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3 SIBLEY'S famous for COMPLETE ASSORTMENTS Sibley's - the shopping headquarters of thousands of people throughout all Western New York! For whether it's home-furnishings or fashions, food or cosmetics, you will find them all at Sibley's. And, what's more, you will find more of them to choose from here, in Western New York's widest assortments. That's one of the main reasons why so many people find they never need go elsewhere for their day-to-day requirements. Shoppif?-g is easiest where assortments are greatest...and Sibley's is famous for complete assortments. Table of Contents ON THE COVER; Action in the Amherst Game, with Moose Kramer on a first-half march into Amherst territory. Colleges Face Housing Problem; Frosh Classes Larger-but Good! Thirty of Class of 1945 Are Children of Graduates Blockade Fails to Halt "Review;" Winston Churchill Gets His Copy New Freshmen, New Graduates Are Welcomed at Chicago Area Picnic Alumna Finds Field for Talents Operating usa Unit for Sailors Historian Sees Foreign Policy Shaped by Lease-Lend Decision Alumni Aim at Membership Record; 1890 Classes Lead in Percentage The Compass Points Editorial Self-Rule Works Well, Says Dean; Gives Women's College Own Flavor Football Men Trample Six Foes, Ring up Best Record Since 1908, 13 Secrest and Kramer are Selected to Head Next Year's Football Men Court Squad Prepares for Action Against Long List of Major Foes Twelve Meets Listed for Tankmen; Speed Speegle Expects Much Speed ; Meanderings Numeral Notations-College for Men Alumni Memberships umeral Notations-College for Women In Memoriam 27 Page )

4 TRUST INVESTMENTS need CONSTANT supervision Inchoosingtrust investments, we try, through careful analysis, to select those that possess stability. But conditions change; and so alertness 1n reviewing trust investments-and open-mindedness in changing them-are equally necessary. The management of trustinvestments is a never-ending task. Group judgment, experience and the data available to a financial institution such as ours are all needed to accomplish it successfully. Our Trust Officers will be glad to discuss the management ofyour trust investments with you and your personal attorney. LINCOLN-ALLIANCE BANK AND 'TRUST COMPANY MAIN OFFICE-I83 Main St., E. LINCOLN OFFICE 33 Exchange St. LAKE AVE. OFFICE 1495 Lake Ave. WEST END OFFICE 886 Main St., W. EAST E D OFFICE 460 N. Goodman St. MONROE AVE. OFFICE 560 Monroe Ave. PORTLAND-CLIFFORD OFFICE 520 Portland Ave. TWELVE CORNERS OFFICE 1853 Monroe Ave. DEWEY-STONE OFFICE 2865 Dewey Ave. NEWARK OFFICE Newark, N. Y. BROCKPORT OFFICE Brockport, N. Y. Member Federal Reserve System Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation

5 THE ROCHESTER A LUMNI-ALUMNAE REVIEW ALUMNI REVIEW-VOL. XX NO. 1 OCTOBER-NOVEMBER 1941 ALUMNAE NEWS-VOL. XVI NO.1 Colleges Face Housing Problem; Frosh Classes Larger-but Good! A few months ago, college administrators were looking forward to the opening of college with some trepidation. No one was quite certain how defense conditions were going to affect registration; but they feared the worst. At some colleges, these fears were realized. Defense jobs, at high wages, lured upperclassmen. Draft boards imperiously beckoned. In September, freshman classes at many institutions were leaner. Rochester did not share in this trend. Registration at the University in 1941 is 5 per cent higher than last year's figures. Here are the latest statistics on enrollment: College for Men 648 College for Women 472 Graduate students. 225 Eastman School of Music: Undergraduates. 351 GndMtts 1M Special and Preparatory 741 School of Medicine and Dentistry 228 School of Nursing. 173 There are 1,471 students in the undergraduate colleges. The School of Medicine has the largest entering class in its history. The total of students in all schools and colleges reaches an impressive 2,964. From Prince Street and from the River Campus come reports that student morale is high, that student personnel is of high caliber. Both colleges are delighted with their entering classes. Rochester's male freshmen number 197, as compared with 196 in T. Richard Long, '20, freshman class officer, says that in quality the Class of 1945 measures up to the best. Applicants for scholarships this year have not only been of high caliber, but there has been an unusually large number of qualified candidates. Another score-probably another forty-prize Scholarships could have been awarded this year, without departing from the high standards which admissions officers have established. Another thing-some of the scholarship candidates, unsuccessful in obtaining a grant, came to Rochester anyway. This is one of the most significant fruits of the University's scholarship policy. Modern freshmen, at least some of them, are shopping for an education rather than for free scholarships. The stipends, of course, aid in bringing the University to their attention; but the University is beginning to demonstrate its power to reach into communities far from Rochester, and attract students, students who are ofscholarship caliber but who come to the University even when there are no scholarships available for them. The new concentration in business administration has affected freshman registration favorably; Dick Long says that he knows of at least four first-year men who would have gone elsewhere but for these course offerings. The class is almost evenly divided between the arts and the sciences. There are ninety-eight candidates for the Bachelor of Arts degree, while ninety-nine are listed in science fields. Of the ninety-eight prospective A.B. 's, however, forty-two are pre-medical students, and are carrying schedules heavily charged with scientific subjects. There are three freshmen who aim to enter the ministry. There are seventy-six engineering students, with chemical engineering favored by forty, the balance, of course, being mechanical engineering aspirants. Optics claims fourteen, chemistry six, physics three. High schools in Rochester and in the adjoining suburbs still furnish the majority of the entering class at Rochester; 110 come from Rochester or from suburban areas such as Brighton, Irondequoit, and Greece. The eightyseven out-of-the-city freshmen have brought the College a vexing housing problem. The River Campus dormitories CTOBER-NOVEMBER 1941

