Case Studies: LSU CSS NATIONAL FLOOD INSURANCE WORKSHOP: PREPARING FOR CHANGES IN THE NATIONAL FLOOD INSURANCE PROGRAM. Coastal Sustainability Studio

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "Case Studies: LSU CSS NATIONAL FLOOD INSURANCE WORKSHOP: PREPARING FOR CHANGES IN THE NATIONAL FLOOD INSURANCE PROGRAM. Coastal Sustainability Studio"

Transcription

1 NATIONAL FLOOD INSURANCE WORKSHOP: PREPARING FOR CHANGES IN THE NATIONAL FLOOD INSURANCE PROGRAM Case Studies: Community Strategies for Reducing Flood Risks and Insurance Burdens Prepared for the National Flood Insurance Workshop June18, 2013 Baton Rouge, LA LRAPLOUISIANA RESILIENCY ASSISTANCE PROGRAM LSU CSS Coastal Sustainability Studio

2 Coastal Sustainability Studio 212 Design Building Baton Rouge, LA css.lsu.edu resiliency.lsu.edu

3 COMMUNITY RATING SYSTEM The National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) Community Rating System (CRS) is a voluntary program for recognizing and encouraging community floodplain management activities that exceed the minimum NFIP requirements. In return, communities receive discounts on flood insurance premiums, ranging from 5-45%. King County, WA Heavy rains and snowmelts lead to frequent river flooding in the Seattle area. In 1990, King County officials recognized the value of the CRS Program in reducing risk to floodplain property owners. By 2007 King County had received a Class 2 rating under the CRS, making it the highest-rated county in the nation at the time. Projects: Photo: King County, WA In order to reduce flooding risks and lower insurance premiums, King County has incorporated every category of projects and programs for which FEMA grants CRS credit. King County has preserved over 100,000 acres of open, natural space, providing beneficial floodplain functions. The county has also purchased and removed more than 40 structures from the floodplain. The King County Flood Control District was established to manage and fund such projects, including the Annual Inspection and Maintenance Program, operation of a Flood Warning Center, and the Washington State Dam Safety Program. As a result, the National Weather Service designated the county as a storm ready county. Other specific examples of flood improvement include: Providing Flood Insurance Rate Map (FIRM) information online Creating and maintaining detailed GIS maps of floodplains, channel mitigation hazard areas, and surveyed benchmarks, and making that information readily available to the public Restricting and regulating development in areas where flood depths exceed 3 feet and velocity exceeds 3 feet per second, including channel migration zones Restricting non-residential structures in the FEMA floodway, including critical facilities (with some exceptions) Requiring a 3-foot freeboard standard for most structures above the 100-year flood elevation and zero-rise standard throughout the zero-rise floodway to provide flood conveyance Requiring the removal of temporary structures and hazardous materials from the floodplain during the flood season The development of their Flood Hazard Mitigation Plan in 2006 provided the county with guidelines and objectives regarding necessary improvements to an aging system of over 500 levees and revetments within the urban and rural floodplain. In order to manage and fund the $335 million in priority repairs and upgrades necessary over the next decade, the Kind County Flood Control District was created in King County s contemporary methods of flood hazard mitigation reduce flood risks to thousands of people and the loss of billions of dollars in property and infrastructure. The county s Class 2 rating provides a 40% discount on flood insurance premiums for properties within special flood hazard areas, and a 10% discount in non-special flood hazard areas. King County has been able to maintain its class 2 rating, as of October 2012.

4 COMMUNITY RATING SYSTEM The National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) Community Rating System (CRS) is a voluntary program for recognizing and encouraging community floodplain management activities that exceed the minimum NFIP requirements. In return, communities receive discounts on flood insurance premiums, ranging from 5-45%. Miami-Dade County, FL Miami-Dade County is especially susceptible to flooding from major rain events and storm surge because it lies close to sea level. This, coupled with a high water table, means water has nowhere to drain. In 2000, FEMA recognized a need to build a series of canals to protect Miami-Dade county from flood risks. Projects: In order to handle excess water resulting from drainage and Photo: MasTec development of wetlands, the city constructed a 620-mile series of canals and waterways called the Miami-Dade Flood Control Project (C-4 Basin), where water is held in reserves or absorbed into the ground. The driving force of the C-4 project is the pump station at the mouth of the Tamiami Canal, which begins in the Everglades National Park. The canal is designed to push water downstream against the tide. The C-6 basin, built at the mouth of the Miami River Canal, offsets the flow from the C-4 canal, preventing flooding upriver. The three pumps at each station have the capacity to process 4,500 gallons of water per second. When the canals cannot handle the full volume of water, an emergency detention basin exists to receive and store excess water in two reservoirs. The project has been so successful that there are now plans to construct a similar system at Miami-Dade s C-7 basin. Aside from Miami-Dade s efforts in structural flood protection and stormwater management, the county also prevents flooding and assists citizens through: Providing elevation certificates Providing FIRM information online Requiring real estate agents to disclose hazards to potential buyers of flood-prone properties Providing technical advice to citizens about protecting their property from flooding The total cost of the C-4 Canal Project was $70 million, $52.5 million of which was awarded by FEMA s Hazard Mitigation Grant Program (HMGP), which funds up to 75% of the eligible costs of a project that will reduce or eliminate damages from future natural hazard events. The other 25% was provided by Miami-Dade County and awards from the Quality Neighborhood Improvement Program (which funds capital infrastructure projects in unincorporated Miami-Dade County), the South Florida Water Management District (SFWMD). SFWMD is the state agency responsible for managing and protecting water resources of South Florida by balancing and improving water quality, flood control, natural systems and water supply. Residents in Miami-Dade County receive discounts based on the county s Class 5 rating. This includes a 25% discount on insurance premiums for residents within the Special Flood Hazard Area (SFHA) and a 10% discount for those outside the SFHA. Additionally, the ability of the C-4 Project to reduce flooding has resulted in fewer insurance claims, reduced repair costs, and less loss of wages due to time away from work.

5 COMMUNITY RATING SYSTEM The National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) Community Rating System (CRS) is a voluntary program for recognizing and encouraging community floodplain management activities that exceed the minimum NFIP requirements. In return, communities receive discounts on flood insurance premiums, ranging from 5-45%. Roseville, CA Flooding in the City of Roseville is largely associated with stormwater runoff exceeding creek and storm drainage capacities, both in the city and surrounding communities. Areas adjacent to the creeks are subject to both flash flooding and riverine flooding. Since 1992, Roseville, California has been active in the Community Rating System to reduce flooding risks. Roseville is the first and only community in the nation to receive CRS s highest rating of a Class 1 community. Photo: City of Roseville Projects: Roseville has maintained their Class 1 CRS rating by adopting all of FEMA s recommended activities. Only 7% of the city is located within a floodplain, but the city has taken action to prevent losses. The city voluntarily bought-out 273 homes at high risk of flooding to convert the majority of the floodplain to open space. Current development requirements include the prohibition of construction or infilling within the 100-year floodplain, except in the center of the city and only if no adverse impact is demonstrated. The floor elevation of any structure is required to be above the future 100-year floodplain water surface elevation. Ongoing flood control projects include the operation of an alert system that predicts and broadcasts flood warnings and an annual streambed maintenance program. Regional flood control efforts are coordinated through the Placer County Flood Control District which operates detention basins and collects developer-paid fees to pay for improvements. Specific past projects include: Elevating flood-prone homes Quadrupling the size of a culvert on Linda Creek to handle a 100-year storm Adding, enlarging, and improving culverts along Linda Creek Replacing a bridge to widen Cirby Creek s channel for larger stream capacity Removing culverts from under railroads (the Union Pacific Culvert Removal Project) Acquiring homes in the floodplain (the Linda Creek and Cirby Creek/I-80 projects) The City of Roseville funded most of these projects at a cost of about $14.9 million over almost 30 years. Today, annual maintenance and upkeep costs are around $350,000. FEMA funded 75% ($750,000) of the Home Elevation Program and $8.7 million of flood control improvements on Linda Creek. Union Pacific Railroad Company funded almost all of the culverts removed from under railroads at a cost of $2 million. Because of the great Class 1 CRS rating, residents within the 100-year floodplain can receive 45% discount on their flood insurance premiums, while those outside the floodplain can receive 10% insurance premium discounts.

