Food Purchasing for Child Care

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1 Participant s Workbook 7.30 hours Food Purchasing for Child Care NATIONAL FOOD SERVICE MANAGEMENT INSTITUTE Project Coordinator Lutina Cochran, MS Executive Director Katie Wilson, PhD, SNS ET Item Number: ET

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3 National Food Service Management Institute The University of Mississippi Building the Future Through Child Nutrition The National Food Service Management Institute was authorized by Congress in 1989 and established in 1990 at The University of Mississippi in Oxford and is operated in collaboration with The University of Southern Mississippi in Hattiesburg. The Institute operates under a grant agreement with the United States Department of Agriculture, Food and Nutrition Service. PURPOSE The purpose of the National Food Service Management Institute is to improve the operation of child nutrition programs through research, education and training, and information dissemination. MISSION CThe mission of the National Food Service Management Institute is to provide information and services that promote the continuous improvement of child nutrition programs. VISION The vision of the National Food Service Management Institute is to be the leader in providing education, research, and resources to promote excellence in child nutrition programs. This project has been funded at least in part with Federal funds from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Food, and Nutrition Service through an agreement with the National Food Service Management Institute at The University of Mississippi. The contents of this publication do not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. government. The University of Mississippi is an EEO/AA/Title VI/Title IX/Section 504/ADA/ADEA Employer. In accordance with Federal law and U.S. Department of Agriculture policy, this institution is prohibited from discriminating on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, age, or disability. To file a complaint of discrimination, write USDA, Director, Office of Civil Rights; Room, 326-W, Whitten Building, 1400 Independence Avenue, SW, Washington, DC or call (202) (voice and TDD). USDA is an equal opportunity provider and employer. 2014, National Food Service Management Institute, The University of Mississippi Except as provided below, you may freely use the text and information contained in this document for non-profit or educational use with no cost to the participant for the training providing the following credit is included. These materials may not be incorporated into other websites or textbooks and may not be sold. Suggested Reference Citation: National Food Service Management Institute. (2014). Food purchasing for child care. University, MS: Author. The photographs and images in this document may be owned by third parties and used by The University of Mississippi under a licensing agreement. The University cannot, therefore, grant permission to use these images. For more information, please contact 11/2014

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5 FOOD PURCHASING FOR CHILD CARE Participant s Workbook - Introduction Table of Contents Introduction... 7 Ground Rules... 8 Pre-Assessment... 9 Lesson 1: Working With the Menu Lesson 2: Creating Grocery Lists Lesson 3: Estimating Quantities Lesson 4: Following the Rules Lesson 5: Understanding Ethics Lesson 6: Vendor Choices Lesson 7: Receiving and Storing Post-Assessment Appendix Answer Key Glossary Regulations Guidance References N a t i o n a l F o o d S e r v i c e M a n a g e m e n t I n s t i t u t e Page 5

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7 FOOD PURCHASING FOR CHILD CARE Participant s Workbook - Introduction Introduction Background Information Welcome to the Food Purchasing for Child Care seminar! Food Purchasing for Child Care has been a key resource for training child care professionals on cost-efficient methods for purchasing foods since The current version was revised to be a seven-hour seminar in It reflects good practices, current federal regulations, and information for smaller child care programs, such as family child care. Additionally, it provides child care professionals resources and tools for purchasing high quality, nutritious, and safe foods at a cost-efficient price. Overview During this seminar, you will explore the six steps in the food purchasing process: 1. plan the menu, 2. create a grocery list, 3. estimate the amount to purchase, 4. purchase food, 5. receive and store food, and 6. prepare meals. Each step will focus on the four major goals when purchasing food for child care facilities. The four goals are to obtain food that is high in quality, obtain food that is nutritious and appealing, obtain food that is safe, and purchase food at a cost-efficient price. Food Purchasing for Child Care is written to provide an overview of the federal requirements for purchasing foods. Most information will apply to all family child care homes, centers, and sponsoring organizations regardless of size or sophistication. N a t i o n a l F o o d S e r v i c e M a n a g e m e n t I n s t i t u t e Page 7

8 FOOD PURCHASING FOR CHILD CARE Participant s Workbook - Introduction However, some information applies only to small centers and sponsoring organizations (those serving up to 150 meals a day to children and caregivers). Other information applies only to large centers and sponsoring organizations (those serving more than 150 meals a day to children and caregivers). Your instructor will outline when there is a specific child care target group throughout the seminar. Adult day care center staff may find portions of this seminar helpful; however, the foods prepared and served for adults will be different. The examples used in this manual are for child care facilities. Ground Rules The following statements are ground rules and expectations for this seminar. Turn your mind on and your electronic devices on silent or off. Be a team player. Stand up when your mind goes on vacation. Share ideas with the class. Be respectful of everyone. Be on time for all sessions. Always ask for clarification if you do not understand. N a t i o n a l F o o d S e r v i c e M a n a g e m e n t I n s t i t u t e Page 8

9 FOOD PURCHASING FOR CHILD CARE Participant s Workbook - Pre-Assessment Pre-Assessment Identifier: Instructions: Select the best answer to the following multiple-choice questions. Then place a non-name identifier, such as a number or letter, at the top of the page. Use the same identifier when completing the post assessment. 1. Which of the following is NOT one of the four goals of successful food purchasing? a. Obtain food that is safe. b. Purchase food at a cost-efficient price. c. Choose locally-grown and seasonal foods. d. Obtain food that is nutritious. 2. A CACFP meal is reimbursable when the meal. a. meets the minimum portion size for all required components and ages. b. is served family style. c. is planned in advance. d. contains a CN product. 3. A cycle menu. a. offers the same foods each week. b. helps control food costs. c. repeats the same menu every 52 days. d. does not accommodate holidays or special celebrations. 4. The two purchasing methods in the procurement process are. a. Formal and Invitation for Bid b. Request for proposal and formal c. Informal and formal d. Informal and Invitation for Bid 5. The Food Buying Guide for Child Nutrition Programs. a. contains 600 recipes. b. provides information on brand name and store brand foods. c. lists the ingredients in processed foods. d. helps calculate the amount of a menu item to add to the grocery list. N a t i o n a l F o o d S e r v i c e M a n a g e m e n t I n s t i t u t e Page 9