6 are full, and there is a waiting list. All of the fraternity houses have their full quota of residents. Slightly over 60 per cent of the freshmen, about 120 of them, have been pledged to fraternities, and every house on the campus is boasting of its delegation. They may well brag, Dick Long believes. Nowadays the freshmen at the University are a hand-picked lot, and a firstrate delegation could be picked out of a hat. What about the 40 per cent of the men who retain their neutral status? About three-fourths of them are nonfraternity men by choice. Some are just not the gregarious type, and refuse the yoke that the majority of their classmates bear so gaily. Others would like to join a fraternity, but cannot afford to do so. Some don't believe in fraternities, or have parents who don't approve of them. Some believe that the social life of the chapter house would endanger their scholastic marks. A very few of these non-greeks will be pledged to fraternities later this year, or next year. The non-fraternity men have their own organization, and there is no evidence that they find college life less interesting and less satisfying than do their badge-wearing classmates. Physically, the River Campus freshmen would seem to be a sturdy lot. Almost exactly a third of the classsixty-six out of 197-came out for Paul Bitgood's football team, forming the largest freshman squad in Rochester's history. Freshman enrollment at the College for Women strikes a very optimistic note this year with 138 members in the Class of 1945 as compared with 119 in last year's freshman class. Rochester has contributed sixty-four members of the class while seventy-four have come from ten states throughout the union. From this has arisen a "full house" policy in the dormitories, for seventy-one of the freshmen students are living on the campus-forty-seven in Munro and Stephen Foster Halls and twenty-four in the Cooperative Dormitories. One room is vacant in the whole dormitory system and that has been reserved for the one guest that can be accommodated at anyone time. The scholastic quality of the students is superior. Scholarships were given to thirty-four of the freshmen and where the calibre of the students was unusual, but scholarships not numerous enough, permission was given to let those students live in the cooperative dormitories, thus in a sense providing scholarship aid. The first indication of mass genius of the group developed when the Freshmen won the traditional Freshman-Sophomore Breakfast and thereby broke the six year jinx offreshmen classes. Meeting in the ten-car garage of James Sibley Watson, '81, the yearlings even found time to telephone Headquarters that the front was clear, and that they were doing their nails and playing bridge! The distribution of courses indicates an unusual response to the new courses available at the University. There are ninety-five plain arts students which includes three pre medicals, the five year degree nursing course has attracted twenty-eight, musical education and music majors number eight, the new concentration in business education with typing and shorthand preparation for teaching has claimed four, and the new art education course is being taken by one student. Physics and Optics have attracted one student each. Ifthe chatter and singing of the freshmen is any barometer of their happiness, they are enjoying the University tremendously. Thirty of Class of I94J Are Children of Graduates Thirty members of this year's freshmen classes are the offspring of alumni and/or alumnae. Seventeen of the College for Men yearlings are sons of sons of Alma Mater, while thirteen first-year Princesses are children of Rochester graduates. Five of the thirty have alumni fathers, alumnae mothers. Here is the list: Edward Curtis Akerly Frank Fosdyck Allen John Baird Irving Baybutt Robert Appelgate Beach William Joseph Conley, Jr. Don'ald Noble Curtis Donald Castle Fisher George F. Harris David Hubbell Richard W. Hughes Charles W. Miller John Neel Eric Hollister Phinney Robert M. Platt Daniel E. Smith Thomas B. Wheeler Jean Willis Anthony Mary Katherine Ault Dorothy Woodams Barry. Ruth Elizabeth Gianniny Mary Elizabeth Gillette Ann T. Goodenough Elizabeth G. Harris Judy Rebasz Elizabeth Marsh Rowe Carolyn Smith Jean Tennent Jane K. Thompson Virginia Van Geyt SONS Harold E. Akerly, '08, Father Dr. Walter C. Allen, '11, Father Sadie C. Fosdick Allen, '10, Mother John A. Baird, '14, Father John W. Baybutt, '21, Father William H. Beach, '18, Father Ina Eldgridge Beach, '11, Mother William J. Conley, '18, Father Glen E. Curtis, '26, Father Raymond C. Fisher, '14, Father George Harris, '92, Father Nathanial D. Hubbell, '14, Father H. Walter Hughes, '13, Father Charles H. Miller, '09, Father W. Robert Neel, '06, Father Sedley H. Phinney, '12 (Deceased), Father Clarence M. Platt, '06, Father Elliot B. Smith, M.S., 1933, Father Harlow B. Wheeler, '23, Father DAUGHTERS Donald A. Anthony, '21, Father Doris Gillette Anthony, '22, Mother George Ault, '18, Father Constance Baker Ault, '15, Mother Robert Barry, '15, Father Jessie Woodams Barry, '18, Mother Mabel Hewlett Gianniny, '16, Mother Charles Gillette, '18, Father Ruth Otis Gillette, '18, Mother Swayne P. Goodenough, '13, Father], Dr. Carl T. Harris, '12, Father Mortimer T. Rebasz, '05, Father Helen Marsh Rowe, '12, Mother Mary Alexander Smith, '18, Mother" Frances Ruliffson Tennent, '12, Mother Raymond L. Thompson, '17, Father Peter J. Van Geyt, '18, Father 6 ROCHESTER ALUMNI-ALUMNAE REVIEW

7 Blockade Fails to Halt "Review"; Winston Churchill Gets His Copy A copy of the June-July issue of THE ALUMNI-ALUM NAE REVIEW, addressed to Prime Minister Winston Churchill at IO Downing Street, reached the distinguished honorary alumnus safely, in spite of U-boats and NaZi air patrols. The cover of that zssue bore a portrait of Mr. Churchill, drawn by Judith Olmsted Ewell, wife of William Ewell, '24. Mrs. Ewell based her drawing on a recent photograph of the British leader, removing the typical Churchill Homburg and substituting a mortarboard, and draping a doctor's velvet-collared hood around his shoulders. As the accompanying letter shows, the result was satisfactory to the prime minister. The copy of the magazine wasforwarded to Londonthrough the kindness of the British Embassy at Washington~' Noel Hall, British minister who represented Mr. Churchill at the Rochester Commencement in June and received the latter's diploma of honorary Doctor of Laws, offered to see that it was placed in his superior's hands. No information is available as to whether the REVIEW journeyed by ship or by bomber. excellent production. the future of your Review. IOJlllJfunhTM ~tmt. U:git.egaII. 20 October, I have read it all with I like the portrait very much and appreciate all the trouble you took over it. I shall value this record of the ceremony at which Rochester University did me me I write to thank you and the members of the Editorial Committee for your very kind letter of September 30, and for the issue of the "Rochester Alumni-Alumnae Review" which you sent me. great interest and I congratulate you warmly on an Mr. the honour of bestowing upon an honorary degree, and I send you my best wishes for Paul McFarland. New Freshmen J New Graduates Are Welcomed at Chicago Area Picnic Havens' hospitality once again brought together alumni, alumnae, their husbands and wives, and undergraduates of the Chicago area at the Samuel M. Havens' home in Flossmoor last August. Approximately 100 Rochester enthusiasts gathered for a picnic supper at "Brookhaven" to welcome the class of Robert S. Burrows, '31, newly elected Alumni president, introduced the post-pie a la mode program with a welcome to the incoming freshmen and congratulations to the graduated seniors, and welcomed to Chicago's Rochester family Ed Brown, '41, now with the Wyman Gordon Company in Harvey, and Del Rayson, '41, formerly of Rochester, whose family has recently moved to Oak Park. Barbara Bourgeois, '41 spoke for the senior OCTOBER-NOVEMBER

8 class and Bob Woods and Julie Ann Morgan for the Class ~f Woods, a member of the varsity football team and president of the Students' Association, talked optimistically about Rochester's prospects for the 1941 football season, while Ray Speth, '44, gave the freshmen a thumbnail sketch of the academic work at Rochester and of Rochester's friendly faculty. Professor George Curtiss amplified Speth's description with some amusing and some serious details. Intelligent, active, and athletically-inclined, the Central Alumni-Alumnae Class of '45 was introduced by Bob Burrows: Barbara Chandler and Richard Schwanke from Oak Park; Leonard Schneller from River Forest; Carol Hughson, Robert Billet, Marcus Minkler, and Roger Tengwall from Evanston; David Walworth from Wilmette; Anne McLaury of Chicago; and Lee Rayson of Oak Park and Alice Hopkins of Highland Park, both transfers to Rochester. The report of Bob Exter, '35, delegate to the June meeting of the Alumni Council was dispensed with, and attention centered once more on the incoming freshmen. Samuel M. Havens, '99, told them in his genial, but direct and forceful way what they might expect and what might be expected of them at Rochester. As always, Mr. Havens' talk infected undergraduates and graduates alike with enthusiasm for what Rochester is trying to do and for what it has achieved. After the singing of the Genesee, led by Tom ewman,,42, the hundred-odd gathered in small groups to catch up on such news as the recent marriage of Mary Adams,,40, and Ed Bickel, '40; the engagement ofjean Hanson, '39, to Lowell Goodhue, '36, of Joanna Adams, '40, to Prep Lane, '39, and the approaching mar.riage of Ann Olson, '40, and Will Neuman, '38. Football Coach Dud DeGroot was a welcome guest at a Central Alumni meeting later in the month, held at Glencoe, Illinois, and Dud and Co-Captain Fred Gehl- " mann gave a preview of the season. Alumna Finds Field for Talents Operating USO Unit for Sailors "The GSO for the USO" is the slogan that keeps Mildred Hall Gleichauf, '23, very active these days in ew London, Connecticut. On a Saturday afternoon she was appointed Assistant Program Director of the United Service Organizations, and the next morning was at her station in the New London Y.M.CA. She has been up for air occasionally since her appointment, and finds her new work tremendously interesting. Her first glimpse of what the work would involve made her feel that "the necessary qualifications for the MILDRED HALL GLEICHAUF, '23 job were to be an architect, an interior decorator, a vaudeville artist, a charming hostess, an expert business woman, a public speaker, and an organizer with the skill of a political leader. As I lay in bed that first night I thought, 'Come the dawn, I'll leave for Rochester'... The next day however, proved that people were most cooperative and that the confusion was only superficial. "New London would be a quaint New England city if it weren't for all of the activities of the Sub Base, the Coast Guard Academy, and the Island Forts which strain the resources of the town very nearly to the breaking point," Millie says. "It is an old whaling town and nearly everyone has a relative at sea, on a merchant ship or in the Navy. One very pleasant experience occurred during my first week when Evelyn Hyslop Niles, '29, called me for luncheon when she learned that I was a Rochester alumna. Her husband is superintendent of the Billard Academy Preparatory School and is Chairman of my Board of Management. She is a delightful person and we are starting a two-man alumnae group." A bird's eye view of the program Mildred has set up is ample proof that her days are busy. Teas have become a daily feature and the sailors, though skeptical at first, admit that they are not sissy affairs. Wednesday nights are game nights with informal dances, ping pong and shuffleboard games. Thursday nights are reserved for movies. On Saturday afternoons the Red Cross Motor Corps takes the boys on sight seeing trips. Saturday 8 ROCHESTER ALUMNI-ALUMNAE REVIEW

