrator s name and was obtained. The final list included 380 administrators located at 255 facilities. Merritt Hawkins ed the survey to these administrators on four separate occasions, once in December, 2010, twice in January, 2011 and once in February, A Merritt Hawkins representative called each administrator on the list who did not respond to the initial at least once, and called a number of administrators multiple times to encourage them to respond. IHS also ed the survey to administrators who did not respond to initial s sent by Merritt Hawkins. A total of 81 administrators responded, for a response rate of 21%. A breakdown of key survey findings and an analysis of findings are included in this report. ABOUT MERRITT HAWKINS 4 Established in 1987, Merritt Hawkins is the largest physician search and consulting firm in the United States and is a company of AMN Healthcare (NYSE: AHS), the largest healthcare staffing organization in the country. Merritt Hawkins conducts over 2,500 physician search assignments for hospitals, medical groups, government facilities and other entities each year nationwide. A leading source of physician recruiting research and commentary, Merritt Hawkins has completed various surveys used throughout the industry to benchmark physician recruiting incentives, physician revenue generation, physician career plans and related topics. Data and commentary generated by Merritt Hawkins have been cited in hundreds of media outlets, including The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, Fortune, The Economist, USA Today, The Washington Post, U.S. News & World Report, Hospitals & Health Networks, Modern Healthcare, American Medical News and many others. Executives with Merritt Hawkins have authored hundreds of articles on physician staffing topics as well as three books, including Will the Last Physician In America Please Turn Off the Lights? A Look at America s Looming Physician Shortage; Merritt Hawkins Guide to Physician Recruiting; and In Their Own Words, 12,000 Physicians Reveal Their Thoughts on Medical Practice in America.

5 Key Findings Indian health program facilities serve a unique population of patients through Federal, Urban Indian and Tribal hospitals and clinics. Many of these facilities are in small, rural communities or urban areas that traditionally have been medically underserved. Consequently, a key challenge facing Indian health program facilities is the recruitment and retention of clinical professionals, including physicians, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, dentists, nurses and pharmacists. The 2011 Clinical Staffing and Recruiting Survey reflects the level of need for various clinicians at Indian health program facilities, the types of clinicians they are seeking, their typical recruiting costs and methods, turnover rates, and factors which enhance or impede their recruiting efforts. Key findings of the survey include Indian health program facility administrators indicated that primary care physicians are more urgently needed than any other type of clinical professional. 45% of Indian health program administrators indicated their facilities have an urgent need for primary care doctors, while 38% indicated they have a moderate need. Only 17% are fully staffed and have no immediate need for primary care physicians. The average vacancy rate for physicians reported by Indian health program administrators was 22%, considerably higher than the vacancy rates experienced by facilities in the private sector. Vacancy rates for other clinicians also are higher for Indian health program facilities than is generally seen in the private sector. Indian health program facility administrators indicated that 25% of physicians on their staffs are 61 years old or older, indicating that staff attrition looms as a serious challenge. Only 5% of all physicians in active patient care are 61 or older. Indian health service administrators report losing more clinicians in the last year than they were able to replace. Administrators report losing an average of 3.1 clinical professionals in the last 12 months but have only replaced an average of 1.7 of those they have lost. 50% of Indian health program facilities currently are recruiting primary care physicians. Dentists follow primary care physicians as the most urgently needed type of clinician. 38% of administrators indicated they have an urgent need for dentists, 33% said they have a moderate need, and 29% said they have no immediate need. 57% of Indian health program facilities currently are recruiting dentists. The majority of administrators (54%) said that a shortage of primary care physicians has compromised access to care in their service areas, while 48% said a shortage of dentists has compromised access to care. To a significant but lesser degree, access to care also has been compromised by shortages of specialist physicians, physician assistants, nurse practitioners, nurses, and pharmacists. 5

6 Close to half of administrators (46%) said quality of care in their service areas has been compromised due to a shortage of primary care physicians, while 41% said a shortage of dentists has compromised quality of care. The majority of administrators see a moderate to serious need for other types of clinicians. 55% are recruiting nurses, 49% are recruiting nurse practitioners, 37% are recruiting pharmacists, and 37% are recruiting physician assistants. Specialist physicians are considered the most difficult type of clinician to recruit by administrators, followed by primary care physicians and dentists. Though challenges persist, Indian health program facilities are enjoying some recruiting success. 64% of administrators said they had been successful recruiting one or more physicians in the last 12 months and 60% said they had been successful recruiting a dentist or nurse in the last 12 months. Administrators rate online advertising/clinical job sites, personal networking, and job postings on their own facility s site as the most effective methods for recruiting clinical professionals. Administrators identify paperwork/red tape as the factor having the most negative effect on clinician turnover at their facilities, followed by IHS policies and priorities, professional isolation, and spousal support/opportunities. 78% of administrators indicated they must interview at least three physicians to fill one opening. Administrators reported an average physician interview cost of $3,815 Salaries offered to physicians by Indian health program facilities tend to be significantly lower than national averages. Only 33% of administrators indicated that their facilities have a clinical recruitment and retention plan in place. Administrators are divided regarding the effect health reform will have on demand for clinicians at their facilities. 48% said health reform will greatly increase or somewhat increase demand for primary care physicians, while 52% said reform will either decrease demand for primary care physicians or have no effect on demand. Summary of Key Findings The survey indicates that Indian health program facilities are encountering recruiting challenges similar to private sector facilities, and, despite comparatively limited resources and strategic planning, are achieving some recruiting success. However, clinical vacancy rates are comparatively high at Indian health program facilities, and some facilities are challenged in addressing vacancies due to staff attrition, lack of planning, a dearth of resources, and administrative inefficiencies that may be hampering recruiting efforts. The recruiting patterns, metrics, challenges and requirements of Indian health program facilities are discussed in more detail later in this report. 6 Following is a breakdown of questions asked by the survey and responses received.

7 QUESTIONS ASKED AND RESPONSES RECEIVED 1 What is your title? Various, including: Executive Director, Health System Administrator, Clinical Director, Department Head, Acting CEO, Facility Director, Vice Chief of Medical Staff, Administrative Officer, PI Officer/IPC Coordinator, Administrator, CEO, Interim CEO, Health Director Assistant, Chief Medical Officer, Director of Human Services, SMSC Health Administrator, Health Administrator, Division Director/Health and Human Services, Chief Dental Officer/Acting Clinical C, Health Director, Clinic Administrator, Director of Health Services, Clinical Service Chief, Clinical Administrator, Human Resource Director, Physician, Health System Specialist, Director of Health Programs, Supervisor, I.H.S. Director 2 In what state is your facility located? California 18% South Dakota 3% Oklahoma 18% Colorado 2% New Mexico 9% Illinois 2% Washington 9% Kansas 2% Arizona 7.5% Louisiana 2% Alaska 4.5% North Dakota 2% Minnesota 4.5% Nevada 2% Montana 4.5% New York 2% Wisconsin 4.5% Rhode Island 2% Oregon 3% 3 What type of facility is your site? Federal Urban Indian Tribal 35% 5% 60% 7

8 In what community is your facility located? What size community do you serve? 4 5 Indian health program administrators were advised that they could complete the survey anonymously and that Merritt Hawkins would not share their names or locations or related data likely to identify them ,001-10,000 10,001-25,000 30% 26% 21% 25,001-50,000 50, , ,001 or more 15% 4% 4% How would you rate the need for additional 6 clinical professionals at your facility? Urgent Moderate No immediate need Primary care physicians 45% 38% 17% Specialist physicians 26% 32% 42% Nurse practitioners/physician assistants 29% 42% 29% Dentists 38% 33% 29% Nurses 28% 45% 27% Pharmacists 19% 35% 46% To what degree is a shortage of the following clinical professionals a 7 concern to your facility? serious Moderate no concern Primary care physicians 50% 33% 17% Specialist physicians 24% 38% 38% Nurse practitioners/physician assistants 28% 43% 29% Dentists 43% 29% 28% Nurses 32% 40% 28% 8 Pharmacists 26% 36% 38%

9 Is access to care in your service area compromised due to the shortage of 8 any of the following clinical professionals? yes no unsure Primary care physicians 54% 42% 4% Specialist physicians 46% 47% 7% Nurse practitioners/physician assistants 36% 59% 5% Dentists 48% 47% 5% Nurses 27% 65% 8% Pharmacists 23% 66% 11% Is quality of care in your service area compromised due to the shortage 9 of any of the following clinical professionals? yes no unsure Primary care physicians 46% 49% 5% Specialist physicians 40% 53% 7% Nurse practitioners/physician assistants 33% 59% 8% Dentists 41% 54% 5% Nurses 25% 65% 9% Pharmacists 22% 68% 10% In the last 12 months, have you recruited one or more physicians 10 to your site? Yes No 64% 36% 9

10 11 If yes, which types Which types of physicians 12 are you now recruiting? Family physician 40% Family physician 50% General internist 15% General internist 14% Pediatrician 7% Pediatrician 10% OB/GYN 7% OB/GYN 9% Anesthesiologist 5% Anesthesiologist 6% General surgeon Otolaryngologist 4% 0% Other: Neurologist, General surgeon Otolaryngologist 4% 0% Emergency physician Orthopedic surgeon 7% 0% Endocrinologist Podiatrist Cardiologist Emergency physician Orthopedic surgeon 12% 4% Other: Optometrist Psychiatrist Radiologist Ophthalmologist 11% 2% 2% Deputy clinical director Pediatrician Physical therapist Respiratory therapist Psychiatrist Radiologist Ophthalmologist 14% 5% 2% Psychologist Independent social worker Podiatrist Community health aide 13 What personnel system do you use to recruit clinicians at your site? Commissioned Corps Civil Service Tribal hire Other 49% 39% 61% 14% Other: Locum tenens agencies (3) Illinois Primary Health Care Association Contract nurses IHS Local advertisements Word of mouth Letter to residencies anything we can think of Website for IHS.gov 14 In the last 12 months, have you recruited one or more of the following? 10 Physician assistant Nurse practitioner Dentist Nurse Pharmacist 37% 48% 60% 60% 46%

