FIELD REPORT BUILDING CONDITION ASSESSMENT

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "FIELD REPORT BUILDING CONDITION ASSESSMENT"

Transcription

1 DATE OF REPORT: February 1, 2012 FIELD REPORT BUILDING CONDITION ASSESSMENT DATE OF VISIT: January 19, 20, 26, 27 and 28, 2012 PROPERTY: ORANGE COUNTY GOVERNMENT BUILDING ADDRESS: 255 Main Street, Goshen, New York COORDINATES: , APPLICANT: ORANGE COUNTY, NEW YORK APPLICANT ID: OBSERVER: Ronald G. Ginste - FEMA Project Specialist PURPOSE: Purpose of the inspection was to evaluate applicant claims of visible mold growth, storm related water damage, proposed emergency protective measures, and permanent remediation work thought to be eligible and disaster related which are listed below. Emergency cleanup measures conducted during the incident period Removal of visible mold growth Cleaning of interior ductwork Cleaning of settled spores from carpets, walls, ceilings, windows, and floors throughout the entire building Removal of water damaged areas of carpeting Demolition of all walls, carpeting, and ceilings on Division 3 First Floor Cleaning and disinfection of the perimeter pipe chases Removal and replacement of the judge s bench in Division 3 Third Floor Room 934 Demolition, inspection, and cleaning of Division 3 First Floor Sunken Floors Cleaning and Re-stacking of Law Library Books PREPARED BY: Ronald G. Ginste FEMA Mold/Project Specialist OCGC Mold Inspection Report ( ).docx 1 2/22/ :58 AM

2 Table of Contents EXECUTIVE SUMMARY... 3 INTRODUCTION... 4 METHODOLOGY... 4 RESULTS... 5 Consultant Inspection Reports... 5 Labella Associates -Property Condition Report September, Labella Post Tropical Storm Property Condition Report dated November EMSNY Investigation and Assessment of Fungal Growth dated November 30, VISUAL INSPECTION... 6 Air Sampling Non-viable Spore Trap Area Samples... 6 Wall Cavity Sampling... 9 Tape Lifts Dust Sampling EMSNY Recommendations FEMA Mold Inspection Division 1 - Third Floor Division 2 Third Floor Division 2 Second Floor Division 3 Third Floor Division 3 First Floor CONCLUSIONS Emergency Cleanup Measures Visible Mold Growth Cleaning of Ductwork Cleaning of Building Interior Removal of Water Damaged Carpet Demolition of Division 3 1st Floor Walls, Floors, and Ceilings Cleaning of Perimeter Pipe Trenches Replacement of Judges Bench Sunken Floor Areas Law Library Books Appendix A Mold Inspection Forms Appendix B Mold Location Diagrams Appendix C Photos OCGC Mold Inspection Report ( ).docx 2 2/22/ :58 AM

3 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY FEMA Project / Mold Specialist Ronald G. Ginste CIH performed an inspection of the Orange County Government Center located at 255 Main Street, Goshen, NY on January 19, 20, 26, 27 and 28, The purpose of the inspection was to evaluate applicant claims of visible mold growth, storm related water damage, proposed emergency protective measures, and mold remediation activities thought to be disaster related eligible work. These items include the following Emergency cleanup measures conducted during the incident period Removal of visible mold growth Cleaning of interior ductwork Cleaning of settled spores from carpets, walls, ceilings, windows, and floors throughout the entire building Removal of water damaged areas of carpeting Demolition of all walls, carpeting, and ceilings on Division 3 First Floor Cleaning and disinfection of the perimeter pipe chases Demolition, inspection, and cleaning of Division 3 First Floor Sunken Floors Removal and replacement of the judges bench in Division 3 Third Floor Room 934 Cleaning and restacking of Law Library Books Prior to the inspection Mr. Ginste reviewed reports produced by an engineering consulting firm hired by Orange County which provided detailed descriptions of building related damages before and after the storm. In addition, a local environmental consultant, Environmental Management Solutions of NY (EMSNY) was also hired by the govt of Orange County, NY (i.e. Orange County) to inspect the building for mold and storm related water damage. These reports formed the basis for conducting the FEMA building inspection since they listed specific building systems which were contributing to the buildup of moisture within the facility, provided a listing of the most heavily damaged areas, and provided observations regarding visible mold growth and areas thought to be contaminated by mold growth as a result of Hurricane Irene and Tropical Storm Lee. Based on the results of the inspection the FEMA Project / Mold Specialist identified approximately 4000 square feet of visible mold growth in two main areas of the building. Approximately 1200 SF of mold growth was widely scattered in a number of localized areas on the third floors of Divisions 1, 2, and 3, ranging in size from a few square feet to 416 square feet. The cause was due to leaks in the concrete roof slab at cracks in the slab, joints between slabs, or penetrations through the slab such as for roof drains, sanitary sewer lines, or electrical conduit. Included in this group were two other small areas of visible mold growth identified in Room 704 located on the Division 3 First Floor and a second small area located in Room 513 Men s Room on Division 1 Second Floor. The remaining area included approximately 1975 square feet of visible mold growth identified in the Emergency Management Area and adjoining rooms also located in the Division 3 First Floor. The emergency cleanup measures taken by the applicant, were considered eligible as was the 1200 SF of widely scattered mold growth seen throughout the building and the other two small areas mentioned. The remaining visible mold growth was not considered eligible since it was caused by an architectural retrofit of the Emergency Management Area in 2009 and was not storm related. OCGC Mold Inspection Report ( ).docx 3 2/22/ :58 AM

4 The cleaning of the interior of the ductwork as well as the carpets, walls, ceilings, windows, and floors throughout the entire building were not considered eligible. This was due to the relatively small amount of fungal growth in the building and the fact that the majority of it was sequestered above ceilings or in wall cavities and therefore unlikely to have contaminated the ductwork and the entire building with fungal spores to a greater degree than they already have been by over 40 years of continuous operation of the HVAC system. The removal of areas of water damaged carpeting was considered eligible work due to the impact from Category 2 waters originating from the roof system. The demolition of walls, carpeting, and ceilings on Division 3 First Floor was not considered eligible because there was no evidence to suggest the area had been subjected to floodwaters. The cleaning and disinfection of the pipe trenches was also not considered eligible because there was no evidence of visible mold growth. The removal and replacement of the entire judges bench in Division 3 Third Floor Room 934 was also not considered eligible since only a small portion of the bench was damaged and could be easily replaced rather than demolish the entire bench. The sunken floors of the Division 3 First Floor area were also not considered eligible since there was no evidence of visible mold growth in these areas. The cleaning and restacking of the Law Library books has not been fully evaluated and a decision regarding eligibility is pending. A complete discussion of the findings of the mold inspection and eligibility determinations regarding the remediation work is provided below. INTRODUCTION FEMA Project Mold Specialist Ronald G. Ginste CIH conducted a mold inspection of the Orange County Govt Center located at 255 Main Street Goshen, NY on January 19, 20, 26, 27, and 28, The purpose of the inspection was to assess applicant claims regarding the extent of visible mold growth and storm damage at the facility caused by Hurricane Irene and Tropical Storm Lee which occurred between August 28, 2012 and September 7, In addition proposed remediation efforts regarding fungal growth at the facility were evaluated for their scope and eligibility. METHODOLOGY The FEMA project mold performed a visual inspection of the building interior focusing on areas of known water damage, areas impacted by mold growth, and failing building systems, as noted by the engineering and mold consultants in their reports. Observations made during the inspection were documented on building floor plans and interior mold inspection forms. Visual observations were also documented with a digital camera. The FEMA Project/Mold specialist also inspected each access point used by EMSNY to inspect wall cavities for visible mold growth and documented his observations at each location. In addition, members of the Building Assessment Team were consulted during the inspection for their expertise regarding the failure of various architectural finishes and exterior detailing that contributed to water intrusion and mold growth within the building. Areas of visible mold growth were mapped and rated according to classification schemes developed by EPA and the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene for assessing mold growth and developing appropriate response actions for remediation. The Orange County Government retained Labella Associates Inc. of Rochester NY to inspect the condition of the facility prior to and after the storm events and develop reports documenting their findings. Orange County also hired a local environmental consultant, EMSNY to inspect and assess storm damage and mold growth in the building related to the storm. The following consultant reports reviewed; Property Condition Report Orange County Government Center dated September, 2011 prepared by Labella Associates, Post Tropical Storm OCGC Mold Inspection Report ( ).docx 4 2/22/ :58 AM

5 Property Condition Report Orange County Government Center, dated November 2011 prepared by Labella Associates, and Investigation and Assessment of Fungal Growth dated November 30, 2011 prepared by EMSNY. A brief discussion of the findings of the report review and the visual inspection are provided below. RESULTS CONSULTANT INSPECTION REPORTS Labella Associates -Property Condition Report September, 2011 This report was written to identify areas of concern and recommend building improvements to bring the facility up to current life safety, energy and ADA Standards which would allow the building to remain in use for another 20 years. This report identified a number of issues related to water intrusion within the building and noted that the building exterior envelope was in poor condition. The cause of the building envelope failure was attributed to the choice of split rib masonry veneer, improper architectural detailing, and inadequate design of the roof drainage system. Problems associated with the split rib veneer were summarized by Labella Associates below The design of the existing concrete unit masonry building envelope is inadequate to provide a weather tight seal around the existing building structural system and the building interior. The use and detailing of split rib concrete unit masonry, the exposure of the existing reinforced concrete superstructure and the quantity of roofs, roof levels, and building configuration contribute to conditions which are very difficult to maintain, shed water and seal weather tight. The rough texture and horizontal configuration of split rib masonry makes it almost impossible to provide weather tight seal with any material or architectural element adjoining the texture and profile of the surface. Labella Associates also indicated that the roofing system had exceeded its life expectancy and that there was evidence throughout building interior and exterior of significant long term water infiltration problems. In addition, the design of the roof drainage system was inadequate to provide drainage for the complex roofing system of the building. The quantity type and location of the roof drains were also observed to be below generally accepted standards for roofing system design in the industry. Labella Post Tropical Storm Property Condition Report dated November 2011 This report was written after the storm events and describes the damage caused to the building by the storms. This report again cited the failing roofing system as the cause of damage to existing finishes. There is significant evidence of substantial water penetration through the existing roofing system into the third floor level throughout all three building divisions, as well as water penetration to the second floor level where second floor spaces rise to the roof deck level through the third floor level. Evidence is in the form of large areas of stained and wet floor finishes, damaged gypsum board ceiling system as well as stained lay-in acoustical ceiling panel systems. There are water stains throughout the third floor level on existing gypsum board partitions. Stains illustrate the fact that in many instances water was running down the sides of vertical wall surfaces The report concluded that a high groundwater table and floodwaters entered the first floor trenches running around the perimeter of the building, rose up out of the trenches and damaged the drywall OCGC Mold Inspection Report ( ).docx 5 2/22/ :58 AM

