The Work Sheet and the Closing Process

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1 C H A P T E R 4 The Work Sheet and the Closing Process A systematic approach is essential for efficient and accurate processing of large amounts of information. Whether work sheets are on paper or computerized, they help provide this structure. Proprietorships, partnerships, and corporations all use similar work sheets. Paralleling Karen White and Mark Smith s progress in the study of accounting was their continued interest in the examination of the annual report of Imperial Oil Limited. They reread the Letter to Shareholders. On this reading they were particularly interested in the statement: First, we intend to improve the sales mix by emphasizing more profitable products. White and Smith have now completed the study of Chapter 3. They intend to use their newfound knowledge to test whether Imperial is indeed improving its profitability. IMPERIAL OIL LIMITED Selected financial data (in millions) Net earnings (income).. $ 359 $ 279 $ 195 $ 162 $ 256 Revenue ,011 8,903 9,147 9,502 11,303

2 184 Chapter 4 LEARNING OBJECTIVES After studying Chapter 4, you should be able to: 1. Explain why work sheets are useful, prepare a work sheet for a service business, and prepare financial statements from the information in a work sheet. 2. Explain why the temporary accounts are closed at the end of each accounting period and prepare closing entries and a post-closing trial balance for a service business. 3. Describe each step in the accounting cycle. 4. Calculate the profit margin ratio and describe what it reveals about a company s performance. 5. Define or explain the words and phrases listed in the chapter glossary. After studying Appendix C at the end of Chapter 4, you should be able to: 6. Explain when and why reversing entries are used and prepare reversing entries. After studying Appendix D at the end of Chapter 4, you should be able to: 7. Explain the nature of a corporation s retained earnings and their relationship to the declaration of dividends. 8. Prepare entries to record the declaration and payment of a dividend and to close the temporary accounts of a corporation. This chapter continues your study of the accounting process by describing procedures that the accountant performs at the end of each reporting period. You learn about an optional work sheet that accountants use to draft adjusting entries and the financial statements. Studying the work sheet allows you to get an overall perspective on the steps in the accounting cycle. The chapter also describes the closing process that prepares the revenue, expense, and withdrawals accounts for the next reporting period and updates the owner s capital account. In addition, the chapter describes the profit margin ratio that decision makers use to assess a company s performance. USING WORK SHEETS AT THE END OF ACCOUNTING PERIODS LO 1 Explain why work sheets are useful, prepare a work sheet for a service business, and prepare financial statements from the information in a work sheet. When organizing the information presented in formal reports to internal and external decision makers, accountants prepare numerous analyses and informal documents. These informal documents are important tools for accountants. Traditionally, they are called working papers. One widely used working paper is the work sheet. Normally, the work sheet is not distributed to decision makers. It is prepared and used by accountants. Why Study the Work Sheet? As we stated previously, preparing a work sheet is an optional procedure. When a business has only a few accounts and adjustments, preparing a work sheet is not necessary. Also, computerized accounting systems provide financial statements without first generating a work sheet. Nevertheless, there are several reasons why an understanding of work sheets is helpful:

3 The Work Sheet and the Closing Process In a manual accounting system involving many accounts and adjustments, the work sheet helps the accountant avoid errors. 2. Studying the work sheet is an effective way for you to see the entire accounting process from beginning to end. In a sense, it gives a bird s-eye view of the process between the occurrence of economic events and the presentation of their effects in financial statements. This knowledge helps managers and other decision makers understand the information in the statements. 3. After a company has tentatively prepared its financial statements, the auditors of the statements often use a work sheet as a basis for planning and organizing the audit. Also, they may use a work sheet to reflect any additional adjustments that appear necessary as a result of the audit. 4. Accountants often use work sheets to prepare interim (monthly or quarterly) financial statements. 5. A modified form of the work sheet is sometimes used to show the effects of proposed transactions. Where Does the Work Sheet Fit into the Accounting Process? In practice, the work sheet is an optional step in the accounting process that can simplify the accountant s efforts in preparing financial statements. When a work sheet is used, it is prepared before making the adjusting entries at the end of the reporting period. The work sheet gathers information about the accounts, the needed adjustments, and the financial statements. When it is finished, the work sheet contains information that is recorded in the journal and then presented in the statements. Illustration 4 1 shows a blank work sheet. Notice that it has five sets of double columns for the 1. Unadjusted trial balance. 2. Adjustments. 3. Adjusted trial balance. 4. Income statement. 5. Statement of changes in owner s equity and the balance sheet. Note that a separate set of double columns is not provided for the statement of changes in owner s equity. Because that statement includes only a few items, they are simply listed with the balance sheet items. A work sheet can be completed manually or with a computer. In fact, the format is well-suited for using a spreadsheet program. PREPARING THE WORK SHEET Step 1 Enter the Unadjusted Trial Balance Turn the first transparency over to create Illustration 4 2. This illustration shows how the accountant starts preparing the work sheet by listing the number and title of every account expected to appear on the company s financial statements. Then, the unadjusted debit or credit balances of the accounts are found in the ledger and

4 Illustration 4 1 Preparing the Work Sheet at the End of the Accounting Period CLEAR COPY CO. Work Sheet For Month Ended December 31, 19X1 The heading should identify the entity, the document, and the time period. Statement of Changes in Unadjusted Adjusted Income Owner s Equity Account Trial Balance Adjustments Trial Balance Statement and Balance Sheet No. Title Dr. Cr. Dr. Cr. Dr. Cr. Dr. Cr. Dr. Cr. The work sheet can be prepared manually or with a computer spreadsheet program. The worksheet collects and summarizes the information used to prepare financial statements, adjusting entries, and closing entries.