11 15 Are you now recruiting any of the following? Physician assistant Nurse practitioner Dentist Nurse Pharmacist 37% 49% 57% 55% 37% 16 How difficult is it to recruit the following clinicians to your facility? Not difficult Somewhat difficult Very difficult Primary care physicians 11% 37% 52% Specialist physicians 19% 22% 59% Nurse practitioners/physician assistants 22% 51% 27% Dentists 21% 30% 49% Nurses 27% 48% 25% Pharmacists 28% 41% 31% Has it become easier or more difficult to recruit these clinicians over the 17 last 12 months, or has there been no change? easier more difficult no change Primary care physicians 10% 42% 48% Specialist physicians 24% 24% 52% Nurse practitioners/physician assistants 21% 48% 31% Dentists 22% 35% 43% Nurses 26% 45% 29% Pharmacists 29% 43% 28% 11

12 How do you believe health reform will affect the need for clinical 18 professionals at your site? Greatly increase Somewhat increase No change Decrease Primary care physicians 33% 27% 19% 33% Specialist physicians 44% 22% 20% 44% Nurse practitioners/physician assistants 37% 27% 19% 37% Dentists 40% 23% 19% 40% Nurses 38% 28% 22% 38% Pharmacists 45% 23% 19% 45% Typically, how long does it take to recruit a physician at your site, including 19 from the time the job is posted to the contract is signed? Primary care Specialists 0-90 days days days more than 365 days 19% 35% 27% 19% 6% 13% 48% 33% Typically, how long does it take to recruit physician assistants and nurse 20 practitioners to your site? days days days more than 365 days 26% 41% 21% 12%

13 On average, how many interviews must you conduct to fill one open spot on 21 your staff? physicians pas/nps or more 32% 39% 15% 5% 2% 7% 35% 45% 13% 5% 2% 0% What are the average costs associated with conducting one physician 22 interview? low average high Flights $300 $905 $3,000 Rental car $100 $204 $750 Accommodation $100 $285 $2,000 Meals/entertainment $65 $168 $1,000 Other $12 $2,253 $20,000 Total $577 $3,815 $26,750 Indian health program facilities are recruiting within the larger context of a rapidly evolving healthcare system and a medical staffing market characterized by clinician shortages. Many of these facilities express an urgent need for the same types of clinicians being sought by virtually all other types of medical facilities nationwide. 13

14 What methods do you use to recruit clinical professionals and how effective 23 are these methods? most Effective Somewhat effective Least Effective Online advertising/clinical job sites 27% 64% 9% Networking with your staff/community 44% 41% 15% Job openings posted on own website 23% 61% 16% Networking with residency training programs 24% 56% 20% IHS assistance/resources 26% 51% 23% In-house recruiting personnel 19% 52% 29% Exhibiting at professional conferences 14% 55% 31% Journal advertising 10% 54% 36% Contingent physician recruiting firms 6% 54% 40% Retained physician recruiting firms 5% 52% 43% Direct mail 5% 52% 43% 24 What is the vacancy rate for the following clinicians at your site? average Physicians Nurse practitioners Physician assistants Dentists Nurses Pharmacists 22% 19% 7% 20% 16% 8% How many clinical staff left your facility in the last year? low average high

15 26 Of those who left, how many have you replaced? low average high How has the turnover rate for these clinicians changed over 27 the last 12 months? increased decreased no change Physicians 21% 12% 67% Nurse practitioners 18% 9% 73% Physician assistants 13% 7% 80% Dentists 17% 17% 66% Nurses 37% 8% 55% Pharmacists 13% 11% 76% 28 To what extent is turnover a concern at your site? major concern moderate concern no concern Physicians 40% 35% 25% Other clinicians 33% 40% 27% 15

16 How would you rate the effect of the following factors on turnover among 29 clinicians at your facility? positive neutral negative Paperwork/red tape 10% 43% 47% IHS policies and priorities 13% 52% 35% Professional isolation 12% 53% 35% Spousal support/opportunities 34% 32% 34% Politics 15% 52% 33% Child care 27% 42% 31% Schools 29% 40% 31% Human resources 25% 44% 31% Adequacy of housing 31% 40% 29% Pay 41% 31% 28% Administrative duties 24% 51% 25% Cultural amenities 37% 42% 21% Administrative support 47% 34% 19% Information Technology 51% 31% 18% Mobility 21% 64% 15% Short-term/long-term training opportunities 28% 56% 16% Equipment 41% 43% 16% Appreciation in community 53% 32% 15% Support staff 64% 21% 15% Health care 36% 51% 13% Safety 40% 50% 10% the key to successful recruiting begins with front-end preparation in which stakeholders, incentives, contracts, candidate parameters, and candidate sourcing methods are aligned. 16

17 30 What is the average salary for the following clinicians at your site? low average high Family physicians $120,000 $165,552 $250,000 General internists $125,000 $174,423 $312,000 Pediatricians $110,000 $173,563 $274,000 Ob/Gyns $110,000 $182,227 $264,000 Anesthesiologists $140,000 $200,950 $250,000 General surgeons $175,000 $241,458 $290,000 Otolaryngologists N/A $175,000 N/A Emergency medicine $165,000 $187,810 $220,000 Ophthalmologists $125,000 $150,000 $175,000 Orthopedic surgeons $160,000 $167,500 $175,000 Psychiatrists $70,000 $168,926 $312,000 Radiologists $150,000 $155,175 $250,000 Nurse practitioners $70,000 $92,911 $125,000 Physician assistants $30,000 $84,582 $120,000 Pharmacists $75,000 $105,674 $160,000 Dentists $75,000 $129,487 $175,000 Nurses $30,000 $65,103 $100,000 Do clinicians at your site receive a straight salary only or are they compensated 31 with a salary plus a bonus based on productivity, quality, or other measures? Salary Only Salary and bonus 65% 35% Does your site offer local educational loan forgiveness/repayment or 32 supplemental loan repayment as part of the recruiting incentive package? Yes No 62% 38% 17

18 If yes, what is the total amount of loan forgiveness/repayment that you 33 offer and over what time period? Total Amount Time Period (in months) low average high $5000 $39,684 $90,000 low average high What is the payer mix at your site? low average high Medicaid 10% 40% 80% Medicare 4% 17% 45% SCHIP 1% 9% 30% Private pay 5% 21% 62% Other 1% 30% 69% 35 Please estimate how much net revenue (inpatient and outpatient) one fulltime equivalent physician generates for your site per year in the following specialties low average high Family physician $100,000 $387,263 $890,000 General internist $50,000 $290,000 $500,000 Pediatrician $30,000 $411,000 $887,719 Ob/Gyn $15,418 $321,000 $650,000 Otolaryngologist N/A $200,000 N/A Ophthalmologist $10,000 $145,102 $225,306 Orthopedic surgeon $39,089 $126,363 $200,000 Psychiatrist $20,000 $129,252 $300,000 Cardiologist $200,000 $350,000 $500, General surgeon $200,000 $525,000 $1,175,000

19 What are the average daily gross charges generated by the following 36 clinical professionals at your site? low average high Family physician $177 $2,100 $8,000 General internist N/A $600 N/A Pediatrician $177 $1,925 $5,000 Ob/Gyn N/A $27,110 N/A Otolaryngologist N/A NA N/A Ophthalmologist N/A $14,624 N/A Orthopedic surgeon N/A $4,909 N/A Psychiatrist $190 $732 $2193 Cardiologist N/A N/A N/A General surgeon N/A $40,000 N/A Physician assistant $2,000 $2,348 $4,268 Nurse practitioner $700 $2,570 $4,239 Pharmacist $987 $2,004 $3,525 Dentist $100 $1,266 $4, Consider the physicians on your staff. How do they break out by age? 40 or younger or older 26% 23% 26% 25% 19

20 38 Do you have a clinician recruitment and retention plan in place? Yes No 33% 67% The following factors attract clinical professionals to Indian health 39 program facilities? strongly agree moderatly agree do not agree Practice style 58% 39% 3% Cultural diversity 43% 52% 5% Mission-driven focus 40% 53% 7% Improving patient care 37% 51% 12% Geographic location 36% 32% 32% Financial rewards 32% 49% 19% Equipment/facilities 29% 51% 20% Lifestyle amenities 29% 46% 25% Quality improvement 28% 60% 12% Patient mix 27% 63% 10% 20 Administrators indicated that it typically takes them longer to recruit specialist physicians than primary care physicians, a not unexpected result given the difficulty of recruiting specialists to rural areas.