6 and saturated the carpeting throughout the entire Division 3 First Floor level. It was subsequently recommended that all the carpet, drywall, and ceilings of Division 3 First Floor be completely removed and that all remaining carpets, walls, ceilings, windows and doors needed to be cleaned throughout the complex because of high fungal spore counts. The report also noted two areas of sunken flooring in the Division 3 First Floor level, which they recommended be demolished, inspected for visible mold growth, remediated and replaced. Labella also recommended cleaning and re-stacking of the books from the Division 3 3 rd Floor Library and the Division 3 1 st Floor District Attorney Library be cleaned. EMSNY Investigation and Assessment of Fungal Growth dated November 30, 2011 EMSNY was retained by Orange County to perform a mold inspection of the facility after the hurricane. EMS performed their inspection over a period of 11 days beginning on September 1, 2011 and lasting until October 7, This inspection included a number of inspection and sampling methods which consisted of a visual and infrared inspection of water damaged areas in conjunction with air sampling, bulk sampling, tape lifts of surfaces, wall cavity air samples, and vacuum samples collected from carpeting. VISUAL INSPECTION EMSNY identified the following areas as most heavily damaged based on the results of their visual and infrared inspection. 3 rd floor Law Library 3 rd floor hall outside of Law Library 3 rd floor Personnel 3 rd floor Budget 3 rd floor County Attorney 3 rd floor Purchasing 3 rd floor Payroll 3 rd floor Finance 3 rd floor Legislature 3 rd floor County Executive Office 2 nd floor Probation Men s and Women s rooms 1 st Floor District Attorneys area Air Sampling Non-viable Spore Trap Area Samples In addition to a visual inspection EMS performed air sampling of the indoor environment for mold which consisted of collecting non-viable total fungal spore traps at a number of locations throughout the building as a potential indicator of fungal amplification (growth) in a particular area. The idea being that if mold is actively growing in a particular area or there is a large reservoir of hidden mold the excess number of spores produced by this area of active growth will show up on a spore traps collected in the area. Unfortunately this sampling methodology is inherently flawed for a number of reasons. The EPA, CDC, and the New York City Dept of Health and Mental Hygiene do not recommend air sampling and a visual inspection is considered sufficient to begin making recommendation regarding remediation. Spore concentrations typically exhibit wide spatial and temporal variations within a room throughout the day and can be affected by activity levels in the area. There are no established mandatory numeric limits for fungal spore exposure There is also inherent interlaboratory and intercounter variability for spore trap samples of this type EMSNY collected a few air samples from undamaged areas of the building to serve as a baseline of fungal spore exposure under quiescent conditions that indicated an average background level of 268 fungal OCGC Mold Inspection Report ( ).docx 6 2/22/ :58 AM

7 structures per cubic meter in the building. The remaining non-viable spore trap sampling conducted in the damaged portions of the building was conducted on multiple days. Based on the results of the air sampling EMSNY identified specific areas of the building that had elevated spore counts. These areas are listed in Table 1 below. It should also be noted that the report also specifically identifies locations where the fungal genera Stachybotrys was identified in air, samples, wall cavity samples, tape lifts or bulk samples but it is unclear why this distinction was made. Stachybotrys is a known toxigenic fungi but its presence is not necessarily an indication that mycotoxins are present and its presence in air or bulk samples is not unusual or a cause for immediate concern since it is a normal component of the indoor and outdoor environment. Table 1 Areas with Elevated Spore Counts 9/1/11 Finance Area 9/22/11 Probation, DA Chamber 9/2/11 Probation Hall 9/27/11 Emergency Management, Grand Jury Waiting Room DA Chamber Room 742 9/9/11 DA Chamber, Payroll 10/3/11 DA Chamber Room 742, DA Area near Kitchen 9/15/11 Law Library, 10/7/11 Purchasing, DA Chamber Hall near 3205G, Payroll Hall adjacent t to 3 rd Floor Elevator Deeds Room Hall between County Executive Office and Finance The evaluation criteria used by EMSNY to assess the air sampling data they collected included a definition for acceptable air quality promulgated by the American Society for Heating Air Conditioning and Refrigeration Engineers (ASHRAE), a Chinese Standard for acceptable airborne bacterial levels, and a general rule used for interpreting fungal spore count data. ASHRAE identifies acceptable indoor air quality (IAQ) as air quality in which there are no known contaminants at harmful concentrations as determined by cognizant authorities and with which a substantial majority (80% or more) of the people exposed do not express dissatisfaction (20% arte complainants). The second evaluation criteria used by EMSNY was a level of 500 colony forming units per cubic meter (CFU/m 3 ) obtained from the publication A Guide on Indoor Air Quality Certification Scheme for Offices and Public Places September 2003 published by the Government of the Hong Kong Special Administration Region Indoor Air Quality Group. The third evaluation criteria used involved making a comparison of the types, quantities, and species present in affected indoor areas versus ambient area or non-affected areas. When this comparison is made it can provide an indication of microbial amplification (growth) in a particular area. A review of the EMSNY report indicates that these evaluation criteria were not employed or were inappropriate. The first criteria used and promulgated by ASHRAE is a valid criteria when performing IAQ evaluations for common atmospheric IAQ parameters such as carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, temperature, relative humidity, etc., and also requires solicited feedback from the building occupants. EMSNY did not obtain this information or perform air testing for common IAQ parameters as part of their evaluation so the relevancy of these evaluation criteria to the fungal spore count data or mold growth in the building is unclear. The second evaluation criteria for the air sample data collected relied on airborne bacterial counts of less than 500 CFU/m 3 as an indicator of acceptable indoor air quality. There was no 7 OCGC Mold Inspection Report ( ).docx 2/22/ :58 AM

8 bacterial sampling, or cultureable fungi air sampling conducted as part of this investigation so the relevancy or applicability of these evaluation criteria was also unclear. The final criteria specified by EMSNY relied on comparisons of the types and numbers of fungi seen indoors versus those seen outdoors. This is a viable methodology for evaluating fungal spore count data but there is no indication it was employed on the data collected. EMSNY simply listed those areas of the building with the highest spore counts for the days sampling and did not compare them to the outdoor spore counts or make a comparison of the types of fungi seen indoors versus those seen outdoors. EMSNY further stated that If the combination of these criteria are considered, it is reasonable to conclude that the building requires remediation but left the actual evaluation of the technical data up to the reader and simply included the data in the report allowing for subjective interpretation by anyone rather than offering their own expert technical opinion. It is also unclear how a conclusion that the building requires remediation could be considered reasonable if the criteria used to make it were either not applicable or not used. A review of the spore count data indicates that the spore trap samples collected between September 1, and 22, 2011 were not indicative of a problem environment. The indoor concentrations were less than the outdoor concentrations and the number of fungal genera seen indoors was less than those seen outdoors. The single exception to this being sample collected from the Finance Area which indicated an indoor spore count of 7,780 Fungal Structures per cubic meter (FS/m 3 ) as opposed to 4,421 FS/m 3 seen outdoors. Due to the wide range of variability seen in spore trap samples this result is not considered statistically significant or elevated since the outdoor spore count on the day of sampling ranged from 3,280 to 5,053 FS/m 3 and the remaining 29 samples collected that day (September 1, 2011) were all less than 500 FS/m 3 The remaining non-viable spore trap area samples collected from the site on September 23, October 3, and October 7 indicated elevated spore counts in the DA Chamber 742, and Emergency Management but a large source of visible mold growth was discovered by FEMA in the Emergency Management Room (Room 719) that is likely responsible for elevated spore counts seen in this area. An inspection of the DA Chamber Room 742 and the surrounding area did not reveal an obvious large scale source of visible mold growth in this area and the cause of the high counts seen there is unknown and is thought to be possibly related to visible mold growth seen in Room 719 with the duct system acting as a possible transmission pathway between the two areas. Additional investigation is warranted to determine the source of elevated mold spore counts in DA Room 742 which is outside the scope of the FEMA inspection. Date Table 2 Summary of Highest Non-viable Spore Trap Results seen Indoors Sample Number Location Highest Interior results cited by EMSNY Exterior result FS/M Finance Area , Probation Hallway 920 9, Grand Jury Waiting Room ,685 20, DA Chamber , Payroll ,567 OCGC Mold Inspection Report ( ).docx 8 2/22/ :58 AM

9 Table 2 (continued) Summary of Highest Non-viable Spore Trap Results seen Indoors Date Sample Number Location Highest Interior results cited by EMSNY County Executive Law Library 1,208 Exterior result FS/M 3 1,201 1,254 1, Hallway near 3205G 6, Payroll 1, Hall near 3 rd Floor Elev. 2, Deeds Room 1, Hall between Exec. & Finance 3,380 50,513 53,375 53, Probation 1,120 46, DA Chamber 2,373 21,607 11, Outside DA Chamber Room , Inside DA Chamber Room 742 Emergency Management near Room ,553 12, Emergency Management 82,900 13,033 21,327 12, DA Chamber Room ,153 2, DA near Kitchen 14,233 6, Wall Cavity Sampling Wall cavity samples were collected by EMSNY from a number of locations within the facility on two different dates September 23, 2011 and October 7, The methodology involved drilling a 1/4 inch hole in the wall and inserting a plastic tube to collect an air sample from inside a wall cavity. The samples were then analyzed by direct microscopic examination to determine if the type and number of fungal spores present on the sampling media was indicative of mold growth within wall cavities. According to EMSNY the methodology employed in collecting the wall cavity samples involved banging on the wall to loosen any possible mold growth within the wall cavity. Vibration has the effect of artificially elevating spore counts which unfortunately makes the data unrepresentative. It is therefore unclear whether some of the elevated counts seen are due to active mold growth or agitation of the walls. EMSNY reported the most affected areas as those with the highest spore count as abnormal. The definition of what constitutes an abnormal spore count from one that is artificially elevated is unclear due to a lack of numerical regulatory standards for this type of sampling. A summary of the highest spore counts seen in the wall cavities is provided below in Table 3. 9 OCGC Mold Inspection Report ( ).docx 2/22/ :58 AM

10 Date of Collection Table 3 Highest Spore Counts Seen in Wall Cavities Sample number Location Result Fungal Structures per cubic meter (FS/m 3 ) County Attorney Room , County Attorney across from , Budget Room 3210G 128, Personnel File Area 1,056, Personnel Room 3221G 77, Wall Outside Budget 256, Probation Men s Room 9, DA Chamber Floor Vent Cavity 66, County Attorney above , County Inside Budget 33, Personnel across from Room 3221G 21, Cavity Outside Budget 200,167 Tape Lifts A total of 16 tape lifts were collected from the interior of the building on September 10, 2011 and September 15, On September 10, 2011 a total of 12 tape lift samples were collected, nine from ductwork diffusers in the Deeds area and two from books and a single sample from a chair in the Grand Jury Room. The nine samples from the ductwork diffusers indicated that mold growth was not detected. The remaining samples indicated mold growth was present but there was no discussion in the report interpreting what the data meant, the size of any mold growth present in square feet or its location. A total of four tape lift samples were collected on September 15, 2011 from the walls and ceilings in the vicinity of Room 3221G which all indicted the presence of growth structures. These areas were all noted as mold growth areas by FEMA but there were no areas larger than 1 square foot visible on the surface of the drywall accessible by building occupants. Dust Sampling A total of five dust samples were collected on September 10, 2011 from the Second Floor Deeds Area, Room 3211, and room 3705G the analysis of which did not indicate the presence of mold growth. EMSNY RECOMMENDATIONS EMSNY recommended that areas of visible mold growth be removed by a qualified contractor. The FEMA Project Mold Specialist concurs with this recommendation. In addition they made the following recommendation with regard to the ductwork in the building. Building ducting is of a common design and is not built in such a way as to isolate supply and returns of an impacted area from a non impacted area. It is recommended that the ventilation system be cleaned to dislodge and remove any spores that may have been deposited within the system. The FEMA Project Mold Specialist does not concur with this recommendation because it is based on the supposition that fungal spores originating from the mold growth caused by the hurricane may have been deposited within the system. During the inspection it was observed that the ductwork has already been contaminated with large amounts of fungal spores introduced into the system over the last 40 years of routine operation and deposited in a thick layer consisting of atmospheric dust, clothing fibers, processed cellulose, OCGC Mold Inspection Report ( ).docx 10 2/22/ :58 AM