6 COMMUNITY RATING SYSTEM The National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) Community Rating System (CRS) is a voluntary program for recognizing and encouraging community floodplain management activities that exceed the minimum NFIP requirements. In return, communities receive discounts on flood insurance premiums, ranging from 5-45%. Tulsa, OK After the Memorial Day storm of 1984 that left 14 people dead and $292 million in damage, the City of Tulsa developed its first Citywide Flood and Stormwater Management Plan (est. 1990). Tulsa is currently completing the fourth update to its Citywide Master Drainage Plan and is ranked third in FEMA s CRS program with an impressive Class 2 rating. Projects: Photo: David Cassidy While Tulsa has a comprehensive flood control program that encompasses all the activities for which the CRS program grants credit (aside from direct flood protection aid to homeowners, as prohibited by Oklahoma state law), it emphasizes the acquisition of flood-prone properties and preservation of open space in the floodplain. Through the Acquisition Program, Tulsa has cleared more than 900 buildings from its floodplains. The Mingo Creek Project ( ) was formed to design and construct a system of networks of landscaped buffers and detention basins along Mingo Creek. Other recreational greenways, doubling as detention basins, where constructed in the 1990s throughout the city. Plans for the floodplain not only consider current developments, but also include future developments; maps include the entire watershed, not just the floodplain. Taxes and fees apply to those who will need stormwater detention facilities and to those who may obstruct the floodplain storage capacity. For management purposes, certain initiatives were developed: Creation of the Department of Stormwater Management Explicit definition of funds: FEMA Hazard Mitigation Grant Program (HMGP) funds and stormwater taxes and fees Public education and outreach campaigns to build support for fees, taxes, and the voluntary acquisition program Tulsa has engaged in both external and internal sources of funding. External sources include the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers with the Mingo Creek Project, and FEMA s HMGP with the Acquisition Program. Internal sources of revenue include those from the stormwater taxes and fees. Since 1990, more than $200 million has been spent on capital projects and programs (with $80 million of that in federal funds). The city has secured another $300 million in projects planned for the next several decades. Because of the city s Class 2 rating, residents in Tulsa benefit from a 40% discount on insurance premiums within the 100-year floodplain and a 10% discount on insurance premiums outside the 100-year floodplain. Tulsa ultimately recognizes that the floodplain should be used for public parks,recreation, and open space, which has improved quality-of-life in the city.

7 LEVEES Levees are a central component of many flood protection programs. Changing environmental conditions require upgrades to levee systems. Construction is often directed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, however local governments have the ability to raise money and lobby for better levees. Grand Forks, ND In April of 1997 the City of Grand Forks was flooded by the Red River to the north. Grand Forks received help from all over the country during the clean-up and since that time Grand Forks has not only recovered, it has flourished. Since the 1997 flood, some farm fields have been flooded, but no one has yet been forced to leave their homes in Grand Forks -- a far cry from 1997, when authorities ordered the entire population of about 50,000 to evacuate. Photo: U.S. Army Corps The Flood Protection Project (FPP) for Grand Forks is comprised of two flood control systems working together: a levee/floodwall system that holds back high water from the river and the English Coulee diversion channel that diverts overland flows around the west side of the city. Although most water is diverted around the city during times of flood, internal city drainage of the English Coulee must be collected. This water is pumped over the levee by the largest pumps constructed in the project, which have the capacity to pump 112,000 gallons per minute. This is the largest storm water pumping station in North Dakota. A series of smaller pumping stations handle runoff and snowmelt within the remainder of the city by pumping the rain and snowmelt runoff over the levees/floodwalls. The floodwalls and levees in Grand Forks span nearly 8 miles. The top of the levees are about 10 feet wide and sit at a river gauge of approximately 60 feet. The Grand Forks floodwalls are built an additional three feet taller. Because of this additional height and the 10-foot width of the levees, the city could successfully fight a 500-year flood by adding clay to the top of the levees. The project included the construction of 12 new flood pump stations, 7 floodwall closure structures, 3 up-and-over crossings, and the 9.5 mile English Coulee Diversion Channel. Additionally, the project included 20 miles of greenway trails and the Lincoln Golf Course. The FPP began shortly after the 1997 flood. The original components of the FPP have been implemented, however the program remains active in improving flood projection measures in the city. The total cost of the project has been $403 million. The federal government provided $203 million. The rest of the costs were split between the cities of Grand Forks, North Dakota ($135 million, 45% coming from the State of North Dakota), and East Grand Forks, Minnesota ($65 million, majority coming from the State of Minnesota). The 1997 flood produced almost $1 billion of damage to the communities in Grand Forks. The Grand Forks levee system will protect the city from a 500-year flood at river gauge level of approximately 60 feet. It is estimated that the benefit-cost ratio of the project is approximately $2.5 saved per $1 spent. Just 80 miles upriver in Fargo, North Dakota, residents are often forced to use sandbags as temporary dikes and dig craters for clay to prevent river water from entering the city.

8 LEVEES Levees are a central component of many flood protection programs. Changing environmental conditions require upgrades to levee systems. Construction is often directed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, however local governments have the ability to raise money and lobby for better levees. Santa Cruz, CA Stormwater runoff from the city is a major contributor of pollutants to the San Lorenzo River and Monterrey Bay. Additionally, parts of the downtown area are located within the 100-year floodplain. In partnership with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and State of California, the San Lorenzo River Flood Control Project was created to control stormwater and reduce flooding. Photo: City of Santa Cruz The U. S. Army Corps of Engineers and the City of Santa Cruz agreed to raise the height of the San Lorenzo River Levees from one to five feet and restore riparian habitat along the levees. A second part of this project was the replacement or repair of the Riverside Avenue Bridge, the Water Street Bridge, the Soquel Avenue Bridge, and the retrofit of the Broadway/Laurel Bridge. The third part of this project was to extend Laurel Street and stabilize the banks of Third Street. A natural rock wall was formed along this section to harden and prevent the collapse of these streets into the river. Vegetation was also planted along the toe of the wall adjacent to the river to provide shade for fish and other wildlife. The San Lorenzo Flood Control Project s $66 million budget was shared between Federal, State and City Governments. The City created the Stormwater Management Utility to establish and collect utility fees, allowing the city to contribute an estimated $4.4 million to help pay for its share of costs for flood control projects and stormwater pollution prevention. The U. S. Army Corps of Engineers aided in raising the levees of the San Lorenzo River. Congress approved this levee raising in phases, and eventually the State joined forces with the City and Federal Government. Bridge construction was funded both federally and through city stormwater fees and taxes. Bank stabilization was a joint effort with the use of City, State and Federal funds. A flood in December 1955 caused $40 million in damage, which is equivalent to $340 million in damage today. The U. S. Army Corps of Engineers estimates that a 100-year flood in Santa Cruz would now only cause $86 million in damage; therefore, these flood control measures are potentially saving the city tens of millions of dollars in losses from future floods. In 2002, while the project was not yet complete, FEMA recognized that the levees were already providing increased flood protection and granted an interim A99 flood zone designation to most parcels in the 100-year floodplain to enable the levee project to be factored into the community s insurance rating. This designation allows flood insurance premiums to be reduced by 40%.

9 LEVEES Levees are a central component of many flood protection programs. Changing environmental conditions require upgrades to levee systems. Construction is often directed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, however local governments have the ability to raise money and lobby for better levees. San Mateo, CA The City of Santa Mateo, located along the San Francisco Bay, is at risk from tidal flooding. After a reassessment of flooding risks in 2008, FEMA included 8,000 new San Mateo properties in the Special Flood Hazard Area (SFHA) of the Flood Insurance Rate Map (FIRM). The new classification would have raised annual premiums from $1,000 to as high as $2,700 the following year. The residents of the area reacted by voting to build a levee themselves with fees of $76 annually to fund levee construction and floodwall improvements. Photo: City of Santa Mateo The South Bayfront Levee and Flood Control Facilities Assessment District was formed in 2008 as a financing mechanism to spread the cost of certain improvements to all properties that receive direct and special benefit from such improvements. Property owners in the designated area have an opportunity to vote on the proposed assessment. Projects financed through the Assessment District include the San Mateo Creek Floodwall, Detroit Drive Floodway, Seal Slough, and East End Levee. Construction of all four components that made up the South Bayfront Levee Improvement Project were completed in late FEMA issued a Letter of Final Determination to officially initiate the map revision process on April 16, 2012, known as a Physical Map Revision (PMR). The reduction in flood risk was only expected to be significant enough for FEMA to remove 6,000 properties from the high-risk flood zone. However, following FEMA s 2012 certification that the levees met current standards to protect against the 100-year flood, all 8,000 properties were reclassified as low risk (now included in flood zones A and B). These property owners are now able to purchase flood insurance under the standard rate, with the highest premiums reaching $1,600. The added protection also led FEMA to lift restrictions on new construction projects and upgrades in the area. The project was funded solely by the city and through taxpayer dollars. Although officials estimated the project would cost $7.5 million when the property owners approved the fees, the actual costs are now estimated to be approximately $8.35 million. The fees are expected to raise only $6.9 million over 20 years, leaving a deficit for construction and maintenance. To make up for the funding shortfall, the city is pulling $1.4 million from a fund meant to pay for a new downtown parking garage and spending it on the levee project. The property owners behind the levee system in San Mateo are now at a lower risk of flooding and FEMA declared them as low risk properties. As a result, these property owners are now able to purchase flood insurance at the standard rates, with a reduction of insurance premiums as much as $1,000 per year.