5 Illustration 4 2 Step One: Enter the Unadjusted Trial Balance CLEAR COPY CO. Work Sheet For Month Ended December 31, 19X1 101 Cash 7, Accounts receivable 125 Store supplies 3, Prepaid insurance 2, Copy equipment 26, Accumulated depreciation, copy equipment 201 Accounts payable 6, Salaries payable 236 Unearned copy services revenue 3, Terry Dow, capital 30, Terry Dow, withdrawals Copy services revenue 3, Depreciation expense, copy equipment 622 Salaries expense 1, Insurance expense 641 Rent expense 1, Store supplies expense 690 Utilities expense 230 Totals 43,100 43,100 When entering the unadjusted trial balances, include all accounts that have balances or that are expected to have balances after adjustments. These two columns should show equal totals.

6 Illustration 4 3 Step Two: Enter the Adjustments and Prepare the Adjusted Trial Balance 7,950 (f) 1,800 1,800 (b) 1,050 2,670 (a) 100 2,300 26,000 (c) ,200 (e) (d) 250 2,750 30, (d) 250 (f) 1,800 5,950 (c) (e) 210 1,610 (a) ,000 (b) 1,050 1, ,785 3,785 45,485 45,485 These two columns should show equal totals. These two columns should show equal totals. Enter the drafts of the adjusting entries and find the total debits and credits. Sum the unadjusted trial balance accounts with the adjustments, and enter them in the adjusted trial balance.

7 llustration 4 4 Step Three: Extend the Adjusted Trial Balance Amounts to the Financial Statement Columns 7,950 1,800 2,670 2,300 26, , ,750 30,000 5, , ,000 1, ,365 5,950 41,120 39,535 Extend all revenue and expense amounts to the Income Statement columns. Extend all asset, liability, and owner s equity amounts to these columns. The totals for the columns are not equal because the debit and the credit balances in the revenue and expense accounts are not equal.

8 llustration 4 5 Step Four: Enter the Net Income (or Loss) and Balance the Financial Statement Columns Net income 1,585 1,585 Totals 5,950 5,950 41,120 41,120 Add two new lines for the net income (or loss) and the totals Enter the net income amount as the difference between the debits and the credits in the Income Statement columns. Also enter the net income amount in the credit column to include all changes in owner s equity.

9 The Work Sheet and the Closing Process CLEAR COPY Income Statement For Month Ended December 31, 1996 Revenues: Copy services revenue $5,950 Operating expenses: Amortization expense, copy equipment.... $ 375 Salaries expense ,610 Insurance expense Rent expense ,000 Store supplies expense ,050 Utilities expense Total operating expenses ,365 Net income $1,585 Illustration 4 6 Step Five: Prepare the Financial Statements from the Work Sheet Information CLEAR COPY Statement of Changes in Owner s Equity For Month Ended December 31, 1996 Terry Dow, Capital, November 30, $ 0 Plus: Investments by owner $30,000 Net income ,585 31,585 Total $31,585 Less withdrawals by owner Terry Dow, capital, December 31, $31,185 CLEAR COPY Balance Sheet December 31, 1996 Assets Cash $ 7,950 Accounts receivable ,800 Store supplies ,670 Prepaid insurance ,300 Copy equipment $26,000 Accumulated amortization, copy equipment.... (375) 25,625 Total assets $40,345 Liabilities Accounts payable $ 6,200 Salaries payable Unearned copy services revenue ,750 Total liabilities $ 9,160 Owner s Equity Terry Dow, capital ,185 Total liabilities and owner s equity $40,345