21 TRENDS AND OBSERVATIONS Overview The Recruiting Market The Indian Health Services 2011 Clinical Staffing and Recruiting Survey was conducted during a period of prevailing change in a health care delivery system characterized by a growing demand for physicians and other clinicians and a limited supply. The Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) forecasts that in 15 years the United States will face a deficit of up to 159,300 physicians, over one-third of them in primary care.1 This projection does not factor in the implementation of health reform, which is expected to increase the ranks of the insured by some 32 million people. Should health reform or other measures succeed in achieving near universal access to health insurance, an additional 31,000 physicians will be needed, the AAMC projects. Physicians are not distributed evenly throughout the population, and consequently shortages tend to be concentrated in rural or inner city areas. The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) currently designates over 6,200 primary care Health Professional Shortage Areas (HPSAs) nationwide in which 65 million Americans live. Sixty-seven percent of these areas are in non-metropolitan communities in which Indian health program facilities typically are located. Physicians are not the only type of health professional in short supply. The number of dentists trained in the United States is not keeping pace with demand. The number of dental school graduates peaked in 1982 at 5,750, then declined for 16 consecutive years and stands at about 4,500 today.2 During that time, over 75 million people were added to the U.S. population, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. An emerging shortage of dentists also is characterized by a maldistribution of providers in many rural and inner city areas. As of April, 2009, HHS designated 4,091 dental HPSAs in the U.S., in which 49 million people live. Nurses also are in short supply, a trend that has been well documented in recent years. HHS has projected a national deficit of one million nurses in the coming decade. This projection has been tempered by the economic downturn which has seen a large number of nurses who were retired or engaged in non-clinical activities return to the clinical workforce. Nevertheless, noted academic Peter Beurhaus projected in the July/August 2009 issue of Health Affairs that the nurse shortage will grow to 260,000 registered nurses by A shortage of this magnitude would be twice as large as any nursing shortage experienced in the United States since the mid-1960s. Nurse practitioners (NPs) and physician assistants (PAs) are being looked to throughout the healthcare industry as a supplement to a strained physician workforce. However, Richard Cooper, M.D. of the University of Pennsylvania projects that the supply of PAs and NPs will be 20% less than demand by In addition, like physicians, many NPs and PAs have chosen to specialize and therefore are not available to supplement the primary care physician workforce, where demand for doctors is considered to be greatest. Only 45% of PAs and only 59% of NPs practice primary care. 3 1 Dill MJ, Saldberg ES, Association of American Medical Colleges. The Complexities of Physician Suppl and Demand, November Staff Care Trends: The Growing use of Locum Tenens Dentists, March American Association of Nurse Practitioner database, 2009, and American Association of Physician Assistants: aapa.org 21

22 Emerging clinician shortages were apparent prior to health reform, which is expected to have a profound impact on how healthcare is delivered in the United States. Among other factors, health reform promotes efficiency gains by encouraging a restructuring of health care delivery into value rather than volume driven models such as Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs). It further promotes the use of preventive care and electronic medical records, measures which may have some effect on reducing utilization of healthcare services. Nevertheless, it is difficult to foresee how the addition of over 30 million patients to the ranks of the insured can be accomplished without a corresponding increase in demand for physicians and other clinical professionals. It is within this context that IHS examined the staffing needs and patterns of Indian health program facilities through this survey. Merritt Hawkins analysis of survey responses will seek to place these needs and patterns within the wider context of the current and projected clinical staffing market as viewed through existing research and our recruiting experience with hospitals, medical groups and other health care facilities nationwide. In addition, we will provide our opinion regarding the recruiting patterns of Indian health program facilities as depicted in this survey, indicating those areas where facilities appear to be operating efficiently and in line with recruiting industry standards and where there may be an opportunity for efficiency gains or practice modifications. SURVEY RESPONDENTS The 2011 Clinical Staffing and Recruiting Survey was sent by to administrators and others with executive titles at Indian program facilities nationwide. The majority of responses (60%) came from Tribal facilities, 35% came from Federal facilities and five percent from Urban Indian facilities. The majority of responses (77%) were from administrators whose facilities serve 25,000 or fewer residents and can be considered semi-rural to rural. Nineteen percent were from administrators whose facilities serve moderate sized communities ranging from 25,001 to 100,000 people. Four percent were from administrators whose facilities serve urban areas of 100,001 people or more. The survey, then, largely represents a rural staffing experience that is most appropriately compared and contrasted to the experience of non-indian health program facilities serving similar small communities with which Merritt Hawkins works. 22 Responses came from administrators from 19 states, with the majority of responses 54% coming from four states; California, New Mexico, Oklahoma and Washington. Geographic variance represented in the survey therefore is somewhat limited.

23 NEEDS, ACCESS AND QUALITY It is assumed that virtually all Indian health program facilities provide some level of primary care services, either through primary care physicians or through non-physician clinicians such as PAs and NPs, while a lesser number provide specialty care, dental services, or pharmacy services. Areas of Need Not surprisingly, the greatest need for clinicians as indicated by the survey is in primary care -- the broadest area of service provided. Forty-five percent of administrators indicated they have an urgent need for primary care physicians, while 38% expressed a moderate need. Fewer than one in five (17%) indicated they are fully staffed in primary care and have no immediate need. This response is consistent with what Merritt Hawkins has observed nationwide among hospitals and medical groups. Family physicians and general internal medicine physicians are the two most requested search assignments we have received for the last five years. Approximately 65% of the healthcare facilities we have contacted in the last six months have indicated a need for primary care physicians. The supply of primary care physicians has been constrained in recent years as medical school graduates have gravitated toward higher paying specialty areas. Indeed, the number of residents choosing primary care declined by 60% between 1998 and Health reform includes provisions to stimulate medical student interest in primary care, but shortages are projected for the foreseeable future. Though not all Indian health program facilities provide dental services, 43% of administrators indicated their facilities have an urgent need for dentists and 29% said they had a moderate need. The emerging shortage of dentists has been observed by Staff Care, a company affiliated with Merritt Hawkins which staffs temporary (i.e.,locum tenens) clinicians. Staff Care received virtually no requests for temporary dentists prior to 2005 but received requests to fill over 10,000 days with temporary dentists in 2010, mostly on behalf of government run or funded facilities. In most cases, facilities are using locum tenens dentists to maintain services while they seek hard-to-find permanent candidates. The urgent need for dentists expressed by many Indian health program facility administrators is therefore in line with what Merritt Hawkins and its affiliated companies are seeing in the overall healthcare market. 4 Newsweek: September 12th,

24 Twenty-nine percent of administrators indicated their facilities have an urgent need for NPs and/or PAs, while 43% said they have a moderate need. Unlike primary care medicine and dentistry, where the number of providers being trained annually has been flat in recent years, the number of PAs and NPs trained annually has increased in recent years. In general, NPs and PAs are therefore often easier to recruit than physicians. However, demand for PAs and NPs is not likely to keep pace with supply in primary care as many PAs and NPs have chosen to specialize. In addition, the team approach to health care delivery, promoted by the health reform act through the medical home concept, is likely to increase demand for primary care PAs and NPs, who will be assuming more duties as primary care physicians focus on overall coordination of comprehensive care. Indian health program facilities and other facilities may therefore face increased challenges in recruiting these clinicians. Twenty-eight percent of administrators indicated their facilities have an urgent need for nurses, while 45% said they have a moderate need. The severity of the nurse shortage has abated since the economic downturn began in 2008, as nurses otherwise occupied returned to the clinical workforce and as utilization of health services (particularly elective services) has declined. Nevertheless, only 27% of administrators indicated their facilities are fully staffed with nurses and have no immediate need for more. This is not generally consistent with what Merritt Hawkins and its affiliated nurse staffing companies are observing in the field, including in rural areas, suggesting Indian health program facilities may have particular challenges in nurse recruiting not being experienced throughout other segments of the healthcare system. In many cases, smaller communities are able to grow their own nurses and often do not have as high a nurse vacancy rate as larger, urban facilities. As a result, Merritt Hawkins affiliated nurse staffing companies only infrequently work in rural areas. By contrast, Merritt Hawkins, which specializes in physician recruiting, often works in such areas, which often do experience high physician vacancy rates. Twenty-six percent of administrators indicated their facilities have an urgent need for specialist physicians, while 32% said they have a moderate need. Media and policy maker attention has largely been focused on the shortage of primary care physicians in recent years, obscuring to some degree the fact that shortages in specialty areas also have emerged. Shortages are particularly acute in general surgery, where the supply of new surgeons is stagnant. In 1980, 945 newly trained general surgeons were certified in the U.S. In 2008, the number was virtually the same (972) despite a population increase of over 75 million people. 5 Shortages also are particularly acute in psychiatry, one of the oldest specialties in which 52% of practitioners are 55 or over, according to the American Medical Association s Physician Master File. Indian health program and other facilities can expect recruiting challenges in these two specialties to be particularly intense moving forward. Nineteen percent of administrators expressed an urgent need for pharmacists at their facilities, while 35% expressed a moderate need. The economic downturn has suppressed demand for pharmacists, which was steadily escalating prior to 2008, largely as a result of the retail boom. Nevertheless, over half of those surveyed indicated a need for pharmacists at their facilities, though vacancy rates for pharmacists reported by IHS facility administrators are smaller than those for most other types of clinicians. These lower rates may be due in part to the fact that some IHS facilities are not staffed with pharmacists and therefore did not report vacancy rates. The relatively high rate of need for pharmacists indicated by the survey suggests Indian health program facilities may be experiencing particular challenges in recruiting pharmacists that are not generally being experienced by other segments of the healthcare system Brown D. Shortage of General Surgeons endangers rural Americans, Washington Post, January 1st, 2009.