10 ACQUISITIONS Sometimes the most cost-effective way to protect human life and property from flooding is to move people out of harm s way. Voluntary property acquisition programs are funded by FEMA to help relocate homes and businesses out of flood-prone areas. Kent County, MI The Rogue River Watershed covers over 167,000 acres of land mostly in Kent and Newaygo Counties, in western central Michigan. The river is the main tributary to the Grand River, Michigan s largest river which runs through the city of Grand Rapids. Fragmentation of the natural landscape due to suburban development was a major threat to the river s health and decreased the capacity of the watershed to detain flood waters, putting communities in the Grand Rapids metro area at risk. Photo: Pete Deboer, The Rockford Squire A conservation easement project in the Rouge River watershed in western Michigan was initiated in 2004 and now covers 270 acres of wetlands, lakes, and adjacent forested uplands. A conservation easement is a voluntary, legally binding agreement that limits certain types of land uses or prevents development from taking place on a piece of property now and in the future, while protecting the property s ecological or open-space values. By creating a conservation easement, a landowner voluntarily agrees to sell or donate certain rights associated with his or her property often the right to subdivide or develop and a private organization or public agency agrees to hold the easement and enforce the landowner's promise not to exercise those rights. The restrictions on development are bound to the property deed and remain in place even if the property is sold. This project is part of a larger Nature Conservancy land conservation initiative called the Dunes & Savannas Project that spans across west Michigan. Additionally, just north of this property, Kent County Parks Department protects 230 acres of forests, streams, wetlands, and lakefront in the watershed. These ecosystems are critical to sustaining the health of the Rouge River and mitigating flooding downstream in the more heavily populated areas of Grand Rapids. Rather than undertake an expensive acquisition program with tax-payer money to mitigate flooding, Kent County worked with the Nature Conservancy, a non-profit, to place a conservation easement on a strategic area in the watershed. The property owners were interested in preserving the land they owned and the conservation easement provided an economic incentive to do so. Conservation easements are an inexpensive option compared to land acquisition. This allows the conservation of natural floodplains to occur without raising money from federal, state, or local taxes. Encouraged by the success of this program, another family decided to preserve their land with a conservation easement, adding another 126 acres of permanently preserved land in the watershed in The ecosystem services of these wetlands and forests save Grand Rapids and its suburbs millions of dollars by preventing flash floods.

11 ACQUISITIONS Sometimes the most cost-effective way to protect human life and property from flooding is to move people out of harm s way. Voluntary property acquisition programs are funded by FEMA to help relocate homes and businesses out of flood-prone areas. Kinston, NC The city of Kinston, North Carolina was struck by two devastating hurricanes in a relatively short period (Hurricane Fran in September 1996 and Hurricane Floyd in September 1999). To protect human life and prevent future property damage, city planners utilized FEMA HMGP (Hazard Mitigation Grant Program) funds to carry out voluntary buyouts of flooded properties and provide residents with money to move to safer areas of the community. Photo: J. Jordan, USACE When Hurricane Fran hit in 1996, a number of properties were damaged. An acquisition program was started with HMGP funds to purchase substantially damaged homes. Only three years later, Hurricane Floyd struck the area causing widespread damage. This second storm not only motivated more residents to participate in the acquisition program, but also allowed for a large portion of the Fran-recovery program to be rolled over to begin including Floyd victims, eliminating the typically long lapse time between a disaster and completing deed transactions. The 100 acquired properties were turned into greenspace. New affordable housing was built on vacant lots downtown to provide residents with a safe place to live without having to leave the community. Anticipating some public pushback and wanting to move the acquisition process along as quickly as possible, planners from the city of Kinston began conducting property damage assessments as soon as it was safe to enter the flooded neighborhoods after Hurricane Floyd. Planners utilized declarations of substantial damage and public health threat on severely damaged properties along with a building moratorium in flooded neighborhoods to help push along the acquisition and relocation agenda. Housing counselors worked with residents to help them understand the risks of staying in a high-risk area and the advantages of taking a buyout. The program costs approximately $2.1 million, with 75% coming from FEMA from the HMGP and 25% from the state. Although the funding for buyouts was coming from the HMGP, Kinston had much more flexibility in its buyouts because the city advanced the funds and was later reimbursed by FEMA. In 2005, the city received a Clean Water Management Trust Fund grant to buy out additional vacant lots who s owners did not accept a buyout after Floyd. Kinston had a high rate (97%) of participation in the acquisition program following Hurricane Floyd. Acquisitions have prevented the need for future expensive disaster recovery efforts in the city s floodplain neighborhoods. Total losses avoided by the acquisition program exceeds $6 million.

12 ACQUISITIONS Sometimes the most cost-effective way to protect human life and property from flooding is to move people out of harm s way. Voluntary property acquisition programs are funded by FEMA to help relocate homes and businesses out of flood-prone areas. New Richmond, OH Following major floods in 1996 and 1997, extremely muddy floodwaters damaged many homes beyond repair in New Richmond, Ohio. Residents combined funds from FEMA, the State of Ohio, and HUD to relocate these homes. The non-profit Habitat for Humanity also built homes in less flood-prone areas for some families. Photo: Habitat for Humanity Greater Cincinnati The Ohio Emergency Management Agency (OEMA) formed a mitigation branch staff to consider mitigation options to protect the community from flooding. The committee considered structural and non-structural acquisition, elevation, wet flood-proofing, flood-safety education, flood response evaluation, and no action. Through the planning process, it became clear that acquisitions were the most logical solutions for two reasons: (1) the buildings were not structurally sound enough for elevation, and (2) acquisition was a permanent solution to insure public safety. Acquisition of properties began shortly after two federally-declared flood disasters in With OEMA s (Ohio Emergency Management Agency) guidance, city officials amended their 1996 FEMA HMGP (Hazard Mitigation Grant Program) project to acquire 63 structures and 36 vacant lots. In 1999, a Parks and Recreation Board was formed to oversee the process of turning the flood mitigation properties into park space. For the acquisitions, the total project cost was about $1.24 million. FEMA HMGP provided almost $1 million through regularly and specially funded activities. The State of Ohio contributed about $75,000 through the Ohio Division of Natural Resources (ODNR). The City of New Richmond covered most of the local floodplain management expenses. A HUD CDBG was included as part of the local match, with the state match coordinated by OEMA and ODNR. Also, private funds from Habitat for Humanity aided in building five NFIP-compliant replacement houses. In 1991, New Richmond residents earned a CRS rating of Class 9, giving them a 5% reduction in flood insurance premiums.

13 ACQUISITIONS Sometimes the most cost-effective way to protect human life and property from flooding is to move people out of harm s way. Voluntary property acquisition programs are funded by FEMA to help relocate homes and businesses out of flood-prone areas. Portland, OR In 1997, Portland s Bureau of Environmental Services developed the Johnson Creek Willing Seller Land Acquisition Program (JCWSLAP). The program helps move people and property out of areas that frequently flood. Additionally, the city places deed restrictions on purchased properties designating them as open space in perpetuity and ensuring no future expenditure of federal disaster assistance funds for the property. Photo: Wikipedia Commons In October of 1996, the Portland City Council adopted the Flood and Landslide Hazard Mitigation Plan, which recommends acquisition of the most vulnerable properties. JCWSLAP offers fair market value to willing sellers. JCWSLAP is also producing an implementation strategy for the Johnson Creek Restoration Plan which addresses nuisance flooding, water quality problems, fish declines, wildlife declines and identifies common solutions to restore natural floodplain functions. Since the program began in 1997, over 70 structures have been removed from the floodplain and 107 acres are in permanent conservation. Many of the properties have now been used to create constructed wetlands, floodplain terraces and open space for flood management, habitat and passive recreation purposes. The program s total budget since 1997 has been about $8.7 million. Following major floods, Portland received three FEMA HMGPs, totaling more than $1.1 million. Those funds were combined with $1.5 million in CDBG funds and money from the Bureau of Environmental Services (BES) ($1,625,000 + $300,000 per year through 2007), the parks department ($1 million), and the metropolitan planning commission ($626,250) to fund the program from 1997 to Funding from the parks department, combined with BES dollars, supported the program from Since then, BES has been the sole provider of funding for the Willing Seller Program. Some of the BES funds came from a $3 million FEMA Pre-Disaster Mitigation Grant the organization submitted for construction of a flood mitigation program. Homeowners in Portland were given the opportunity to move from flood-prone areas, while retaining the fair market value of their homes. The residents of Portland can also enjoy recreational activities through the strategies brought about by the Johnson Creek Restoration Plan.