10 FOOD PURCHASING FOR CHILD CARE Participant s Workbook - Pre-Assessment 6. A food inventory consists of the following two parts:. a. menu items and product items b. menu-driven items and stock items c. product-driven items and stock items d. none of the above 7. The Federal small purchase threshold for private, non-profit organizations was recently raised to. a. $150,000 b. $50,000 c. $10,000 d. $25, In CACFP, geographic preference allows a child care center to. a. Purchase locally grown or raised processed foods b. Pay 10% more for locally grown products c. Purchase foods grown locally with no regard to price d. Establish a geographic preference factor for locally grown unprocessed foods 9. Which of the following statements is NOT a good practice for receiving foods from retail vendors? a. Check and record temperatures of frozen and refrigerated items upon arrival at the child care facility. b. Date the food packages after storing. c. Properly store foods immediately after receiving. d. File receipts with other required purchasing documentation. 10. What is the meaning of the acronym, FIFO? a. Front In First Off b. First In Front Out c. First In First Out d. Front In First Out N a t i o n a l F o o d S e r v i c e M a n a g e m e n t I n s t i t u t e Page 10

11 FOOD PURCHASING FOR CHILD CARE Participant s Workbook - Lesson 1 Lesson 1: Working With the Menu Table of Contents Note Page: Working With the Menu Think, Write, and Share Menu Planning Benefits Menu Planning Resources Vegetables and Subgroups Vegetables and Seasons Fruits and Seasons Colors of Fruits and Vegetables Tips for Planning Nutritious Meals Pathways to Nutritious Meals Tips for Planning Meals That Look and Taste Good Healthy Meals Journal Supplement A: Practice Choking Prevention Children CACFP Child Meal Patterns for Children Reviewing Menus for Success Find the Solution Menu Planning Checklist Key Messages Working With the Menu N a t i o n a l F o o d S e r v i c e M a n a g e m e n t I n s t i t u t e Page 11

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13 FOOD PURCHASING FOR CHILD CARE Participant s Workbook - Lesson 1 Note Page: Working With the Menu Instructions: Use the note page to take notes you may find useful in your child care program. Introduction: Objective 1: State the benefits of using cycle menus in child care programs. Objective 2: Identify strategies for planning safe, nutritious, and appealing meals in child care programs. N a t i o n a l F o o d S e r v i c e M a n a g e m e n t I n s t i t u t e Page 13

14 FOOD PURCHASING FOR CHILD CARE Participant s Workbook - Lesson 1 Objective 3: State the benefits of reviewing menus prior to purchasing foods. Conclusion: N a t i o n a l F o o d S e r v i c e M a n a g e m e n t I n s t i t u t e Page 14

15 FOOD PURCHASING FOR CHILD CARE Participant s Workbook - Lesson 1 Think, Write, and Share Menu Planning Benefits Instructions: Think about the benefits of using menus in child care. List the benefits in the space provided. When you are finished, share your responses with at least two participants. N a t i o n a l F o o d S e r v i c e M a n a g e m e n t I n s t i t u t e Page 15

16 FOOD PURCHASING FOR CHILD CARE Participant s Workbook - Lesson 1 Menu Planning Resources Books Menu Magic for Children Websites ChooseMyPlate.Gov USDA Healthy Meals Resource System: Healthy Meals National Food Service Management Institute CARE Connection: Menu Planning Online Courses Step by Step Menu Planning for Child Care Planning Cycle Menus in Child Care Resources Nutrition and Menu Planning for Children in the Child and Adult Care Food Program Crediting Handbook for the Child and Adult Care Food Program NACCRRA Healthy Menu Planning Menus and Recipes Menus for Child Care Recipes for Healthy Kids: Cooking for Child Care Centers and Schools USDA Recipes for Child Care menu_magic.pdf Default.aspx?qs=cElEPTIzNg== Default.aspx?qs=cElEPTIzNg== spx?id= Division.aspx?qs=cElEPTMw CACFP_creditinghandbook.pdf ntent/dam/hkhf/filebox/naccrra/newnaccrra /menuplan.pdf healthy-kids-cookbook-child-care-centers- 0 N a t i o n a l F o o d S e r v i c e M a n a g e m e n t I n s t i t u t e Page 16

17 FOOD PURCHASING FOR CHILD CARE Participant s Workbook - Lesson 1 Vegetables and Subgroups Dark Green Vegetables Bok Choy Broccoli Collard Greens Dark Green Leafy Lettuce Kale Mesclun Mustard Greens Romaine Lettuce Spinach Turnip Greens Watercress Starchy Vegetables Cassava Corn Fresh Cowpeas, Field Peas, or Black-eyed Peas (not dry) Green Bananas Green Peas Green Lima Beans Parsnips Plantains Taro Water Chestnuts Red/Orange Vegetables Acorn Squash Butternut Squash Carrots Hubbard Squash Pumpkin Red Peppers Sweet Potatoes Tomatoes Tomato Juice Beans/Peas (Legumes) Black Beans Black-eyed Peas (mature, dry) Edamame Garbanzo Beans, Chickpeas Kidney Beans Lentils Navy Beans Pinto Beans Soy Beans Split Peas White Beans Artichokes Asparagus Avocado Bean Sprouts Beets Brussels Sprouts Cabbage Cauliflower Celery Other Vegetables Cucumbers Eggplant Green Beans Green Peppers Iceberg (head) Lettuce Mushrooms Okra Onions Turnips N a t i o n a l F o o d S e r v i c e M a n a g e m e n t I n s t i t u t e Page 17