10 186 Chapter 4 recorded in the first two columns. Because these columns serve as the unadjusted trial balance, the totals of the columns should be equal. Illustration 4 2 uses the information for Clear Copy from Chapter 2 to show step 1. The account balances include the effects of December s external transactions. They do not reflect any of the adjustments described in Chapter 3. In some cases, the accountant determines later that additional accounts need to be inserted on the work sheet. If the work sheet is completed manually, the additional accounts are inserted below the initial list. If a computer spreadsheet program is used, the new lines are easily inserted between existing lines. Because a later phase in the example requires two lines for the Copy Services Revenue account, Illustration 4 2 includes an extra blank line below that account. If this need is not anticipated when the work sheet is being prepared manually, the accountant can squeeze two entries on one line. Step 2 Enter the Adjustments and Prepare the Adjusted Trial Balance Turn the next overlay page to create Illustration 4 3. The work sheet now appears as it would after step 2 is completed. Step 2 begins by entering adjustments for economic events that were not external transactions. These include adjustments for prepaid expenses, amortization, unearned revenues, accrued expenses, and accrued revenues. The illustration shows the six adjustments for Clear Copy that were explained in Chapter 3: a. Expiration of $100 of prepaid insurance. b. Consumption of $1,050 of store supplies. c. Amortization of copy equipment by $375. d. Earning of $250 of previously unearned revenue. e. Accrual of $210 of salaries owed to the employee. f. Accrual of $1,800 of revenue owed by a customer. To be sure that equal debits and credits are entered, the components of each adjustment are identified on the work sheet with a letter. Some accountants explain the adjustments with a list at the bottom of the work sheet or on a separate page. 1 To test for accuracy, they add the totals of the two columns to confirm that they are equal. After the adjustments are entered on the work sheet, the adjusted trial balance is prepared by combining the adjustments with the unadjusted balances. Debits and credits are combined just as they would be in determining an account s balance. For example, the Prepaid Insurance account in Illustration 4 3 has a $2,400 debit balance in the unadjusted trial balance. This is combined with the $100 credit entry (a) in the Adjustments columns to give the account a $2,300 debit balance in the adjusted trial balance. Salaries Expense has a $1,400 balance in the unadjusted trial balance and is combined with the $210 debit entry (e) in the Adjustments columns. When the debit balance is combined with the debit from the adjustment, the account 1 Auditors work sheets cross-reference each adjustment to a detailed analysis and other supporting evidence.

11 The Work Sheet and the Closing Process 187 has a $1,610 debit balance in the adjusted trial balance. The totals of the Adjusted Trial Balance columns should confirm that debits equal credits. Step 3 Extend the Adjusted Trial Balance Amounts to the Financial Statement Columns Turn the third transparency over to create Illustration 4 4 and to see the effects of step 3. In this step, the accountant assigns each adjusted account balance to its financial statement. This is done by extending each amount to the appropriate column across the page. The revenue and expense balances are extended to the Income Statement columns. The asset, liability, and owner s capital and withdrawals account balances are extended to the Statement of Changes in Owner s Equity and Balance Sheet columns. Accounts with debit balances in the adjusted trial balance are extended to the Debit columns and accounts with credit balances are extended to the Credit columns. Next, the columns are totaled. Notice that the paired column totals are not equal. This occurs because the sum of the expenses debit balances does not equal the sum of the revenue credit balances. This also creates an equal and opposite imbalance in the Statement of Changes in Owner s Equity and Balance Sheet columns. Step 4 deals with this imbalance. Step 4 Enter the Net Income (or Loss) and Balance the Financial Statement Columns To see the completed work sheet, turn the final transparent overlay to create Illustration 4 5. Step 4 begins by entering Net income and Totals on the next two lines in the account title column. Next, the accountant computes the net income by finding the excess of the Income Statement Credit column total over the Debit column total. This amount is inserted on the net income line in the Debit column, and a new total is computed for each column. (If the initial total of the debits is greater than the initial total credits, the expenses exceed the revenues and the company has incurred a net loss. If so, the difference is entered in the Credit column instead of the Debit column.) The total debits and total credits in the Income Statement columns are now equal. The accountant next enters the net income in the last Credit column of the work sheet. (If there is a net loss, it is entered in the last Debit column.) Notice that this entry causes the total debits in the last two columns to equal the total credits. Even if all five pairs of columns balance, the work sheet may not be free of errors. For example, if the accountant incorrectly extends an asset account s balance to the Income Statement Debit column, the columns balance but net income is understated. Or, if an expense is extended to the Statement of Changes in Owner s Equity and Balance Sheet Debit column, the columns balance but the net income is overstated. Although these errors may not be immediately obvious, they are discovered when the accountant begins to actually prepare the financial statements. For example, it would be apparent that an asset does not belong on the income statement or that an expense does not belong on the balance sheet. At this point, the work sheet is complete. If the accountant discovers new information or an error, the change can easily be included in the work sheet, especially if it is being prepared with a computer spreadsheet.