25 Quality of Care and Access Compromised Shortages of clinicians present a serious concern to Indian health program administrators responding to the survey, with the greatest concern focused on primary care physicians and dentists. Eighty-three percent of administrators indicated that a shortage of primary care physicians at their facilities was a cause of serious or moderate concern and 72% said a shortage of dentists was a cause of serious or moderate concern. However, concern about clinician shortages was reflected across the spectrum of providers. The majority of administrators (62%) expressed at least moderate to serious concern over shortages of specialist physicians, NPs and PAs, nurses, and pharmacists. Administrators also indicated that clinician shortages have led to compromised access to care in their service areas. The majority (54%) said that a shortage of primary care physicians has compromised access to care in their areas, 48% said a shortage of dentists has compromised access, and 46% said a shortage of specialist physicians has compromised access. Shortages of PAs/NPs, nurses and pharmacists also have compromised access according to at least 23% of administrators. Poor access to care often leads to poorer quality of care, which appears to be the case for some of the administrators surveyed. Forty-six percent said that a shortage of primary care physicians has compromised quality of care in their areas, 41% said a shortage of dentists has compromised quality, and 40% said a shortage of specialty physicians has compromised quality. Shortages of other clinicians also have compromised quality, though to a lesser degree. Thirty-three percent of administrators indicated a shortage of NPs/PAs has compromised quality of care in their areas, 25% said a shortage of nurses had compromised quality of care, and 22% said a shortage of pharmacists had compromised quality of care. How these results compare to other segments of the healthcare system is difficult to ascertain. However, in a 2009 survey of acute care hospital administrators (none of them within the IHS system) conducted by AMN Healthcare (Merritt Hawkins parent company) only 19% of administrators said that quality of care in their service areas had been compromised due to a shortage of physicians, only 11% said quality had been compromised due to a shortage of nurses, and only 5% said quality had been compromised due to a shortage of pharmacists. Of these administrators, 35% serve with hospitals in communities of 25,000 or less, and 32% serve with hospitals in communities of 25,001 to 100,000 people. The remaining 33% serve with hospitals in communities of 100,001 people or more. The majority (66%), therefore, serve in moderate to smaller communities where staffing challenges may parallel to some degree of IHS facilities. Lack of Planning Given the urgent need for clinicians expressed by many Indian health program facility administrators, it is somewhat surprising that some two-thirds of administrators (67%) indicated their facilities do not have a clinician recruitment and retention plan in place. Similarly, in IHS 2011 Survey of Physician Practice Patterns and Career Satisfaction, 67% of IHS facility physicians said their facilities either do not have a recruitment and retention plan in place or they do not know if such a plan is in place. In Merritt Hawkins experience, lack of a staff plan is not uncommon in smaller healthcare facilities that are focused on daily rather than strategic challenges and which do not have personnel dedicated to recruitment. However, a formal plan featuring goals, benchmarks and physician involvement can be critical to consistent recruiting success. 25

26 RECRUITING PATTERNS Indian health program facilities are actively engaged in the recruitment of a range of clinicians with a focus on dentists, nurses, family physicians and nurse practitioners. Fifty-seven percent of administrators are recruiting dentists, 55% are recruiting nurses, 50% are recruiting family physicians and 49% are recruiting nurse practitioners. In the last 12 months, Indian health program administrators have achieved some recruiting success. The majority (64%) have recruited at least one physician, while the remaining 36% have either been unsuccessful or have not attempted to recruit. In Merritt Hawkins experience, many facilities serving small, rural populations can go a year and sometimes much longer without being able to recruit a physician, suggesting that the Indian health service model and the way it is being presented has generated some appeal among physicians. This point is further substantiated by IHS 2011 Survey of Physician Practice Patterns and Career Satisfaction. Eighty-five percent of IHS facility physicians responding to this survey indicated they have practiced in both IHS and non- IHS facilities. Of these, 78% said working with IHS facilities is either more satisfying or as satisfying as working with non-ihs facilities. In addition, 70% of IHS physicians surveyed said they now find medical practice to be very satisfying or somewhat satisfying. By contrast, only 34% of non-ihs physicians surveyed by Merritt Hawkins said they now find medical practice to be very satisfying or somewhat satisfying. The 2011 Clinical Staffing and Recruiting Survey indicates that forty percent of administrators have had success in the last 12 months recruiting primary care physicians, 15% have recruited general internists, and 11% have recruited psychiatrists, all difficult searches to fill. Fifty percent of administrators indicated they are now recruiting family physicians, 14% are recruiting general internists, and 14% are recruiting psychiatrists, 12% emergency physicians, and 10% pediatricians. A majority of administrators (60%) have had success recruiting dentists and nurses in the last 12 months, while 48% have recruited nurse practitioners and 46% have recruited pharmacists. The majority (57%) are now recruiting dentists, 55% are recruiting nurses and 49% are recruiting nurse practitioners. Areas of Difficulty Of these clinicians, physician specialists are deemed the most difficult to recruit by the administrators surveyed. Fifty-nine percent of administrators rated specialists as very difficult to recruit, a number reflecting the experience of many rural facilities with which Merritt Hawkins has worked. Specialists generally require a wider referral network, more sub-specialty support, and more sophisticated equipment than is typically available in small communities. 26 Fifty-two percent of administrators rated primary care physicians as very difficult to recruit, reflecting the limited supply and intense competition for providers in this area, while 49% rated dentists as very difficult to recruit. Nurses, by contrast, were only rated difficult to recruit by 25% of administrators, reflecting the general easing of supply constraints resulting from the economic turndown. Though the majority of IHS facility administrators (64%) have succeeded in recruiting at least one physician in the last 12 months, the process is nevertheless deemed to be challenging by many, and 50% of administrators describe the shortage of primary care physicians at their facilities as a serious concern.

27 In general, administrators indicated that clinicians have become more difficult to recruit over the last 12 months rather than less, as might be expected given the supply and demand trends referenced above. For example, 42% of administrators said primary care physicians have become more difficult to recruit while 10% said they have become less difficult to recruit. Administrators are mixed on their views of specialist physicians, however. An equal number (24%) said they have become easier to recruit as said they have become harder to recruit. This reflects trends in the overall specialist market in which payment and utilization patterns have suppressed demand for certain types of specialists (radiologists, anesthesiologists) who are now somewhat easier to recruit, while having little effect on others (general surgeons, psychiatrists) who remain difficult to recruit. Recruiting Time-Frames Nineteen percent of administrators indicated that it typically takes them 90 days or less to recruit a primary care physician. Based on recruiting industry standards, in which it is common for such searches to take 180 days or more, some Indian health program facilities are experiencing extremely efficient search completion times. An additional 35% of administrators indicated they are completing primary care physician searches between days, also an efficient time frame. Just over one quarter (27%) are completing primary care searches between days, a somewhat inefficient but not uncommon time frame. The remaining 19% are completing primary care searches in more than 365 days, a generally inefficient though not unheard of time frame. Administrators indicated that it typically takes them longer to recruit specialist physicians than primary care physicians, a not unexpected result given the difficulty of recruiting specialists to rural areas. Only six percent of administrators indicated they typically complete specialist searches in 30 days or less, while 33% indicated it typically takes more than 360 days to complete a specialist search. In general, time frames to recruit primary care physicians to Indian program facilities are within industry efficiency standards, whereas time frames to recruit specialists are somewhat longer than industry standards. Sixty-seven percent of administrators indicated they are able to recruit NPs and PAs within 180 days, a time frame consistent with industry standards. A minority (12%) require over 365 days to recruit NPs and PAs, a time frame typically longer than industry standards. Interviews Per Physician The majority of administrators (71%) indicated they conduct four or fewer interviews in order to place one physician, while 29 percent require five or more interviews. Industry standards vary, but as a general rule an efficient physician search can be completed within two interviews, given clear candidate parameters and communication, though three to four interviews is not uncommon. While some administrators are interviewing efficiently, an opportunity appears to exist for many Indian health program facilities to achieve a more efficient interview to placement ratio. Such ratios typically are achieved through in-depth front-end preparation during which candidates are rigorously screened. Administrators reported an average candidate interview cost of $3,815, including flights, rental car, accommodation, meals/entertainment and other. The unspecified other category accounted for $2,253 of the total average expense, and no data in the survey accounts for the nature of the other category. Excluding the other category, the average interview expense was $1,562, an amount closely in line with what Merritt Hawkins sees as a national average. 27

28 Methods of Recruiting Administrators indicated they use a range of methods to recruit clinicians, including online advertising, job postings on their web sites, journal advertising and a variety of others. Networking with their staff and community was rated a most effective recruiting method by 44% of administrators, followed by online advertising (27%), IHS assistance and resources (26%), networking with residency programs (24%), and posting jobs on their own web sites. Networking through personal contacts and residency programs has traditionally been the key method by which health facilities recruit, and online tools have largely replaced journal advertising, suggesting that Indian health program facilities are in tune with the general market in their utilization of recruiting resources. Administrators were asked to rate the factors that attract candidates to Indian health program facilities. Fifty-eight percent said they strongly agree that practice style is an attraction, 43% strongly agree cultural diversity is an attraction, and 40% strongly agree a mission-driven focus is an attraction. In IHS s 2011 Survey of Physician Practice Patterns and Career Satisfaction, IHS facility physicians were asked what they find satisfying about working with IHS facilities. Eighty-seven percent said they find overall IHS practice style to be very satisfying or somewhat satisfying. IHS administrators responding to the Clinical Staffing and Recruiting Survey therefore are validated in thinking that the IHS practice brand is one of their strongest physician recruiting assets. An even higher number of IHS facility physicians (89%) surveyed said they find mission-driven care to be a very satisfying or somewhat satisfying aspect of IHS practice. As noted in the 2011 Survey of Physician Practice Patterns and Career Satisfaction, many physicians today are disillusioned with the current medical practice environment and the diminishing emotional rewards it offers. Many such physicians embark on medical missions to experience these rewards. IHS practice allows physicians to achieve the emotional satisfaction derived from such missions in their daily practice, a key recruiting advantage and a central component of the IHS practice brand. Indian health program facilities clearly are recruiting on the basis of a unique practice style that narrows the candidate pool to physicians who are seeking alternatives to the prevailing practice environment, which in Merritt Hawkins experience is the appropriate approach. 28

Trend The Growing Use of Locum Tenens Providers as a Supplement To Permanent Medical Staff

Trend The Growing Use of Locum Tenens Providers as a Supplement To Permanent Medical Staff Trend The Growing Use of Locum Tenens Providers as a Supplement To Permanent Medical Staff By Phillip Miller Vice President of Communications Staff Care (866) 871-8519 www.staffcare.com Table of Contents