9 night is the big dance, often formal. The Coast Guard Orchestra provides the music and it is a social function the sailors look forward to. On Sunday the gym is open all day for games. At 5 o'clock there is a musical program or a speaker, and at 6 0'clock a buffet supper is served to from 100 to 150 men. In addition to these regularly scheduled events Mildred is establishing a special interest program. There is a lot of latent talent for radio programs, dramatics, music, and hobbies. Not only must Millie organize these programs but also find assistance in the community to make it possible to carry out the entertainment. The Girls Service Organization was started by a high school teacher and a Conecticut College alumna. Theirs is the slogan "The GSa for the usa." Political clubs volunteer to serve at teas and have spoken as far in advance as 8 weeks for the privilege. The collegians of Connecticut College have formed a Service League and assist wherever possible. Cakes and cookies are brought for suppers by women all over the town. Girls from 18 to 80 are clamoring to assist. None is under 18 years of age and lives up to the responsibilities and regulations of hostesses in a most inspiring way. Many times the boys have remarked that New London hasn't been the same since the usa and its civilian assistants have been functioning. One sailor rolled up his sleeves to help in the kitchen after a party and displayed a huge tattoo mark. "If the usa had been here three months ago, I wouldn't have gotten drunk and had that cussed thing put on my arm," he explained. usa is proving to be the focal point that is bringing the soldiers and sailors together with the civilians for recreation on a higher level than just dances. An interesting by-product has developed in the office which has made it the rental agency for homes for the service men and their families. Volunteer groups drive the officers around to listed homes and help settle their families. Mildred says that a home is never listed more than an hour, so great is the demand for living quarters. When asked if alumnae could help in any way, she replied: "I am decorating a room where the men maygo when they desire quieter entertainment. I have a piano but need a victrola and some fine records. We have plenty of dance records for the victrola down stairs, but need some really good music. I could use a couple of subscriptions to the Book of the Month Club and some good books. Not just junk that people don't know what to do with. Current magazines, FORTUNES that are not more than two or three months old, would be wonderful. My cookie jar always needs to be filled. The cookie jar is a usa custom and there is one in every club room." Each day means twelve to sixteen hours of work and then one stops only because of physical limitations. There are always humorous spots too. One Cherokee Indian was expounding at a tea on the art of scalping. Upon Mildred's exclamation that his father must have been old to have known about scalping, the Indian remarked, "Why, Mam, they were scalping when you were a girl." At that point her tea went down her windpipe. One sailor told her he certainly hoped his wife would be as good looking when she got old as Mrs. Gleichauf! Historian Sees Foreign Policy Shaped by Lend-Lease Decision A long and difficult war faces the world, with little hore of an early Allied victory resulting from a German collapse, Dexter Perkins, professor of history, told alumni at their first "Campus Night" gathering on October 20th. Germany, Professor Perkins said, probably has more food this year than was available in 1940; if famine strikes Europe this winter, it will hit the periphery of the continent, not the German center. Informed journalists believe that the Nazis have an adequate supply of gasoline for their mechanized forces and air fleets. There may be a shortage of edible fats and of greases and lubricants. The clothing situation in Germany may be critical..'further, Germany may find new and severe probletl}s arising from the diffusion of power, from the necessity of patrolling vast conquered territories," Dr. Perkins declared. "There is very little question but that the aerial ascendancy of Germany is being broken. The British have gone a long way toward controlling the submarine menace, and barring an unexpected new development, the sea lanes will be kept open. That is assuming, of course, that Senators Nye, Wheeler, and their buddies do not persuade America to withdraw from the stand that she has taken." The historian vigorously attacked this country's neutrality legislation of the middle 1930's, declaring that it was "based upon a false theory of the origins of the last war and a false assumption of the course of the next war." "The Neutrality Act was enacted because Americans, led by Srnator Nye and others of his intellectual caliber, OCTOBER-NOVEMBER