14 UNDEVELOPED LANDS Natural floodplains evolved to handle regular flooding. Urban and agricultural development impedes the ability of floodplain soils and plants to mitigate flooding damages. Conserving and restoring floodplain environments can offer a cost-effective mitigation solution to communities. Galveston Bay area, TX Undeveloped coastal land can serve as a natural buffer for a significant amount of storm surge, reducing flooding and damage further inland. After Hurricane Ike in 2008, Matagorda, Brazoria, Galveston, and Chambers counties united to push for the creation the Lone Star Coastal National Recreation Area to protect valuable wetlands from over-development. Photo: Scott Whitlock These Texas communities understand that undeveloped lands along the coast serve as a natural buffer for a large amount of storm surge, reducing flooding and property damage further inland. These lands provide a coastal system protection network and it makes sense to use these natural assets as part of a long-term non-structural flood mitigation system. The Lone Star Coastal National Recreation Area (NRA) is envisioned as a voluntary partnership among local, state and federal governments as well as non-governmental organizations and private parties. In order to obtain a National Recreation Area, Congress must designate it as such. This requires that the area (1) displays unique natural, cultural, or recreational resources, (2) represents a natural or cultural theme not already adequately represented in the park system, (3) must be of sufficient size and configuration to ensure long-term protection and accommodate public use, and (4) must have potential for efficient administration at a reasonable cost. The NRA is planned as a non-contiguous cluster of lands, historic sites and structures within Matagorda, Brazoria, Galveston and Chambers counties, encompassing 450,000 acres of tidal marshland and adjacent brackish wetlands and coastal prairie along with 150,000 acres of bay and estuarine areas. The NRA s management structure and land tenure it is expected to be managed under a custom-built partnership agreement between participating land owners and the National Park Service. The NPS will provide a coordinating presence for visitor services and tourism marketing. Institutional support for the Lone Star Coastal NRA is provided by a Steering Committee comprised of a group of national, state, and local community leaders. Technical support is provided by the Severe Storm Prediction, Education, and Evacuation from Disasters (SSPEED) Center. A partner s coalition has been established to bring together the private institutions involved in providing land resources to the project. In 2005, the National Park Service generated almost $12 billion in revenues from the near 275 million visitation fees and associated sales in parks and surrounding communities. When completed, this NRA is expected to provide an economic boost to the participating counties. Additionally, the NRA is expected to reduce loss of life and property from tropical storms and the government millions of dollars on disaster relief.

15 UNDEVELOPED LANDS Natural floodplains evolved to handle regular flooding. Urban and agricultural development impedes the ability of floodplain soils and plants to mitigate flooding damages. Conserving and restoring floodplain environments can offer a cost-effective mitigation solution to communities. Napa County, CA Since the 1970s, Napa County residents have suffered $542 million in property damage alone from flooding. In 1998, the residents of Napa County, California formed a community-based planning process known as the Community Coalition for Napa Flood Management. The plan is a multi-objective watershed-wide plan for flood damage reduction, river and watershed restoration, and economic revitalization. Photo: USACE San Francisco District The plan has a main goal of reconnecting the Napa River to its natural floodplain and maintaining the natural depth-to-width ratio, modeled on the concept of a Living River. The project included the removal and breach of levees in order to allow tide to restore the marsh plains. Over 1,000 acres of wetlands have been restored; 11 acres of riverbanks were cleaned of petroleum spills; 5 bridges were replaced; 33 buildings and warehouses were purchased, demolished and relocated, including 9 houses, 53 mobile homes, and the Napa Valley wine train tracks; and 900 acres of river adjacent agricultural lands were purchased. Among the impacts of the project is the mitigation of the severity of flood events, as well as the physical improvement of the City of Napa and surrounding environment. Approximately 75% of the plan has been completed. The U. S. Army Corps of Engineers portions - including excavation, setback levees, terrace grading, in-channel work, and railroad bridges - are all in various states of completion. Almost 100% of the local elements were completed. These elements include the cost of lands, easements, and rights-of-way, and relocation of utilities, structures and railroads. Original estimates for the plan totaled $250 million: $100 million from federal and state government, and $150 million from local taxpayers and the tourists who visit Napa Valley. The community of Napa voted to raise taxes that would fund the necessary resources to implement the plan. The total costs have almost doubled the original estimates for the project, but higher than expected proceeds from the half-cent sales tax and State of California bonds for flood control have managed to keep the local expenditure side of the equation in balance. Together with the mitigation of flood risk and improvement of natural beauty, economic growth is taking place in downtown Napa and throughout the Napa Valley. This economic boom has been associated with an increase in tourism and ecotourism activities, recreational activities and associated services; as well as increased real estate value. Since the beginning of the project, property values have increased by 20 percent with a 20 percent decrease in flood insurance rates.

16 UNDEVELOPED LANDS Natural floodplains evolved to handle regular flooding. Urban and agricultural development impedes the ability of floodplain soils and plants to mitigate flooding damages. Conserving and restoring floodplain environments can offer a cost-effective mitigation solution to communities. Onion Creek, TX In 2005, Travis County, Texas initiated the development of a greenway to protect stream corridors and floodplains. The developed area included existing parks and large tracts of lands within the 100-year floodplain that landowners were willing to sell. Residents of Travis County were involved in the planning Photo: Travis County process through public engagement and outreach. For example, a citizens bond advisory committee was appointed by Travis County Commissioners to facilitate the public engagement process. Other parties involved included the Austin-Bastrop River Corridor Partnership, the Trust for Public Land, and the City of Austin. The Onion Creek Greenway was implemented with the following goals: (1) enhance flood mitigation, (2) increase recreational outdoor opportunities, (3) provide alternative methods of transportation for the City of Austin, (4) increase real estate values, and (5) connect fragmented habitats to benefit wildlife populations. The successful approval of the project was the result of a multi-pronged strategy. During the 2005 county bond election, Travis County residents voted to approve funding for the project. Additionally, the package was presented to voters as a single park proposition rather than as individual propositions. Other measures used to ensure the bond was passed include coordinating priorities with a system-wide parks master plan and successfully implementing several park projects approved by voters. In the 2005 county bond election, voters approved $8.6 million for the Onion Creek Greenway to protect and restore bottomland forest. Most of this funding was used in the land acquisition process. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers also contributed some money for land acquisition. Greenbelts and natural spaces benefit water quality and wildlife as they provide recreation and health benefits for people. Greenspaces also increase property value to those properties near and adjacent to it. Placing floodplain land into permanent conservation has also prevented development from spreading into high-risk areas.

17 UNDEVELOPED LANDS Natural floodplains evolved to handle regular flooding. Urban and agricultural development impedes the ability of floodplain soils and plants to mitigate flooding damages. Conserving and restoring floodplain environments can offer a cost-effective mitigation solution to communities. Sanibel, FL Throughout the 20th century, many coastal Florida communities did not include environmental considerations into their comprehensive plans and developments. Alternatively, the City of Sanibel adopted a comprehensive plan in 1976 to protect beneficial functions of interior wetlands and coastal ecosystems and to adopt development and density standards that reflect the capacity of the native landscapes. Photo: Mariette College Biology Department Unhappy with the high-density zoning handed down by the county government, the residents of Sanibel Island voted to become an incorporated city in This gave them the political power to make land use decisions that protected the natural resources of the island. The city council then selected Ian McHarg, author of Design with Nature, as their planning consultant to draft the plan and recommend zoning codes and maps. The planner was also responsible for receiving public input through interviews and workshops. The non-profit Sanibel-Captiva Conservation Foundation (SCCF) organized scientists to write the Sanibel Report, which provided detailed descriptions of natural systems of Sanibel and to suggest means for conservation. The findings of the Sanibel Report were incorporated into the city s official comprehensive plan (the Sanibel Plan). In addition to environmentally-conscious development ordinances, the plan also called for much of the island s land to be held in permanent conservation. Through voluntary land acquisitions that took place starting in 1967 and continue today, the majority of interior wetlands are in public ownership and protected for conservation purposes. Acquisitions are funded primarily by the SCCF, which works in conjunction with the city and state government to preserve natural lands. After incorporation, the city levied taxes to pay for the planning process. Funding for the environmental assessment and much of the land acquisitions is provided by the SCCF. Tourism, especially ecotourism, continues to bring in large amounts of money for the city every year through taxes that help fund continued conservation efforts and regular updates of the comprehensive plan. Sanibel Island is commonly considered to be a great example of a sustainable community and has been awarded the prestigious National Planning Landmark Award for the 1976 Sanibel Plan. The protection of the natural environment has attracted new residents and millions of visitors, resulting in increased investment and a higher tax base, without exceeding the carrying capacity of the island. Additionally, informed development has limited loss of life and property on Sanibel Island, creating a prosperous and resilient community.

18 UNDEVELOPED LANDS Natural floodplains evolved to handle regular flooding. Urban and agricultural development impedes the ability of floodplain soils and plants to mitigate flooding damages. Conserving and restoring floodplain environments can offer a cost-effective mitigation solution to communities. South Carolina Coast Rolling easements were established on South Carolina s coast in the Beach Front Management Act of This allows development, but prohibits structures from being built within a certain zone which rolls back with an encroaching shoreline. It allows natural habitats to migrate without impediments, while providing flexibility to property owners and coastal communities. The Beach Front Management (BFM) Act of 1988 was put in place to establish a setback line on the coast of South Carolina. As such, some landowners on the sea side of the setback line Image: US Global Change Research Program owned property that no longer held its original value. In response, the legislature was prompted to amend the Beach Front Management Act in 1990 to allow for a rolling easement on any lot located on the sea side of the setback line. Rolling easements are a special type of easement placed along the shoreline to prevent property owners from holding back the sea through hard shoreline stabilization structures, but allow any other type of use and activity on the land. As the sea advances, the easement automatically moves or "rolls" landward. However, some "soft" erosion control methods can be used including beach renourishment, building up artificial dunes, and temporarily placing small sandbags around a home. If homes are damaged or destroyed during a storm, they are allowed to rebuild as long as high ground still exists. If the lot is submerged during high tide, rebuilding/repairing is no longer allowed. Because no land was physically changed during this process, the only actions taken by the government were those of the legislature to amend the BFM Act. No land acquisition process, or takings, was needed because all landowners were still allowed to use and develop on their land. Since no physical changes were made, nor land acquired, the local, state, and national governments were not required to spend taxpayer dollars to implement rolling easements. Additionally, all land seaward of the setback line was able to be used at the property owner s discretion, and any land could be used for profitability.