18 FOOD PURCHASING FOR CHILD CARE Participant s Workbook - Lesson 1 Vegetables and Seasons Fall Acorn Squash, Black Salsify, Belgian Endive, Broccoli, Brussels Sprouts, Butter Lettuce, Buttercup Squash, Butternut Squash, Cardoon, Cauliflower, Chayote Squash, Chinese Long Beans, Delicate Squash, Daikon Radish, Endive, Feijoa, Garlic, Ginger, Guava, Jerusalem Artichoke, Kohlrabi, Mushrooms, Persimmons, Radicchio, Sweet Dumpling Squash, Swiss Chard, and Turnips Winter Brussels Sprouts, Buttercup Squash, Cardoon, Collard Greens, Delicate Squash, Sweet Dumpling Squash, Sweet Potatoes, Turnips Spring Artichoke, Asparagus, Broccoli, Butter Lettuce, Collard Greens, Corn, Fava Beans, Fennel, Green Beans, Manoa Lettuce, Morel Mushrooms, Mustard Greens, Pea Pods, Peas, Purple Asparagus, Radicchio, Red Leaf Lettuce, Rhubarb, Snow Peas, Sorrel, Spinach, Vidalia Onions, Watercress, White Asparagus Summer Butter Lettuce, Chayote Squash, Chinese Long Beans, Corn, Crookneck Squash, Cucumbers, Eggplant, Garlic, Green Soybeans, Lima Beans, Manoa Lettuce, Peas, Radishes, Shallots, Sugar Snap Peas, Summer Squash, Tomatillo, Tomatoes, Winged Beans, Yukon Gold Potatoes, Zucchini N a t i o n a l F o o d S e r v i c e M a n a g e m e n t I n s t i t u t e Page 18

19 FOOD PURCHASING FOR CHILD CARE Participant s Workbook - Lesson 1 Fruits and Seasons Fall Asian Pear, Cactus Pear, Cape Gooseberries, Crab Apples, Cranberries, Grapes, Huckleberries, Key Limes, Muscadine Grapes, Passion Fruit, Pear, Pineapple, Pomegranate, Pumpkin, Quince, Sapote, Sharon Fruit, Sugar Apple Winter Cactus Pear, Cherimoya, Clementine, Dates, Grapefruit, Kiwifruit, Mandarin Oranges, Oranges, Passion Fruit, Pear, Pomelo Red Banana, Red Currants, Sharon Fruit, Tangerines Spring Apricots, Asian Pear, Barbados Cherries, Beets, Blackberries, Blueberries, Breadfruit, Cantaloupe, Champagne Grapes, Cherries, Crenshaw Melon, Elderberries, Figs, Grapefruit, Grapes, Honeydew Melon, Jackfruit, Key Limes, Limes, Loganberries, Mulberries, Nectarines, Passion Fruit, Peaches, Persian Melon, Plum, Raspberries, Sapodillas, Strawberries, Sugar Apple, Watermelon Summer Apricots, Asian pear, Barbados Cherries, Beets, Blackberries, Blueberries, Breadfruit, Cantaloupe, Champagne Grapes, Cherries, Crenshaw Melon, Elderberries, Figs, Grapefruit, Grapes, Honeydew Melon, Jackfruit, Key Limes, Limes, Loganberries, Mulberries, Nectarines, Passion Fruit, Peaches, Persian Melon, Plum, Raspberries, Sapodillas, Strawberries, Sugar Apple, Watermelon Year Round Apples, Dried Apricots, Avocados, Bananas, Dried Cranberries, Coconut, Kiwano, Lemons, Papaya N a t i o n a l F o o d S e r v i c e M a n a g e m e n t I n s t i t u t e Page 19

20 FOOD PURCHASING FOR CHILD CARE Participant s Workbook - Lesson 1 Colors of Fruits and Vegetables Red Orange/ Yellow Green Blue/Purple White/ Tan/Brown Beets Blood Oranges Cherries Cranberries Papaya Pink Grapefruit Pomegranates Radicchio Radishes Raspberries Red Apples Red Grapes Red Onions Red Pears Red Peppers Red Potatoes Rhubarb Strawberries Tomatoes Watermelon Apricots Butternut Squash Cantaloupe Carrots Grapefruit Lemon Mangoes Nectarines Oranges Papayas Peaches Pineapples Pumpkin Sweet Corn Sweet Potatoes Tangerines Yellow Apples Yellow Beets Yellow Figs Yellow Pears Yellow Potatoes Yellow Summer Squash Yellow Tomatoes Yellow Watermelon Yellow Winter Squash Artichokes Asparagus Avocados Broccoflower Broccoli Brussels Sprouts Celery Cucumbers Green Apples Green Beans Green Cabbage Green Grapes Green Onion Green Pears Green Peppers Honeydew Kiwifruit Leafy Greens Lettuce Limes Okra Peas Spinach Watercress Zucchini Blackberries Blueberries Dried Plums Eggplant Grapes Plums Pomegranates Prunes Purple Cabbage Purple Carrots Purple Figs Purple Grapes Raisins Bananas Brown Pears Cauliflower Dates Garlic Ginger Mushrooms Onions Parsnips Potatoes Shallots Turnips White Corn White Nectarines White Peaches N a t i o n a l F o o d S e r v i c e M a n a g e m e n t I n s t i t u t e Page 20

21 FOOD PURCHASING FOR CHILD CARE Participant s Workbook - Lesson 1 Tips for Planning Nutritious Meals Plan to serve a variety of foods during the day and week. Check to make sure that the same foods are not repeated more than once a week. Increase fiber by including fresh vegetables, fresh fruits, and whole-grain products. Limit the number of fried foods and high-fat foods offered. Limit the number of sweets, such as cookies, cakes, brownies, and sweetened cereals. Plan to serve fewer high-salt (sodium) foods, such as luncheon meats and processed foods. Include foods that provide vitamin A, such as spinach and other dark, leafy greens; deep orange fruits and vegetables (carrots, pumpkin, sweet potatoes, winter squash, such as butternut or acorn, mango, cantaloupe); and fortified dairy products like milk and cheese. Include foods that provide vitamin C, such as citrus fruits (oranges, grapefruit, lemons, canned mandarin oranges); cabbage-type vegetables (brussels sprouts, broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower); and dark green vegetables (green peppers, spinach, kale, lettuce); Don t forget to include iron-rich foods, such as spinach; dry beans and peas; and whole-grain, enriched, or fortified grains/breads. Pathways to Nutritious Meals Instructions: Use the list of tips above to help you answer the following questions. 1. Which tips do you normally use when planning menus? 2. Which tip(s) would you like to incorporate when planning menus? N a t i o n a l F o o d S e r v i c e M a n a g e m e n t I n s t i t u t e Page 21