10 believed that the United States was dragged into the war by wicked financial interests," Dr. Perkins said. "This view was widely held; the Neutrality Actforbidding loans and the sale ofmunitions to belligerents, and restraining American vessels from entering belligerent ports-was passed by enormous majorities, and signed by President Roosevelt. "The President changed his views in 1938 and At Kingston, Ontario, in 1938, he pledged the United States to defend Canada; this extension of the Monroe Doctrine was accepted in the United States almost without a dissenting voice. "Twice, in 1939, he urged the repeal of the law forbidding the export of munitions. Congress refused to act; but when war came, in September, it was demonstrated almost at once that America could not and would not take a detached view. In the months that followed, there was a mounting tide of distrust of Germany. The fall of France, and the accompanying invasion of the Low Countries, made clear the ruthlessness and efficiency of Germany, and there were times when public opinion moved ahead of the President; in the demand for conscription, for instance. Wendell Willkie was nominated largely because he sto'od for resistance to aggression; his isolationist rivals were favored by the politicians but rejected by the rank and file of his party at the Republican Convention. "Colonel Lindbergh has complained that in the 1940 election the people had no choice; both candidates held international views that were largely identical. The people had made their choice, in the conventions that nominated Mr. Willkie and Mr. Roosevelt. "The Lease-Lend legislation, adopted after long debate in Congress, has been probably the most critical piece of legislation evolved during the present struggle. It fixed the foreign policy of the United States; while it was suggested by the President, it was passed by the Congress, by the elected legislative representatives of the people. It commits the United States to a definite program of action. It represents a great historical decision. It left open no other course than that which the government has followed. The Atlantic patrol, the occupation of Greenland and of Iceland, are natural and obvious steps to implement the Lease-Lend Act. Maybe the legislators who voted for it, and their constituents who urged them to vote for it, didn't realize that, but those are the facts. "The isolationists have been repudiated. Americans are apparently convinced that a German victory, involving the dissolution of the British Empire, would mean a long armed truce, with mounting tension; the probable Nazi penetration of this hemisphere; and eventually a terrific explosion. There have been four world wars since this nation was founded; and the United States has been able to insulate itself against none of them." Alumni Aim at.membership Record~' I890 Classes Lead in Percentage Alumni memberships are heading toward a new high, Alumni Secretary Charles R. Dalton, '20, told members of the Alumni Council at its October meeting. The membership roster includes 1,127 names now, as compared with 1,030 last year, and there is a good possibility that the number will pass the 1,200 mark before the fiscal year ends in March. This is the largest total in history with the exception of the over 1,500 enrolled during the person-to-person campaign of Rochester ranks very well indeed when its alumni membership percentage is compared with other ~niversities and colleges, now listing 24 per cent of its total alumni list of known addresses. Rochester is well ahead of Princeton, which boasts 16 per cent, and of Cornell, 12 per cent. It is below Williams and Wellesley, that top the list with 44 per cent; Wesleyan, with 29 per cent, and Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 27 per cent.., When the classes are grouped by decades, it appears that the Gay Nineties lead the list, with 28 per cent of the classes on the line as members. The 1880's also do very well indeed, with 26 per cent; has an even 25 per cent, and per cent. The diminishing ranks of classes yield four members out of a potential 22, for 18 per cent. The Flaming Youth era of the 1920's, for reasons not yet discovered, drops down to 12 per cent, with 152 members of a possible 1,232. One of the brightest spots in the membership picture, and one that brings particular delight to alumni officials, is the showing of the younger classes-the men who, at some time during their college course, or throughout their four years, studied under the drab shadow of the depression. Of 1,918 alumni of the decade-and this includes 588 non-graduates-531, or 27 per cent, are members of the Associated Alumni. This group alone, therefore, accounts for nearly half of the total membership strength. True, this band of alumni members pays $2 dues, as against the general alumni fee of $5, but association leaders properly regard this large junior membership as one of its major sources of strength. It's Doctor Dudley S. DeGroot now, Rochester's grid coach having acquired a Ph.D. in physical education from Leland Stanford University during the summer. One of coaching's highest honors came to Dud this fall when he was named, along with Bernie Bierman of Minnesota and Andy Kerr of Colgate, to coach the East Team that will meet a similar picked eleven from West Coast colleges on New Year's Day, in San Francisco. 10 ROCHESTER ALUMNI- ALUMNAE REVIEW

11 The Compass Points NEW YORK ALUMNAE set a new style in luncheon activity at their first fall meeting on October 25th. Held at Helena Rubinstein's Salon on Fifth Avenue they heard the Baroness Wrangell talk on "Food for Beauty." Her lecture pointed out that sound health, natural beauty and vitality are the responsibility of every woman to herself and her nation today. Adele Smith May, ' I6, president of the group, says that before and after the luncheon alumnae were able to wander through rooms in which $1,000,000 worth of miniature furniture, collected from all parts of the world, had been arranged by periods. NIAGARA FRONTIER ALUMNAE combined forces with ALUMNI of that area and gave a tea 0t?- October 31st in honor of Dr. Alan Valentine who was in that region at the time. As Leone Reeves Hemenway, '34, Alumnae President, put it, "Grandma stayed with the babies, we left hash for supper, and had a handsome time meeting Dr. Valentine and learning about new things at the University. " ROCHESTER ALUMNAE are poking in their cupboards for" odd pieces" to make unique table arrangements and ~et off their new receipes to best advantage after hearing how it could be done at the first supper meeting on October 20th. Wilma Lord Perkins, ' I8, distributed free recipes, complete with pictures, that were so new they had not even been published, and Mrs. Walter Will demonstrated that modern table beauty was nothing more than common sense utility, attractively arranged. Alice Booth Holmes, ' I3, was Chairman of the meeting. ALUMNAE COLLEGE WEEKEND, the current flash of alumnae genius that is as new as tomorrow, was approved by the Board of Directors at their October 2nd meeting. The Fall Alumnae Council and thejune Campus Day will be combined into a Spring Weekend which will be truly an Alumnae College. Attending classes, meeting professors again, student-alumnae sing fests, and regional caravans of alumnae for reunions are some ofthe schemes afoot. Vera Wilson, '24, chairman, says to watch and wait for further news that will make a spring vacation at College more a necessity than your new Easter bonnet. QUESTIONNAIRE RESPONSES continue to come in with each mail, and the serious thought which Rochester and vicinity alumnae have given to answering them is most gratifying. A large proportion of the 1,480 members are working actively in religious, educational, and social organizations throughout the community. They responded eagerly to the plea to all women's organizations to assist with Nutrition Programs in the nation. Every work classification listed is amply supplied with the 104 alumnae volunteers and plans are in progress to offer a course to the ninety-nine women interested in the study of trends in nutrition. Typical of the thought devoteq to criticisms and suggestions for the planning of alumnae affairs are the following remarks: Blanche Corcoran Randall, 'I2: "Keep the lives of students as normal as possible. The last war overshadowed their lives all out of proportion to its worth or results. We who went through the last war should try to keep the school days, days of study and normal growth, then the students will enter the peace days as trained leaders for a peaceful world." Ruth Walker White' 26' is "delighted that the Alumnae Association is becoming active in civic programs as a group. Eleanor Synder Kappelman, '35, remarked: "I believe that the Alumnae Association should be a group through which we may continue our education and growth. Make 'service' secondary to avoid overlapping of the numerous service organizations in the city." Virginia O'Brien RitZ, '2I, said: "If everyone were less selfish there would be no wars. This principle must be taught in the homes, and it is a mother's first job. 'A city or a community is no stronger than its weakest member'." SUSAN GLOVER, '35, Program Chairman, announces that on Thursday, December 11th, Dr. Albert Snoke, Assistant Director of Strong Memorial Hospital, will be the guest speaker at the second Alumnae Supper Meeting in Cutler Union. He will talk on the organization of a modern hospital, the specific roles it plays in health programs, and something of the function of the University's hospital in National Defense. Dr. Snoke is an able administrator and a well informed and charming speaker. Further notices will be sent out just previous to the meeting. THE ALUMNAE OFFICE has expanded into larger quarters and is now located at 206 Cutler Union in the old music room, just across the hall from the old office. OCTOBER-NOVEMBER 1941 II