11 pollen, and fungal spores. It is also difficult to see how the interior of the system could be more contaminated by fungal spores than it already is with the relatively small amount of visible mold growth seen in the building that was attributed to the hurricane. In addition, the building utilizes a ducted return system and not a plenum return. Most of the visible mold growth seen in the building is above ceilings or within wall cavities and it is improbable that sufficient numbers of mold spores could have migrated out of these areas and contaminated the inside of the ductwork to a degree worse than it already was before the hurricane. It should also be noted that the inspection of the interior main trunk lines conducted by EMSNY did not reveal the presence of any visible mold growth, as indicated in the Labella reports, and that no inspections have been conducted in the remaining areas of ductwork. Moreover, any fungal growth discovered now or in the future is not likely to be related to the hurricane due to the ducts being sealed, the long lead times necessary to initiate fungal growth within the system, and the fact that exposure of the ducts to high humidity levels does not in and of itself foster mold growth but is due to free water introduced into the system. FEMA MOLD INSPECTION The mold inspection of the building conducted by FEMA focused on visiting each of the areas identified by EMSNY as needing immediate remediation and visually inspecting the area to assess the findings of the EMSNY report. A summary table indicating all areas of visible mold growth identified in the building and brief summary of the results of that inspection for each area is provided below. Table - 4 Summary Table of Visible Mold Growth Location Room EPA/NYCDOHMH Approximate Material Impacted Classification Surface Area Div 1 Room 301 Medium (<10 SF / <100 SF) Drywall ceiling <25 SF* Div 1 Mezzanine Medium (<10 SF / <100 SF) Drywall ceiling <25 SF* Div 1 Room 339 Small (<10 SF) Drywall ceiling <6 SF* Div 1 Room 340 Small (<10 SF) Drywall partition (corridor) 2 SF Div2 Room 341 Small (<10 SF) Drywall (above entrance) 2 SF Div2 Room 610 Large (100+ SF) Drywall partition 188 SF Div2 Room 604 (3211GA) Medium (<10 SF / <100 SF) Drywall partition 72 SF Div2 Room 611 (3211G) Medium (<10 SF / <100 SF) Drywall partition 56 Div2 Room 608A (3207G) Large (100+ SF) Drywall partition 112 SF Div2 Room 613B (3216G) Medium (<10 SF / <100 SF) Drywall ceiling <100 SF* Div2 Room 615 (3230G) Small (<10 SF) Drywall partition <1 SF* Div2 Room 615 (3230GA) Medium (<10 SF / <100 SF) Drywall ceiling <100 SF* Div2 Room 626 (Chase) Medium (<10 SF / <100 SF) Drywall partition / Pipe insulation <100 SF* Div2 Room 3929 Small (<10 SF) Drywall ceiling <10 SF* Div 2 2 nd Room 513 Men s Small (<10 SF) Acoustical ceiling tile 8 SF Div 3 3 rd Room 909 Medium (<10 SF / <100 SF) Drywall ceiling <25 SF* Div 3 3 rd Room 926A Small (<10 SF) Drywall ceiling <10 SF* Div 3 3 rd Room 926 Law Library Large (100+ SF) Drywall ceiling <225 SF* Div 3 3 rd Room 931 (Conference Room) Large (100+ SF) Drywall ceiling <100 SF* Div 3 3 rd Corridor at Rm 925 Entrance Large (100+ SF) Drywall ceiling <100 SF* Div 3 Room 704 Medium (<10 SF / <100 SF) Drywall partition 64 SF* OCGC Mold Inspection Report ( ).docx 11 2/22/ :58 AM

12 Location Room Table 4 (continued) Summary Table of Visible Mold Growth EPA/NYCDOHMH Classification Material Impacted Approximate Surface Area Div 3 1st Room 707 Large (100+ SF) Drywall partition / Pipe insulation 563 SF Div 3 1st Room 714 Large (100+ SF) Pipe insulation covers and flexduct 897 SF Div 3 1st Room 716 Large (100+ SF) Drywall partition and metal ductwork 154 SF Div 3 1st Room 717 Medium (<10 SF / <100 SF) Pipe Insulation 68 SF Div 3 1st Room 718 Large (100+ SF) Pipe insulation 101 SF Div 3 1st Room 719 Large (100+ SF) Drywall partitions and pipe insulation 195 SF * - Actual amount of mold growth is estimated at less than stated amount Division 1 - Third Floor FEMA further subdivided this area into the County Executive s Office, County Attorney offices, and Legislature Area. The inspection of the County Executive s Office and adjacent areas revealed a number of areas where water had penetrated through cracks in the roof slab or at concrete joints but there was no visible mold growth on interior room surfaces. FEMA also inspected each wall penetration made by EMSNY to inspect wall cavities but found no evidence of visible mold growth in these areas. Damage to the building finishes in this area were limited to water stained carpet and drywall. The County Attorneys offices were examined and a few small areas of visible mold growth were noted that included a small area above the ceiling in Room 339 and above the entrances to Rooms 340 and 341, were noted totaling approximately 6 SF. Visible mold growth was observed in only one wall cavity between entrances of Room 340 and 341. This was caused by a leaking concrete joint at this location. Damaged building finishes in this area included damaged carpeting, and visible mold growth on drywall. The remaining area of Division 1 third Floor included the Legislature Area. A small area of visible mold growth was observed above the drywall ceiling where a crack in the roof slab allowed water to accumulate. This area was approximately two square feet of visible mold growth. Visible mold growth was not identified on any remaining finishes in this area or inside the wall cavities which were inspected. This area was also noted to contain approximately 20 water damaged ceiling tiles. The Mezzanine area associated with the legislature courtroom balcony was also included with this area. It was found to have a significant water leak in the area of the Mezzanine above the NW entrance to the courtroom. Visible mold growth was observed on the back of the ceiling drywall near a hatch in this area. Division 2 Third Floor This area was subdivided into two individual subareas that included office areas associated with Budget and Personnel. The Budget Area comprised rooms 3207 to 3215 and was the area with the greatest amount of mold growth found in two main areas, Room 3210 and Room The visible growth in Room 3210 was caused by a leaking roof drain located in a mechanical area on the roof. The growth was extensive in this area and was noted to have affected the base of the walls in 3210 (610), 3211G, and 3211GA. The source of moisture in Room 3207 was not so clearly evident but visible mold growth in the area was easily identified on interior walls and within wall cavities. Locations of visible mold growth can be seen in the Attached Appendix OCGC Mold Inspection Report ( ).docx 12 2/22/ :58 AM

13 B. There was approximately 425 square feet of mold impacted drywall in this area, and an additional 416 SF of adjacent drywall was recommended to be removed to ensure all VMG is removed. The personnel area was the second area of the Division 2 3 rd Floor and was found to have 5 areas of mold growth. Three of the areas identified were considered EPA Medium Size areas (i.e. >10SF <100SF) and were located above the ceiling of Room 3216, 3230GA and in the mechanical chase behind the Men s and Women s Room 624 and 626. Visible mold growth in this area (mechanical chase) was located on a pipe covering and on the back side of the drywall along the south wall of the Women s Room. The remaining areas of visible mold growth in this area were located at the top of the south wall of Room 3230G and above the entry door to room 621. These areas were rated as EPA Small size areas (i.e. <10SF). Division 2 Second Floor Visible mold growth on this floor was located in Men s Room 513 and consisted of 2 mold impacted ceiling tiles. These two areas were combined into one and rated as an EPA Small size area (i.e. <10SF). Division 3 Third Floor Visible mold growth in this area was located primarily above the ceiling of the Law Library corridor ceiling outside Room 925 and above the ceiling of Room 909. A judges bench in Room 931 was also observed to be water damaged and have some visible mold growth though the visible mold growth was not apparent at the time of the FEMA inspection. The law Library was found to contain three EPA/NYCDOHMH medium size areas of visible mold growth (i.e. >10 SF and <100 SF) above the ceiling of the law Library itself and a Fourth EPA/NYCDOHMH medium size area above the ceiling of Conference Room 931. The source of the water leak in the Conference Room was a roof drain while the remaining areas were caused by leakage associated with cracks in the roof slab. A fifth area of visible mold growth rated as an EPA/NYCDOHMH small size area located above the storage room 926B in the Law Library. The corridor outside the north entrance to the Law Library at the entrance to Room 925 had an EPA/NYCDOHMH medium size area of visible mold growth located around the roof hatch associated with a crack in the roof slab. A judges bench located in Courtroom #6 of the Division 3 Third Floor Area (Room 931) was identified by the applicants consultant, Labella Associates as requiring demolition and replacement due to extensive water damage and mold growth. An examination of the bench confirmed that a part of the witness stand on the left hand side of the bench was water damaged but the rest of the bench was not damaged. The portion that was damaged consisted of a 18 x24 inch piece of ¾ inch finished plywood that could be removed from the bench and replaced. Division 3 First Floor Visible mold growth in this area was located in two main areas, men s Room 704 and the Emergency Management Room and adjacent areas which consisted of Rooms 707,714,716,718, and 719. Visible mold growth located in the Men s Room 704 was located inside the wall cavities of the south wall. This area was rated as an EPA/NYCDOHMH medium size area and was caused by water originating from pumping operations conducted in the flooded pipe trenches during the storm. The remaining area located in the Emergency Management Rooms was considered an EPA/NYCDOHMH large size area (>100SF). The mold growth in this area was located on canvas pipe wrap insulation jackets, the exterior of ducts, on drywall above the ceilings of Room 707 and 716, and on the exterior of an un-insulated duct located in a Storage Room off Room 716. This mold growth was not considered storm related because it was located above the ceilings of the rooms described above. This is an indication that the particular conditions that caused moisture condensation and subsequent mold growth are located only above the ceiling and not below it because there was no visible OCGC Mold Inspection Report ( ).docx 13 2/22/ :58 AM

14 mold growth below the ceiling level. It should be noted that the Labella Reports indicated groundwater and floodwaters entered the building through the sub slab pipe trenches located around the perimeter of Division 3. Floodwaters typically contain sediment and other materials that usually leave tell-tale marks such as water lines or other indicators such as rust at the bottom of door frames, staining or discoloration on carpeting, or wicking on the interior wall cavities. Assuming that floodwaters were the cause of the growth in the Emergency Management Rooms these marks should be present somewhere in these areas but are conspicuously absent throughout the area. The cause of the mold growth above the ceiling is believed to be due to architectural modifications made to the area in which affected normal airflow above the ceiling in the Emergency Management Area. There were also two areas of sunken floors in the Division 3 First Floor area in DA Room 742 and the DA Attorney s Area. The applicant is requesting funding for the removal, inspection, and replacement of the flooring in these areas due to assumed mold growth on the plywood flooring and floor joists from flooding. These areas were inspected and there was no evidence of visible mold growth in the areas inspected. The area beneath the sunken floor of Room 742 exhibited signs of flooding to a depth of 3 to 4 inches. The structural supports were made of douglas fir studs but were not supporting mold growth in the areas inspected. The sunken floor in the DA areas did not exhibit signs of flooding beneath it and was dry. The structural supports were observed to be metal studs supporting a plywood deck that did not appear to be supporting visible mold growth in the areas inspected at the time of the FEMA inspection. CONCLUSIONS Damages to the interior of the building were located mainly on the Third Floor Level of Divisions 1, 2 and 3 and the First Floor of Division 3. The cause was water infiltration through cracks in the concrete roof deck, leaks at slab joints, and leaks at slab penetrations such as at roof drains or electrical conduit. The failure of the roofing system was the main cause of damage and failed prior to the storm events as indicated by the September, 2011 property condition report completed prior to the storm by Labella Associates. Damages to building interior finishes in the building consisted mainly of water damaged drywall and localized areas of wetted carpeting. A brief discussion summarizing the conclusions reached regarding the eligibility of specific items raised by the Applicant ore their consultants has been provided below EMERGENCY CLEANUP MEASURES - During the disaster the applicant hired DKI-Hudson Valley to perform emergency cleanup measures within the building. This firm performed cleanup operations on August 31, September 1, and September 2, 2011 and performed water extraction, carpet cleaning, and drying operations. The total amount of the charges was $ which was deemed eligible work. VISIBLE MOLD GROWTH - A total of 1,189 SF of mold impacted drywall was found scattered mainly through the third floor of the building that was considered eligible remediation work. Additional small areas of visible mold growth were identified in Division 2 Second Floor (Room 513), and Division 3 First Floor (Room 704) that were considered eligible. A large area of visible mold growth was found in the Emergency Management Area and adjacent rooms that was not considered storm related and therefore ineligible. A complete listing of all areas of visible mold growth found during the inspection can be seen in Table 4. CLEANING OF DUCTWORK - The applicant has also requested cleaning of ductwork within the building because of the possibility of spores entering the system from the mold growth in the building. FEMA does not concur with this recommendation and cleaning of the ducts is not considered eligible work. The EMSNY recommendation is based on the supposition that fungal spores originating from the mold growth caused by the hurricane may have OCGC Mold Inspection Report ( ).docx 14 2/22/ :58 AM