More information

2014 SURVEY OF TEMPORARY PHYSICIAN STAFFING TRENDS BASED ON 2013 DATA

2014 SURVEY OF TEMPORARY PHYSICIAN STAFFING TRENDS BASED ON 2013 DATA WE VE EARNED THE JOINT COMMISSION S GOLD SEAL OF APPROVAL 2014 SURVEY OF TEMPORARY PHYSICIAN STAFFING TRENDS BASED ON DATA 2014 STAFF CARE, Inc 5001 Statesman Drive, Irving, Texas 75063 (800) 685-2272

More information

SUMMARY REPORT 2005 Survey of Hospital Physician Recruitment Trends

SUMMARY REPORT 2005 Survey of Hospital Physician Recruitment Trends SUMMARY REPORT 2005 Survey of Hospital Physician Recruitment Trends Overview Merritt, Hawkins & Associates (MHA) is a national physician search and consulting firm that periodically conducts surveys regarding

More information

2015 SURVEY OF FAMILY MEDICINE RESIDENTS CERTIFIED BY THE JOINT COMMISSION AND THE NATIONAL COMMITTEE FOR QUALITY ASSURANCE

2015 SURVEY OF FAMILY MEDICINE RESIDENTS CERTIFIED BY THE JOINT COMMISSION AND THE NATIONAL COMMITTEE FOR QUALITY ASSURANCE CERTIFIED BY THE JOINT COMMISSION AND THE NATIONAL COMMITTEE FOR QUALITY ASSURANCE 2015 SURVEY OF FAMILY MEDICINE RESIDENTS 2015 Staff Care, Inc 8840 Cypress Waters Dr, #300 Dallas, TX 75019 (800) 685-2272

More information

TREND WHITE PAPER LOCUM TENENS NURSE PRACTITIONERS AND PHYSICIAN ASSISTANTS: A GROWING ROLE IN A CHANGING WORKFORCE

TREND WHITE PAPER LOCUM TENENS NURSE PRACTITIONERS AND PHYSICIAN ASSISTANTS: A GROWING ROLE IN A CHANGING WORKFORCE TREND WHITE PAPER LOCUM TENENS NURSE PRACTITIONERS AND PHYSICIAN ASSISTANTS: A GROWING ROLE IN A CHANGING WORKFORCE The Leader in Locum Tenens Staffing INTRODUCTION Today s Mobile Healthcare Work Force

More information

Survey of Nurse Practitioners: Practice Trends and Perspectives

Survey of Nurse Practitioners: Practice Trends and Perspectives Survey of Nurse Practitioners: Practice Trends and Perspectives Advanced Practice An Examination of the Professional Morale, Practice Patterns, Career Plans, and Perspectives of Nurse Practitioners Attending

More information

2015 SURVEY OF TEMPORARY PHYSICIAN STAFFING TRENDS BASED ON 2014 DATA

2015 SURVEY OF TEMPORARY PHYSICIAN STAFFING TRENDS BASED ON 2014 DATA CERTIFIED BY THE JOINT COMMISSION AND THE TIOL COMMITTEE FOR QUALITY ASSURANCE 2015 SURVEY OF TEMPORARY PHYSICIAN STAFFING TRENDS BASED ON DATA 2015 Staff Care, Inc 5001 Statesman Drive, Irving, Texas

More information

2013 Physician Inpatient/ Outpatient Revenue Survey

2013 Physician Inpatient/ Outpatient Revenue Survey Physician Inpatient/ Outpatient Revenue Survey A survey showing net annual inpatient and outpatient revenue generated by physicians in various specialties on behalf of their affiliated hospitals Merritt

More information

2013 Survey of Temporary. 2013 STAFF CARE, Inc. 5001 Statesman Drive, Irving, Texas 75063 (800) 685-2272 www.staffcare.com

2013 Survey of Temporary. 2013 STAFF CARE, Inc. 5001 Statesman Drive, Irving, Texas 75063 (800) 685-2272 www.staffcare.com We ve earned The Joint Commission s Gold Seal of Approval 2013 Survey of Temporary Physician Staffing Trends Certified by the Joint Commission 2013 STAFF CARE, Inc 5001 Statesman Drive, Irving, Texas 75063

More information

THE GROWING USE OF LOCUM TENENS DENTISTS

THE GROWING USE OF LOCUM TENENS DENTISTS TREND WHITE PAPER THE GROWING USE OF LOCUM TENENS DENTISTS WE VE EARNED THE JOINT COMMISSION S GOLD SEAL OF APPROVAL The Leader in Locum Tenens Staffing IN THIS WHITE PAPER INTRODUCTION BACKGROUND: PHYSICIANS

More information

2011 Survey of Final-Year Medical Residents

2011 Survey of Final-Year Medical Residents 2011 Survey of Final-Year Medical Residents A Survey Examining the Career Preferences, Plans and Expectations of Physicians Completing Their Residency Training 2011 Survey of Final-Year Medical Residents

More information

INDUSTRY PERSPECTIVES. Knowing your demographic: Exploring the utilization of locums physicians to expand business

INDUSTRY PERSPECTIVES. Knowing your demographic: Exploring the utilization of locums physicians to expand business INDUSTRY PERSPECTIVES Knowing your demographic: Exploring the utilization of locums physicians to expand business Justin Roark, Recruiting Principal, Delta Locum Tenens the Offering services appropriate

More information

INDUSTRY PERSPECTIVES

INDUSTRY PERSPECTIVES INDUSTRY PERSPECTIVES Behavioral Health: Staying ahead of the shortage As the demand for behavioral health professionals increases, facilities should consider what implications this may have on facility

More information

INDUSTRY PERSPECTIVES. Chris McDonald, Regional Vice President, Delta Locum Tenens. As many talented physicians adopt locum

INDUSTRY PERSPECTIVES. Chris McDonald, Regional Vice President, Delta Locum Tenens. As many talented physicians adopt locum INDUSTRY PERSPECTIVES Locum Tenens Industry Growing; Where do You Stand on the Spectrum? Chris McDonald, Regional Vice President, Delta Locum Tenens the 2nd Quarter 2015 July 14 - June 15 According to

More information

AMN Healthcare Investor Presentation

AMN Healthcare Investor Presentation AMN Healthcare Investor Presentation Q2 2015 The Innovator in Healthcare Workforce Solutions and Staffing Services Forward-Looking Statements This investor presentation contains forward-looking statements

More information

2014 SURVEY. Physician Appointment Wait Times and Medicaid and Medicare Acceptance Rates

2014 SURVEY. Physician Appointment Wait Times and Medicaid and Medicare Acceptance Rates SURVEY Physician Appointment Wait Times and Medicaid and Medicare Acceptance Rates A survey examining the time needed to schedule a new patient appointment with a physician in major metropolitan markets

More information

2013 SURVEY OF TEMPORARY PHYSICIAN STAFFING TRENDS. 2013 STAFF CARE, Inc. 5001 Statesman Drive, Irving, Texas 75063 (800) 685-2272 www.staffcare.

2013 SURVEY OF TEMPORARY PHYSICIAN STAFFING TRENDS. 2013 STAFF CARE, Inc. 5001 Statesman Drive, Irving, Texas 75063 (800) 685-2272 www.staffcare. We ve earned The Joint Commission s Gold Seal of Approval 2013 SURVEY OF TEMPORARY PHYSICIAN STAFFING TRENDS 2013 STAFF CARE, Inc 5001 Statesman Drive, Irving, Texas 75063 (800) 685-2272 www.staffcare.com

More information

The Economic Impact of Physicians

The Economic Impact of Physicians The Economic Impact of Physicians A Fact Sheet Examining the Economic Contribution Physicians Make to Their Communities and to Their Affiliated Hospitals Prepared by: Merritt Hawkins, the nation s leading

More information

THE DOCTOR CAN T SEE YOU NOW NEW YORK S PHYSICIAN SHORTAGE GROWS

THE DOCTOR CAN T SEE YOU NOW NEW YORK S PHYSICIAN SHORTAGE GROWS THE DOCTOR CAN T SEE YOU NOW NEW YORK S PHYSICIAN SHORTAGE GROWS DECEMBER 2009 KEY FINDINGS HANYS 2009 Physician Advocacy Survey Physician retirements are offsetting recruitment, and little progress is

More information

Patty Iron Cloud National Native American Youth Initiative Meeting June 20, 2011

Patty Iron Cloud National Native American Youth Initiative Meeting June 20, 2011 Patty Iron Cloud National Native American Youth Initiative Meeting June 20, 2011 Indian Health Service Overview by Yvette Roubideaux, M.D., M.P.H. Director, Indian Health Service (The Patty Iron Cloud

More information

STATEMENT OF RECORD PRESENTED TO THE COMMITTEE ON VETERANS AFFAIRS SUBCOMMITEE ON HEALTH OVERSIGHT

STATEMENT OF RECORD PRESENTED TO THE COMMITTEE ON VETERANS AFFAIRS SUBCOMMITEE ON HEALTH OVERSIGHT STATEMENT OF RECORD PRESENTED TO THE COMMITTEE ON VETERANS AFFAIRS SUBCOMMITEE ON HEALTH OVERSIGHT HEARING ON THE ABILITY OF THE DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (VA) TO EFFECTIVELY RECRUIT, ONBOARD AND

More information

RVU BASED PHYSICIAN COMPENSATION AND PRODUCTIVITY

RVU BASED PHYSICIAN COMPENSATION AND PRODUCTIVITY RVU BASED PHYSICIAN COMPENSATION AND PRODUCTIVITY Ten Recommendations for Determining Physician Compensation/Productivity Through Relative Value Units 2011 Merritt Hawkins 5001 Statesman Drive Irving,