12 THE ROCHESTER ALUMNI-ALUMNAE REVIEW Published bi-monthly, August and September excepted Lester O. Wilder, '11 Editorial Committees For the Alumni: Ernest A. Paviour, '10, Chairman For the Alumnae: Caro Fitz-Simons Spencer, '2.7 Helen A. Ancona, '38 Football and Education Paul McFarland '20 Alumni have been delighted, naturally, with the record of the football team this fall. There is plenty of praise to be distributed-to coaches, players, the students, the administration. Probably the best thing about the football renaissance at Rochester is that it has been accomplished with no major shift in the University's academic policy. The primary job of a university is education. With marked success, the University has undertaken the bold experiment of placing the coaching of football in the hands of educators. Actually, of course, football is not an essential element in a college curriculum, as physics is, say, or economics. A college can attain and retain academic greatness with a losing football team, or with no football team at all. But if football is taught, it ought to be taught well-not for the same of those who watch it, but of those who play it. Defeat is only one of the results of an inadequate football policy. The accompanying harvest of injuries is even more serious. The University administration deserves highest praise, therefore, for its action in engaging capable football teachers. There is ample evidence that those teachers have done a first-rate job of education. The football class of forty-eight men has been taught very well indeed-as the Varsity's 1941 opponents will ruefully testify. Emphasis on physical condition, and painstaking individualized instruction, have paid dividends. Withal, no fundamental policy of the University has been altered. Scholastic standards have not been tossed to the gridiron wolves. Professors DeGroot and Hubbard; Captains Gehlman and Bruckel, and your teammates; President Valentine, and your associates; will you all stand, and take a bow? Self-Rule Works Well, Says Dean~~ Gives Women~ s College Own Flavor Dr. Janet Howell Clark, dean ofthe College for Women~ believes that the women students at the University have a higher degree of self-government than the men, she told the Board of Trustees at its October meeting. Through the Students' Association Board, made up of eleven undergraduates and three elected faculty members, the College for Women possesses a strong undergraduate self-government which differs from the wellbalanced River Campus Board of Control with its seven students and seven faculty, administrative, and alumni representatives. This undergraduate autonomy has helped the women's campus to acquire a personality of its own, she told the trustees. Munro Hall and Cutler Union have also played their part in this development. A different student philosophy comes out in selfgovernment, the Dean contended. Drum majorettes, asked by the men for football games, were refused by the women, although the board reluctantly approved cheer leaders. Since the appointment of the girl cheer leaders, however, large numbers of the women students have purchased student tickets and attend the games regularly. Dean Clark cited the different aim of the women in their education. Of a total freshman class of 138 women, ninety-eight entered arts' courses; only forty elected to become bachelors of science or are taking pre-medical courses. On the River Campus only 36 out of 197 are unqualified A.B. candidates. The College for Women is primarily liberal arts, while the different aims and philosophy of the men are reflected in the emphasis on pre-professional and vocational subjects. This perhaps justifies the separation into co-ordinate colleges, in the opinion of the dean, despite heavy' expense and administrative and teaching difficulties. Dean Clark favors even more complete separation. She apparently still has some doubts as to whether coordination will be a lasting experiment. Rochester's strong faculty, great variety of courses, and attractive campus life are drawing each year more out-of-town students. The Director of the Division of University Extension, Earl B. Taylor, told the trustees that the credit and noncredit extension courses were not for entertainment or edification. Half of the 1,025 students are seeking degrees in arts, science, or education. They are chemists, clerks, engineers, housewives, industrial employees, teachers, secretaries,_ office workers, social workers, nurses, and students. Many of them are college or high school graduates. The average age of the students is 32. Professor Taylor really operates a University College for older students rather than a typical extension department. Ii' ROCHESTER ALUMNI-ALUMNAE REVIEW

13 Football Men Trample Six Foes, Ring Up Best Record Since 19 8 The 1941 football team wrote one of the most brilliant chapters in Rochester grid history by whipping six of its seven opponents, bowing only to Amherst in a bitter 7-to-2 fray, and winding up the season on Coach Dud DeGroot's birthday by smashing the seven-year-old Hobart hex. Zero victories in 1939; four victories out ofseven games in 1940; six games out of seven in That, in three brief chapters, is the story of Dud DeGroot and Bill Hubbard and Rochester football. In two seasons the football professors have built up a powerful, alert squad that was four dozen strong when the season ended; perfectly conditioned, smartly coached, and wildly enthusiastic about football. First-:rate conditioning and sound instruction explain the Varsity's negligible injury list for the current season. In the seven games Rochester has scored 119 points while holding their foes to 33. Ten seniors, all of them students who entered Rochester during the gridiron eclipse of , will be missing next season, including such stalwarts as Co-Captains Bill Bruckel and Fred Gehlmann; Bill Sandow and Bob Woods, heavy-duty backs; Dick Sheldon, guard; Tackle Jerry Thoman; Ken Wobbecke, iron-man Varsity center; Glenn Quaint and Randy Kenyon, ends, and Frank DeChristopher, halfback. To fill the gaps left by the graduating players, the coaches will have to draw heavily from the ranks of the freshman team, coached this year by Paul Bitgood, with Pete Stranges, '41, and Fred Martin, '40, assisting. Fortunately, the yearlings have had the best team in several years, winning all three of their games without being scored upon and thumping the Hobart frosh by four touchdowns. ROCHESTER I3, OBERLIN 6 A first-rate Oberlin team gave the Varsity stubborn opposition throughout except for the runaway second quarter, when Rochester did all of its scoring. Oberlin gained plenty of yardage between the twenty-yard lines, but, except for its single scoring thrust in the third quarter, failed to come up with a touchdown attack that was good enough to match the fine defensive play of the Yellowjacket line, flanked by Chuck (Chopper) Carman and Glenn Quaint, senior captain of basketball FOOTBALL BRAINTRUST Here is the football board of strategy that planned Rochester's six football victories in I94L and established the best season's record since I908. From left, Professor Dud DeGroot, Ph.D. J Fred Gehlmann and Bill Bruckel, Co-Captains, and Bill Hubbard, backfield coach. OCTOBER-NOVEMBER 1941

14 FIRST ROW, left to right: Dick Nowak, Bob Hoe, George Williams, Jack Gair, Moe Cole, Carlos Chapman, Bill Gay, Bob Varney, Dick Kruger, John Schnacky. making his first bid for a post on the football eleven. Rochester's first score came when Bob Woods, right halfback, intercepted a pass deep in Oberlin territory and flipped a lateral to Bill Bruckel, co-captain. Bill went to the 19; a pass, Bruckel to Woods, brought it to the 3-yard mark, and Bruce Babcock, sophomore fullback, carried it over. The second touchdown followed Moose Kramer's long pass to Bill Bruckel; the Varsity took to the sky suc- SECOND ROW: Bob Springer, Frank DeChristopher, Jim Lawrence, Chuck Carman, Ken Wobbecke, Co-Captain Fred Gehlmann, Walt Menegazzi, Dick Wade, Dick Baldwin, Don Forsyth, John Murphy. cessfully in this march from midfield, a series of short behind-the-line passes to Bill Sandow moving the ball down to the 5-yard stripe with Bill Bruckel making the climax dash across the line on a tricky reverse. Bob Plass, 225-pound sophomore tackle, kicked for the extra point. Oberlin made its score following a 25-yard penalty assessed against Rochester for holding Bill Dipman, using a reverse to cut through the Rochester defenses. ROCHESTER ALUMNI-ALUMNAE REVIEW

15 Photograph Courtesy of Rochester Democrat & Chronicle THIRD ROW: Howie Bacon, Ed Shongalla, Jack Forsyth, Jerry Thoman, Dick Sheldon, Bill Sandow; 1942 Co-Captains Dick Kramer and Dick Secrest; Bob Woods, Randy Kenyon, Bruce Babcock.. TOP ROW: Bill Urbon, Bob McMahon, Jim Murphy, Bob Nettnin, Art Holzman, Coaches BillHubbard and DudDeGroot; Pete Stranges, '41, assistant frosh coach; Bob Plass, Greg Thomas, John King, Bill Forsyth. Dipman and Dick LeFevre accounted for a great share of the Oberlin mileage, using a running play from a punt formation-often employed with devastating effect on fourth down-to gain ground through a cruel1y deceived Varsity. On the final play of the game, with seconds to go, Bill Bruckel borrowed the play to gain 48 yards. Washington and Jefferson replaces Oberlin on the 1942 schedule. ROCHESTER I3, KENYON 0 Rochester fumbled nine times, but still won by a two-touchdown margin. Kenyon, light but aggressive, failed to threaten; its air attack looked good at times, but the Varsity defense tightened in Rochester territory, Bruce Babcock's pass interception on the IS-yard line halting a promising Kenyon advance through the sky. In the second quarter the Yellowjackets moved from their own 29 to the Kenyon 25 in two plays, Babcock OCTOBER-NOVEMBER 1941