15 been deposited within the system. During the inspection it was observed that the ductwork has already been contaminated with large amounts of fungal spores introduced into the system over the last 40 years of routine operation and deposited in a thick layer throughout the system consisting of atmospheric dust, clothing fibers, processed cellulose, pollen, and fungal spores. In addition, it is unlikely that mold spores from the relatively minor amount of mold growth above ceilings and a few wall cavities could have impacted the interior of the ductwork to a greater degree than it already has been by over 40 years of continuous operation in which thousands of cubic feet of air containing millions of fungal spores are routinely introduced into the system on a daily basis. In addition, the building utilizes a ducted return system and not a plenum return. Most of the visible mold growth seen in the building is above ceilings or within wall cavities and it is unlikely that enough mold spores could have migrated out of these areas to contaminate the entire interior lining of the ductwork to a greater degree than it already has been. It should also be noted that the inspection of the interior main trunk lines conducted by EMSNY did not reveal the presence of any visible mold growth, as indicated in the Labella reports, and that no inspections have been conducted in the remaining areas of ductwork. Moreover, any fungal growth discovered now or in the future is not likely to be related to the hurricane due to the ducts being sealed, the long lead times necessary to initiate fungal growth within the system, and the fact that exposure of the ducts to high humidity levels does not in and of itself foster mold growth but is primarily due to the presence of free water on the interior lining. CLEANING OF BUILDING INTERIOR - The applicant has also requested cleaning of all remaining carpets, walls, ceilings, windows and floors throughout the building because of the presence of visible mold growth inside the building. This work is also considered ineligible due to the relatively small amount of visible mold growth seen in the building and the fact that most of it is sequestered above ceilings or inside a few wall cavities on the Third Floor which makes it difficult for mold spores to migrate from to any significant degree. While the carpeting, floors, walls, and ceilings may have resident mold spores the origin of the spores is most likely from the ventilation system. The exception to this is on the Division 3 - First Floor where a large area of visible mold growth was discovered in the Emergency Management Area and some adjacent rooms that was not considered eligible making cleaning of carpets and walls in this area also ineligible. It should also be noted that all areas of water damaged carpeting and their associated mold spore burden are being removed as eligible work. REMOVAL OF WATER DAMAGED CARPET - Areas of water damaged carpeting in the building originally impacted by category 2 water were deemed eligible for funding because the applicant was unable to perform emergency repairs because of a power outage at the facility. Since category 2 water introduced into the building becomes category 3 water the longer it resides on a carpeted floor and there was no indication of how long it remained saturated it was considered a prudent course of action to remove it in accordance with the IICRC standards for water damage restoration. DEMOLITION OF DIVISION 3 1ST FLOOR WALLS, FLOORS, AND CEILINGS - The applicant has also indicated that the demolition of the walls, carpeting, and ceilings are necessary on the First Floor of Division 3 but this was also considered ineligible work due to the lack of any evidence on the floors, walls, or ceilings that that the Division 3 First Floor carpeting was saturated as indicated in the Labella Post Tropical Storm Property Condition Report. CLEANING OF PERIMETER PIPE TRENCHES - The remaining area of potential visible mold growth was on the piping of located in the perimeter pipe trenches. The Labella inspection reports indicated that the pipe insulation in only one of the pipe trenches were impacted by visible mold growth as a result of being flooded. Currently, there is no evidence of visible mold growth in the southern trench of Div 3 First Floor and the degree of rust and other OCGC Mold Inspection Report ( ).docx 15 2/22/ :58 AM

16 debris indicates that the pipe trenches have been subjected to water intrusions numerous times prior to the hurricane. The removal and disinfection of the piping is considered ineligible. REPLACEMENT OF JUDGES BENCH - The applicant is also requesting the removal and replacement of the judges bench in Division 3 Third Floor Room 934, a part of which was damaged by water infiltration from a concrete joint located directly above it. Only the damaged portion of the judges bench is considered eligible work. SUNKEN FLOOR AREAS - In addition to the finishes described above the Labella report identified two areas of sunken flooring in DA Chamber Room 742 and the DA s office that were flooded and possibly contain visible mold growth. FEMA inspected these areas and found evidence that the sunken floor area of Room 742 was flooded to a depth of three inches but was not impacted by visible mold growth. The other area also showed no evidence of having been impacted by water or visible mold growth and they are both considered ineligible work until such time as the applicant provides evidence of significant damage or mold growth in these areas. LAW LIBRARY BOOKS The applicants consultant, Labella Associates recommended that the contents of two law libraries in the building be removed, cleaned, and restacked. These building contents were not evaluated as part of the building inspection process and will be inspected at a later date. OCGC Mold Inspection Report ( ).docx 16 2/22/ :58 AM

17 APPENDIX A MOLD INSPECTION FORMS

18 APPENDIX B MOLD LOCATION DIAGRAMS

19 APPENDIX C PHOTOS

20 APPENDIX A Orange County Government Center Mold Inspection Forms I. OBSERVATION LOCATION II. MOLD OBSERVATIONS III. WATER OBSERVATIONS IV. ENVIRONMENTAL IA. Number IB. Level IC. Room ID. Area IE. Surf. IF. Subarea IIA. - Status IIB. EPA/NYC Classification IIC. Affected Substrate(s) IIIA. Type IIIB. Source IIIC. Condition IIID. Moisture meter DATE All observations numbered sequentially B/CS/1/2/3/4/5/A/PH/R A-Z N/NE/E/SE/S/SW/W/NW Wall, Floor, Ceiling, Window L C R U UL UC UR M ML MC MR B BL BC BR Not Included in Scope Not Impacted Impacted NVG - No Visible Growth VG - Visible Growth EX - Extensive L- Localized IND - Indeterminate NI - Area Not Inspected S-Suspect EPA Sm. EPA Med. EPA Med. EPA Lrg. NYC- 1 NYC- 2 NYC- 3 NYC- 4 5 <10 S.F. 10/30 S.F. '30/ S.F. HVAC<10 HVAC>10 B-Brick CA-carpet O-Other CT-cell./ tiles PA-Painted CB-C/block PB-Prt.Brd. CC-Concrete PL-Plaster DW-Drywall PN-Panel(ed)ing FN-Furn. PW-Plywood FR-Furnish. WP-Wallpaper I-Ins. W-Wood OSB-Orn.Std Brd Cat. 1 - Clean Cat. 2 - Gray Cat. 3 - Black Condensation Infiltration Foundation Leak Plumb Leak Roof Leak DA - Damp DR - Dry M - Moisture formation W - Wet R - Rotted ST - Staining SW - Standing Water RD - Rills / Dripping Wood % moisture Green - dry Non-Wood NYC- Yellowdamp Red - wet Air Temperature (ºF) % Rel. Humidity Dewpoint (ºF) Surface Temp.(s) 1/19/ DIV-3 Drywall - dry no moisture 930 N W NVG X X X X 58 inside wall, interior dry 1/19/ /19/ DIV-3 DIV-3 Corridor at 930 entrance Drywall on ceiling is 930 NVG X X X looked inside ceiling door stained 914B 912A 903 C at ceiling NVG X X X Cracks present in roof deck that have been patched. 1/19/ DIV-3 1st Plywood lip has less than 742 F under floor VG X X (less than 1 SF) X X X 1 SF of growth Dry - no moisture 1/20/ DIV2 Corridor wall near entrance to Room 3206G (607) VG X X Drywall inside wall cavity X X X 0.1 1/20/ DIV2 3207G X X Drywall on interior side VG of wall X X 1/20/ DIV2 3208G N W 10 feet off The drywall inside wall NVG floor cavity is not impacted X X 1/20/ DIV2 3208G E W 5 feet off NVG floor X X 1/20/ DIV2 3216G X Localized below Personnel at ceiling VG Drywall under duct run duct X X 1/20/ DIV2 3239G Inspected above ceiling tile NVG 1/20/ DIV2 3239G C VG X X < 2 SF Drywall X X X 1/20/ DIV2 Personnel area, south wall at ceiling level VG X X < 2 SF Drywall X X X 1/20/ DIV2 Room 3230GA cubicles inside duct bulkhead east wall VG Ductwork above X X Drywall X X X growth 1/20/ DIV2 Drywall bulkhead north face 10 feet above floor VG Roof drain X Drywall X penetration X X through roof slab 1/20/ DIV2 Hole in ceiling VG Water following X Drywall X X drain 1/20/ DIV2 EMSNY hole above door to 3222G VG X X < 6 inches Drywall very patchy X X G Appendix A - OC Govt Center Mold Inspection Forms ( ).xls 6 - INTERIOR 2/24/ :20 AM

21 APPENDIX A Orange County Government Center Mold Inspection Forms I. OBSERVATION LOCATION II. MOLD OBSERVATIONS III. WATER OBSERVATIONS IV. ENVIRONMENTAL IA. Number IB. Level IC. Room ID. Area IE. Surf. IF. Subarea IIA. - Status IIB. EPA/NYC Classification IIC. Affected Substrate(s) IIIA. Type IIIB. Source IIIC. Condition IIID. Moisture meter DATE All observations numbered sequentially B/CS/1/2/3/4/5/A/PH/R A-Z N/NE/E/SE/S/SW/W/NW Wall, Floor, Ceiling, Window L C R U UL UC UR M ML MC MR B BL BC BR Not Included in Scope Not Impacted Impacted NVG - No Visible Growth VG - Visible Growth EX - Extensive L- Localized IND - Indeterminate NI - Area Not Inspected S-Suspect EPA Sm. EPA Med. EPA Med. EPA Lrg. NYC- 1 NYC- 2 NYC- 3 NYC- 4 5 <10 S.F. 10/30 S.F. '30/ S.F. HVAC<10 HVAC>10 B-Brick CA-carpet O-Other CT-cell./ tiles PA-Painted CB-C/block PB-Prt.Brd. CC-Concrete PL-Plaster DW-Drywall PN-Panel(ed)ing FN-Furn. PW-Plywood FR-Furnish. WP-Wallpaper I-Ins. W-Wood OSB-Orn.Std Brd Cat. 1 - Clean Cat. 2 - Gray Cat. 3 - Black Condensation Infiltration Foundation Leak Plumb Leak Roof Leak DA - Damp DR - Dry M - Moisture formation W - Wet R - Rotted ST - Staining SW - Standing Water RD - Rills / Dripping Wood % moisture Green - dry Non-Wood NYC- Yellowdamp Red - wet Air Temperature (ºF) % Rel. Humidity Dewpoint (ºF) Surface Temp.(s) 1/26/ DIV2 3218G N W EMS Insp hole NVG 1/26/ DIV2 3225G Corridor at entrance 24" x Drywall with staining NVG 24" hatch at ceiling under joint leak X X Through concrete joints 1/26/ DIV2 3231G Drywall, north wall of Womens room near 3231G NVG duct chase X X Staining of drywall 1/26/ DIV2 3232G Corridor at 3231G Entrance NVG No VG in EMS insp hole 1/26/ DIV2 3232G Ceiling tiles (3) visibly Ceiling NVG stained X X Crack in concrete above ceiling tile 1/26/ DIV2 3233G < 1 SF on top of Ceiling VG X Ceiling tiles ceiling tile X Leak at concrete joint 1/26/ DIV2 Law Library hatch entrance Leak at concrete 926 VG X X Drywall X X NW of column joint 1/26/ /26/ /26/ DIV2 DIV3 DIV3 926 Law Library NE corner VG X X Drywall X Leak at concrete joint X Law library S wall between Source of water unclear 926 library & conference room VG X Drywall X due to visibility X above hatch constraint 931 ceiling VG X Drywall X Leaking roof drain penetration X 1/26/ DIV3 Law Library ceiling near Drywall is water stained Leak from crack in 926 NVG X X north entrance < 1 SF concrete above 1/26/ DIV3 Room 926A storage VG X X Leak from crack above X 1/26/ DIV3 915 South wall adjacent to door - EMS core NVG 1/26/ DIV3 911 Ceiling along east wall NVG 1/26/ DIV3 912A East wall bottom NVG Appendix A - OC Govt Center Mold Inspection Forms ( ).xls 6 - INTERIOR 2/24/ :20 AM