Flood Risk Management

Flood Risk Management Flood Risk Management Value of Flood Risk Management Value to Individuals and Communities Every year floods sweep through communities across the United States taking lives, destroying property, shutting

More information

Flood Risk Management

Flood Risk Management Flood Risk Management Value of Flood Risk Management Every year floods sweep through communities across the United States taking lives, destroying property, shutting down businesses, harming the environment

More information

Lower Raritan Watershed Management Area Stormwater & Flooding Subcommittee Strategy Worksheet LRSW-S3C1

Lower Raritan Watershed Management Area Stormwater & Flooding Subcommittee Strategy Worksheet LRSW-S3C1 Strategy Name: Reduce Existing Potential for Flood Damages LRSW-S3C1. Develop and implement a program to: Minimize flood damages through the use of structural measures. Minimize flood damages through the

More information

Why should communities invest in resiliency? What are the steps communities can take to become more resilient?

Why should communities invest in resiliency? What are the steps communities can take to become more resilient? Community Preparedness for Flood Resiliency Nina Peek, AICP New York Planning Federation Board of Directors Senior Technical Director AKRF, Inc. Focus of Today s Presentation Why should communities invest

More information

COMMUNITY CERTIFICATIONS

COMMUNITY CERTIFICATIONS National Flood Insurance Program Community Rating System COMMUNITY CERTIFICATIONS Public reporting burden for this form is estimated to average 4 hours for annual recertification, per response. The burden

More information

Flooding and Flood Threats on Trenton Island

Flooding and Flood Threats on Trenton Island Mitigation Success Trenton Island, Pierce County, Wisconsin Background: Trenton Island is located in the unincorporated area of Trenton Township, Pierce County, in northwestern Wisconsin. Often called

More information

Develop hazard mitigation policies and programs designed to reduce the impact of natural and human-caused hazards on people and property.

Develop hazard mitigation policies and programs designed to reduce the impact of natural and human-caused hazards on people and property. 6.0 Mitigation Strategy Introduction A mitigation strategy provides participating counties and municipalities in the H-GAC planning area with the basis for action. Based on the findings of the Risk Assessment

More information

A. Flood Management in Nevada

A. Flood Management in Nevada Nevada Division of Water Planning A. Flood Management in Nevada Introduction Flooding has been a concern for Nevada communities since the first settlers moved to the territory in the mid-1800 s. Fourteen

More information

Barre City City-wide Policy and Program Options

Barre City City-wide Policy and Program Options Barre City (VERI Land Use Regulations Update policies allowing fill in flood hazard areas. RPC, DEC River Management, VLCT, Allowing landowners to elevate buildings using fill may help protect an individual

More information

Post-Flood Assessment

Post-Flood Assessment Page 1 of 7 Post-Flood Assessment CHAPTER 4 AGENCY COORDINATION Agency coordination is an essential element for the operation of the flood management systems in the Central Valley. Due to the nature of

More information

AN INITIATIVE TO IMPROVE

AN INITIATIVE TO IMPROVE L OW E R C A R M E L R I V E R A N D L AG O O N F L O O D P L A I N R E S TO R AT I O N A N D E N H A N C E M E N T P R O J E C T AN INITIATIVE TO IMPROVE FLOOD PROTECTION RESTORE AND PROTECT RIPARIAN

More information

Flood Plain Reclamation to Enhance Resiliency Conserving Land in Urban New Jersey

Flood Plain Reclamation to Enhance Resiliency Conserving Land in Urban New Jersey Flood Plain Reclamation to Enhance Resiliency Conserving Land in Urban New Jersey Rutgers Cooperative Extension Water Resources Program Christopher C. Obropta, Ph.D., P.E. Email: obropta@envsci.rutgers.edu

More information

Information For Residents In The High-Risk Flood Zone

Information For Residents In The High-Risk Flood Zone Information For Residents In The High-Risk Flood Zone YOUR FLOOD HAZARD RISK You are receiving this informational flyer as part of a public safety education campaign by Hillsborough County. The flyer is

More information

Saving Constituents Money on Flood Insurance Under FEMA s Community Rating System (CRS)

Saving Constituents Money on Flood Insurance Under FEMA s Community Rating System (CRS) Saving Constituents Money on Flood Insurance Under FEMA s Community Rating System (CRS) Today s Discussion 1. FEMA s Flood Insurance Program: A Brief Overview 2. Flood Insurance Rates: Are they rising?

More information

1.7.0 Floodplain Modification Criteria

1.7.0 Floodplain Modification Criteria 1.7.0 Floodplain Modification Criteria 1.7.1 Introduction These guidelines set out standards for evaluating and processing proposed modifications of the 100- year floodplain with the following objectives:

More information

King County, Washington Policies and Practice for the Use of Eminent Domain For Flood Risk Reduction

King County, Washington Policies and Practice for the Use of Eminent Domain For Flood Risk Reduction King County, Washington Policies and Practice for the Use of Eminent Domain For Flood Risk Reduction Introduction Eminent domain refers to the power possessed by the state over all property within the

More information

ECONOMIC ANALYSIS FLOOD DAMAGE REDUCTION. Lower Carmel River Floodplain Restoration and Enhancement Project

ECONOMIC ANALYSIS FLOOD DAMAGE REDUCTION. Lower Carmel River Floodplain Restoration and Enhancement Project ECONOMIC ANALYSIS FLOOD DAMAGE REDUCTION Lower Carmel River Floodplain Restoration and Enhancement Project I. Description of the Project and its Relationship to Other Projects in the Proposal The Lower

More information

PLANNING FOR POST-DISASTER RECOVERY BRIEFING PAPERS FLOOD INSURANCE AND DESIGN REQUIREMENTS

PLANNING FOR POST-DISASTER RECOVERY BRIEFING PAPERS FLOOD INSURANCE AND DESIGN REQUIREMENTS 06 PLANNING FOR POST-DISASTER RECOVERY BRIEFING PAPERS FLOOD INSURANCE AND DESIGN REQUIREMENTS Flood losses are increasing nationwide. A community may take more than a decade to fully recover from a flood,

More information

Flood Insurance Repetitive Loss Property

Flood Insurance Repetitive Loss Property Flood Insurance Repetitive Loss Property When our system of canals, ditches and culverts was built over 20 years ago, it could handle all but the largest tropical storms and hurricanes; since then, urban

More information

Swannanoa River Flood Risk Management Study

Swannanoa River Flood Risk Management Study Swannanoa River Flood Risk Management Study Measures Evaluated to Reduce Future Flood Damages City of Asheville U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Flooding History Part of the 132 square mile Swannanoa River

More information

Vermont Economic Resiliency Initiative (VERI) Community Forum Barre City & Barre Town

Vermont Economic Resiliency Initiative (VERI) Community Forum Barre City & Barre Town Vermont Economic Resiliency Initiative (VERI) Community Forum Barre City & Barre Town MEETING NOTES April 16, 2015 6:00 8:00 PM VERI Project Overview With funding from the US Economic Development Administration

More information

Flood Protection Tips

Flood Protection Tips Flood Protection Tips Information About Floodplains and Flood Prevention What is a floodplain? Floodplains serve many useful purposes, and those that are preserved in their natural or nearly natural state

More information

Ecosystem Services in the Greater Houston Region. A case study analysis and recommendations for policy initiatives

Ecosystem Services in the Greater Houston Region. A case study analysis and recommendations for policy initiatives Ecosystem Services in the Greater Houston Region A case study analysis and recommendations for policy initiatives Ecosystem Services Ecosystems provide services through their natural processes that we

More information

CLACKAMAS COUNTY ZONING AND DEVELOPMENT ORDINANCE

CLACKAMAS COUNTY ZONING AND DEVELOPMENT ORDINANCE 1008 STORM DRAINAGE (3/24/05) 1008.01 PURPOSE To minimize the amount of stormwater runoff resulting from development utilizing nonstructural controls where possible, maintain and improve water quality,

More information

City of Indian Rocks Beach, Florida NFIP Number 125117

City of Indian Rocks Beach, Florida NFIP Number 125117 City of Indian Rocks Beach, Florida NFIP Number 125117 Floodplain Management Plan / Local Mitigation Strategy Annual Report - September 2015 Introduction The City of Indian Rocks Beach has been an active

More information

Flood Emergency Response Planning: How to Protect Your Business from a Natural Disaster RIC005

Flood Emergency Response Planning: How to Protect Your Business from a Natural Disaster RIC005 Flood Emergency Response Planning: How to Protect Your Business from a Natural Disaster RIC005 Speakers: Tom Chan, CEO, Global Risk Miyamoto Greg Bates, Principal, Global Risk Consultants Learning Objectives