More information

Federal Health Care Workforce Education and Training Programs

Federal Health Care Workforce Education and Training Programs 1 Federal Health Care Workforce Education and Training Programs Presented by: Kathleen M. King Director, Health Care US Government Accountability Office February 20, 2015 2 Table of Contents Overview of

More information

Progress Report. Adequacy of New Mexico s Healthcare Workforce Systems AT A GLANCE

Progress Report. Adequacy of New Mexico s Healthcare Workforce Systems AT A GLANCE Progress Report Program Evaluation Unit Legislative Finance Committee Date: August 21, 2015 Adequacy of New Mexico s Healthcare Workforce Systems AT A GLANCE With the full implementation of the Affordable

More information

How to Hire International Medical Graduates with Ease by Ann Massey Badmus, Attorney at Law

How to Hire International Medical Graduates with Ease by Ann Massey Badmus, Attorney at Law May 2011 How to Hire International Medical Graduates with Ease by Ann Massey Badmus, Attorney at Law According to an American College of Physicians monograph published in 2008, International Medical Graduates

More information

2011 Hospitalist Locum Tenens Survey

2011 Hospitalist Locum Tenens Survey 2011 Hospitalist Locum Tenens Survey Introduction The past two decades have seen explosive growth in Hospital Medicine. A majority of US hospitals now have hospital medicine programs and the number of

More information

ACCESS TO CARE IN CRISIS: PHYSICIANS IN SHORT SUPPLY

ACCESS TO CARE IN CRISIS: PHYSICIANS IN SHORT SUPPLY HANYS ACCESS TO CARE IN CRISIS: PHYSICIANS IN SHORT SUPPLY HANYS 2008 PHYSICIAN WORKFORCE SURVEY NOVEMBER 2008 ACCESS TO CARE IN CRISIS: PHYSICIANS IN SHORT SUPPLY HANYS 2008 PHYSICIAN WORKFORCE SURVEY

More information

Workforce Development Programs

Workforce Development Programs Nurses provide extraordinary care. They re the front lines of the healthcare system. ~ President Barack Obama White House Health Care Summit March 5, 2009 Nursing Workforce Development Programs Title VIII

More information

The Physician Workforce. 2012 Physician Survey Report. Dianne Reynolds-Cane, MD, Director. Virginia Department of Health Professions

The Physician Workforce. 2012 Physician Survey Report. Dianne Reynolds-Cane, MD, Director. Virginia Department of Health Professions The Physician Workforce 2012 Physician Survey Report Dianne Reynolds-Cane, MD, Director Virginia Department of Health Professions Joint Commission on Health Care September 17, 2013 Updated 9/18/13 Healthcare

More information

2012 SURVEY OF REGISTERED NURSES AMN HEALTHCARE, INC., 2012 JOB SATISFACTION, CAREER PATTERNS AND TRAJECTORIES

2012 SURVEY OF REGISTERED NURSES AMN HEALTHCARE, INC., 2012 JOB SATISFACTION, CAREER PATTERNS AND TRAJECTORIES We ve earned The Joint Commission s Gold Seal of Approval 2012 SURVEY OF REGISTERED NURSES AMN HEALTHCARE, INC., 2012 12400 High Bluff Drive, San Diego, CA 92130 JOB SATISFACTION, CAREER PATTERNS AND TRAJECTORIES

More information

kaiser medicaid and the uninsured MARCH 2012 commission on

kaiser medicaid and the uninsured MARCH 2012 commission on I S S U E kaiser commission on medicaid and the uninsured MARCH 2012 P A P E R Medicaid and Community Health Centers: the Relationship between Coverage for Adults and Primary Care Capacity in Medically

More information

Your Partner in Nationwide Locum Tenens Staffing and Placement

Your Partner in Nationwide Locum Tenens Staffing and Placement Maxim Physician Resources Your Partner in Nationwide Locum Tenens Staffing and Placement www.maximphysicians.com Table of Contents Company Overview MPR Company Overview... 2 An Experienced Provider...

More information

2015 Healthcare. Recruiting Trends Survey. Key Findings. Contents. About this Survey. n Key Findings. n The Healthcare Employment Landscape

2015 Healthcare. Recruiting Trends Survey. Key Findings. Contents. About this Survey. n Key Findings. n The Healthcare Employment Landscape 2015 Healthcare Recruiting Trends Survey Contents n Key Findings n The Healthcare Employment Landscape n Recruiting Challenges n Recruiting Tools & Strategies n Conclusion About this Survey HEALTHeCAREERS

More information

CHCs AND PHYSICIAN RECRUITING

CHCs AND PHYSICIAN RECRUITING THE PHYSICIAN RECRUITING MAKEOVER: HOW TO MAKE YOUR COMMUNITY HEALTH CENTER A DOCTOR MAGNET CHCs AND PHYSICIAN RECRUITING THERE S GOOD NEWS and BAD NEWS 1 FIRST, THE BAD NEWS THE PHYSICIAN SHORTAGE IS

More information

AAPA ANNUAL SURVEY REPORT

AAPA ANNUAL SURVEY REPORT 2013 AAPA ANNUAL SURVEY REPORT PHYSICIAN ASSISTANTS AT A GLANCE HIGHLIGHTS OF THE MEDIAN AGE CLINICALLY PRACTICING PAS BY PRIMARY SPECIALTY PRACTICE SETTING Primary Care 32.0% Surgical Subspecialties 27.0%

More information

PRIMARY CARE PHYSICIAN RECRUITMENT AND RETENTION PROGRAMS IN MASSACHUSETTS

PRIMARY CARE PHYSICIAN RECRUITMENT AND RETENTION PROGRAMS IN MASSACHUSETTS PRIMARY CARE PHYSICIAN RECRUITMENT AND RETENTION PROGRAMS IN MASSACHUSETTS THIS INFORMATION HAS BEEN COLLECTED THROUGH A COLLABORATIVE EFFORT BETWEEN THE MASSACHUSETTS DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC HEALTH PRIMARY

More information

Physician Assistant Census Report: Results from the 2010 AAPA Census

Physician Assistant Census Report: Results from the 2010 AAPA Census Physician Assistant Census Report: Results from the 2010 AAPA Census PHYSICIAN ASSISTANTS AT A GLANCE: HIGHLIGHTS OF THE 2010 ANNUAL PHYSICIAN ASSISTANT CENSUS REPORT Median Age: 38 years Percent in Clinical

More information

Primary Care Recruitment & Retention Programs in Massachusetts

Primary Care Recruitment & Retention Programs in Massachusetts Primary Care Recruitment & Retention Programs in Massachusetts Nicole Watson Recruitment / Retention Program Specialist, Massachusetts Health Care Workforce Center Nicole.watson@state.ma.us The Massachusetts

More information

Health Workforce Trends and Policy in Nevada and the United States

Health Workforce Trends and Policy in Nevada and the United States Health Workforce Trends and Policy in Nevada and the United States Tabor Griswold, PhD Health Services Research Analyst Office of Statewide Initiatives University of Nevada School of Medicine CHS Fall

More information

The National Progress Report on e-prescribing and Safe-Rx Rankings

The National Progress Report on e-prescribing and Safe-Rx Rankings The National Progress Report on e-prescribing and Safe-Rx Rankings YEAR 2012 neutrality transparency physician and patient choice open standards collaboration privacy THE national progress report ON E-prescribing

More information

HEALTH CARE TODAY& PHYSICIAN RECRUITING RESOURCES MICHIGAN PRIMARY CARE ASSOCIATION

HEALTH CARE TODAY& PHYSICIAN RECRUITING RESOURCES MICHIGAN PRIMARY CARE ASSOCIATION HEALTH CARE TODAY& PHYSICIAN RECRUITING RESOURCES MICHIGAN PRIMARY CARE ASSOCIATION BY: JEREMY SCHULTZ SENIOR MARKET CONSULTANT 2013 AMN Healthcare, Inc. All rights reserved. Redistribution of these materials

More information

National and State-Level Projections of Dentists and Dental Hygienists in the U.S., 2012-2025 February 2015

National and State-Level Projections of Dentists and Dental Hygienists in the U.S., 2012-2025 February 2015 National and State-Level Projections of Dentists and Dental Hygienists in the U.S., 2012-2025 February 2015 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Health Resources and Services Administration Bureau

More information

What If Your In-House Physician Recruiting is Not Working? The Benefits of Recruitment Process Outsourcing for Healthcare Organizations

What If Your In-House Physician Recruiting is Not Working? The Benefits of Recruitment Process Outsourcing for Healthcare Organizations What If Your In-House Physician Recruiting is Not Working? The Benefits of Recruitment Process Outsourcing for Healthcare Organizations www.practicematch.com What If Your In-House Physician Recruiting

More information

Workforce Development Programs

Workforce Development Programs Nurses provide extraordinary care. They re the front lines of the healthcare system. ~ President Barack Obama White House Health Care Summit March 5, 2009 Nursing Workforce Development Programs Title VIII

More information

REPORT OF FINDINGS NURSING FACILITY STAFFING SURVEY 2010

REPORT OF FINDINGS NURSING FACILITY STAFFING SURVEY 2010 REPORT OF FINDINGS NURSING FACILITY STAFFING SURVEY 2010 October, 2011 ABSTRACT Approximately 2 million workers were employed at nursing facilities across the United States in 2010. 1.3 million nursing

More information

VA Programs designed specifically to encourage medical professionals to work at rural VA s.