22 APPENDIX A Orange County Government Center Mold Inspection Forms I. OBSERVATION LOCATION II. MOLD OBSERVATIONS III. WATER OBSERVATIONS IV. ENVIRONMENTAL IA. Number IB. Level IC. Room ID. Area IE. Surf. IF. Subarea IIA. - Status IIB. EPA/NYC Classification IIC. Affected Substrate(s) IIIA. Type IIIB. Source IIIC. Condition IIID. Moisture meter DATE All observations numbered sequentially B/CS/1/2/3/4/5/A/PH/R A-Z N/NE/E/SE/S/SW/W/NW Wall, Floor, Ceiling, Window L C R U UL UC UR M ML MC MR B BL BC BR Not Included in Scope Not Impacted Impacted NVG - No Visible Growth VG - Visible Growth EX - Extensive L- Localized IND - Indeterminate NI - Area Not Inspected S-Suspect EPA Sm. EPA Med. EPA Med. EPA Lrg. NYC- 1 NYC- 2 NYC- 3 NYC- 4 5 <10 S.F. 10/30 S.F. '30/ S.F. HVAC<10 HVAC>10 B-Brick CA-carpet O-Other CT-cell./ tiles PA-Painted CB-C/block PB-Prt.Brd. CC-Concrete PL-Plaster DW-Drywall PN-Panel(ed)ing FN-Furn. PW-Plywood FR-Furnish. WP-Wallpaper I-Ins. W-Wood OSB-Orn.Std Brd Cat. 1 - Clean Cat. 2 - Gray Cat. 3 - Black Condensation Infiltration Foundation Leak Plumb Leak Roof Leak DA - Damp DR - Dry M - Moisture formation W - Wet R - Rotted ST - Staining SW - Standing Water RD - Rills / Dripping Wood % moisture Green - dry Non-Wood NYC- Yellowdamp Red - wet Air Temperature (ºF) % Rel. Humidity Dewpoint (ºF) Surface Temp.(s) 1/26/ DIV3 912A East wall NVG Part of E wall is water stained under crack 1/26/ /26/ DIV3 DIV3 Drywall under roof Hatch in SE corner on 909 VG X X penetration and under X X X X ceiling near double door duct Drywall painted interior Rill formation under window 909 South wall at floor NVG X X X surface edge 1/26/ DIV3 925 Conference room entrance in corridor left of entrance above ceiling (EMS core) NVG Checked wall cavity NVG 1/26/ DIV3 Corridor between 925 and 927A seen from hatch (8"x 8") VG Drywall of corridor ceiling X X X is stained 1/26/ DIV3 Electrical penetrations 925 Conference room hatch NVG X through slab leaking onto X drywall ceiling in 2 areas 1/26/ DIV3 Ceiling hatch in womens 925 NVG X room The duct in the wall cavity is badly corroded as seen from womens room 1/26/ DIV3 934 Room 934 NVG Water leak at slab joint in NE corner of corridor 1/26/ DIV3 924 EMS core in E wall 10 ft off floor NVG 1/26/ DIV3 1st N. Wall of corridor adjacent to Men's Room 704 VG X X Drywall X X X 1/26/ DIV3 1st S wall of corridor adjacent to Mens Room NVG 1/26/ DIV3 1st in dust adhering 743 Diffuser vanes of return VG to diffuser X vanes Dust on diffuser vanes 1/26/ DIV3 1st 750 Exterior south wall (EMS hole) NVG 1/26/ DIV3 1st Rill formation on column, 748 NVG unclear if ongoing or formed X during construction 1/26/ DIV3 1st 742 Two cores on east and west bulkhead NVG Appendix A - OC Govt Center Mold Inspection Forms ( ).xls 6 - INTERIOR 2/24/ :20 AM

23 APPENDIX A Orange County Government Center Mold Inspection Forms I. OBSERVATION LOCATION II. MOLD OBSERVATIONS III. WATER OBSERVATIONS IV. ENVIRONMENTAL IA. Number IB. Level IC. Room ID. Area IE. Surf. IF. Subarea IIA. - Status IIB. EPA/NYC Classification IIC. Affected Substrate(s) IIIA. Type IIIB. Source IIIC. Condition IIID. Moisture meter DATE All observations numbered sequentially B/CS/1/2/3/4/5/A/PH/R A-Z N/NE/E/SE/S/SW/W/NW Wall, Floor, Ceiling, Window L C R U UL UC UR M ML MC MR B BL BC BR Not Included in Scope Not Impacted Impacted NVG - No Visible Growth VG - Visible Growth EX - Extensive L- Localized IND - Indeterminate NI - Area Not Inspected S-Suspect EPA Sm. EPA Med. EPA Med. EPA Lrg. NYC- 1 NYC- 2 NYC- 3 NYC- 4 5 <10 S.F. 10/30 S.F. '30/ S.F. HVAC<10 HVAC>10 B-Brick CA-carpet O-Other CT-cell./ tiles PA-Painted CB-C/block PB-Prt.Brd. CC-Concrete PL-Plaster DW-Drywall PN-Panel(ed)ing FN-Furn. PW-Plywood FR-Furnish. WP-Wallpaper I-Ins. W-Wood OSB-Orn.Std Brd Cat. 1 - Clean Cat. 2 - Gray Cat. 3 - Black Condensation Infiltration Foundation Leak Plumb Leak Roof Leak DA - Damp DR - Dry M - Moisture formation W - Wet R - Rotted ST - Staining SW - Standing Water RD - Rills / Dripping Wood % moisture Green - dry Non-Wood NYC- Yellowdamp Red - wet Air Temperature (ºF) % Rel. Humidity Dewpoint (ºF) Surface Temp.(s) 1/26/ DIV3 1st 742 West bulkhead above entrance NVG 1/26/ DIV3 1st Canvas pipe jacket and 714 Ceiling tile along east wall VG X X X X 73 exterior flex duct /26/ DIV3 1st Visible growth on canvas 707 VG X X jackets of piping and X X X ductwork 1/26/ DIV3 1st Canvas jackets on 719 VG X X piping, drywall, fiberglass X X X piping 1/26/ DIV3 1st 716 Storage VG X X Metal painted duct X X X 1/26/ DIV3 1st 716 E Wall above ceiling VG X X Drywall X X 1/27/ DIV1 302 Ceiling above 302A VG X X < 1 SF Drywall X X X X 1/27/ DIV1 Ceiling tiles (20 total Concrete joint and roof 301 NVG 2'x2' qaffected by joint X crack leaks) 1/27/ DIV1 301 South wall near entry (EMS Core) NVG 1/27/ DIV1 301 EMS core in entry corridor south wall NVG 1/27/ DIV1 303 Room 303 doorway east, west side of door NVG 1/27/ DIV1 302B Room 302B NE corner NVG 1/27/ DIV1 302 South Wall NVG 1/27/ DIV1 302 Room 302 E wall at entrance to 302B NVG 1/27/ DIV1 302 Room 302 south wall, N wall of 302A NVG Appendix A - OC Govt Center Mold Inspection Forms ( ).xls 6 - INTERIOR 2/24/ :20 AM

24 APPENDIX A Orange County Government Center Mold Inspection Forms I. OBSERVATION LOCATION II. MOLD OBSERVATIONS III. WATER OBSERVATIONS IV. ENVIRONMENTAL IA. Number IB. Level IC. Room ID. Area IE. Surf. IF. Subarea IIA. - Status IIB. EPA/NYC Classification IIC. Affected Substrate(s) IIIA. Type IIIB. Source IIIC. Condition IIID. Moisture meter DATE All observations numbered sequentially B/CS/1/2/3/4/5/A/PH/R A-Z N/NE/E/SE/S/SW/W/NW Wall, Floor, Ceiling, Window L C R U UL UC UR M ML MC MR B BL BC BR Not Included in Scope Not Impacted Impacted NVG - No Visible Growth VG - Visible Growth EX - Extensive L- Localized IND - Indeterminate NI - Area Not Inspected S-Suspect EPA Sm. EPA Med. EPA Med. EPA Lrg. NYC- 1 NYC- 2 NYC- 3 NYC- 4 5 <10 S.F. 10/30 S.F. '30/ S.F. HVAC<10 HVAC>10 B-Brick CA-carpet O-Other CT-cell./ tiles PA-Painted CB-C/block PB-Prt.Brd. CC-Concrete PL-Plaster DW-Drywall PN-Panel(ed)ing FN-Furn. PW-Plywood FR-Furnish. WP-Wallpaper I-Ins. W-Wood OSB-Orn.Std Brd Cat. 1 - Clean Cat. 2 - Gray Cat. 3 - Black Condensation Infiltration Foundation Leak Plumb Leak Roof Leak DA - Damp DR - Dry M - Moisture formation W - Wet R - Rotted ST - Staining SW - Standing Water RD - Rills / Dripping Wood % moisture Green - dry Non-Wood NYC- Yellowdamp Red - wet Air Temperature (ºF) % Rel. Humidity Dewpoint (ºF) Surface Temp.(s) 1/27/ DIV1 302A North wall NVG 1/27/ DIV1 302 West wall NVG 1/27/ DIV 1 4th Gallery entrance above X Drywall and carpet is VG NW Entry water damaged X X X X 1/27/ DIV1 Above entry to Room 343 (EMS core) NVG 1/27/ DIV1 333 North wall between 341 & 342 (EMS core) NVG 1/27/ DIV1 Above entry to 341 VG X X X X 1/27/ DIV1 Corridor between 340 and file room VG X < 1 SF Drywall at top of ceiling X X X 1/27/ DIV1 339 Above entry to 339 NVG 1/27/ DIV1 339 West wall at base NVG 1/27/ DIV1 Corridor near entry to 338 NVG 1/27/ DIV1 Corridor wall of Room 337 NVG 1/27/ DIV1 337 East wall NVG 1/27/ DIV1 343 East wall near entry to 344 NVG Water stains at base of wall 1/27/ DIV1 343 East wall near entry to 344 NVG 1/27/ DIV1 Drywall under leak in 339 SE corner VG X X X X X concrete roof Appendix A - OC Govt Center Mold Inspection Forms ( ).xls 6 - INTERIOR 2/24/ :20 AM