22 FOOD PURCHASING FOR CHILD CARE Participant s Workbook - Lesson 1 Tips for Planning Meals That Look and Taste Good Include different shapes round, square, rectangular, and wedge-shaped. Include different colors yellow, orange, red, bright green, purple/blue, white, tan, and brown. Include different textures soft, fluffy, crunchy, crisp, creamy, and smooth. Include different tastes sweet, sour, tart, salty, spicy, and mild. Look for ways to use herbs and spices in child care menus. Think about the likes and dislikes of the children. Thin k about the cultures of the children and what they might eat at home. Consider special requests of parents. Introduce new foods along with familiar favorites. Plan menus that are right for the age of the children. Healthy Meals Journal Instructions: The local newspaper, Healthy Meals Journal recently contacted you about doing a creative ad for the Sunday s paper. Using the tips above, create a catchy slogan, quote, or poem outlining the importance of planning meals that look and taste good in child care. N a t i o n a l F o o d S e r v i c e M a n a g e m e n t I n s t i t u t e Page 22

23 FOOD PURCHASING FOR CHILD CARE Participant s Workbook - Lesson 1 Supplement A: Practice Choking Prevention Children N a t i o n a l F o o d S e r v i c e M a n a g e m e n t I n s t i t u t e Page 23

24 FOOD PURCHASING FOR CHILD CARE Participant s Workbook - Lesson 1 N a t i o n a l F o o d S e r v i c e M a n a g e m e n t I n s t i t u t e Page 24

25 FOOD PURCHASING FOR CHILD CARE Participant s Workbook - Lesson 1 N a t i o n a l F o o d S e r v i c e M a n a g e m e n t I n s t i t u t e Page 25

26 FOOD PURCHASING FOR CHILD CARE Participant s Workbook - Lesson 1 CACFP Child Meal Patterns for Children Child Meal Pattern Breakfast Select all 3 components for a reimbursable meal. Food Components Ages 1 2 Ages 3 5 Ages milk fluid milk 1/2 cup 3/4 cup 1 cup 1 fruit/vegetable juice, 2 fruit and/or vegetable 1/4 cup 1/2 cup 1/2 cup 1 grains/bread 3 bread or 1/2 slice 1/2 slice 1 slice cornbread or biscuit or roll or muffin or 1/2 serving 1/2 serving 1 serving cold dry cereal or 1/4 cup 1/3 cup 3/4 cup hot cooked cereal or 1/4 cup 1/4 cup 1/2 cup pasta or noodles or grains 1/4 cup 1/4 cup 1/2 cup 1 Children age 12 and older may be served larger portions based on their greater food needs. They may not be served less than the minimum quantities listed in this column. 2 Fruit or vegetable juice must be full-strength. 3 Breads and grains must be made from whole-grain or enriched meal or flour. Cereal must be whole-grain or enriched or fortified. N a t i o n a l F o o d S e r v i c e M a n a g e m e n t I n s t i t u t e Page 26

27 FOOD PURCHASING FOR CHILD CARE Participant s Workbook - Lesson 1 Child Meal Pattern Lunch or Supper Food Components Ages 1 2 Ages 3 5 Ages milk fluid milk 1/2 cup 3/4 cup 1 cup 2 fruits/vegetables juice, 2 fruit and/or vegetable 1/4 cup 1/2 cup 3/4 cup 1 grains/bread 3 bread or cornbread or biscuit or roll or muffin or cold dry cereal or hot cooked cereal or pasta or noodles or grains 1/2 slice 1/2 serving 1/4 cup 1/4 cup 1/4 cup 1/2 slice 1/2 serving 1/3 cup 1/4 cup 1/4 cup 1 slice 1 serving 3/4 cup 1/2 cup 1/2 cup 1 meat/meat alternate meat or poultry or fish 4 or alternate protein product or cheese or egg or cooked dry beans or peas or peanut or other nut or seed butters or nuts and/or seeds 5 or yogurt 6 1 ounce 1 ounce 1 ounce 1/2 egg 1/4 cup 2 Tbsp. 1/2 ounce 4 ounces 1 1/2 ounces 1 1/2 ounces 1 1/2 ounces 3/4 egg 3/8 cup 3 Tbsp. 3/4 ounce 6 ounces 2 ounces 2 ounces 2 ounces 1 egg 1/2 cup 4 Tbsp. 1 ounce 8 ounces 1 Children age 12 and older may be served larger portions based on their greater food needs. They may not be served less than the minimum quantities listed in this column. 2 Fruit or vegetable juice must be full-strength. 3 Breads and grains must be made from whole-grain or enriched meal or flour. Cereal must be whole-grain or enriched or fortified. 4 A serving consists of the edible portion of cooked lean meat or poultry or fish. 5 Nuts and seeds may meet only one-half of the total meat/meat alternate serving and must be combined with another meat/meat alternate to fulfill the lunch or supper requirement. 6 Yogurt may be plain or flavored, unsweetened or sweetened. N a t i o n a l F o o d S e r v i c e M a n a g e m e n t I n s t i t u t e Page 27

28 FOOD PURCHASING FOR CHILD CARE Participant s Workbook - Lesson 1 Child Meal Pattern Snack Select 2 of the 4 components for a reimbursable snack. Food Components Ages 1 2 Ages 3 5 Ages milk fluid milk 1/2 cup 1/2 cup 1 cup 1 fruit/vegetable juice, 2 fruit and/or vegetable 1/2 cup 1/2 cup 3/4 cup 1 grains/bread 3 bread or cornbread or biscuit or roll or muffin or cold dry cereal or hot cooked cereal or pasta or noodles or grains 1/2 slice 1/2 serving 1/4 cup 1/4 cup 1/4 cup 1/2 slice 1/2 serving 1/3 cup 1/4 cup 1/4 cup 1 slice 1 serving 3/4 cup 1/2 cup 1/2 cup 1 meat/meat alternate meat or poultry or fish 4 or alternate protein product or cheese or egg 5 or cooked dry beans or peas or peanut or other nut or seed butters or nuts and/or seeds or yogurt 6 1/2 ounce 1/2 ounce 1/2 ounce 1/2 egg 1/8 cup 1 Tbsp. 1/2 ounce 2 ounces 1/2 ounce 1/2 ounce 1/2 ounce 1/2 egg 1/8 cup 1 Tbsp. 1/2 ounce 2 ounces 1 ounce 1 ounce 1 ounce 1/2 egg 1/4 cup 2 Tbsp. 1 ounce 4 ounces 1 Children age 12 and older may be served larger portions based on their greater food needs. They may not be served less than the minimum quantities listed in this column. 2 Fruit or vegetable juice must be full-strength. Juice cannot be served when milk is the only other snack component. 3 Breads and grains must be made from whole-grain or enriched meal or flour. Cereal must be whole-grain or enriched or fortified. 4 A serving consists of the edible portion of cooked lean meat or poultry or fish. 5 One-half egg meets the required minimum amount (one ounce or less) of meat alternate. 6 Yogurt may be plain or flavored, unsweetened or sweetened. N a t i o n a l F o o d S e r v i c e M a n a g e m e n t I n s t i t u t e Page 28