More information

Chapter 6: Mitigation Strategies

Chapter 6: Mitigation Strategies Chapter 6: Mitigation Strategies This section of the Plan describes the most challenging part of any such planning effort the development of a Mitigation Strategy. It is a process of: 1. Setting mitigation

More information

The answers to some of the following questions are separated into two major categories:

The answers to some of the following questions are separated into two major categories: Following the recent flooding events for Front Range communities in Colorado, property owners, communities, and the National Flood Insurance Program are being presented with some new challenges in the

More information

FLOOD PROTECTION AND ECOSYSTEM SERVICES IN THE CHEHALIS RIVER BASIN. May 2010. Prepared by. for the. 2010 by Earth Economics

FLOOD PROTECTION AND ECOSYSTEM SERVICES IN THE CHEHALIS RIVER BASIN. May 2010. Prepared by. for the. 2010 by Earth Economics FLOOD PROTECTION AND ECOSYSTEM SERVICES IN THE CHEHALIS RIVER BASIN May 2010 Prepared by for the Execubve Summary The Chehalis Basin experienced catastrophic flooding in 2007 and 2009. In response, the

More information

FLOOD PROTECTION BENEFITS

FLOOD PROTECTION BENEFITS IV. (340 points) Flood Protection Benefits A. Existing and potential urban development in the floodplain (50) 1. Describe the existing and potential urban development at the site and the nature of the

More information

Regulatory Alternatives to Address Stormwater Management and Flooding in the Marlboro Street Study Area

Regulatory Alternatives to Address Stormwater Management and Flooding in the Marlboro Street Study Area Regulatory Alternatives to Address Stormwater Management and Flooding in the Marlboro Street Study Area Alternative 1: Amend Existing Local Regulations This proposed alternative provides an incremental

More information

CHAPTER II SURFACE WATER MANAGEMENT ELEMENT

CHAPTER II SURFACE WATER MANAGEMENT ELEMENT CHAPTER II TABLE OF CONTENTS Objective 1-Master Stormwater Management Plan Implementation... 1 Objective 2- Meeting Future Needs... 5 Objective 3- Concurrency Management... 6 Objective 4- Natural Drainage

More information

Protecting Floodplain. While Reducing Flood Losses

Protecting Floodplain. While Reducing Flood Losses Protecting Floodplain Natural and Beneficial i Functions While Reducing Flood Losses Jon Kusler Association of State Wetland Managers 518 872 1804; jon.kusler@aswm.org Report available at: http://aswm.org/pdf_lib/nbf.pdf

More information

FINAL TECHNICAL MEMORANDUM AWD-00002 FLOWS THROUGH FLOOD DAMAGE REDUCTION AREA July 16, 2012

FINAL TECHNICAL MEMORANDUM AWD-00002 FLOWS THROUGH FLOOD DAMAGE REDUCTION AREA July 16, 2012 FINAL TECHNICAL MEMORANDUM AWD-00002 FLOWS THROUGH FLOOD DAMAGE REDUCTION AREA July 16, 2012 Table of Contents TABLE OF CONTENTS Table of Contents... 1 Executive Summary... 2 1 Objective... 4 2 Study Approach...

More information

Insurance Questions: Clothes washers and dryers, food freezers and the food in them are covered if there is contents coverage.

Insurance Questions: Clothes washers and dryers, food freezers and the food in them are covered if there is contents coverage. Introduction: Floods occur when runoff from rain or snowmelt exceeds the capacity of rivers, stream channels or lakes and overflows onto adjacent land. Floods can also be caused by storm surges and waves

More information

Appendix A. Lists of Accomplishments and Project Costs. UMRWD 10 Year Plan Update. Appendix A UPPER MINNESOTA RIVER WATERSHED DISTRICT

Appendix A. Lists of Accomplishments and Project Costs. UMRWD 10 Year Plan Update. Appendix A UPPER MINNESOTA RIVER WATERSHED DISTRICT UPPER MINNESOTA RIVER WATERSHED DISTRICT Lists of Accomplishments and Project Costs 10 Year Plan Update UMRWD 10 Year Plan Update Page A 1 UMRWD LIST OF ACCOMPLISHMENTS Since its inception in 1967, the

More information

5.0 OVERVIEW OF FLOOD DAMAGE REDUCTION MEASURES

5.0 OVERVIEW OF FLOOD DAMAGE REDUCTION MEASURES 5.0 OVERVIEW OF FLOOD DAMAGE REDUCTION MEASURES Flood damage reduction consists of two basic techniques structural and non-structural. Structural methods modify the flood and take the flood away from people

More information

Chehalis River Basin Flood Damage Reduction 2013-2015 Capital Budget Approved by Legislature in June 2013

Chehalis River Basin Flood Damage Reduction 2013-2015 Capital Budget Approved by Legislature in June 2013 Chehalis River Basin Flood Damage Reduction 2013-2015 Capital Budget Approved by Legislature in June 2013 1. Design alternatives for large capital flood projects (basinlevel water retention and Interstate

More information

King County Flood Hazard Management Plan Update Cedar/ Sammamish Rivers. Public Meeting December 5, 2012

King County Flood Hazard Management Plan Update Cedar/ Sammamish Rivers. Public Meeting December 5, 2012 King County Flood Hazard Management Plan Update Cedar/ Sammamish Rivers Public Meeting December 5, 2012 Goals of the Presentation Cedar and Sammamish R. Plan Update Context - Brief summary info about the

More information

Remaining Wetland Acreage 1,500,000 915,960 584,040-39%

Remaining Wetland Acreage 1,500,000 915,960 584,040-39% NEW JERSEY Original Wetland Acreage Remaining Wetland Acreage Acreage Lost % Lost 1,500,000 915,960 584,040-39% New Jersey Wetlands: Nearly 99 percent of New Jersey s wetlands are palustrine or estuarine.

More information

MITIGATION STRATEGY OVERVIEW

MITIGATION STRATEGY OVERVIEW ALL-HAZARDS MITIGATION PLAN MITIGATION STRATEGY Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Requirement 44 CFR Part 201.6(c)(3)(i): The mitigation strategy shall include a description of mitigation goals to reduce

More information

3.4 DRAINAGE PLAN. 3.4.1 Characteristics of Existing Drainages. 3.4.2 Master Drainage System. Section 3: Development Plan BUTTERFIELD SPECIFIC PLAN

3.4 DRAINAGE PLAN. 3.4.1 Characteristics of Existing Drainages. 3.4.2 Master Drainage System. Section 3: Development Plan BUTTERFIELD SPECIFIC PLAN 3.4 DRAINAGE PLAN This section describes the existing onsite drainage characteristics and improvements proposed within this Specific Plan. Following this description, drainage plan development standards

More information

Goal 1 To protect the public health, safety and property from the harmful effects of natural disasters.

Goal 1 To protect the public health, safety and property from the harmful effects of natural disasters. Plan Framework for Coastal Management The purpose of this element is to provide for the protection of residents and property in within the coastal area of the host community, and to limit expenditures,

More information

Why does Kittitas County want to form a Flood Control Zone District?

Why does Kittitas County want to form a Flood Control Zone District? KITTITAS COUNTY DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS Kirk Holmes, Director What is a Flood Control Zone District (FCZD)? A Kittitas County Flood Control Zone District (FCZD) would be a special-purpose government

More information

Division of Water Frequently asked floodplain questions

Division of Water Frequently asked floodplain questions Division of Water Frequently asked floodplain questions Q: Where can I find copies of the floodplain mapping? A: Local floodplain administrators will have copies of the FEMA mapping. (Generally the local

More information

NYSDEC Optional Additional Language Model Local Law for Flood Damage Prevention Optional Additional Language

NYSDEC Optional Additional Language Model Local Law for Flood Damage Prevention Optional Additional Language NYSDEC General Comments. The contains language that complies with the floodplain management requirements of the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) contained in federal regulations 44 CFR 60.3 through

More information

LEAGUE NOTES ON APPROVED COMMUNITY WATER SUPPLY PLAN

LEAGUE NOTES ON APPROVED COMMUNITY WATER SUPPLY PLAN 1 AUGUST 2011 LEAGUE NOTES ON APPROVED COMMUNITY WATER SUPPLY PLAN KEY ELEMENTS OF THE PLAN: 1. Replace the existing unsafe Ragged Mountain dam with a new dam and raise the reservoir pool level initially

More information

Floodplain 8-Step Process in accordance with Executive Order 11988: Floodplain Management. New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection

Floodplain 8-Step Process in accordance with Executive Order 11988: Floodplain Management. New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection Floodplain 8-Step Process in accordance with Executive Order 11988: Floodplain Management New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development Community Development

More information

Section 6: Mitigation Strategy

Section 6: Mitigation Strategy Section 6: Mitigation Strategy The Mitigation Strategy section provides the blueprint for the participating jurisdictions in the Unifour Region to follow to become less vulnerable to the negative effects

More information

LOS ANGELES COUNTY S FLOODING HISTORY:

LOS ANGELES COUNTY S FLOODING HISTORY: LOS ANGELES COUNTY S FLOODING HISTORY: Since 1975, Los Angeles County has experienced twelve federally, declared flood disasters, with three of those disasters coming under El Niño conditions (1983, 1998,

More information

Flooding Fast Facts. flooding), seismic events (tsunami) or large landslides (sometime also called tsunami).