25 APPENDIX A Orange County Government Center Mold Inspection Forms I. OBSERVATION LOCATION II. MOLD OBSERVATIONS III. WATER OBSERVATIONS IV. ENVIRONMENTAL IA. Number IB. Level IC. Room ID. Area IE. Surf. IF. Subarea IIA. - Status IIB. EPA/NYC Classification IIC. Affected Substrate(s) IIIA. Type IIIB. Source IIIC. Condition IIID. Moisture meter DATE All observations numbered sequentially B/CS/1/2/3/4/5/A/PH/R A-Z N/NE/E/SE/S/SW/W/NW Wall, Floor, Ceiling, Window L C R U UL UC UR M ML MC MR B BL BC BR Not Included in Scope Not Impacted Impacted NVG - No Visible Growth VG - Visible Growth EX - Extensive L- Localized IND - Indeterminate NI - Area Not Inspected S-Suspect EPA Sm. EPA Med. EPA Med. EPA Lrg. NYC- 1 NYC- 2 NYC- 3 NYC- 4 5 <10 S.F. 10/30 S.F. '30/ S.F. HVAC<10 HVAC>10 B-Brick CA-carpet O-Other CT-cell./ tiles PA-Painted CB-C/block PB-Prt.Brd. CC-Concrete PL-Plaster DW-Drywall PN-Panel(ed)ing FN-Furn. PW-Plywood FR-Furnish. WP-Wallpaper I-Ins. W-Wood OSB-Orn.Std Brd Cat. 1 - Clean Cat. 2 - Gray Cat. 3 - Black Condensation Infiltration Foundation Leak Plumb Leak Roof Leak DA - Damp DR - Dry M - Moisture formation W - Wet R - Rotted ST - Staining SW - Standing Water RD - Rills / Dripping Wood % moisture Green - dry Non-Wood NYC- Yellowdamp Red - wet Air Temperature (ºF) % Rel. Humidity Dewpoint (ºF) Surface Temp.(s) 1/27/ DIV1 Mezzanine above NW entry to 303 legislature VG X X Drywall under HVAC leak, carpet also affected 1/27/ DIV1 County Executives offices - Closet in SE corner of building NVG 1/27/ DIV1 Room 328 near ceiling (EMS Core) NVG 1/27/ DIV1 Room 328 near ceiling (EMS Core) NVG 1/27/ DIV1 328 Room 328 above entry to 326 (EMS core) NVG 1/27/ DIV1 322 West wall (EMS core) NVG 1/27/ DIV1 319 East wall (EMS core) NVG 1/27/ DIV1 319 West wall near window NVG 1/27/ DIV1 319 West wall at bottom NVG 1/27/ DIV1 325 West wall at bottom NVG /27/ DIV1 Mens bathroom, wall chase 507 NVG X under room 3210 Water damage in chase 1/27/ DIV Room 3228 inside chase VG X Pipe elbow insulation X X X 1/27/ DIV1 341 Room 341 NVG Appendix A - OC Govt Center Mold Inspection Forms ( ).xls 6 - INTERIOR 2/24/ :20 AM

26 Remediation Plan Remove approximately 6 SF of mold impacted drywall Remove all carpeting in hatched area followed by HEPA vacuum of floor Remove 2 SF of mold impacted drywall on ceiling Remove 2 SF of mold impacted drywall from walls at each location LEGEND Remove mold impacted drywall Remove drywall Remove water damaged ceiling tile Remove water damaged carpet Remove mold impacted ceiling tile DIVISION 1 THIRD FLOOR COUNTY ATTORNEY

27 Remove 25 SF of mold impacted ceiling drywall on the Mezzanine Level. Remove 25 SF of mold impacted drywall on ceiling Remove 80 SF of water damaged ceiling tiles Remediation Plan Remove approximately 50 SF of mold impacted drywall from ceiling of Room 302 and Mezzanine Level Remove 80 SF of water damaged ceiling tiles from Room 301 Remove all carpeting in hatched area followed by HEPA vacuum of floor LEGEND Remove mold impacted drywall Remove drywall Remove water damaged ceiling tile Remove water damaged carpet Remove mold impacted ceiling tile DIVISION 1 THIRD FLOOR LEGISLATURE

28 LEGEND Remove mold impacted drywall Remove drywall Remove approx 416 SF of drywall on walls up to a height of 48 inches Remove approx. 425 SF of mold impacted drywall on walls up to a height of 48 inches Remove water damaged ceiling tile Remove water damaged carpet Remove mold impacted ceiling tile Remediation Plan Remove approximately 428 SF of mold impacted drywall. Remove additional drywall as necessary to ensure mold growth is removed entirely. Remove water damaged ceiling tiles. Remove all carpeting in hatched area followed by HEPA vacuum of floor. Remove water damaged ceiling tile Remove approximately 2 SF of mold growth above drywall ceiling f DIVISION 2 THIRD FLOOR BUDGET

29 Remediation Plan Remove approximately 200 SF of mold impacted drywall. Remove additional drywall as necessary to ensure mold growth is removed entirely. Remove water damaged ceiling tiles Remove all carpeting in hatched area followed by HEPA vacuum of floor. Remove approx. 100 SF of mold impacted drywall on ceiling. Remove additional drywall as needed to ensure mold growth is removed. Remove 1 SF of mold growth on drywall at top of door. Remove 100 SF of Mold impacted drywall on ceiling LEGEND Remove mold impacted drywall Remove drywall Remove 1 SF of mold growth from inside wall cavity at top of wall Remove water damaged ceiling tile Remove water damaged carpet Remove mold impacted ceiling tile Remove 100 SF of mold growth from backside of wall cavity and from pipe insulation Remove 4 water damaged ceiling tiles and one mold impacted ceiling tile from 3232G and 3233G. DIVISION 2 THIRD FLOOR PERSONNEL

30 Remediation Plan Remove approximately 457 SF of mold impacted drywall from ceilings of the Law Library, Corridor, Conference Room and Room 909. Remove all carpeting in hatched area followed by HEPA vacuum of floor. Remove approx 2 SF of mold impacted drywall on ceiling. Remove additional drywall as needed to ensure mold growth is removed. Remove approx. 25 SF of mold impacted drywall on ceiling of Room 909. Remove additional drywall as needed to ensure mold growth is removed. Remove 325 SF of mold impacted drywall from ceiling of Law Library and Conference Room LEGEND Remove mold impacted drywall Remove drywall Remove water damaged ceiling tile Remove water damaged carpet Remove mold impacted ceiling tile Remove 100 SF of mold impacted drywall from ceiling of Corridor outside Room 925 DIVISION 3 THIRD FLOOR LAW LIBRARY, CORRIDOR, ROOM 909

31 LEGEND Remove mold impacted drywall Remove drywall Remove water damaged ceiling tile Remove water damaged carpet Remove mold impacted ceiling tile Remove 6 SF of mold impacted drywall from walls and ceiling of County Attorney s Office Remove 25 SF of mold impacted drywall from ceiling Remove 25 SF of mold impacted drywall from ceiling Remove 80 SF of water damaged ceiling tiles from Room 301 DIVISION 1 THIRD FLOOR COUNTY ATTORNEY, LEGISLATURE, MEZZANINE

32 Remove 2 mold impacted ceiling tiles from Men s Room 513. LEGEND Remove mold impacted drywall Remove drywall Remove water damaged ceiling tile Remove water damaged carpet Remove mold impacted ceiling tile DIVISION 2 SECOND FLOOR PROBATION

33 Remediation Plan Remove mold impacted ceiling tiles from Men s Room Wet wipe walls with a dilute solution of quaternary ammonia and water Remove 2 mold impacted ceiling tile from Men s Room 513. LEGEND Remove mold impacted drywall Remove drywall Remove water damaged ceiling tile Remove water damaged carpet Remove mold impacted ceiling tile DIVISION 2 SECOND FLOOR PROBATION MENS and WOMENS REST ROOM

34 Remove 416 SF of drywall on walls up to a height of 48 inches Remove approx. 425 SF of mold impacted drywall on walls up to a height of 48 inches Remove approx. 100 SF of mold impacted drywall on ceiling. Remove additional water damaged drywall as needed to ensure mold growth is removed. LEGEND Remove mold impacted drywall Remove drywall Remove water damaged ceiling tile Remove water damaged carpet Remove mold impacted ceiling tile DIVISION 2 THIRD FLOOR BUDGET and PERSONNEL

35 Remove approx. 25 SF of mold impacted drywall on ceiling of Room 909. Remove additional drywall as needed to ensure mold growth is removed. Remove approx 2 SF of mold impacted drywall on ceiling. Remove additional drywall as needed to ensure mold growth is removed. Remove 325 SF of mold impacted drywall from ceiling of Law Library and Conference Room Remediation Plan Remove mold impacted drywall from ceilings of the Law Library, Corridor, Conference Room and Room 909. Remove all carpeting in hatched area followed by HEPA vacuum of floor. Remove 100 SF of mold impacted drywall from ceiling of Corridor outside Room 925 LEGEND Remove mold impacted drywall Remove drywall Remove water damaged ceiling tile Remove water damaged carpet Remove mold impacted ceiling tile DIVISION 3 THIRD FLOOR LAW LIBRARY, CORRIDOR, ROOM 909

36 Area of extensive visible mold growth in Rooms 707, 714, 716, and 719 ineligible, not storm related. Remove approx. 64 SF of mold impacted drywall from south wall of Men s 704 and adjacent corridor up to a height of 48 inches LEGEND Remove mold impacted drywall Remove drywall Remove water damaged ceiling tile Remove water damaged carpet Remove mold impacted ceiling tile DIVISION 3 FIRST FLOOR

37 APPLICANT: ORANGE COUNTY, NEW YORK FIPS NO. FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY PHOTO SHEET CATEGORY: PW REF NO. Figure 1 Div 1 3 rd Flr Leakage in County Executives Office Figure 2 Div 1 3 rd Flr Location 067 approximately 2 SF of visible mold growth above entrance to Room 341 Figure 3 Div 1 3 rd Flr Location 067 approximately 2 SF of visible mold growth above entrance to Room 341 Figure 4 Div 1 3 rd Flr Location 069 an area of approximately <2 Sf of visible mold growth in wall cavity above entrance. to 339

38 APPLICANT: ORANGE COUNTY, NEW YORK FIPS NO. FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY PHOTO SHEET CATEGORY: PW REF NO. Figure 5 Div 1 3 rd Flr Location 076 in Room 339 location of approx. 2Sf of mold growth above ceiling Figure 6 Div 1 3 rd Flr Legislature Area location 053 in Room 531 showing an area of approx. 25 SF of mold growth above ceiling Figure 7 Div 1 3 rd Flr Legislature Area Room 302, water damaged ceiling tiles Figure 8 Div 1 3 rd Flr Legislature Area Room 302, water damaged ceiling tiles

39 APPLICANT: ORANGE COUNTY, NEW YORK FIPS NO. FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY PHOTO SHEET CATEGORY: PW REF NO. Figure 9 Div 1 3 rd Flr Top of water damaged ceiling tiles in Legislature area Room 302 Figure 10 Div 1 3 rd Flr Leaking concrete joint that caused the water damaged ceiling tiles in Room 302 Figure 11 Div 2 3 rd Floor, Budget Room 3210 (Room 610) showing mold growth at bottom of wall Figure 12 Div 2 3 rd Floor, inside mechanical chase in room 3210

40 APPLICANT: ORANGE COUNTY, NEW YORK FIPS NO. FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY PHOTO SHEET CATEGORY: PW REF NO. Figure 13 Div2 3 rd Flr showing hatch entrance in south wall of mech chase Room 3211GA (Room 604) Figure 14 Div 2 3 rd Floor Budget area showing mold growth along bottom of wall in Room 3207GA Figure 15 Div 2 3 rd Flr Location 005 an area of mold growth within wall cavity at east wall of Room 3207GA Figure 16 Div 2 3 rd Flr Location 005 Visible mold growth inside wall cavity south wall of 3207GA

41 APPLICANT: ORANGE COUNTY, NEW YORK FIPS NO. FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY PHOTO SHEET CATEGORY: PW REF NO. Figure 17 Div 2 3 rd Flr Room 3230GA. Inspection hole with approximately 1 SF of mold growth inside wall Figure 18 Div 2 3 rd Flr Room 3230GA Location 012 showing small localized area of mold growth inside wall from roof leak Figure 19 Div 2 3 rd Flr Water damaged drywall in mech. chase behind Women s Room 626 Figure 20 Div 2 3 rd Flr Women s Room 626 mechanical chase with water damaged drywall and mold on pipe ins.