29 FOOD PURCHASING FOR CHILD CARE Participant s Workbook - Lesson 1 Reviewing Menus for Success Instructions: Evaluate the Sample Practice Lunch Menu using the Menu Planning Checklist. Please note: for the purpose of this activity, the menu complies with Federal regulations and portion sizes are appropriate for the intended age. Sample Practice Lunch Menu Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Beef Tacos (1 ½ oz. cooked lean meat, 1 slice of bread) Fresh Carrot Cubes (¼ cup) Sweetened Applesauce (¼ cup) 1% Milk (¾ cup) Fried Tuna Fish on Pita Bread (1½ oz. cooked lean meat, ¼ cup pasta) Fried potato wedges (¼ cup) Sweetened Mixed Fruit(¼ cup) 1% Milk (¾ cup) Roasted Sliced Turkey (1½ oz.) Sliced Bread (½ slice) Buttered Mashed Potatoes (¼ cup) Sweetened Apple Sauce (¼ cup) 1% Milk (¾ cup) Fried Tuna Patty (1½ oz.) Deep Fried Green Tomatoes (¼ cup) Sliced Bread(½ slice) Sweetened Applesauce (¼ cup) 1% Milk (¾ cup) Spaghetti with Ground Beef (1½ oz. cooked lean meat, ¼ cup pasta) Buttered Mashed Potatoes (¼ cup) Sweetened Mixed Fruit (¼ cup) 1% Milk (¾ cup) Find the Solution Instructions: In the space provided, list ways to improve the Sample Practice Lunch Menu. Ways to improve the menu include N a t i o n a l F o o d S e r v i c e M a n a g e m e n t I n s t i t u t e Page 29

30 FOOD PURCHASING FOR CHILD CARE Participant s Workbook - Lesson 1 Menu Planning Checklist Instructions: Think about your child care program, including children s likes and dislikes, kitchen equipment, and other factors that contribute to preparing meals in your facility. Use the checklist to evaluate the Sample Practice Lunch Menu. Place a check mark in the box for your answer to each statement. Then add the YES check marks for a score to determine if this is a good menu for your child care program. YES NO The menus meet the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) meal pattern requirements. The menu items are foods from all of the components required for each meal and snack. The serving sizes are correct for the ages of the children. Foods included have been approved as creditable by the USDA and my state agency. YES NO The menus provide healthful foods. The menu includes a variety of foods each day. The main dishes for the week contain a variety of Meat/Meat Alternates. The menu includes a variety of Fruits/Vegetables for the week. The menu includes several fresh fruits and vegetables. The menu includes a variety of Grains/Breads for the week. The menu includes some raw vegetables, fruits, and whole-grain breads and cereals for fiber. The menu limits the number of fried and high-fat foods on the week s menu. The menu limits the number of sweets such as cookies, cakes, brownies, doughnuts, and sweet cereals. N a t i o n a l F o o d S e r v i c e M a n a g e m e n t I n s t i t u t e Page 30

31 FOOD PURCHASING FOR CHILD CARE Participant s Workbook - Lesson 1 YES NO The menus provide healthful foods. (continued) The menu includes few high salt (sodium) foods such as luncheon meats, wieners, and processed foods. The menu includes good sources of vitamin A such as sweet potatoes and romaine lettuce. The menu includes good sources of vitamin C such as oranges, pineapple, and kiwi. The menu includes good sources of iron such as red meat, egg yolks, and legumes (e.g., lentils, and chickpeas.) The menu does not include foods that could cause choking in young children. YES NO The menus appear to look and taste good. The menu includes foods that have different shapes. The menu includes foods that are different colors. The menu includes foods that have different textures. The menu includes foods that have different tastes. The menu reflects the likes and dislikes of the children and their parents. The menu reflects some favorite items in each meal. The menu introduces new/seasonal foods. YES NO The menus work for the children and staff. The menu includes some foods that take longer to prepare with foods that are easy to prepare. N a t i o n a l F o o d S e r v i c e M a n a g e m e n t I n s t i t u t e Page 31

32 FOOD PURCHASING FOR CHILD CARE Participant s Workbook - Lesson 1 YES NO The menus work for the children and staff. (continued) The menu includes foods that can be prepared with the facility s equipment. The menu can be prepared in the time I have available. The menu includes higher-cost foods with lower-cost foods over the weeks. Standardized recipes are available for menu items. The menu can be served family style. Foods are incorporated in a cycle menu. Evaluate Did you answer NO to the first three questions? If so, STOP! Meals must meet CACFP meal pattern requirements to be claimed for reimbursement. Review your copy of the USDA guidance materials on menu planning. Contact your sponsor or state agency if you need help. How did you score? Count the number of YES boxes checked and write your score here. Score 20 or above: You are doing great! Look at the items to which you answered NO. What can you change in your menus to make them a YES? Score 15-19: You have learned a lot about menu planning. To keep improving, think about each item to which you answered NO. Review CARE Connections to learn some ways that you can make your answer a YES. Score 14 or below: You could use some help with menu planning. Go over the above checklist with a representative from your sponsoring organization or state agency. Look for ways to improve your menus. N a t i o n a l F o o d S e r v i c e M a n a g e m e n t I n s t i t u t e Page 32

33 FOOD PURCHASING FOR CHILD CARE Participant s Workbook - Lesson 1 Key Messages Working With the Menu Instructions: Think about the information discussed in this lesson. In the space provided, write down the key points learned and how you will apply them in your child care program. Key Points Learned Methods for Applying the Information Learned N a t i o n a l F o o d S e r v i c e M a n a g e m e n t I n s t i t u t e Page 33

34 FOOD PURCHASING FOR CHILD CARE Participant s Workbook - Lesson 1 This page is intentionally left blank. N a t i o n a l F o o d S e r v i c e M a n a g e m e n t I n s t i t u t e Page 34