12 188 Chapter 4 PREPARING ADJUSTING ENTRIES FROM THE WORK SHEET Entering the adjustments in the Adjustments columns of a work sheet does not get these adjustments into the ledger accounts. Therefore, after completing the work sheet, adjusting entries like the ones described in Chapter 3 must be entered in the General Journal and posted to the accounts in the ledger. The work sheet makes this easy because its Adjustments columns provide the information for these entries. If adjusting entries are prepared from the information in Illustration 4 3, you will see that they are the same adjusting entries we discussed in the last chapter. PREPARING FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FROM THE WORK SHEET A work sheet is not a substitute for the financial statements. The work sheet is nothing more than a supporting tool that the accountant uses at the end of an accounting period to help organize the data. However, as soon as it is completed, the accountant uses the work sheet to prepare the financial statements. The sequence is the same as we have seen before. The income statement is completed first. The net income is then combined with the owner s investments, withdrawals, and beginning capital balance on the statement of changes in owner s equity. In doing this, the accountant analyzes the owner s capital account to separate the beginning balance from any new investments made during the reporting period. Finally, the balance sheet is completed by using the ending balance of owner s equity from the statement of changes in owner s equity. WHY USE A WORK SHEET? At this point, it should be clear that we ended up with exactly the same financial statements and adjusting entries that we developed in Chapter 3 without using a work sheet. So, why prepare a work sheet? First, the example in this chapter is greatly simplified. Real companies have many more adjusting entries and accounts than Clear Copy. A work sheet makes it easier to organize all the additional information. As we mentioned earlier in the chapter, auditors often use work sheets to plan and organize their work. In fact, they may request that a company provide a work sheet showing the adjustments made prior to the audit. Second, the work sheet can be used to prepare interim financial statements without recording the adjusting entries in the journal and ledger. Thus, a company can prepare statements each month or quarter and avoid taking the time to formally journalize and post the adjustments except once at the end of each year. All large companies with publicly traded ownership prepare interim financial reports, usually on a quarterly basis. Some of them also include summaries of the past year s quarterly data in their annual reports. Also, companies may use a work sheet format to show the effects of proposed transactions. In doing this, they enter their adjusted financial statements amounts in the first two columns, arranging them to appear in the form of financial statements. Then, the proposed transactions are inserted in the second two columns. The extended amounts in the last columns show the effects of the proposed transactions on the financial statements. These final columns are called pro forma statements, because they show the statements as if the proposed transactions had already occurred.

13 The Work Sheet and the Closing Process 189 Because the work sheet is an informal working paper, its format is not dictated by generally accepted accounting principles. For example, some accountants omit the Adjusted Trial Balance columns. Others use different work sheet columns to draft the closing entries described later in the chapter. Some work sheets have separate columns for the statement of changes in owner s equity and the balance sheet. The decision about which format is preferred rests with the accountant who creates the work sheet. ALTERNATE FORMATS OF THE WORK SHEET Progress Check (Answers to Progress Checks are provided at the end of the chapter.) 4 1 On a work sheet, the $99,400 salaries expense balance was incorrectly extended from the Adjusted Trial Balance column to the Statement of Changes in Owner s Equity and Balance Sheet Debit column. As a result of this error, (a) the Adjusted Trial Balance columns will not balance; (b) revenues on the work sheet will be understated; (c) net income on the work sheet will be overstated. 4 2 Where does the accountant obtain the amounts entered in the Unadjusted Trial Balance columns of the work sheet? 4 3 What is the advantage of using a work sheet to prepare adjusting entries? 4 4 From a 10-column work sheet, the accountant prepares the financial statements in what order? After the financial statements are completed and the adjusting entries are recorded, the next step in the accounting cycle is to journalize and post closing entries. Closing entries are designed to transfer the end-of-period balances in the revenue, expense, and withdrawals accounts to the owner s capital account. These entries are necessary because: 1. Revenues increase owner s equity, while expenses and withdrawals decrease owner s equity. 2. During an accounting period, these increases and decreases are temporarily accumulated in the revenue, expense, and withdrawals accounts rather than in the owner s capital account. 3. By transferring the effects of revenues, expenses, and withdrawals from the revenue, expense, and withdrawals accounts to the owner s capital account, closing entries install the correct end-of-period balance in the owner s capital account. 4. Closing entries also cause the revenue, expense, and withdrawals accounts to begin each new accounting period with zero balances. Remember that an income statement reports the revenues earned and expenses incurred during one accounting period and is prepared from information recorded in the revenue and expense accounts. Also, the statement of changes in owner s equity reports the changes in the owner s capital account during one period and uses the information accumulated in the withdrawals account. Because the revenue, expense, and withdrawals accounts accumulate information for only one period and then must be ready to do the same thing the next period, they must start each period with zero balances. CLOSING ENTRIES LO 2 Explain why the temporary accounts are closed at the end of each accounting period and prepare closing entries and a post-closing trial balance for a service business.

14 190 Chapter 4 To close the revenue and expense accounts, the accountant transfers their balances first to a summary account called Income Summary. Then, the Income Summary balance, which is the net income or loss, is transferred to the owner s capital account. Finally, the accountant transfers the owner s withdrawals account balance to the owner s capital account. After the closing entries are posted, the revenue, expense, Income Summary, and withdrawals accounts have zero balances. Thus, these accounts are said to be closed or cleared. Illustration 4 7 diagrams the four entries that close the revenue, expense, Income Summary, and withdrawals accounts of Clear Copy on December 31, The preclosing balances of the accounts in the illustration are taken from the adjusted trial balance in Illustration 4 5. Entry 1. The first closing entry transfers the credit balances in the revenue accounts to the Income Summary account. In general journal form, the entry is: Dec. 31 Copy Services Revenue , Income Summary , To close the revenue account and create the Income Summary account. Note that this entry closes the revenue account by giving it a zero balance. If the company had several different revenue accounts, this entry would be a compound entry that included a debit to each of them. This clearing of the accounts allows them to be used to record new revenues in the upcoming year. The Income Summary account is created especially for the closing process and is used only during that process. The $5,950 credit balance in Income Summary equals the total revenues for the year. Entry 2. The second closing entry transfers the debit balances in the expense accounts to the Income Summary account. This step concentrates all the expense account debit balances in the Income Summary account. It also closes each expense account by giving it a zero balance. That allows it to be used to record new expenses in the upcoming year. The second closing entry for Clear Copy is: Dec. 31 Income Summary , Amortization Expense, Copy Equipment Salaries Expense , Insurance Expense Rent Expense , Store Supplies Expense , Utilities Expense To close the expense accounts. Illustration 4 7 shows that posting this entry gives each expense account a zero balance and prepares it to accept entries for expenses in The entry also makes the balance of the Income Summary account equal to December s net income of