42 APPLICANT: ORANGE COUNTY, NEW YORK FIPS NO. FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY PHOTO SHEET CATEGORY: PW REF NO. Figure 21 Div 2 3 rd Flr water damaged ceiling tiles and approx. 2 SF of mold growth above ceiling drywall Figure 22 Div 2 3 rd Flr, Personnel Room 3230G location 013 water damaged bulkhead with mold growth inside Figure 23 Div 2 3 rd Flr Room 3230G location 015 visible mold growth on ceiling drywall Figure 24 Div 2 3 rd Flr, location 016 area of mold growth inside wall cavity above entrance to Room 3222G

43 APPLICANT: ORANGE COUNTY, NEW YORK FIPS NO. FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY PHOTO SHEET CATEGORY: PW REF NO. Figure 25 Div 2 3 rd Flr, Room 3232G showing water damaged ceiling tiles in this area Figure 26 Div 2 3 rd Flr, Room 3233G showing water damaged and mold impacted ceiling tiles in this area Figure 27 Div 2 3 rd Flr, Room 3233G showing mold impacted area on top of a single ceiling tile in this area Figure 28 Division 3 3 rd Flr location 033 hatch with visible mold growth above ceiling

44 APPLICANT: ORANGE COUNTY, NEW YORK FIPS NO. FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY PHOTO SHEET CATEGORY: PW REF NO. Figure 29 Div 3 3 rd Flr Law Library showing area of damaged ceiling above bookshelf Figure 30 Div 3 3 rd Flr Law Library showing area of mold growth above damaged ceiling above bookshelf in Fig 29 Figure 31 Div 3 3 rd Flr Law Library Conference Room Figure 32 Div 3 3 rd Flr Law Library area of mold growth above ceiling of conference room seen in Fig 31

45 APPLICANT: ORANGE COUNTY, NEW YORK FIPS NO. FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY PHOTO SHEET CATEGORY: PW REF NO. Figure 33 Div 3 3 rd Flr, leaking roof drain above conference room of Law Library Figure 34 Div 3 3 rd Flr hatch in NE corner of Law Library Figure 34 Div 3 3 rd Flr mold growth on drywall above ceiling adjacent to hatch in Figure 34 Figure 35 Div 3 3 rd Flr Area of approximately 25 SFG of visible mold growth above ceiling of SE corner of Law Library

46 APPLICANT: ORANGE COUNTY, NEW YORK FIPS NO. FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY PHOTO SHEET CATEGORY: PW REF NO. Figure 36 Div 3 3 rd Flr Area of water damaged ceiling in corridor outside Room 925 Figure 37 Div 3 3 rd Flr Area of mold growth above ceiling of water damaged area seen in Figure 36 at entr. To Room 925 Figure 38 Div 3 1 st Flr Area of mold growth at bottom of south wall of Room 704 Figure 39 Div 3 1 st Flr Area of mold growth inside wall at bottom of south wall of Room 704

47 APPLICANT: ORANGE COUNTY, NEW YORK FIPS NO. FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY PHOTO SHEET CATEGORY: PW REF NO. Figure 40 Div 3 1 st Flr Perimeter pipe trench under Room 704 looking west Figure 41 Div 3 1 st Flr Entrance to perimeter pipe trench Figure 42 Div 3 1 st Flr Entrance to perimeter pipe trench Figure 43 Div 3 1 st Flr Perimeter pipe trench under Room 704 looking west

48 APPLICANT: ORANGE COUNTY, NEW YORK FIPS NO. FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY PHOTO SHEET CATEGORY: PW REF NO. Figure 44 Div 3 1 st Flr District Attorney area sump location in sunken floor Figure 45 Div 3 1 st Flr District Attorney area underside of plywood deck Figure 46 Div 3 1 st Flr District Attorney area mold growth in dust on return diffuser entrance to Room 743 Figure 46 Div 3 1 st Flr Small area of visible mold growth <1 SF beneath floor of Room 742

49 APPLICANT: ORANGE COUNTY, NEW YORK FIPS NO. FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY PHOTO SHEET CATEGORY: PW REF NO. Figure 47 Div 3 1 st Area beneath sunken floor of Room 742 showing height of water beneath flkoor Figure 48 Div 3 1 st Area beneath sunken floor of Room 742 Figure 49 Div 3 1 st Room 707 showing visible mold growth on drywall above ceiling. Figure 50 Div 3 1 st Room 707 mold growth on pipe insulation above ceiling

50 APPLICANT: ORANGE COUNTY, NEW YORK FIPS NO. FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY PHOTO SHEET CATEGORY: PW REF NO. Figure 51 Div 3 1 st Room 714 visible mold growth on exterior of flex duct above ceiling Figure 52 Div 3 1 st Room 714 visible mold growth on exterior of flex duct above ceiling Figure 53 Div 3 1 st Room 714 visible mold growth on exterior of flex duct and pipe insulation above ceiling Figure 54 Div 3 1 st Room 716 visible mold growth on exterior of uninsulated duct

51 APPLICANT: ORANGE COUNTY, NEW YORK FIPS NO. FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY PHOTO SHEET CATEGORY: PW REF NO. Figure 55 Div 3 1 st Room 719 Hatch entrance above ceiling Figure 56 Div 3 1 st Area of visible mold growth adjacent to hatch seen in Figure 55 Figure 57 Div 3 1 st Area of visible mold growth on pipe insulation and insulation adjacent to hatch seen in Figure 55 Figure 58 Div 3 1 st Room 714 return air intake at south wall

52 APPLICANT: ORANGE COUNTY, NEW YORK FIPS NO. FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY PHOTO SHEET CATEGORY: PW REF NO. Figure 59 Div 1 2 nd Flr Room 513 mold impacted ceiling tiles Figure 60 Div 3 1 st Flr View of interior of flex duct above ceiling of Room 714 near entrance. To Room 715 Figure 61 Leaking roof drain above mechanical chase behind Budget Room 3210 Figure 62 Div 2 3 rd Flr Typical leak through concrete in Room 301

53 DATE OF REPORT: February 1, 2012 FIELD REPORT BUILDING CONDITION ASSESSMENT DATE OF VISIT: January 28 & 31, 2012 PROPERTY: ORANGE COUNTY GOVERNMENT BUILDING ADDRESS: 255 Main Street, Goshen, New York COORDINATES: , APPLICANT: ORANGE COUNTY, NEW YORK APPLICANT ID: OBSERVER: (b)(6) (b)(6) (b)(6) State of New York SEMO State of New York SEMO Adjusters International Ken Oliver FEMA Project Specialist Steve Meredith FEMA Project Specialist PURPOSE: Verify Potential Storm Damage Water Infiltration Analysis (Limited to Below Locations Only) (A) - South Side Utility Trench Division 3, First Floor (B) - Corridor Division 2, First Floor PREPARED BY: Ken Oliver, Architect SUMMARY ANALYSIS AND CONCLUSIONS (A) - Water Infiltration - South Side Utility Trench Division 3, First Floor It has been observed that there has been frequently occurring water infiltration into the mechanical piping chases below the first floor concrete slab in Division 3. There are two distinct and separate chases that are not connected below the first floor. The piping chase on the north side of the building appears to remain dry and there is no apparent water leakage. The piping chase on the south side of the building appears to be problematic and at various times there is

54 either standing or free flowing water in the chase (RE: Photo #1). Another FEMA Project Specialist, Thomas Schuelke, was previously assigned to look at the water in the piping chase and to determine the cause of the water infiltration. His conclusions are captured in his report filed January 27, He concluded that if the water was not originating either from the startup of the chiller or from an increase in domestic water consumption, then most likely it is caused by ground water infiltration into the piping chase. During our site inspection, the pipe chase did contain a small amount of water along the bottom. During previous inspections the chase was completely dry. Since the chiller has been shut down and there has not been a noticeable increase in domestic water consumption, we concentrated are investigation solely around ground water infiltration. We looked into all of the areas of the upstream access points of the piping chase and finalized our investigation at the location where a temporary sump pump was located, the lowest point of elevation in the chase. This final access point is located in a short corridor between Rooms 704 and 705. This final termination point of the piping chase run is also adjacent to an exterior concrete and masonry wall which is located below grade. At the very end of the piping chase there is a small permanent wall mounted floor drain that is normally used to drain water out of the chase (RE: Photo #2). It is assumed that the piping from this drain is connected to the storm water drainage system at some point. It is possible that ground water is coming into the pipe chase via this drain piping caused by heavy rains and surface run-off. The exterior concrete block wall near the piping chase termination point was cracked and broken. Directly at the finished grade level, the decorative concrete block was broken exposing the open interior cells to the weather (RE: Photo # 3). Also, at this location the finished grade slopes toward the building and the broken concrete block. It is obvious that surface water run-off will migrate down through the block into the concrete floor slab below that houses the piping chase. It appears that the broken concrete block wall and the lack of positive storm water drainage away from the building was not damage caused by the declared disasters. Proper maintenance and proper site drainage would most likely prevent any future water infiltration into the piping chase located at the south side of the first floor of Division 3. (B) - Water Infiltration - Corridor Division 2, First Floor It has been observed that there has been frequently occurring ponding water on the concrete floor in the corridor just north of the electrical switchgear Room 402 (RE: Photo # 4). The ponding water seems to appear right after a new rain storm and then dries up later. Above this area in the open ceiling cavity above, there is evidence of an extensive amount of rusting of various galvanized mechanical ducts and electrical conduits that run through this space (RE: Photo # 5). During the time of the site visits, it was observed that a large piece of plastic sheathing had been recently placed underneath the above building components to capture new

55 water infiltration that was coming into the space from overhead; the water captured in the sheathing was finally being collected in a large trash container below (RE: Photo # 4). On the east side of the concrete block corridor wall is a long linear mechanical duct chase that runs parallel with the corridor. At the bottom of this concrete block wall there is evidence of damaged to the mortar bed joint to the first course above the concrete floor slab where the water ponding occurs. Mechanical ducts in the chase showed significant rusting from water infiltration (RE: Photo # 6). The rusted ducts are located in the same exact area where the water ponding occurs. An earlier assumption was made that the water infiltration into the first floor corridor space may somehow be coming down from overhead from either the roof drainage system or roofing membrane directly above this area of the building and migrating into the space. Division 2 consists of a three-story concrete framed building structure with a concrete roof deck. A thorough inspection was made of the roof drain piping system and routing in this area from the roof down to the first floor; the inspection procedures included looking into ceiling cavities, mechanical chases, wall cavities and adjacent rooms. There was no evidence of recent damage or water leakage that was observed to these systems and in these spaces. It was later determined that directly above the corridor area, where the ponding water occurred, there is no second or third floors of the building as assumed, but actually an open exterior plaza leading into the second floor building entry (RE: Photo # 7). It was observed that there was a major crack and hole in the concrete steps, separation between the tread and riser, leading up to the plaza (RE: Photos # 8, # 9). It is obvious that rain water will sheet off the concrete plaza and steps and migrate down through the concrete slab into the space below. Below the plaza and entry steps is the structural concrete slab that forms the ceiling of the corridor below where the ponding water was found. A second possible point of water leakage into the building is from storm water run-off and ponding against the adjacent low exterior concrete wall that separates the concrete plaza and steps from the finish grade and landscaping rocks (RE: Photo # 7). It appears that the crack in the concrete steps and the lack of positive storm water drainage away from the building was not damage caused by the declared disasters. Proper maintenance and proper site drainage would most likely prevent any future water infiltration into the first floor corridor of Division 2. END OF REPORT: ATTACHMENTS: Photos 1-9

56 PHOTO # 1 - TEMPORARY SUMP PUMP AT PIPING CHASE FIRST FLOOR, DIVISION 3

57 PHOTO # 2 PERMANENT FLOOR DRAIN IN PIPING CHASE FIRST FLOOR, DIVISION 3

58 PHOTO # 3 BROKEN DECORATIVE CONCRETE BLOCK AT GRADE (PIPING CHASE BELOW) OUTSIDE AND ABOVE FIRST FLOOR, DIVISION 3

59 (b)(6) PHOTO # 4 WATER PONDING AT FIRST FLOOR SLAB FIRST FLOOR, DIVISION 2

60 PHOTO # 5 RUSTED ELECTRICAL CONDUITS AND MECHANICAL DUCTS ABOVE CORRIDOR FIRST FLOOR, DIVISION 2

61 PHOTO # 6 RUSTED MECHANICAL DUCTS IN MECHANICAL CHASE FIRST FLOOR, DIVISION 2

62 (b)(6) PHOTO # 7 VIEW OF EXTERIOR PLAZA, WALL, ENTRY STEPS AND LANDSCAPE ROCKS SECOND FLOOR ENTRY PLAZA, DIVISION 2

63 PHOTO # 8 CRACKS AND SEPARATION IN EXTERIOR CONCRETE STEPS AT WALL SECOND FLOOR ENTRY PLAZA, DIVISION 2

64 (b)(6) (b)(6) (b)(6) PHOTO # 9 CLOSE-UP VIEW OF CRACKS IN EXTERIOR CONCRETE STEPS SECOND FLOOR ENTRY PLAZA, DIVISION 2