35 FOOD PURCHASING FOR CHILD CARE Participant s Workbook - Lesson 2 Lesson 2: Creating Grocery Lists Table of Contents Note Page: Creating Grocery Lists Think, Write, and Share Creating Grocery Lists Name That Stock Selecting Stock and Menu-Driven Items Sample Grocery List: Stock Items Chart Menu-Driven Items List Grocery List Template Key Messages Creating Grocery Lists N a t i o n a l F o o d S e r v i c e M a n a g e m e n t I n s t i t u t e Page 35

36 FOOD PURCHASING FOR CHILD CARE Participant s Workbook - Lesson 2 This page is intentionally left blank. N a t i o n a l F o o d S e r v i c e M a n a g e m e n t I n s t i t u t e Page 36

37 FOOD PURCHASING FOR CHILD CARE Participant s Workbook - Lesson 2 Note Page: Creating Grocery Lists Instructions: Use the note page to take notes you may find useful in your child care program. Introduction: Objective 1: Explain how to generate a grocery list, distinguishing between stock items and menu-driven items. Objective 2: Outline factors to consider when purchasing foods. Conclusion: N a t i o n a l F o o d S e r v i c e M a n a g e m e n t I n s t i t u t e Page 37

38 FOOD PURCHASING FOR CHILD CARE Participant s Workbook - Lesson 2 Think, Write, and Share Creating Grocery Lists Instructions: Think about factors to consider when planning a grocery list. List the resources, tools, and/or other information needed in the space provided. Discuss your responses with at least two other participants. Include any additional suggestions on your list. N a t i o n a l F o o d S e r v i c e M a n a g e m e n t I n s t i t u t e Page 38

39 FOOD PURCHASING FOR CHILD CARE Participant s Workbook - Lesson 2 Name That Stock Instructions: In the space provided, list foods that you consider stock items in your child care facility. Remember stock items are those foods that are on hand all of the time, appear on your menu or are used in recipes almost every week, are non-perishable, allowing you to keep enough on hand to cover a couple of weeks or more, and are not too expensive to safely maintain in inventory. Flour N a t i o n a l F o o d S e r v i c e M a n a g e m e n t I n s t i t u t e Page 39

40 FOOD PURCHASING FOR CHILD CARE Participant s Workbook - Lesson 2 Selecting Stock and Menu-Driven Items Instructions: Read the food items on the chart below and think about your child care program. Then divide the foods items into stock items and menu-driven items by placing an X under the appropriate category. The first food item has been completed for you. Food Item Black beans, whole, 15.5 oz. can Brown rice,1 lb. Catsup, 24 oz. Cheese, shredded partially skimmed mozzarella, 2 lb. Chicken broth, low-sodium, oz. can Crackers, whole wheat, 14 oz. Graham crackers, enriched 14 oz. Green beans, frozen, 1 lb. Ground turkey, fresh, 3 lb. Hamburger buns, whole wheat, 16 each Jam, strawberry, 15 oz. Milk, 1%, 2 gallons Onions, fresh, 2 lb. Bag Oregano leaves, crushed, 1 oz. Parsley flakes, 2 oz. Peanut butter, creamy, 18 oz. Low-fat salad dressing, ranch, 16 oz. Tomatoes, diced, oz. can Tomatoes, fresh, 1 lb. Stock Items X Menu-Driven Items N a t i o n a l F o o d S e r v i c e M a n a g e m e n t I n s t i t u t e Page 40

41 FOOD PURCHASING FOR CHILD CARE Participant s Workbook - Lesson 2 Sample Grocery List: Stock Items Chart Stock Item Description Stock Level Amount on Purchase Amount Hand Crackers, whole wheat, 14 oz Graham crackers, enriched oz. Black beans, whole, 15.5 oz can Brown rice,1 lb Peanut butter, creamy, 18 oz Jam, strawberry, 15 oz Catsup, 24 oz Salad dressing, ranch, 16 oz Oregano leaves, crushed, 1 oz Parsley flakes, 2 oz Menu-Driven Items List 2 gallons of milk, 1% 1 lb. fresh diced tomatoes 2 lb. bag, fresh onions 2 lb. shredded, partially skimmed mozzarella cheese oz. can diced tomatoes 1 lb. frozen green beans 3 lb. fresh ground turkey 16 each whole wheat hamburger buns oz. can low-sodium chicken broth N a t i o n a l F o o d S e r v i c e M a n a g e m e n t I n s t i t u t e Page 41

42 FOOD PURCHASING FOR CHILD CARE Participant s Workbook - Lesson 2 This page is intentionally left blank. N a t i o n a l F o o d S e r v i c e M a n a g e m e n t I n s t i t u t e Page 42

43 FOOD PURCHASING FOR CHILD CARE Participant s Workbook - Lesson 2 Grocery List Template Instructions: Review the Sample Grocery List: Stock Item Chart and the Menu-Driven Items List. Combine the stock items and the menu-driven items to create one grocery list. Place the quantity to purchase on the Grocery List Template in the appropriate category. Grocery List Bread: Produce: Canned Vegetables: Frozen Foods: Canned Soups: Dry Goods: Refrigerated Foods: Other: N a t i o n a l F o o d S e r v i c e M a n a g e m e n t I n s t i t u t e Page 43

44 FOOD PURCHASING FOR CHILD CARE Participant s Workbook - Lesson 2 Key Messages Creating Grocery Lists Instructions: Think about the information discussed in this lesson. In the space provided, write down the key points learned and how you will apply them in your child care program. Key Points Learned Methods for Applying the Information Learned N a t i o n a l F o o d S e r v i c e M a n a g e m e n t I n s t i t u t e Page 44

45 FOOD PURCHASING FOR CHILD CARE Participant s Workbook - Lesson 3 Lesson 3: Estimating Quantities Table of Contents Note Page: Estimating Quantities Think, Write, and Share Estimating Quantities Food Buying Guide for Child Nutrition Programs Convert to Calculate Method Decimal Equivalents of Commonly Used Fractions Care Academy Information Sheet: Fresh Oranges Calculating Food Quantities: Fresh Oranges Care Academy Information Sheet: Fresh Blueberries Calculating Food Quantities: Fresh Blueberries Care Academy Information Sheet: Chicken Tenders Calculating Food Quantities: Chicken Tenders Food Buying Guide Calculator Best Buy for the Size Key Messages Estimating Quantities N a t i o n a l F o o d S e r v i c e M a n a g e m e n t I n s t i t u t e Page 45