15 The Work Sheet and the Closing Process 191 lllustration 4 7 Closing Entries for Clear Copy Expense Accounts Revenue Accounts Amortization Expense, Copy Equipment Balance Copy Services Revenue 5,950 Balance 5,950 Salaries Expense Balance 1,610 1,610 Insurance Expense Balance Rent Expense Balance 1,000 1,000 Store Supplies Expense Balance 1,050 1,050 Utilities Expense Balance Income Summary 4,365 5,950 4,365 Balance 1,585 1,585 Terry Dow, Withdrawals Balance Terry Dow, Capital Balance Balance 30,000 1,585 31, ,185 3 The Four Closing Entries 1. Close the revenue accounts 2. Close the expense accounts 3. Close the Income Summary account 4. Close the withdrawals account $1,585. In effect, all the debit and credit balances of the expense and revenue accounts have now been concentrated in the Income Summary account. Entry 3. The third closing entry transfers the balance of the Income Summary account to the owner s capital account. This entry closes the Income Summary account and adds the company s net income to the owner s capital account:

16 192 Chapter 4 Dec. 31 Income Summary , Terry Dow, Capital , To close the Income Summary account and add the net income to the capital account. After this entry is posted, the Income Summary account has a zero balance. It will continue to have a zero balance until the closing process occurs at the end of the next year. The owner s capital account has been increased by the amount of the net income, but still does not include the effects of the withdrawal that occurred in December. Entry 4. The final closing entry transfers the debit balance of the withdrawals account to the capital account. This entry for Clear Copy is: Dec. 31 Terry Dow, Capital Terry Dow, Withdrawals To close the withdrawals account and reduce the balance of the capital account. This entry gives the withdrawals account a zero balance, which allows it to accumulate the next year s payments to the owner. It also reduces the capital account balance to the $31,185 amount reported on the balance sheet. SOURCES OF CLOSING ENTRY INFORMATION The accountant can identify the accounts to be closed and the amounts to be used in the closing entries by referring to the individual revenue and expense accounts in the ledger. However, the work sheet provides this information in a more convenient format. To locate the information on the work sheet, look again at the income statement columns in Illustration 4 5. All accounts with balances in these columns are closed and the amounts in the work sheet are used in the closing entries. The balance of the owner s withdrawals account appears in the last debit column in the work sheet. THE POST- CLOSING TRIAL BALANCE The six-column table in Illustration 4 8 summarizes the effects of the closing process. The first two columns contain the adjusted trial balance from the work sheet, with two additional lines for the Income Summary account. The next two columns present the closing entries, numbered (1) through (4). The last two columns contain the post-closing trial balance, which lists the balances of the accounts that were not closed. 2 These accounts represent the company s assets, liabilities, and owner s equity as of the end of These items and amounts are the same as those presented in the balance sheet in Illustration Some accountants use work sheets that include these four columns instead of the financial statement columns. The financial statements are not changed by choosing one or the other.

17 The Work Sheet and the Closing Process 193 Illustration 4 8 The Adjusted Trial Balance, Closing Entries, and Post-Closing Trial Balance for Clear Copy Adjusted Trial Closing Post-Closing Balance Entries Trial Balance Cash ,950 7,950 Accounts receivable ,800 1,800 Store supplies ,670 2,670 Prepaid insurance ,300 2,300 Copy equipment ,000 26,000 Accumulated amortization, copy equipment Accounts payable ,200 6,200 Salaries payable Unearned copy services revenue.... 2,750 2,750 Terry Dow, capital ,000 (4) 400 (3) 1,585 31,185 Terry Dow, withdrawals (4) 400 Copy services revenue ,950 (1) 5,950 Amortization expense, copy equipment (2) 375 Salaries expense ,610 (2) 1,610 Insurance expense (2) 100 Rent expense ,000 (2) 1,000 Store supplies expense ,050 (2) 1,050 Utilities expense (2) 230 Income summary (2) 4,365 (1) 5,950 (3) 1,585 Totals ,485 45,485 12,300 12,300 40,720 40,720 Instead of preparing the six-column table in Illustration 4 8, the post-closing trial balance is often prepared as a separate two-column table, as in Illustration 4 9. Regardless of the format, the post-closing trial balance is the last step in the annual accounting process. Permanent (Real) Accounts and Temporary (Nominal) Accounts Asset, liability, and owner s capital accounts are not closed as long as the company continues to own the assets, owe the liabilities, and have owner s equity. Because these accounts are not closed, they are called permanent accounts or real accounts. These accounts are permanent because they describe real conditions that are perceived to exist. In contrast, the terms temporary accounts and nominal accounts describe the revenue, expense, Income Summary, and withdrawals accounts. These terms are used because the accounts are opened at the beginning of the year, used to record events, and then closed at the end of the year. These accounts are temporary because they describe nominal events or changes that have occurred rather than real conditions that continue to exist.