16 making 5 yards and Co-Captain Bill Bruckel sprinting the rest of the distance. A fourth-down pass, Babcock to Bruckel, brought the ball to the 8, and on the next play Bill sped over right tackle for the first score. It was Bruckel again in the third quarter when the speedy Rochester back took a Kenyon quick-kick on his own 32, juggled the ball for a heart-breaking moment, then brought it downfield 68 yards for a score. Bob Plass, who earlier had unsuccessfully attempted a field goal from placement, was called infor the point-after-touchdown try. Co-Captain 'Fred Gehlmann played part of the game, in spite of an injury. The rugged River Forest, Illinois, senior has been playing football practically since his toddling years, and was considered hurt-proof. The evening of the Oberlin game he attempted to open the window of his room in the Alpha Delta house, which had been painted during the summer. The combination of sticky paint and wet weather jammed the window, and Fred thrust his arm through the glass. AMHERST 7, ROCHESTER 2 Playing a heavier and more experienced Amherst squad on even terms, the Yellowjackets amazed even their most frenzied partisans with a rugged defense that bottled up highly-regarded Backs Muroy and Blood, and knocked most of the poison out of their foes' usually devastating end sweeps. Mud and rain hampered the play of both teams. Amherst scored early in the first quarter from the 18-yard line when a pass, Blood to Hasse, was good. The Lord Jeffs were put on the defensive when one of big Bruce Babcock's booming kicks, traveling 65 yards through the air, was juggled by Blood on the Amherst three, and Walt Menegazzi threw him there. Blood attempted to kick; Moe Cole and Bob Hoe, soph linesmen, broke through to block the punt, and Babcock recovered on the 12. A pass, Babcock to Dick Secrest, moved the leather to the 4, but the drive stalled. Amherst took over, and Blood fumbled a pass from center and fell on the ball behind the goal line for a 2-point safety. The rest of the half was all Rochester's, as the Yellowjackets again and again drove down into Amherst territory, aided by frequent fumbles on the part of the badly rattled Amherst backs and by Babcock's terrific boots. The second half was scoreless as Amherst clung stubbornly to its lead, with Mulroy stopping repeated Varsity attacks. The Varsity did some first-class stopping too, throttling the famous Amherst sweeps. Chuck (Chopper) Carman, Dick Kramer, and Dick Secrest broke up the Amherst convoys repeatedly, and Bobby Blood finished the afternoon with an extensive collection of bruises and a net yardage of minus 18 inches. Dick Sheldon and Jim Lawrence were the heroes of the Rochester line along with Cole, Hoe, and the durable Ken Wobbecke, great Varsity center, who played all but a few seconds of the battering contest. 16 ROCHESTER I9, HAMILTON 7 Hamilton was the expert's choice; it had been undefeated in 1941, piling up one-sided scores against Rensselaer, Hobart, and Oberlin; Forest Evashevksi, Michigan's and Tom Harmon's great blocker last season, in his first year of coaching at Clinton had developed Milt Janonne into one of the nation's leading scorers. Hamilton rooters had their first chance to cheer in the second quarter, when Janonne, fading back for a pass from the Rochester 28, found his receivers covered and elected to run. The ghost-footed junior drifted through the entire Rochester team like smoke through a screen door to score standing up. Dodd's placement made the score 7 to O. Then the jolted Varsity, that hitherto had been busy trying to defend its own goal line, started to move. In the waning minutes of the half Chuck (Chopper) Carman halted Janonne with a jarring tackle on Hamilton's 39. Janonne fumbled and Rochester recovered. Bruce Babcock's bull's-eye passes to Randy Kenyon and Bill Bruckel moved the ball down to the 21; then the 190-pound Newark sophomore plunged 20 yards through a tangle of Hamilton tacklers, and carried it across the goal stripe on the next play. Hamilton still led, 7 to 6, at the half, but the toil expended by Dud DeGroot on pass defense during the post-amherst week paid off in startling fashion soon after play was resumed. Quarterback Dick Secrest turned the tide when he raced over to intercept a Hamilton pass two yards beyond midfield, and galloped unmolested to another touchdown. Bill Sandow kicked the extra point. Another pass interception led to the third Rochester counter. Dick (Moose) Kramer tossed a pass into the hands of Hamilton's J anonne, and made good his error 'on the very next play by spearing a Janonne heave on his own 40 and pushing down to the Hamilton 25. Bill Bruckel made 20 yards on a beautiful off-tackle play, and Kramer bucked the ball over in two tries through the tiring Hamilton line. Janonne looked good enough for any league when he made his single touchdown, his eleventh for the season; thereafter he was just another ball carrier. The Rochester defense, schooled all week on Hamilton plays-with the freshman team in the Continentals' role-had no little success in knocking him down in his own backfield territory. Chuck Carman was particularly active in keeping the fast-moving Janonne from breaking loose, and the improving Rochester line, outcharged in the early minutes of the game, did its full share in halting the Hamilton attack. Alumni are wondering whether newspaper clippings, plus some astute DeGroot psychology, didn't have a share in defeating Hamilton. Even Hamilton rooters were worried, in midweek, at the colum~s offlattering comment heaped upon]anonne ROCHESTER ALUMNI-ALUMNAE REVIEW