46 FOOD PURCHASING FOR CHILD CARE Participant s Workbook - Lesson 3 This page is intentionally left blank. N a t i o n a l F o o d S e r v i c e M a n a g e m e n t I n s t i t u t e Page 46

47 FOOD PURCHASING FOR CHILD CARE Participant s Workbook - Lesson 3 Note Page: Estimating Quantities Instructions: Use the note page to take notes you may find useful in your child care program. Introduction: Objective 1: Identify key factors for estimating quantities when planning to purchase food. Objective 2: Calculate the quantity of each food item when planning to purchase food. N a t i o n a l F o o d S e r v i c e M a n a g e m e n t I n s t i t u t e Page 47

48 FOOD PURCHASING FOR CHILD CARE Participant s Workbook - Lesson 3 Objective 3: Determine the most cost-efficient size of each food item to purchase when planning to purchase food. Conclusion: N a t i o n a l F o o d S e r v i c e M a n a g e m e n t I n s t i t u t e Page 48

49 FOOD PURCHASING FOR CHILD CARE Participant s Workbook - Lesson 3 Think, Write, and Share Estimating Quantities Instructions: Identify the benefits of estimating quantities before making food purchases. When you are finished, share your responses with at least two participants. N a t i o n a l F o o d S e r v i c e M a n a g e m e n t I n s t i t u t e Page 49

50 FOOD PURCHASING FOR CHILD CARE Participant s Workbook - Lesson 3 Food Buying Guide for Child Nutrition Programs The Food Buying Guide for Child Nutrition Programs is a resource that helps take the guess work out of how much to buy to meet food program s needs. Buying the right amount of fresh produce helps keep meal costs under control. Understanding the Chart Each column in the chart lists a piece of information. When you know the meaning of each term, you will be more likely to use the chart correctly. 1. Food As Purchased 2. Purchase Unit 3. Servings per Purchase Unit, (EP) 4. Serving Size per Meal Contribution 5. Purchase units for 100 Servings 6. Additional Information Column 1 lists Food as Purchased, or AP. For each food item, there are separate rows for fresh, frozen, canned, or dried forms of the food. Column 2 lists the Purchase Unit. Use this column to find the package, can size, or other unit of measure for a food, such as pound. The Purchase Unit lists the different ways foods are packaged. For example, a #10 can is large and commonly used in child care centers; a #300 can is smaller and more common in family child care homes. Column 3 lists Servings Per Purchase Unit, EP. The EP stands for edible portion. The column gives the number of servings that each purchase unit provides. The edible portion amount is often smaller than the purchased amount. Why is this? Edible portions are figured after the parts of foods we do not eat are removed. Examples include liquid drained from canned products (such as tuna or vegetables), inedible peels from fresh produce (such as jicama or oranges), and pits or seeds from fresh produce (such as apricots or cherries). Knowing the edible portion each purchase unit provides makes it easy to decide how much food to buy. Column 4 lists the Serving Size per Meal Contribution. For Fruits and Vegetables, a 1 4 cup serving size is common. Column 5 lists the number of Purchase Units (cans, pounds, packages) for 100 servings (usually 1 4 cup serving). This column is very useful for child care centers serving large numbers of children. Column 6 lists useful Additional Information. Source: National Food Service Management Institute. (2009). Mealtime Memo for Child Care: USDA s food buying guide for child nutrition programs. Retrieved from N a t i o n a l F o o d S e r v i c e M a n a g e m e n t I n s t i t u t e Page 50

51 FOOD PURCHASING FOR CHILD CARE Participant s Workbook - Lesson 3 Convert to Calculate Method There are several methods for calculating food quantities, including the Convert to Calculate Method. This method is designed to convert multiple serving sizes to one single size and then calculate the total purchase amount. The Convert to Calculate Method consists of the following five steps. Step 1: Identify the Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) age groups and the projected total servings. CACFP for Infants Age Groups: Birth-3 months, 4-7 months, and 8-11 months. CACFP for Children Age Groups include 1-2 years and 3-5 years. Identify the total amount of caregivers participating in meal service. Step 2: Identify the total serving sizes needed for each CACFP age group, using the CACFP Meal Patterns. Then, convert the fractions to decimal numbers. Fraction to Decimal Formula (Top number Bottom number = Whole number) Example: ½ cup or 0.5 cup (1 2 = 0.5) Step 3: Multiply each age group s projected servings by the serving sizes to determine Total Projected Quantity. Formula: Projected Total Servings x Serving Sizes Needed = Total Projected Quantity Step 4: Calculate the number of servings to meet the Serving Size per Meal Contribution. This step is only required when calculating fruits and vegetables in ¼ cup servings. Skip this step when calculating ounces, such as meats or beverages. Formula: Total Projected Quantity Serving Size per Meal Contribution = Total Servings Step 5: Calculate the total purchase amount. Refer to the Food Buying Guide s Column 2 for the Purchase Unit and Column 3 for the Servings per Purchase Unit, EP. Formula: Total Servings Servings Per Purchased Unit, EP = Total Amount to Purchase For additional methods for estimating quantities, review the USDA s Food Buying Guide for Child Nutrition Professionals at N a t i o n a l F o o d S e r v i c e M a n a g e m e n t I n s t i t u t e Page 51

52 FOOD PURCHASING FOR CHILD CARE Participant s Workbook - Lesson 3 This page is intentionally left blank. N a t i o n a l F o o d S e r v i c e M a n a g e m e n t I n s t i t u t e Page 52

53 FOOD PURCHASING FOR CHILD CARE Participant s Workbook - Lesson 3 Decimal Equivalents of Commonly Used Fractions 1/8 = /3 = /3 = /4 = /2 = /4 = /8 = /8 = /8 = To convert a fraction to a decimal number, divide the top number by the bottom number (i.e. ½, 1 2 = 0.5). N a t i o n a l F o o d S e r v i c e M a n a g e m e n t I n s t i t u t e Page 53