VA Programs designed specifically to encourage medical professionals to work at rural VA s. VA Programs designed specifically to encourage medical professionals to work at rural VA s. The Office of Rural Health (ORH) is committed to the recruitment, education, training and retention of the rural

More information

Addressing Dental Workforce in the State of Michigan. Michigan Department of Community Health ~ Oral Health Program April 30, 2009

Addressing Dental Workforce in the State of Michigan. Michigan Department of Community Health ~ Oral Health Program April 30, 2009 Addressing Dental Workforce in the State of Michigan Michigan Department of Community Health ~ Oral Health Program April 30, 2009 1 Acknowledgements State of Michigan Governor Jennifer M. Granholm Michigan

More information

1.3 Fellowship, Academic, Government, Caring for the Underserved, Immigration Issues, International Medicine

1.3 Fellowship, Academic, Government, Caring for the Underserved, Immigration Issues, International Medicine 1. Making Career Decisions 1.17 1.3 Fellowship, Academic, Government, Caring for the Underserved, Immigration Issues, International Medicine Learning Objectives Describe these careers alternatives and

More information

Challenges Recruiting and Retaining Healthcare Providers

Challenges Recruiting and Retaining Healthcare Providers Challenges Recruiting and Retaining Healthcare Providers A Surplus of Doctors?? For the past 25 years, the AMA and other industry groups have predicted an excess of doctors and worked to limit the number

More information

Subtitle B Innovations in the Health Care Workforce

Subtitle B Innovations in the Health Care Workforce H. R. 3590 474 (B) licensed registered nurses who will receive a graduate or equivalent degree or training to become an advanced education nurse as defined by section 811(b). ; and (2) by adding at the

More information

Regulatory and Legislative Action Since the September 2010 Membership Meeting:

Regulatory and Legislative Action Since the September 2010 Membership Meeting: MEMBERSHIP MEETING January 19, 2011 Delivery System Reform: Healthcare Workforce Issue: The passage of health reform will bring millions of newly insured individuals into the system and drive patients

More information

Welcome. The National Health Service Corps: The Ins, Outs, and Opportunities for HCH Grantees. Tuesday, June 18, 2013

Welcome. The National Health Service Corps: The Ins, Outs, and Opportunities for HCH Grantees. Tuesday, June 18, 2013 1 Welcome The National Health Service Corps: The Ins, Outs, and Opportunities for HCH Grantees Tuesday, June 18, 2013 We will begin promptly at 1 p.m. Eastern. Event Host: Mallory Powell, BA Program Contractor

More information

2009 REVIEW OF PHYSICIAN AND CRNA RECRUITING INCENTIVES

2009 REVIEW OF PHYSICIAN AND CRNA RECRUITING INCENTIVES 2009 REVIEW OF PHYSICIAN AND CRNA RECRUITING INCENTIVES 2009 Merritt Hawkins & Associates 5001 Statesman Drive Irving, Texas 75063 (800) 876-0500 MerrittHawkins.com SUMMARY REPORT 2009 REVIEW OF PHYSICIAN

More information

Primary Care Recruitment & Retention Programs in

Primary Care Recruitment & Retention Programs in Primary Care Recruitment & Retention Programs in Massachusetts Nicole Watson National Health Service Corps Specialist Primary Care Office Nicole.watson@state.ma.us The Mission The mission of these programs

More information

2002 Physician Inpatient/Outpatient Revenue Survey

2002 Physician Inpatient/Outpatient Revenue Survey 2002 Physician Inpatient/Outpatient Revenue Survey INTRODUCTION: Merritt, Hawkins & Associates is a national physician search and consulting firm representing over 2,000 physician search engagements annually.

More information

HPNEC. FY 2015 Brochure

HPNEC. FY 2015 Brochure HPNEC Health Professions and Nursing Education COALITION Health Professions Education Programs: Connecting students to health careers, health professionals to underserved communities, and communities to

More information

Psychiatry: The Silent Shortage

Psychiatry: The Silent Shortage Psychiatry: The Silent Shortage A resource provided by Merritt Hawkins, the nation s leading physician search and consulting firm and a company of AMN Healthcare (NYSE: AHS), the largest healthcare workforce

More information

Healthcare. State Report. Anthony P. Carnevale Nicole Smith Artem Gulish Bennett H. Beach. June 2012

Healthcare. State Report. Anthony P. Carnevale Nicole Smith Artem Gulish Bennett H. Beach. June 2012 Healthcare State Report June 2012 Anthony P. Carnevale Nicole Smith Artem Gulish Bennett H. Beach B Table of Contents Healthcare: State Level Analysis... 3 Alabama... 12 Alaska... 14 Arizona... 16 Arkansas...

More information

Workforce Series: Physician Assistants

Workforce Series: Physician Assistants National Rural Health Association Policy Position Workforce Series: Physician Assistants Recruitment and Retention of Quality Health Workforce in Rural Areas: A Series of Policy Papers on the Rural Health

More information

Nurse Leaders in Native Care Conference. Indian Health Reform

Nurse Leaders in Native Care Conference. Indian Health Reform Indian Health Service Nurse Leaders in Native Care Conference July 20, 2010 Indian Health Reform by Yvette Roubideaux, M.D., M.P.H. Director, Indian Health Service Good morning. It is great to be here

More information

Survey PRACTICE AND COMPENSATION EXPECTATIONS FOR PHYSICIAN ASSISTANTS. 800.780.3500 mdainc.com

Survey PRACTICE AND COMPENSATION EXPECTATIONS FOR PHYSICIAN ASSISTANTS. 800.780.3500 mdainc.com Survey PRACTICE AND COMPENSATION EXPECTATIONS FOR PHYSICIAN ASSISTANTS 800.780.3500 mdainc.com Overview OBJECTIVE The objective of this survey was to collect and quantify practice and compensation expectations

More information

. Women in Medicine: A Review of Changing Physician Demographics, Female Physicians by Specialty, State and Related Data

. Women in Medicine: A Review of Changing Physician Demographics, Female Physicians by Specialty, State and Related Data . Women in Medicine: A Review of Changing Physician Demographics, Female Physicians by Specialty, State and Related Data A resource provided by Staff Care, the nation s leading locum tenens staffing firm

More information

Total 15,555 191,604

Total 15,555 191,604 January 2012 Program -to -Date Medicare Eligible Professionals 8,524 132,445 Doctors of Medicine or Osteopathy 7,620 118,146 Dentists 12 198 Optometrists 436 5,928 Podiatrists 222 4,890 Chiropractors 234

More information

Southern Oregon Nursing

Southern Oregon Nursing Southern Oregon Nursing Summit World Café Information Overview January 9 & 15, 2008 Red Lion Inn Medford Sponsored by: Gordon Elwood Foundation Jefferson Regional Health Alliance Rogue Valley Workforce

More information

Recruitment and Retention Resources By State List

Recruitment and Retention Resources By State List Recruitment and Retention Resources By State List Alabama $5,000 rural physician tax credit o http://codes.lp.findlaw.com/alcode/40/18/4a/40-18-132 o http://adph.org/ruralhealth/index.asp?id=882 Area Health

More information

REPORT OF FINDINGS 2008 NURSING FACILITY STAFF VACANCY, RETENTION AND TURNOVER SURVEY

REPORT OF FINDINGS 2008 NURSING FACILITY STAFF VACANCY, RETENTION AND TURNOVER SURVEY REPORT OF FINDINGS 2008 NURSING FACILITY STAFF VACANCY, RETENTION AND TURNOVER SURVEY American Health Care Association Department of Research October, 2010 ABSTRACT Approximately 2 million workers were

More information

Real Progress in Food Code Adoption

Real Progress in Food Code Adoption Real Progress in Food Code Adoption August 27, 2013 The Association of Food and Drug Officials (AFDO), under contract to the Food and Drug Administration, is gathering data on the progress of FDA Food

More information

2012 Hospitalist Locum Tenens Survey

2012 Hospitalist Locum Tenens Survey 2012 Hospitalist Locum Tenens Survey Introduction The past two decades have seen explosive growth in Hospital Medicine. A majority of US hospitals now have hospital medicine programs and the number of

More information

www.ruralhealth.kumc.edu

www.ruralhealth.kumc.edu www.ruralhealth.kumc.edu Recruitment Tools for Kansas Hospitals Presented by Joyce Grayson Director Rural Health Education & Services KU Medical Center Rural Health Education and Services Services Provided:

More information

2011 REVIEW OF PHYSICIAN RECRUITING INCENTIVES. An OvervIew Of THe SAlArIeS, BOnuSeS, AnD OTHer IncenTIveS customarily used TO recruit PHySIcIAnS

2011 REVIEW OF PHYSICIAN RECRUITING INCENTIVES. An OvervIew Of THe SAlArIeS, BOnuSeS, AnD OTHer IncenTIveS customarily used TO recruit PHySIcIAnS 2011 REVIEW OF PHYSICIAN RECRUITING INCENTIVES An OvervIew Of THe SAlArIeS, BOnuSeS, AnD OTHer IncenTIveS customarily used TO recruit PHySIcIAnS 2011 Merritt Hawkins 5001 Statesman Drive, Irving, Texas

More information

Federal Reform-Related Funding for the Health Care Workforce (May 2010)

Federal Reform-Related Funding for the Health Care Workforce (May 2010) Highlights of HRSA Stimulus Related (ARRA) for the Health Care Workforce ARRA includes $500 million for health workforce programs. $200 million is directed to scholarships, loans and loan repayment and

More information

AASA PHYSICIAN RECRUITING AND COMPENSATION TRENDS

AASA PHYSICIAN RECRUITING AND COMPENSATION TRENDS AASA PHYSICIAN RECRUITING AND COMPENSATION TRENDS OUR AGENDA 1. The state of the physician workforce 2. Physician recruiting incentives and trends OUR FRAGILE, FRAGMENTED PHYSICIAN WORKFORCE PART 1 HOW