Flooding Fast Facts. flooding), seismic events (tsunami) or large landslides (sometime also called tsunami). Flooding Fast Facts What is a flood? Flooding is the unusual presence of water on land to a depth which affects normal activities. Flooding can arise from: Overflowing rivers (river flooding), Heavy rainfall

More information

1. Review your insurance policies and coverage with your local agent.

1. Review your insurance policies and coverage with your local agent. Dear Orange Beach Resident: The Community Development Office of The City of Orange Beach, Alabama is providing this information to the residents as part of a public outreach strategy as developed by the

More information

BEFORE A FLOOD Prepare a family disaster plan and a disaster

BEFORE A FLOOD Prepare a family disaster plan and a disaster The City of Fort Lauderdale participates in the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) so that residents can obtain flood insurance to cover their property against loss from flood damage. Participation

More information

SUSTAINABILITY ON A LARGE SCALE

SUSTAINABILITY ON A LARGE SCALE Urban Drainage and Flood Control District SUSTAINABILITY ON A LARGE SCALE Action: In 1972 the Board of Directors of the Urban Drainage and Flood Control District decided to pursue a two-pronged approach

More information

2012 Flood Hazard Prevention By Building and Planning Operations Manager Lou Ann Patellaro

2012 Flood Hazard Prevention By Building and Planning Operations Manager Lou Ann Patellaro 2012 Flood Hazard Prevention By Building and Planning Operations Manager Lou Ann Patellaro In 1968, Congress created the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) to provide affordable flood insurance to

More information

Henry Van Offelen Natural Resource Scientist MN Center for Environmental Advocacy hvanoffelen@mncenter.org

Henry Van Offelen Natural Resource Scientist MN Center for Environmental Advocacy hvanoffelen@mncenter.org Henry Van Offelen Natural Resource Scientist MN Center for Environmental Advocacy hvanoffelen@mncenter.org Wetland study slide Water Quality NRE goals in watershed plans Protect habitat that remains.

More information

1. GENERAL ADVISORY BASE FLOOD ELEVATION (ABFE) QUESTIONS

1. GENERAL ADVISORY BASE FLOOD ELEVATION (ABFE) QUESTIONS INTRODUCTION As communities begin to recover from the devastating effects of Hurricane Sandy, it is important to recognize lessons learned and to employ mitigation actions that ensure structures are rebuilt

More information

Chapter 10. The National Flood Insurance Program

Chapter 10. The National Flood Insurance Program Chapter 10 The National Flood Insurance Program Chapter Overview The National Flood Insurance Program has been mentioned in numerous instances in preceding chapters. Its time has arrived in this course!

More information

13. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION/ RESOURCE MANAGEMENT

13. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION/ RESOURCE MANAGEMENT 13. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION/ RESOURCE MANAGEMENT A. Existing Conditions Ramsey is fortunate to have an ample amount of natural resources and open space areas and a community attitude that is increasingly

More information

Why should policymakers care about restoring

Why should policymakers care about restoring Restoring and Protecting Floodplains State Policy Options National Conference of State Legislatures By Larry Morandi August 2012 Why should policymakers care about restoring and protecting floodplains?

More information

Frequently-Asked Questions about Floodplains and Flood Insurance FLOOD INSURANCE

Frequently-Asked Questions about Floodplains and Flood Insurance FLOOD INSURANCE Frequently-Asked Questions about Floodplains and Flood Insurance What is a floodplain? The floodplain is any area covered by water during normal water flows, and which could be inundated as a result of

More information

Tropical Storm Allison

Tropical Storm Allison Tropical Storm Allison June 13, 2003, 2:41PM Two years after Allison, Houston has reached a watershed moment By KEVIN SHANLEY Houston is exploding with growth. But city building can be a messy business,

More information

SARASOTA COUNTY Dedicated to Quality Service

SARASOTA COUNTY Dedicated to Quality Service SARASOTA COUNTY Dedicated to Quality Service Florida Flood Map Updates and the National Flood Insurance Program Joy Duperault, CFM State of Florida NFIP Coordinator Desiree (Des) Companion, CFM CRS Coordinator

More information

A Comprehensive Summary

A Comprehensive Summary Minnesota Department of Public Safety Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Management Minnesota Recovers Task Force Fact Sheet 2015 A Comprehensive Summary Purpose This document will review the

More information

Mitigation Leads to Preservation and Economic Recovery For One Community: Darlington, Wisconsin

Mitigation Leads to Preservation and Economic Recovery For One Community: Darlington, Wisconsin Mitigation Leads to Preservation and Economic Recovery For One Community: Darlington, Wisconsin The Effects of Flooding During the past half century, multiple flooding events along the Pecatonica River

More information

Upper Des Plaines River & Tributaries, IL & WI Feasibility Study

Upper Des Plaines River & Tributaries, IL & WI Feasibility Study Upper Des Plaines River & Tributaries, IL & WI Feasibility Study Jeffrey Zuercher Project Manager Chicago District February 19, 2014 Study Partnership: US Army Corps of Engineers Agenda Background Study

More information

3. The submittal shall include a proposed scope of work to confirm the provided project description;

3. The submittal shall include a proposed scope of work to confirm the provided project description; QIN Shoreline Master Program Project Summary The Shoreline Master Program (SMP) development process for the Quinault Indian Nation (QIN) includes the completion of inventory and analysis report with corresponding

More information

DRAFT SOUTH FORK SKYKOMISH RIVER

DRAFT SOUTH FORK SKYKOMISH RIVER DRAFT SOUTH FORK SKYKOMISH RIVER 9 levees and revetments / Approximately 1.1 miles of river bank are armored Revetments provide limited, localized erosion protection, but impact habitat Frequent and costly

More information

Adopted 9/23/98 CHATTAHOOCHEE CORRIDOR PLAN. The goals of the Chattahoochee Corridor Plan (hereinafter also referred to as the Plan ) are:

Adopted 9/23/98 CHATTAHOOCHEE CORRIDOR PLAN. The goals of the Chattahoochee Corridor Plan (hereinafter also referred to as the Plan ) are: CHATTAHOOCHEE CORRIDOR PLAN Adopted 9/23/98 PART 1: GOALS. POLICY. COVERAGE. A. Goals The goals of the Chattahoochee Corridor Plan (hereinafter also referred to as the Plan ) are: 1. Preservation and protection

More information

CHAPTER 3 page 69 LOCAL FLOODPLAIN REGULATIONS AND NFIP STANDARDS

CHAPTER 3 page 69 LOCAL FLOODPLAIN REGULATIONS AND NFIP STANDARDS CHAPTER 3 page 69 LOCAL FLOODPLAIN REGULATIONS AND NFIP STANDARDS LOCAL FLOODPLAIN REGULATIONS AND NFIP STANDARDS, page 69 THE PARTICIPATION OF A COMMUNITY IN THE NFIP IS MADE POSSIBLE BY ITS ADOPTION

More information

United States Army Corps of Engineers, Civil Works

United States Army Corps of Engineers, Civil Works United States Army Corps of Engineers, Civil Works Fiscal Year 2013 Federal Program Inventory May 2013 Table of Contents Introduction... 2 Program Inventory... 3 1. Navigation... 3 2. Flood Risk Management...

More information

Flood After Fire Fact Sheet

Flood After Fire Fact Sheet FACT SHEET Flood After Fire Fact Sheet Risks and Protection Floods are the most common and costly natural hazard in the nation. Whether caused by heavy rain, thunderstorms, or the tropical storms, the

More information

Disaster Recovery Managing and Leveraging Multiple Funding Sources

Disaster Recovery Managing and Leveraging Multiple Funding Sources Disaster Recovery Managing and Leveraging Multiple Funding Sources Jordan Williams, CFM June 3, 2015 Overview Programs FEMA Public Assistance (PA) and Hazard Mitigation Grant Program HUD s Community Development

More information

Town of Chatham Department of Community Development

Town of Chatham Department of Community Development Town of Chatham Department of Community Development TOWN ANNEX 261 GEORGE RYDER ROAD 02633 CHATHAM, MA TELEPHONE (508) 945-5168 FAX (508) 945-5163 FEMA FLOOD MAP UPDATE & PROPOSED ZONING BYLAW AMENDMENT

More information

Risk Analysis, GIS and Arc Schematics: California Delta Levees

Risk Analysis, GIS and Arc Schematics: California Delta Levees Page 1 of 7 Author: David T. Hansen Risk Analysis, GIS and Arc Schematics: California Delta Levees Presented by David T. Hansen at the ESRI User Conference, 2008, San Diego California, August 6, 2008 Abstract

More information

And Flood Resilient Design in Austin, Texas

And Flood Resilient Design in Austin, Texas And Flood Resilient Design in Austin, Texas The good, the bad and the ugly; What does this video show us? Riverine Flooding versus Flash Flooding Flash Flood Alley Stretches along the I 35 corridor between