18 194 Chapter 4 Illustration 4 9 Separate Post-Closing Trial Balance for Clear Copy The Post Closing Trial Balance Cash $ 7,950 Accounts receivable ,800 Store supplies ,670 Prepaid insurance ,300 Copy equipment ,000 Accumulated amortization, copy equipment. $ 375 Accounts payable ,200 Salaries payable Unearned copy services revenue ,750 Terry Dow, capital ,185 Totals $40,720 $40,720 THE LEDGER FOR CLEAR COPY To complete the Clear Copy example, look at Illustration 4 10, the company s entire ledger as of December 31, Review the accounts and observe that the temporary accounts (the withdrawals account and all accounts with numbers greater than 400) have been closed. CLOSING ENTRIES FOR CORPORATIONS Up to this point, our examples of closing entries have related to the activities and accounts of single proprietorships. However, closing entries for corporations are very similar. The first two closing entries are exactly the same. In other words, a corporation s revenue and expense accounts are closed to the Income Summary account. The last two entries are different. Recall from Chapter 3 that a corporation s balance sheet presents the shareholders equity as contributed capital and retained earnings. As a result, the third closing entry for a corporation closes the Income Summary account to the Retained Earnings account. For example, Petro-Canada reported a net income of $162 million in 1993, which means that was the credit balance in the Income Summary account after the revenue and expense accounts were closed. The company s third closing entry would have updated the Retained Earnings account as follows: Dec. 31 Income Summary ,000, Retained Earnings ,000, To close the Income Summary account and update Retained Earnings. The fourth closing entry is also different because corporations use a Dividends Declared account instead of a withdrawals account. The accounting practices for dividends paid to shareholders are described in Appendix D and in Chapter 16. Coverage of corporations, at this point, is limited to closing entries. For a more complete coverage of partnership and corporation accounting refer to Appendix D at the end of this chapter and Chapters 14, 15 and 16.

19 The Work Sheet and the Closing Process 195 IIlustration 4 10 The Ledger for Clear Copy as of December 31, 1996 (after adjustments and closing entries have been posted) Asset Accounts: Cash Acct. No. 101 Date Expl. Debit Credit Balance 1996 Dec. 1 30,000 30, ,500 27, ,000 7, ,200 9, ,000 8, , ,700 9, , , ,000 11, ,400 9, , , ,950 Accounts Receivable Acct. No. 106 Date Expl. Debit Credit Balance 1996 Dec. 12 1,700 1, , ,800 1,800 Store Supplies Acct. No. 125 Date Expl. Debit Credit Balance 1996 Dec. 2 2,500 2, ,100 3, , ,050 2,670 Prepaid Insurance Acct. No. 128 Date Expl. Debit Credit Balance 1996 Dec. 26 2,400 2, ,300 Copy Equipment Acct. No. 167 Date Expl. Debit Credit Balance 1996 Dec. 3 20,000 20, ,000 26,000 Accumulated Amortization, Copy Equipment Acct. No. 168 Date Expl. Debit Credit Balance 1996 Dec Liability and Equity Accounts: Accounts Payable Acct. No. 201 Date Expl. Debit Credit Balance 1996 Dec. 6 7,100 7, ,200 Unearned Copy Services Revenue Acct. No. 236 Date Expl. Debit Credit Balance 1996 Dec. 26 3,000 3, ,750 Salaries Payable Acct. No. 209 Date Expl. Debit Credit Balance 1996 Dec

20 196 Chapter 4 IIlustration 4 10 (concluded) Terry Dow, Capital Acct. No. 301 Date Expl. Debit Credit Balance 1996 Dec. 1 30,000 30, ,585 31, ,185 Terry Dow, Withdrawals Acct. No. 302 Date Expl. Debit Credit Balance 1996 Dec Revenue and Expense Accounts (including Income Summary): Copy Services Revenue Acct. No. 403 Date Expl. Debit Credit Balance 1996 Dec. 10 2,200 2, ,700 3, , ,800 5, ,950 0 Amortization Expense, Copy Equipment Acct. No. 614 Date Expl. Debit Credit Balance 1996 Dec Salaries Expense Acct. No. 622 Date Expl. Debit Credit Balance 1996 Dec , , ,610 0 Insurance Expense Acct. No. 637 Date Expl. Debit Credit Balance 1996 Dec Rent Expense Acct. No. 641 Date Expl. Debit Credit Balance 1996 Dec. 12 1,000 1, ,000 0 Store Supplies Expense Acct. No. 651 Date Expl. Debit Credit Balance 1996 Dec. 31 1,050 1, ,050 0 Utilities Expense Acct. No. 690 Date Expl. Debit Credit Balance 1996 Dec Income Summary Acct. No. 901 Date Expl. Debit Credit Balance 1996 Dec. 31 5,950 5, ,365 1, ,585 0