More information

Center for Rural Health North Dakota Center for Health Workforce Data. July 2004

Center for Rural Health North Dakota Center for Health Workforce Data. July 2004 North Dakota Nursing Needs Study: Licensed Nurse Survey Year 2 Center for Rural Health North Dakota Center for Health Workforce Data July 2004 Carol Bennett, M.A., R.N. Patricia L. Moulton, Ph.D. Mary

More information

PRIMARY CARE NURSE RECRUITMENT AND RETENTION PROGRAMS IN MASSACHUSETTS

PRIMARY CARE NURSE RECRUITMENT AND RETENTION PROGRAMS IN MASSACHUSETTS PRIMARY CARE NURSE RECRUITMENT AND RETENTION PROGRAMS IN MASSACHUSETTS THIS INFORMATION HAS BEEN COLLECTED THROUGH A COLLABORATIVE EFFORT BETWEEN THE MASSACHUSETTS DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC HEALTH PRIMARY CARE

More information

New Application for Individual Providers

New Application for Individual Providers Professional Discipline Eligibility New Application for Individual Providers The first set of questions in this application will determine whether you are eligible for participation in this loan repayment

More information

ISSUE PAPER. Eighth in a series of Issue Papers released at the request of Chairman Charles Miller to inform the work of the Commission

ISSUE PAPER. Eighth in a series of Issue Papers released at the request of Chairman Charles Miller to inform the work of the Commission A NATIONAL DIALOGUE: The Secretary of Education s Commission on the Future of Higher Education ISSUE PAPER Eighth in a series of Issue Papers released at the request of Chairman Charles Miller to inform

More information

Why it is Cost Effective to Use a Physician Search Firm

Why it is Cost Effective to Use a Physician Search Firm January 2010 Why it is Cost Effective to Use a Physician Search Firm Guest Author: Thomas Grimes III, FACHE, retired CEO, Good Samaritan Community Healthcare, Puyallup, Washington. Tom currently leads

More information

(800) 955-1919 info@dystaffing.com dystaffing.com

(800) 955-1919 info@dystaffing.com dystaffing.com Win-win healthcare staffing solutions Since 1989, D&Y has held a leadership position in healthcare staffing by matching quality healthcare providers with quality practice environments. Beginning with anesthesia

More information

Indian Health Service Advances in Indian Health Conference April 30, 2010. Indian Health Care Reform

Indian Health Service Advances in Indian Health Conference April 30, 2010. Indian Health Care Reform Indian Health Service Advances in Indian Health Conference April 30, 2010 Indian Health Care Reform by Yvette Roubideaux, M.D., M.P.H. Director, Indian Health Service Good morning. It s a pleasure to be

More information

Projected Supply, Demand, and Shortages of Registered Nurses: 2000-2020

Projected Supply, Demand, and Shortages of Registered Nurses: 2000-2020 Projected Supply, Demand, and Shortages of Registered Nurses: 2000-2020 July 2002 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Health Resources and Services Administration Bureau of Health Professions

More information

Nursing Workforce. Primary Care Workforce

Nursing Workforce. Primary Care Workforce Key Provisions Related to Nursing: The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (Public Law 111-148) clearly represents a movement toward much-needed, comprehensive and meaningful reform for our nation

More information

Highlights From the 2012 National Sample Survey of Nurse Practitioners

Highlights From the 2012 National Sample Survey of Nurse Practitioners Highlights From the 2012 National Sample Survey of Nurse Practitioners Health Resources and Services Administration Bureau of Health Professions National Center for Health Workforce Analysis The Health

More information

Partners in Physician Retention: Retaining Michigan s Physician Workforce. Deb Collier Director, Recruitment Services Michigan Health Council

Partners in Physician Retention: Retaining Michigan s Physician Workforce. Deb Collier Director, Recruitment Services Michigan Health Council Partners in Physician Retention: Retaining Michigan s Physician Workforce Deb Collier Director, Recruitment Services Michigan Health Council Agenda Physician Workforce Profile Michigan Snapshot National

More information

United States Senate Special Committee on Aging Testimony of Scott Ekblad, Director

United States Senate Special Committee on Aging Testimony of Scott Ekblad, Director Oregon Office of Rural Health Mail code: L593 3181 S.W. Sam Jackson Park Road Portland, Oregon 97239-3098 tel 503 494-4450 fax 503 494-4798 toll free 866 674-4376 www.ohsu.edu/oregonruralhealth United

More information

THE PHYSICIAN RECRUITING MAKEOVER: HOW TO MAKE YOUR CENTER A DOCTOR MAGNET

THE PHYSICIAN RECRUITING MAKEOVER: HOW TO MAKE YOUR CENTER A DOCTOR MAGNET THE PHYSICIAN RECRUITING MAKEOVER: HOW TO MAKE YOUR CENTER A DOCTOR MAGNET THERE S AND BAD GOOD NEWS NEWS CHCs AND PHYSICIAN RECRUITING FIRST, THE BAD NEWS THE PHYSICIAN SHORTAGE IS LIKELY TO GET WORSE

More information

Senate Finance Committee. Transforming the Health Care Delivery System: Proposals to Improve Patient Care and Reduce Health Care Costs.

Senate Finance Committee. Transforming the Health Care Delivery System: Proposals to Improve Patient Care and Reduce Health Care Costs. Senate Finance Committee Transforming the Health Care Delivery System: Proposals to Improve Patient Care and Reduce Health Care Costs May 15, 2009 Comments Presented on Behalf of the American Association

More information

Practice Management 101

Practice Management 101 Practice Management 101 Program Agenda Market Trends in Eye Care Demographic trends Increased eye care services Medicare challenges Financial Benchmarking Clinic Optical Opportunities for a Successful

More information

Federal research suggests our country is

Federal research suggests our country is WYOMING LABOR FORCE TRENDS Copyright 2005 by the Wyoming Department of Employment Research & Planning Nursing in Wyoming, Part One: Supply and Retention by: Tony Glover, Senior Research Analyst Article

More information

A Look At Healthcare Spending, Employment, Pay, Benefits, And Prices

A Look At Healthcare Spending, Employment, Pay, Benefits, And Prices JUNE 2016 A Look At Healthcare Spending, Employment, Pay, Benefits, And Prices While Benjamin Franklin once said, "Nothing is more fatal to health than an over care of it," people are now living longer

More information

Three Year Comparison of Nurses in North Dakota Health Care Facilities: Results and Implications

Three Year Comparison of Nurses in North Dakota Health Care Facilities: Results and Implications CR H Center for Rural Health University of North Dakota School of Medicine & Health Sciences Three Year Comparison of Nurses in North Dakota Health Care Facilities: Results and Implications Patricia Moulton,

More information

Health Care Workforce Center PRIMARY CARE PHYSICIAN RECRUITMENT PROGRAMS IN MASSACHUSETTS

Health Care Workforce Center PRIMARY CARE PHYSICIAN RECRUITMENT PROGRAMS IN MASSACHUSETTS Massachusetts Department of Public Health Health Care Workforce Center PRIMARY CARE PHYSICIAN RECRUITMENT PROGRAMS IN MASSACHUSETTS THIS INFORMATION HAS BEEN COLLECTED THROUGH A COLLABORATIVE EFFORT BETWEEN

More information

Healthcare Jobs Snapshot

Healthcare Jobs Snapshot Q3 Healthcare Jobs Snapshot Executive Summary 2 Key Findings General Findings 3 Physicians/Surgeons 4 Nurses, Nurse Practitioners & Physician Assistants 6 Healthcare IT 7 Other Notable Growth Spots 8 Key

More information

You CAN work in New Mexico after you graduate AND earn money towards your educational debt

You CAN work in New Mexico after you graduate AND earn money towards your educational debt UNIVERSITY OF NEW MEXICO HEALTH SCIENCES CENTER FAMLY AND COMMUNITY MEDICINE CENTER FOR COMMUNITY PARTNERSHIPS RECRUITMENT AND RETENTION DO YOU WANT YOUR EDUCATION LOAN DEBT REPAID? DO YOU WANT TO STAY

More information

The Ontario Health Care Labour Market. 1.0 Ontario Public and Community Health Care Labour market

The Ontario Health Care Labour Market. 1.0 Ontario Public and Community Health Care Labour market The Ontario Health Care Labour Market 1.0 Ontario Public and Community Health Care Labour market 1.1 Profile of Health Care Workers in Ontario Agencies and hospitals responding to the surveys reported

More information

OVERVIEW OF CURRENT SCHOOL ADMINISTRATORS

OVERVIEW OF CURRENT SCHOOL ADMINISTRATORS Chapter Three OVERVIEW OF CURRENT SCHOOL ADMINISTRATORS The first step in understanding the careers of school administrators is to describe the numbers and characteristics of those currently filling these

More information

Electronic Health Records (EHR) Demonstration Frequently Asked Questions

Electronic Health Records (EHR) Demonstration Frequently Asked Questions Demo Goals / Objectives 1. What is the Electronic Health Records Demonstration, and why are you doing it? The Electronic Health Records Demonstration is a five-year demonstration project that will encourage

More information

Health Care Reform, What s in It?

Health Care Reform, What s in It? Health Care Reform, What s in It? Rural Communities and Rural Medical Care No. 9 July 2010 Jon M. Bailey Center for Rural Affairs A critical component of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act

More information

Population Health Management and Physician Staffing

Population Health Management and Physician Staffing Population Health Management and Physician Staffing A resource provided by Merritt Hawkins, the nation s leading physician search and consulting firm and a company of AMN Healthcare (NYSE: AHS), the largest

More information

The Current and Future Supply and Demand For The Health Workforce in the US

The Current and Future Supply and Demand For The Health Workforce in the US The Current and Future Supply and Demand For The Health Workforce in the US Edward Salsberg, MPA Director, National Center for Health Workforce Analysis Department of Health and Human Services Health Resources

More information