54 FOOD PURCHASING FOR CHILD CARE Participant s Workbook - Lesson 3 Care Academy Information Sheet: Fresh Oranges Enrollment Information Age Group Breakfast Lunch Snack 1-2 Years Years Caregivers TOTALS Snapshot: CACFP Meal Patterns for Children Breakfast Meal Component Serving Size: 1-2 Years Serving Size: 3-5 Years Milk 1/2 cup 3/4 cup Fruit/Vegetable 1/4 cup 1/2 cup Grains/Bread 1/4 cup 1/4 cup Other Food Buying Guide for Child Nutrition Programs 1. Food As Purchased, AP Oranges, fresh 125 count Florida or Texas Whole 2. Purchase Unit 3. Servings per Purchase Unit, EP 4. Serving Size per Meal Contribution Pound orange (about 5/8 cup fruit and liquid) Pound 7.02 ¼ cup fruit and liquid (about1/2 orange) 5. Purchase Units for 100 Servings Additional Information lb= about 0.76lb (about 1 ¾ cups) ready to serve peeled oranges N a t i o n a l F o o d S e r v i c e M a n a g e m e n t I n s t i t u t e Page 54

55 FOOD PURCHASING FOR CHILD CARE Participant s Workbook - Lesson 3 Calculating Food Quantities: Fresh Oranges Instructions: Care Academy recently completed their grocery list. They are planning to serve fresh oranges for one breakfast meal during the cycle menu. As the Instructor reviews each step of the Convert to Calculate Method, fill in the worksheet to determine the total purchase amount for fresh oranges. Refer to the Care Academy Information Sheet: Fresh Oranges for enrollment information, Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) Meal Pattern, and the Food Buying Guide for Child Nutrition Programs (FBG) to help you determine the total purchase amount. Step 1: Identify the age groups and the projected total servings. Age Groups Projected Servings x Step 2: Identify the serving size needed and convert fractions into decimal numbers. Serving Size (CACFP Meal Pattern) x = Step 3: Multiply the projected servings by the serving size, then total the age groups. = Total Projected Quantity x = x = Total: Step 4: Calculate the number of servings to meet the Serving Size per Meal Contribution. Total Projected Quantity Serving Size = Total Servings (In the space below, list the Total Projected Quantity from Step 3.) per Meal Contribution (FBG, Column 4) = Step 5: Calculate the total amount to purchase. Total Servings (In the space below, list the Total Servings from Step 4.) Servings per Purchase Unit, EP (FBG, Column 3) & Purchase Unit (FBG, Column 2) = = Total Purchase Amount N a t i o n a l F o o d S e r v i c e M a n a g e m e n t I n s t i t u t e Page 55

56 FOOD PURCHASING FOR CHILD CARE Participant s Workbook - Lesson 3 Care Academy Information Sheet: Fresh Blueberries Enrollment Information Age Group Breakfast Lunch Snack 1-2 Years Years Caregivers TOTALS Snapshot: CACFP Meal Patterns for Children Lunch Meal Component Serving Size: 1-2 Years Serving Size: 3-5 Years Milk 1/2 cup 3/4 cup Fruit/Vegetable 1/8 cup 1/4 cup Fruit/Vegetable 1/8 cup 1/4 cup Grains/Bread 1/4 cup 1/4 cup Meat/Meat Alternate 1 oz. 1-1/2 oz. Food Buying Guide for Child Nutrition Programs 1. Food As Purchased, AP Blueberries, fresh Whole Includes USDA Foods 2. Purchase Unit Pint (14-1/4 oz) 3. Servings per Purchase Unit, EP 4. Serving Size per Meal Contribution 5. Purchase Units for 100 Servings 6. Additional Information /4 cup raw fruit pt AP = 0.87 lb (about 2-2/3 cups) ready-to-serve raw berries Pound /4 cup raw fruit lb AP = 0.96 lb ready-to serve raw berries N a t i o n a l F o o d S e r v i c e M a n a g e m e n t I n s t i t u t e Page 56

57 FOOD PURCHASING FOR CHILD CARE Participant s Workbook - Lesson 3 Calculating Food Quantities: Fresh Blueberries Instructions: Care Academy recently completed their grocery list. They are planning to serve fresh blueberries for one lunch meal during the cycle menu. Refer to the Care Academy Information Sheet: Fresh Blueberries for enrollment information, Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) Meal Pattern, and the Food Buying Guide for Child Nutrition Programs (FBG) to help you determine the total purchase amount. Step 1: Identify the age groups and the projected total servings. Age Groups Projected Servings x Step 2: Identify the serving size needed and convert fractions into decimal numbers. Serving Size (CACFP Meal Pattern) x = Step 3: Multiply the projected servings by the serving size, then total the age groups. = Total Projected Quantity x = x = Total: Step 4: Calculate the number of servings to meet the Serving Size per Meal Contribution. Total Projected Quantity Serving Size = Total Servings (In the space below, list the Total Projected Quantity from Step 3.) per Meal Contribution (FBG, Column 4) = Step 5: Calculate the total amount to purchase. Total Servings (In the space below, list the Total Servings from Step 4.) Servings per Purchase Unit, EP (FBG, Column 3) & Purchase Unit (FBG, Column 2) = = Total Purchase Amount N a t i o n a l F o o d S e r v i c e M a n a g e m e n t I n s t i t u t e Page 57

58 FOOD PURCHASING FOR CHILD CARE Participant s Workbook - Lesson 3 Care Academy Information Sheet: Chicken Tenders Enrollment Information Age Group Breakfast Lunch Snack 1-2 Years Years Caregivers TOTALS Snapshot: CACFP Meal Patterns for Children Lunch Meal Component Serving Size: 1-2 Years Serving Size: 3-5 Years Milk 1/2 cup 3/4 cup Fruit/Vegetable 1/8 cup 1/4 cup Fruit/Vegetable 1/8 cup 1/4 cup Grains/Bread 1/4 cup 1/4 cup Meat/Meat Alternate 1 oz. 1-1/2 oz. Food Buying Guide for Child Nutrition Programs 1. Food As Purchased, AP Chicken,boneless, fresh or frozen Tenders Tenderloins (boneless, chicken breast pieces without skin) 2. Purchase Unit 3. Servings per Purchase Unit, EP 4. Serving Size per Meal Contribution Pound oz cooked poultry Pound /2 oz cooked poultry 5. Purchase Units for 100 Servings 6. Additional Information lb AP = 0.73 lb cooked chicken meat 12.9 N a t i o n a l F o o d S e r v i c e M a n a g e m e n t I n s t i t u t e Page 58

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