21 The Work Sheet and the Closing Process 197 Progress Check 4 5 When closing entries are prepared: a. The accounts for expenses, revenues, and the owner s withdrawals are closed to the Income Summary account. b. The final balance of the Income Summary account equals net income or net loss for the period. c. All temporary accounts have zero balances when the process is completed. 4 6 Why are revenue and expense accounts called temporary? Are there any other temporary accounts? 4 7 What accounts are listed on the post-closing trial balance? 4 8 What account is used by a corporation to close the Income Summary account? Chapters 2, 3, and 4 have described the accounting procedures that are completed during each reporting period. They begin with recording external transactions in the journal and end with preparing the post-closing trial balance. Because these steps are repeated each period, they are often called the accounting cycle. A flow Step Description 1. Journalizing Analyzing transactions and recording debits and credits in a journal. 2. Posting Copying the debits and credits from the journal entries to the accounts in the ledger. 3. Preparing an unadjusted Summarizing the ledger accounts and partially testing trial balance clerical accuracy. (If a work sheet is used, this is done on the work sheet.) 4. Completing the work sheet Identifying the effects of adjustments on the financial (optional) statements before entering them in the ledger and posting them to the accounts; also drafting the adjusted trial balance, extending the adjusted amounts to the appropriate financial statement columns, and determining the size of the net income or net loss. 5. Adjusting the accounts Identifying necessary adjustments to bring the account balances up to date; journalizing and posting entries to record the adjustments in the accounts. (If the work sheet is prepared, the information in the adjustments columns is used for the entries.) 6. Preparing the financial Using the information on the adjusted trial balance (or statements the work sheet) to prepare an income statement, a statement of changes in owner s equity, a balance sheet, and a statement of changes in financial position. (Techniques for preparing the changes in financial position statement are described in Chapter 18.) 7. Closing the temporary Preparing journal entries to close the revenue, accounts expense, and withdrawals accounts and to update the owner s capital (or retained earnings) account. These entries are posted to the ledger. 8. Preparing a post-closing Testing the clerical accuracy of the adjusting and trial balance closing procedures. A REVIEW OF THE ACCOUNTING CYCLE LO 3 Describe each step in the accounting cycle.

22 198 Chapter 4 IIlustration 4 11 The Accounting Cycle Throughout the year: Transactions Journalize Journal Post Ledger At the end of the year: OR Prepare the unadjusted trial balance Complete the work sheet Adjust the ledger accounts Adjusting entries Journalize Journal Post Ledger Prepare the financial statements Income Statement Statement of Changes in Owner s Equity Balance Sheet Statement of Changes in Financial Position Close the temporary accounts Closing entries Journalize Journal Post Ledger Prepare the post-closing trial balance At the beginning of the next year: Prepare optional reversing entries Reversing entries Journalize Journal Post Ledger chart in Illustration 4 11 shows the steps in order. Steps 1 and 2 take place every day as the company engages in business transactions. The other steps are completed at the end of the accounting period. Review this illustration and the list of the steps to be sure that you understand how each one helps accountants provide useful information in the financial statements. Illustration 4 11 also identifies an optional ninth step of making reversing entries at the beginning of the following period. These entries are described in Appendix C, which begins on page 204.

23 The Work Sheet and the Closing Process 199 A Practical Point Normally, accountants are not able to make all of the adjusting and closing entries on the last day of the fiscal year. Information about the economic events that require adjustments often is not available until after several days or even a few weeks. As a result, the adjusting and closing entries are recorded later but dated as of the last day of the year. This means the financial statements reflect what is known on the date that they are prepared instead of what was known on the financial statement date. For example, a company might receive a utility bill on January 14 for costs incurred from December 1 through December 31. Upon receiving the bill, the company s accountant records the expense and the payable as of December 31. The income statement for December reflects the full expense and the December 31 balance sheet includes the payable, even though the exact amounts were not actually known on December 31. Progress Check 4 9 The steps in the accounting cycle (a) are concluded by preparing a post-closing trial balance; (b) are concluded by preparing a balance sheet; or (c) begin with preparing the unadjusted trial balance At what point in the accounting cycle is the work sheet prepared? By now, it should be clear that accountants go to great lengths to ensure that a company s financial statements reflect up-to-date information about its assets, liabilities, revenues, and expenses. A primary goal of this effort is to provide information that helps internal and external decision makers evaluate the results achieved in the reporting period. This includes evaluating management s success in generating profits. The information may suggest ways to achieve better results and also helps users predict future results. In using accounting information to evaluate the results of operations, one widely used ratio relates the company s net income to its sales. The ratio is called the profit margin or the return on sales, and is calculated with this formula: Profit margin N et income Revenues In effect, this ratio measures the average portion of each dollar of revenue that ends up as profit. Recall from the beginning of the chapter that Karen White and Mark Smith desired to test whether Imperial Oil Limited was improving its profitability. The company's profit margins during several years were: USING THE INFORMATION THE PROFIT MARGIN LO 4 Calculate the profit margin ratio and describe what it reveals about a company s performance. (in millions) Net revenue (income).... $ 359 $ 279 $ 195 $ 162 $ 256 Revenue ,011 8,903 9,147 9,502 11,303 Profit margin % 3.1% 2.1% 1.7% 2.3%