17 by the Rochester and Utica papers. Furthermore, Dud invited the fathers of the squad members to attend the game in a bodypossibly remembering that when the team observed..dad's Day" in I940, it buried the favored Union College Dutchmen beneath a 40-to-6 score. ROCHESTER 34, ALLEGHENY 0 Once upon a time Allegheny trimmed Rochester 49 to 6; but that was back in In 1941 the 'Gator back were good enough to make seven first downs, but that was all. Varsity substitutes were mainly responsible for the five touchdowns scored against the defensively impotent Pennsylvanians. The statistics tell the story. Rochester netted 316 yards on the ground while its opponent recorded minus 35 yards. Rochester punted once throughout the game. The Varsity attempted 40 passes, and made 13 of them good. Two intercepted Allegheny passes were good for Rochester touchdowns. Frank DeChristopher scored first for Rochester, and Bruce Babcock made it two in the first quarter with a pass interception. Howard Bacon, sophomore fullback, from Prospect Park, Pennsylvania, ploughed through the heavy but porous 'Gator line for 10 yards and another score. Bruce Babcock contributed the most sensational play of the afternoon, a perfectly executed touchdown sprint for 67 yards in the third quarter, and Bill Sandow tallied with an intercepted aerial in the closing minutes of the game. Dud DeGroot employed his first stringers sparingly, using a total of forty-eight players during the afternoon. Promising linesmen revealed in the contest were Warren Heard, Irondequoit, end; Bob Hoe, of Leroy, guard; Bill Moir, center, from Schenectady; Moe Cole, Cuba, guard; John Schnacky, Rochester, guard; Bill Gay, East Rochester, guard. ROCHESTER I9, UNION 6 A stubborn but overmatched Union outfit, that had notched only one victory in 1941, did little else but defend its own mud-spattered goal line most of the afternoon. Then in the fourth quarter, with Rochester enjoying a 12-point advantage, it exploded three plays in the faces of the astonished Yellowjackets and moved from its own 22 for a touchdown. Ed Enstice accounted for 63 yards over tackle and, after one attempt at the line had failed, tossed a pass to Lee Sherman for the ~ounter. The aroused Varsity came back with a smashing power attack that crushed the brief Dutchman rally. Dick Kramer's reverses advanced the ball from Rochester's 40 to the Union 24, and when the Union defenses tightened Moose passed to Bill Bruckel in the end zone. Bill Sandow converted. The Rochester scoring started in the first period when Bruckel intercepted a Union pass on the Union 45 and ran it to the 28. Bill Sandow found the right side of the Garnet line vulnerable, crashing to a touchdown in four tries. Rochester scored again in the second quarter, moving 63 yards as Dick Secrest took over the major part of the ball-carrying burden. Union held briefly on its own 4, but Bill Bruckel went over by way of a right-end detour. The Union team, aided by the deep mire of its playing field, stopped some Rochester marches deep in its own territory, once halting the Yellowjackets on the one-foot line. ROCHESTER I9, HOBART 7 Nearly 10,000 Rochesterians and Genevans turned out to see this contest, the former expecting a slaughter and the latter looking for a miracle. Hobart, which had won only one out of six games before its Rochester invasion, refused to submit tamely to the favored Varsity, and gave its traditional foes a very interesting afternoon. Hobart's secret weapon turned out to be a highly dangerous pass attack, with Dick Kimball pitching. It was good for a 52-yard touchdown strike in the fourth period when Herb Fitch caught the soaring leather on the Rochester 20-yard line. It was good also for 6 of Hobart's 9 first downs. Hobart just couldn't make headway along the turf, however, its rushes netting a yardage of only 6 for the afternoon. Rochester got away to a roaring start in the scoring when Bill Bruckel caught the opening kick-off on his own 12 and faked a lateral to Bill Sandow, who stepped over to the right side of the field behind a screen of blockers. Bruckel, hugging the ball, came down the left sidelines like a scared whippet, streaking 88 yards to the Hobart goal stripe. Hobart dug in and repulsed repeated Rochester assaults for the remainder of the quarter, but faltered in the second period beneath the hammering of Bob Woods and Bruce Babcock. The latter's pass to Walt--M:enegazzi from the Rochester 18 brought Rochester's second touchdown. In the final quarter, after Hobart's airway touchdown and its conversion had whittled the Varsity's lead to a perilous 6 points, Rochester shook off the threat and halted Hobart's second stratosphere advance. Chuck Carman smothered Kimball as the latter'was attempting a pass, and Menegazzi, playing right end, dropped on the fumbled ball on the Hobart 23. Dick Kramer, Woods, and Bruckel smashed their way down to the one-yard line, and Kramer drove the ball over for the third counter. OCTOBER-NOVEMBER 1941

18 Secrest and Kramer Are Selected To Head Next Year~s Football Men Dick (Moose) Kramer, of Butler, Pennsylvania, fullback, and Dick Secrest, quarterback, of Galion, Ohio, have been elected captains of the Varsity football team for Their election was announced at the annual Alumni Touchdown Dinner, held the Monday after the Hobart game. Also featured at this dinner, at which the football players and coaches were guests, were the awards of three grid trophies. The Phillips Cup, gift of Raymond G. Phillips, '97, given for "improvement, loyalty, and general excellence," went to Kenneth Wobbecke, of Newark, Ohio, hard-working senior center. Chuck (Chopper) Carman, end, an alumnus ofjohnny Sullivan's Aquinas team, was an obvious choice for the Ball Keating Trophy, presented by Raymond N. Ball, '14, and Kenneth Keating, '19, and awarded to the outstanding linesman. Co-Captain Bill Bruckel received the Gordie Wallace Memorial Trophy as the season's best back, and carried away a replica of the trophy given by fifty of the friends of the late Gordon Wallace, '23, one of Rochester's earliest and best forward-passing players. Three football leaders of other years presented the awards. Herbert W. Bramley, '90, member of Rochester's first grid team in 1899, gave the Phillips Cup, and Donald (Bunny) Harris, '19, and Johnny Sullivan, '23, passed out the Ball-Keating and Gordie Wallace trophies. Court Squad Prepares for Action Against Long List of Major Foes Facing a murderous schedule that includes bouts with Yale, Michigan State, Princeton, Vermont and Colgate, Basketball Coach Lou Alexander started his training season November 3rd; building a Feam that, he hopes, will be able to hold its own against some of the East's better clubs. Captain Glenn Quaint, of Falconer, and Bob Erickson of Oak Park, Illinois, are holdovers from last year's five. Pete Kelly, six-foot, four-inch Rochester senior, and Bob Patchen of Pittsford and Tuck Faulkner, Chicago, juniors, saw plenty of action last season, and should have little difficulty in winning starting berths. There are five men from last year's freshman squad who will probably give the upperclassmen a first-rate battle for places. Lou considers Dick Baroody, from Geneva; Jim Beal, West High; Johnny Baynes, Aquinas; Bruce Babcock, Newark, and Long Island's Dugal Davis a very promising list of replacements. Here is the schedule for : December December December December January January January January February February February February February February February February 13-Alumni at Rochester 20-Alfred at Rochester 22-Yale at Rochester 29-Michigan State at Rochester I-Princeton at Rochester 14-Hamilton at Clinton 16-Allegheny at Meadville 17-0berlin at Oberlin 4-Buffalo at Buffalo 7-Hobart at Rochester la-clarkson at Rochester 14-Vermont at Rochester 18-Buffalo at Rochester 21-Colgate at Rochester 24-Hobart at Geneva 28-Hamilton at Rochester Twelve Meets Listed for Tankmen~' Speed Speegle Expects Much Speed The swimming team, facing fourteen opponents this season, probably will set some new records, but is going to meet sterner competition than has been the case in some years, according to Coach Roman L. Speegle. Five regulars will be missing from the lineup; Captain Frank Parske, one of the best all-round men in Rochester's marine galaxy, now in Naval Aviation at Pensacola; Don Miller, back-stroke, Emerson Chapin, freestyler, Bill Yates, and Bill Smith. Remaining from last year's squad are Warren Hennrich, Herb Lockman, Mike Beall, and Louis Guzzetta, in the sprint events; Jerry Myer, Roy Phillip, and Stuart Bolger, distance men; Johnny Cranch and Roger Swett in the back-stroke, and Doug Jones, breast stroke. The sophomore class is coming up with some very promising material, including Gordon Morrison, who holds the Junior A.A.U. championship in the loa-yard free style; Bill Gavett, breast stroke, son of Joseph Gavett, professor of mechanical engineering; and George Rentoumis, transfer from Boston University, who is counted upon for action in the distance events. The schedule is as follows: Saturday, Dec. 13 Niagara University Wednesday, Dec. 17 Buffalo State College Saturday, Jan. 10 Central Y.M.CA. Saturday, Jan. 17 Colgate University Saturday, Feb. 7 Cornell University Friday, Feb. 13 Fenn College Saturday, Feb. 14 Oberlin College Wednesday, Feb. 18 Syracuse University Saturday, Feb. 21 Rensselaer Friday, Feb. 27 Fordham University Saturday, Feb. 28 Brooklyn College Saturday, Mar. 7 Union College at Rochester at Rochester at Rochester at Rochester at Ithaca at Cleveland at Oberlin at Rochester at Rochester at New York at Brooklyn at Rochester 18 ROCHESTER ALUMNI- ALUMNAE REVIEW