More information

Using Land Use Planning Tools to Support Strategic Conservation

Using Land Use Planning Tools to Support Strategic Conservation Using Land Use Planning Tools to Support Strategic Conservation Resources A Citizen s Guide to Planning & Zoning in Virginia (2003) Provides background information on how basic land use planning tools

More information

Flood Protection in Garland Past, Present, and Future. Presented by: R. Lyle Jenkins, P.E., CFM City of Garland, Texas

Flood Protection in Garland Past, Present, and Future. Presented by: R. Lyle Jenkins, P.E., CFM City of Garland, Texas Flood Protection in Garland Past, Present, and Future Presented by: R. Lyle Jenkins, P.E., CFM City of Garland, Texas A few facts about Garland: Originally incorporated in 1891 Population 226,876 (2010

More information

2010 Salida Community Priorities Survey Summary Results

2010 Salida Community Priorities Survey Summary Results SURVEY BACKGROUND The 2010 Salida Community Priorities Survey was distributed in September in an effort to obtain feedback about the level of support for various priorities identified in the draft Comprehensive

More information

Flood Mitigation Efforts in the Red River Basin. Slobodan P. Simonovic University of Manitoba University of Western Ontario

Flood Mitigation Efforts in the Red River Basin. Slobodan P. Simonovic University of Manitoba University of Western Ontario Flood Mitigation Efforts in the Red River Basin Slobodan P. Simonovic University of Manitoba University of Western Ontario Presentation outline Introduction Red River basin experience legislation structural

More information

Program Details Notes Flood Mitigation Assistance Program (FMA)

Program Details Notes Flood Mitigation Assistance Program (FMA) Federal Emergency Agency Flood Mitigation Assistance (FMA) Provides funding to implement measures to reduce or eliminate the long-term risk of flood damage http://www.fema.gov/government/grant/fma/index.shtm

More information

Section 6: Mitigation Strategy

Section 6: Mitigation Strategy Section 6: Mitigation Strategy The Mitigation Strategy section provides the blueprint for the participating jurisdictions in the Eno- Haw Region to follow to become less vulnerable to the negative effects

More information

Environmental Case Study Decatur, Georgia, DeKalb County A Suburban Creek Resists Channelization

Environmental Case Study Decatur, Georgia, DeKalb County A Suburban Creek Resists Channelization Introduction A visual examination of Doolittle Creek in a highly developed suburban county in Georgia yielded telltale signs of a creek whose original streambed had been altered. Examination of official

More information

URBAN DRAINAGE CRITERIA

URBAN DRAINAGE CRITERIA URBAN DRAINAGE CRITERIA I. Introduction This division contains guidelines for drainage system design and establishes a policy for recognized and established engineering design of storm drain facilities

More information

Local hazard mitigation plans Disaster recovery plans Flood preparedness activities/public education Mitigation projects (construction) Post-disaster

Local hazard mitigation plans Disaster recovery plans Flood preparedness activities/public education Mitigation projects (construction) Post-disaster Local hazard mitigation plans Disaster recovery plans Flood preparedness activities/public education Mitigation projects (construction) Post-disaster recovery and mitigation efforts Others? We have a significant

More information

COMPREHENSIVE PLAN SECTION B, ELEMENT 4 WATER RESOURCES. April 20, 2010 EXHIBIT 1

COMPREHENSIVE PLAN SECTION B, ELEMENT 4 WATER RESOURCES. April 20, 2010 EXHIBIT 1 COMPREHENSIVE PLAN SECTION B, ELEMENT 4 WATER RESOURCES April 20, 2010 EXHIBIT 1 ELEMENT 4 WATER RESOURCES TABLE OF CONTENTS 4.1 INTRODUCTION 4.2 GOALS AND POLICIES 4.2.A General Goals and Policies 1 4.2.B

More information

CASS COUNTY COMMISSION POLICY MANUAL 38.07 ADOPTED DATE: FEBRUARY 2, 1998 PAGE 1 OF 9

CASS COUNTY COMMISSION POLICY MANUAL 38.07 ADOPTED DATE: FEBRUARY 2, 1998 PAGE 1 OF 9 CASS COUNTY COMMISSION POLICY MANUAL 38.07 SUBJECT: ORDINANCE #1998-2 (FLOOD DAMAGE PREVENTION) ADOPTED DATE: FEBRUARY 2, 1998 PAGE 1 OF 9 NORTH DAKOTA COUNTY OF CASS ORDINANCE #1998-2 Be it ordained and

More information

BASSETT CREEK VALLEY MASTER PLAN OPEN HOUSE

BASSETT CREEK VALLEY MASTER PLAN OPEN HOUSE BASSETT CREEK VALLEY MASTER PLAN OPEN HOUSE February 23, 2006 PROJECT INTRODUCTION Project Area 230 acres $50 million estimated market value (approximately) 50 acres parkland 100 residences (estimated)

More information

ALTERNATIVE SOURCES OF FUNDING FOR

ALTERNATIVE SOURCES OF FUNDING FOR November 2015 ALTERNATIVE SOURCES OF FUNDING FOR Flood-Related General Water Management Water Supply Projects The following inventory contains information about a variety of funding programs offered by

More information

The Basics of Chapter 105 Waterways and Wetlands Permitting in PA

The Basics of Chapter 105 Waterways and Wetlands Permitting in PA The Basics of Chapter 105 Waterways and Wetlands Permitting in PA April 17, 2013 Goal To develop a basic understanding of PA Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) and US Army Corps of Engineers

More information

Town of Union Community Rating System News

Town of Union Community Rating System News own of Union Community Rating System News own of Union Department Of Planning FEMA BUYOU AND CDBG DR ACQUISIION FOR REVELOPMEN PROGRAMS NOW COMPLEED I n November of 2013 the own of Union began acquiring

More information

MICHIGAN S LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS

MICHIGAN S LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS MICHIGAN S LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS protecting the health, safety, and welfare of our citizens site design land use planning master planning streetscape design brownfield redevelopment guidelines and regulations

More information

In addition to the terms defined in this By-law, the following terms shall have the corresponding meanings for the purposes of this Section:

In addition to the terms defined in this By-law, the following terms shall have the corresponding meanings for the purposes of this Section: Click here to access definitions SECTION 12 FLOODPLAIN LANDS 12.1 INTERPRETATION In addition to the terms defined in this By-law, the following terms shall have the corresponding meanings for the purposes

More information

The project site lies within an AE Zone and portions lie within the regulated floodway. Development of this site is subject to TCLUO, Section 3.060.

The project site lies within an AE Zone and portions lie within the regulated floodway. Development of this site is subject to TCLUO, Section 3.060. Introduction This application is for the Southern Flow Corridor-Landowner Preferred Alternative, a flood mitigation and tidal wetland restoration project. The Port of Tillamook Bay is the applicant in

More information

Restoring and protecting natural floodplains reduces flood losses and benefits the environment. Photo: USDA NRCS.

Restoring and protecting natural floodplains reduces flood losses and benefits the environment. Photo: USDA NRCS. The Multiple Benefits of Floodplain Easements: An Assessment of American Recovery and Reinvestment Act-Funded Emergency Watershed Protection Program Floodplain Easements in the Upper Mississippi River

More information

4.2 Buena Vista Creek Watershed

4.2 Buena Vista Creek Watershed Buena Vista Creek Watershed 4.2 Buena Vista Creek Watershed Watershed Overview The Buena Vista Creek Watershed is the fourth-largest system within the Carlsbad Hydrologic Unit. The watershed extends approximately

More information

Time Allotted 1:50pm-2:23pm Agenda Topic Overview New Business

Time Allotted 1:50pm-2:23pm Agenda Topic Overview New Business Local Mitigation Strategy Working Group (LMS WG) Meeting- Communitywide Review Committee Stewardship: Hillsborough County Public Works Hazard Mitigation Program Meeting Summary Meeting Date Time October

More information

5.14 Floodplains and Drainage/Hydrology

5.14 Floodplains and Drainage/Hydrology I-70 East Final EIS 5.14 Floodplains and Drainage/Hydrology 5.14 Floodplains and Drainage/Hydrology This section discusses floodplain and drainage/hydrology resources and explains why they are important

More information

Credit: Lars Gange & Mansfield Heliflight. Caption: Images of flood damage in Vermont communities from Tropical Storm Irene.

Credit: Lars Gange & Mansfield Heliflight. Caption: Images of flood damage in Vermont communities from Tropical Storm Irene. Disaster Recovery and Long-Term Resilience Planning in Vermont U.S. EPA Smart Growth Implementation Assistance Project Guidance Document for the State of Vermont August 2013 Credit: Lars Gange & Mansfield

More information

Town of Hingham. Changes to Flood Insurance Rate Maps and Flood Insurance Costs Frequently Asked Questions

Town of Hingham. Changes to Flood Insurance Rate Maps and Flood Insurance Costs Frequently Asked Questions Town of Hingham 1. What is a floodplain? Changes to Flood Insurance Rate Maps and Flood Insurance Costs Frequently Asked Questions A floodplain is an area of land where water collects, pools and flows

More information