24 200 Chapter 4 Note the positive trend in Imperial s profit margin in the last three years. However, this may be less favourable because the company's sales volume decreased 20% during the same period. Consequently, one may conclude that although the trend in Imperial's profit margin is favourable, you cannot conclude that the absolute values are good without further investigation, such as comparisons with other companies in the same industry. Progress Check 4 11 The profit margin is the ratio between a company s net income and total (a) expenses; (b) assets; (c) liabilities; or (d) revenues If a company had a profit margin of 22.5% and net income of $1,012,500, what was the total amount of its revenues for the reporting period? SUMMARY OF THE CHAPTER IN TERMS OF LEARNING OBJECTIVES LO 1. Explain why work sheets are useful, prepare a work sheet for a service business, and prepare financial statements from the information in a work sheet. Accountants often use work sheets at the end of an accounting period in the process of preparing adjusting entries, the adjusted trial balance, and the financial statements. The work sheet is only a tool for accountants and is not distributed to investors or creditors. The work sheet described in this chapter has five pairs of columns for the unadjusted trial balance, the adjustments, the adjusted trial balance, the income statement, and the statement of changes in owner s equity and the balance sheet. Other formats are used in practice. The income statement is prepared from the Income Statement columns of the work sheet by taking the revenues from the Credit column and the expenses from the Debit column. The net income is the difference between the debits and credits. The statement of changes in owner s equity combines the preclosing balance of the capital account (including the beginning balance plus any new investments), the net income from the Income Statement columns, and the owner s withdrawals. The balance sheet combines all assets, contra assets, and liabilities from the last two columns of the work sheet with the ending balance of owner s equity presented in the statement of changes in owner s equity. LO 2. Explain why the temporary accounts are closed at the end of each accounting period and prepare closing entries and a post-closing trial balance for a service business. The temporary accounts are closed at the end of each accounting period for two reasons. First, this process updates the owner s equity account to include the effects of all economic events recorded for the year. Second, it prepares the revenue, expense, and withdrawals accounts for the next reporting period by giving them zero balances. The revenue and expense account balances are initially transferred to the Income Summary account, which is then closed to the owner s capital account. Finally, the withdrawals account is closed to the capital account. LO 3. Describe each step in the accounting cycle. The accounting cycle consists of eight steps: (1) journalizing external transactions and (2) posting the entries during the year, and at the end of the year: (3) preparing either an unadjusted trial balance or (4) a work sheet, (5) preparing and posting adjusting entries, (6) preparing the financial statements, (7) preparing and posting closing entries, and (8) preparing the post-closing trial balance.

25 The Work Sheet and the Closing Process 201 LO 4. Calculate the profit margin ratio and describe what it reveals about a company s performance. The profit margin ratio describes a company s income earning activities by showing the period s net income as a percentage of total revenue. It is found by dividing the reporting period s net income by the revenue for the same period. The ratio can be usefully interpreted only in light of additional facts about the company and its industry. This six-column table shows the December 31, 1996, adjusted trial balance of Westside Appliance Repair Company: DEMONSTRATION PROBLEM Adjusted Trial Closing Post-Closing Balance Entries Trial Balance Cash ,300 Notes receivable ,000 Prepaid insurance ,000 Prepaid rent ,000 Equipment ,000 Accumulated amortization, equipment.. 52,000 Accounts payable ,000 Long-term notes payable ,000 B. Westside, capital ,500 B. Westside, withdrawals ,000 Repair services revenue ,000 Interest earned ,500 Amortization expense, equipment ,000 Wages expense ,000 Rent expense ,000 Insurance expense ,000 Interest expense ,700 Income summary Totals , ,000 The beginning balance of the capital account was $140,500, and the owner invested $33,000 cash in the company on June 15, Required 1. Prepare closing entries for Westside Appliance Repair Co. 2. Complete the six-column schedule. 3. Post the closing entries to this capital account: B. Westside, Capital Account No. 301 Date Explanation Debit Credit Balance 1996 Jan. 1 Beginning balance 140, June 15 New investment 33, , Prepare entries to close the revenue accounts to Income Summary, to close the expense accounts to Income Summary, to close Income Summary to the capital account, and to close the withdrawals account to the capital account. Planning the Solution

26 202 Chapter 4 Enter the four closing entries in the second pair of columns in the six-column schedule, and then extend the balances of the asset and liability accounts to the third pair of columns. Enter the post-closing balance of the capital account in the last column. Examine the totals of the columns to verify that they are equal. Post the third and fourth closing entries to the capital account. Solution to Demonstration Problem 1. Dec. 31 Repair Services Revenue , Interest Earned , Income Summary , To close the revenue accounts and create the Income Summary account. 31 Income Summary , Amortization Expense, Equipment , Wages Expense , Rent Expense , Insurance Expense , Interest Expense , To close the expense accounts. 31 Income Summary , B. Westside, Capital , To close the Income Summary account and add the net income to the capital account. 31 B. Westside, Capital , B. Westside, Withdrawals , To close the withdrawals account and reduce the balance of the capital account.

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