19 Meanderings David O. Selznick, president of International Pictures, who spoke at the "New Frontiers" clinic at the University in May, 1940, has qualified as an admissions representative. He has sent one famed student to the School of Medicine and Dentistry Dr. Peter Lindstrom, whose wife is the able and beautiful Ingrid Bergman, noted screen actress. Dr. Lindstrom already holds a degree in dentistry from a Swedish University, and is aiming at a medical degree. He plans to spend two years at the Medical School, and perhaps his highly ornamental wife will join him here. When he told Mr. Selznick-who brought Miss Bergman to Hollywood from Sweden -ofhis plans, the producer suggested the University of Rochester. Every golfer, be he dub or expert, dreams of the bright day when he will make a hole in one. Generally it remains just a dream; but not for Fox Holden, '20, Poughkeepsieschool superintendent. Fox has become one of those fantastically rare golfers with not one, but two aces to his credit. He made the first solo stroke a dozen years or so ago, on the Lake Clear Course in the Adirondacks. In those pre-depression days there were standing prizes for one-strokers, and he received cases of ginger ale, golf balls by the dozeq., and other gifts from manufacture~s. He made the same unit score on the same course late in August, 1941, under the envious eyes of Chuck Dalton, '20, alumni secretary, who was also present when the first ace was scored. Old friends of the late Gordon Wallace, '23, were startled when the Gordie Wallace trophy which they established a year ago arrived from the silversmith's, because, they claim Gordie himself might have posed for WALLACE IN METAL the metal image adorning the award. Fifty of Gordie Wallace's friends joined in purchasing the trophy, awarded to the outstanding backfield man on the football squad. The committee, whichincluded Warren Allen, '24; Johnny Sullivan, '23; Matt Lawless, '09, and Tommy Jackson, '26, has received this letter from Mrs. Alice Y. Wallace, Gordon's mother: "It is certainly a grand and gracious tribute to pay to one who is gone, and whose heart and soul was bound up in University of Rochester sports. I ratherfeel that Gordon knows about it, and I am deeply grateful for this beautiful memorial accorded to him by so many of his dear friends. It has seemed to me so many times during this last year that the football team had come into its own again with such an eminent coach to lead them on to bigger and better things. Talk of the town and center of excitement is Anne Newell, '38, who left Eastman Kodak sales offices to sail for Honolulu this September on the good ship Van Buren. On its maiden voyage from New York the ship ran into the worst storm known on the Atlantic in many years. Passengers were strapped into bunks and fed sandwiches for eighteen days since the galley was completely destroyed and $1,000 worth of china ruined in the thirty-six hours of chaos. Recovering in the Carribean the ship ran into the tail end of the Texas hurricane which Anne says was tame. They managed to get through the Panama Canal and on to San Francisco ooere, after gala night life and excitement, they sailed for Honolulu. One woman who was a partner at dinner on the boat was traveling incognito, as Mrs. Stonewood. Upon leaving the ship she handed Anne a note telling her she I was Mrs. John Steinbeck. Anne will be living with the Stewart Wilcoxes at 2040 Round Top Terrace, Honolulu, and will be working in the branch office of Kodak there. Her new home is right on the beach near the Royal Honolulu Hotel where broadcasts to America originate. Someday you mayhear, "Hello, Mother, I'm washed up on the shores of heaven safely." High caliber pencil pushing in academic offices throughout the country has come to five alumnae with the opening of colleges this fall. Elizabeth Connelley, '34, is the first woman to be appointed Dean of Women at Gettysburg College in Pennsylvania. Former Alumnae Secretary Elizabeth Thulin, '27, resigned as Social Director of Currier Hall at the University of Iowa to become the Assistant to the Counselor for Women at Cornell University. Margaret McGurck, '37, is the Director of Physical Education at Gettysburg College making the twosome of new appointments there. Emily Clapp, '39, is the personal secretary to Dr. Helen D. Bragdon who was inaugurated President of OCTOBER-NOVEMBER 1941

20 Lake Erie College in Painesville, Ohio, on November 1st. Esther Teller, '40, is the secretary to the Dean of Students at Antioch College in Yellow Springs, Ohio. Such an impressive array of academic appointments just proves what Rochester alumnae can do when they gang up on the educational system! Perched on the roof of the stadium press boxsaturday afternoons, Roman L. Speegle, swimming coach, has been taking movies of every play made on the football field. It's all a part of Dud DeGroot's coaching system. The films are rushed to the Eastman Kodak Company and developed in time for Dud's Monday evening session with his gridders. The films reveal every flaw in defensive and offensive action. Suppose Dud detects a player blocking too low, or being drawn out of position, or handling the ball improperly. Football men being human, they are likely to argue that Dud, from the bench, might not have seen all that went on in the lightning-fast battle. The film is the crushing and unanswerable answer to every alibi. Dud uses a projector that permits the action to be stopped at any time and the film reversed, so that a single piay can be examined again and again in slow motion. Coach DeGroot is one of the few football instructors who use Kodachrome when the sunlight is favorable, permitting the pictures to be shown in color. He believes that the color gives greater depth and perspective, and Speed Speegle's films are practically three-dimensional. Naturally, Dud isn't interested in the films just from an "r told you so" viewpoint. They are invaluable in correcting mistakes. The Kenyon pictures, for example, helped mightily in smoothing out defensive errors, with the result that the mighty Lord Jeffs from Amherst were held to a single touchdown a week later. The Kenyon film-with Rochester in yellow jerseys, Kenyon in purple-was colorful in every sense of the word, and.showed that the Kenyons had a pair of mighty capable ball carriers in Herrick and Mutch. Something may have to be done sometime about University of Rochester nomenclature. "University of Rochester," with its nine syllables generously sprinkled with sibilants, is a lengthy and mouth-filling phrase; but when "College for Men of the" or "College for Women of the" is added, the result just won't go into a newspaper headline, and uses up all but two words of a telegram. Matt Lawless, '09, suggests that the undergraduate colleges be given shorter titles. The College for Women might become Anthony College, to honor Susan B. Anthony, pioneer Rochester suffragist; or Morgan College, in tribute to Lewis H. Morgan, the noted anthropologist, who in 1881 bequeathed his fortune to the University to provide' 'female education of high grade in the City of Rochester. ', The College for Men has a host of distinguished names from which to choose; Martin B. Anderson, Rush Rhees, William B. Morey, John Wilder, leader in the founding of the University and first chairman of the Board of Trustees; and many others. The Eastman School of Music has, of course, appropriated the name of Rochester's most generous benefactor, and "Eastman School" is known from ocean to ocean. Its fate might have been otherwise had one of its proposed, and seriously considered, titles been adopted. When the school and theater were under construction, the board fence surrounding the excavation in Gibbs Street bore the legend' 'Rochester School.of Music and Academy of Motion Pictures." That was probably George Eastman's idea, although earlier the camera manufacturer had evolved, out of thin air and the brisk letter K, the euphonious "Kodak." He was overruled, and his name was given to the school, with happy results. President Alan Valentine believes that he's been smoking too many cigarettes, and has switched to a pipe in an effort to cut down the daily consumption of nicotine. The coffin-nail habit is strong, however; recently he was observed leaving his office with a briar in one corner of his mouth, a cigarette in the other. Any apple-polishing student care to contribute some cigars, or a plug of tobacco? Hobart College celebrated the golden anniversary of football on October 11th, the day of the Hamilton game. Hamilton refused to cooperate however, trampling the Genevans 27 to 12. Rochester defeated Amherst in singing last month, just before the Amherst football game, but poor officiating robbed the local singers of a decision and a highly prejudiced referee awarded the combat to Hobart. It happened at a meeting of the Ad Club Day at the stadium on the afternoon of the Amherst struggle. For some strange reason the Lord Jeffs had trouble in rounding up a double quartet, and had to borrow an alumnus, Lamont McNall, who had spent a year at Amherst before transferring, thoroughly repentant, W. BERT WOODAMS Anthracite. Bituminous Coke. Fuel Oil Thermostats 785 SOUTH AVENUE Monroe ROCHESTER ALUMNI-ALUMNAE REVIEW

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