65 Electrical Damage Report DATE OF REPORT: January 31, 2012 LOCATION: Orange County Center ADDRESS: 255 Main Street, Goshen, New York COORDINATES: , APPLICANT: ORANGE COUNTY APPLICANT ID: PREPARER: (b)(6) r DR-4020-NY Critical Infrastructure Team: Estimator/Electrical Specialist PURPOSE: Verify potential damage to electrical systems of Orange County Government Center from Hurricane Irene The purpose of the visit was to address potential storm related damage to the electrical systems at the Orange County Government Center. The facility consists of three separate buildings (Division 1, Division 2, and Division 3) with each Division having three floors. The main electrical room for the entire facility is located on the first floor of Division 2. Observations: Division 1: First Floor Mechanical Room #119: Contains electrical equipment to supply air handlers and emergency generator and transfer switch. Visual inspection of electrical components show no apparent event related damage. Electrical equipment was energized and functioning at the time of inspection. Elevator Equipment Room: Contains electrical equipment to supply power to elevator. Visual inspection of electrical components show no apparent event related damage. 1

66 Electrical equipment was energized and functioning, as well as the elevator at the time of inspection. Electrical Room #114A: Contains distribution panels LP-1-1, LP1-1A both 120/208V three phase and one 112 ½ KVA 480V to 120/208V Dry Type Transformer three phase. Visual inspection of electrical components show no apparent event related damage. Electrical equipment was energized and functioning at the time of inspection. Division 1: Second Floor Electrical Room #209: Contains distribution panels LP-1-2, LP1-2A both 120/208V three phase and H1 480/277V three phase. One 42 circuit residential load center 120/208V single phase has been installed for computer circuits. Visual inspection of electrical components show no apparent event related damage. Electrical equipment was energized and functioning at the time of inspection. Division 1: Third Floor Electrical Room #348: Contains distribution panels LP-1-3, LP1-3A both 120/208V three phase and MCDP 480/277V three phase. Visual inspection of electrical components show no apparent event related damage. Electrical equipment was energized and functioning at the time of inspection. Division 2: First Floor Main Electrical Room #416: Contains 4000 amp General Electrical switchboard and panel EMDP both 480/277V three phase. Flood water reached a level of 40 in Room #416 damaging a 600 amp and 400 amp fused switch insert in the main 4000 amp switch board. At the time of inspection the Applicant had employed an electrical contractor and repaired the eligible event damage. The Applicant has supplied invoicing for the described work. Invoicing states that the electrical contractor meggar tested the main switchboard and found it safe to be energized. 2

67 One 112 ½ KVA Dry Type Transformer 480V to 120/208V three phase is located in Room #416 on a raised concrete pedestal. This unit was above flood water depth and sustained no damage. One 1/4hp sump pump in the room #416 failed during the event. The Applicant has supplied invoicing for the pump replacement All Electrical equipment was energized and functioning at the time of inspection. Chiller Room # 404: Contains electrical equipment to supply power to Chillers and associated equipment. Visual inspection of electrical components show no apparent event related damage. Electrical equipment was energized and functioning at the time of inspection. Boiler Room # 404: Contains electrical equipment to supply power to Boiler pumps and associated equipment. Two 3HP pump motors and associated control equipment were damaged by the event. The Applicant has supplied invoicing for replacement of this equipment. Visual inspection of electrical components show no apparent event related damage, other than above noted pumps. Electrical equipment was energized and functioning at the time of inspection. Building Maintenance Offices: Fire Alarm Control Panel s are located in this area and sustained no apparent event related damage. Facility Fire Alarm System was energized and function at the time of inspection Elevator Equipment Room located in Building Maintenance Offices: Contains electrical equipment to supply power to elevator. Visual inspection of electrical components show no apparent event related damage. Electrical equipment was energized and functioning, as well as the elevator at the time of inspection. Division 2: Second Floor: Electrical Room #532: Contains distribution panels LP-1-2, LP1-2A both 120/208V three phase and H2 480/277V three phase. Visual inspection of electrical components show no apparent event related damage. 3

68 Electrical equipment was energized and functioning at the time of inspection. Electrical Room for computer power located adjacent on the elevator. Contains distribution panels CP-1, CP-2A both 120/208V three phase and MP-1 480/277V three phase. One 75 KVA K-Rated 480V to 120/208V three phase Dry Type Transformer. Note: This equipment has been added for computer power and not displayed on the original electrical drawings. Visual inspection of electrical components show no apparent event related damage. Electrical equipment was energized and functioning at the time of inspection. Division 2: Third Floor: Electrical Room #632: Contains distribution panels LP-2-3, LP-2-3A both 120/208V three phase. One 75 KVA 480V to 120/208V three phase Dry Type Transformer. Visual inspection of electrical components show no apparent event related damage. Electrical equipment was energized and functioning at the time of inspection. Division 3: First Floor: Electrical Room #732: Contains distribution panels LP-3-1, LP3-1A,ELP-3-all 120/208V three phase and DP-3 800A 480/277V three phase. One 225 KVA 480V to 120/208V three phase Dry Type Transformer. Visual inspection of electrical components show no apparent event related damage. Electrical equipment was energized and functioning at the time of inspection. Elevator Equipment Room: Contains electrical equipment to supply power to elevator. 4

69 Visual inspection of electrical components show no apparent event related damage. Electrical equipment was energized and functioning, as well as the elevator at the time of inspection. Division 3: Second Floor: Electrical Room #821: Contains distribution panels LP-3-1, LP3-2A,LP-3-2,H-3a, and DP-3, all 120/208V three phase. Visual inspection of electrical components show no apparent event related damage. Electrical equipment was energized and functioning, as well as the elevator at the time of inspection Electrical Panels Halls: Second floor. Contains distribution panels 822, 836, 841, and 805 all 120/208V three phase. Visual inspection of electrical components show no apparent event related damage. Electrical equipment was energized and functioning, as well as the elevator at the time of inspection Division 3: Third Floor: Electrical Room #914: Contains distribution panels LP-3A, LP-33 both 120/208V three phase. Visual inspection of electrical components show no apparent event related damage. Electrical equipment was energized and functioning, as well as the elevator at the time of inspection. Electrical Panels Halls Third Floor: Contains distribution panels 939 and 946 both 120/208V three phase. Visual inspection of electrical components show no apparent event related damage. Electrical equipment was energized and functioning, as well as the elevator at the time of inspection Roof Electrical Equipment Cooling Tower and Air Handling Penthouse: Contains electrical equipment for cooling tower pumps and penthouse air handling equipment. Visual inspection of electrical components show no apparent event related damage. Electrical equipment was energized and functioning, as well as the elevator at the time of inspection. 5

70 Orange County Government Center 255 Main Street Goshen, New York Orange County 01/03/2012 Date of Report 01/28/2012 Date of Photos Report prepared by: (b)(6) (b)(6) Exterior of Building - General Observations: Division 1: (start at the south west corner of the building near the Building Closed banner & progresses eastward) 1. The Orange County Government Center facility is constructed with split ribbed block with horizontal concrete bands at the parapets, floors and cantilevers. Very little of the poured in place concrete foundation is exposed. 2. In most cases weep holes were visible at the bottom of the split ribbed block wall at the foundation/foundation ledge juncture. In some locations the landscape materials were placed such that the weeps were not visible. Where visible, these weeps were consistently 32 O.C. and located in the starter bed joint. 3. The split ribbed block cladding is severely discolored and caused by the lamp black additive in the ballast pavers on the roof (Refer: Roof System General Observations report dated 1/30/2012). This discoloring is typical and located on most exterior walls of this building. The upper portions of the walls show more discoloration. 4. Moisture is conspicuous between joints of concrete soffit material and the horizontal concrete band at the cantilevers. 5. Metal flashing materials were observed at some joints between split ribbed block and horizontal structural concrete bands and not at other locations. Same issue applies to the metal flashing under the window units. It is possible that the metal flashing was trimmed short and it is not visible but this seems unlikely. This is typical throughout the exterior face of the building. 6. Cantilevered portions of horizontal structural concrete bands show evidence of deterioration (creep) as heavy steel angle irons installed in several locations. 7. Steel rebar protruding ¾ out from foundation wall coated with clear silicone sealant was observed in several locations. The joint between the foundation and split ribbed block is caulked with clear silicone and offers very little protection from the elements (north side and west of Motor Vehicle tags entrance). 8. Glazing units are steel framed and in all cases the original putty has dried, cracked and in some cases missing. Maintenance over the years has included elastomeric, latex and clear silicone caulking materials applied with poor quality control. The steel frame is rusting out due to exposure to the elements for many years. Deferred maintenance is definitely an issue. 9. A wall mounted intake grille (3-4 x 2-4 ) is severely rusted.

71 OCGC Building Exterior Report Continued: 10. The overhead expansion joint (approximately ¾ wide) and caulking material located at the connection bridge soffit between Division 1 and Division 2 has deteriorated and/or separated due to building movement and possibly the use of incorrect material for this application. It also appears as if there is no backer rod behind the caulking. The concrete soffit shows hairline cracks, efflorescence at cracks and soffit area as well as along the expansion joint. 11. The concrete stair system shows movement, expansion joints with caulking opened up and steps are cracked and separating at the concrete tread heel. 12. Horizontal concrete bands at second floor show signs of efflorescence. The concrete bands show rust stains where the steel reinforcement was placed too close to the concrete surface. Building Codes call for a minimum of ¾ of concrete cover above ground and 1-½ of cover below grade. Division 2: (start at SW corner at chiller intake grille) 13. The chiller intake grille (11-4 x SW corner) is rusted and the horizontal concrete band above and the split ribbed block below are discolored from water drainage coming off the roof. 14. Severe block discoloration was observed on the west side of building. 15. Metal flashing materials noticed at some joints between split ribbed block and horizontal structural concrete bands and not at other locations. The same issue applies to the metal flashing under the window units. It is possible that the metal flashing was trimmed short and it is not visible but this seems unlikely. This is typical throughout the exterior face of the building. 16. The soffit at the third floor cantilever ( NW corner) is wet, cracked and appears to have efflorescence around the cracks. 17. The coping (roof membrane) at parapet wall is severely discolored as is the horizontal concrete band just below and the split ribbed concrete block below the band on the north end at stairwell entry. 18. The vertical concrete wall and horizontal concrete band show signs of deterioration and patching above stairwell entry (see note #17 above). 19. The split ribbed block (bottom course) and concrete entry slab (see note #18 above) show signs of rust discoloration caused by the rusting of the entry door frame. 20. On the south side of east wall bump out, one of the steel framed double strength plate glass units was removed and a new aluminum frame, mullions and glazing units (3 each-noninsulated) was installed. The right side frame vertical joint at wall was filled with under sized backer rod which was dangling in the breeze. No caulking at this joint was observed. Just below the window unit right side, where split ribbed block tees into split ribbed block clad concrete column, a wall mounted electrical box with 1-½ conduit runs into the vertical joint. The joint is packed with Styrofoam and protrudes about 4 out from the wall. Caulking at this joint was not evident. 21. The concrete soffit at window head (to right of window noted in #20 above) is discolored, steel window frame rusted and caulking material is dried, cracked and compromised. 22. Concrete beam deterioration noted with bottom edge spalls and reinforcement exposed leaving rust stains on the concrete face. 23. Severe split ribbed block discoloration on east face of building.

72 OCGC Building Exterior Report Continued: Division 3: (start at SW corner) 24. Four sleeved expansion bolts (severely rusted) penetrate the split ribbed block and blew out an 18 portion of rib. 25. The horizontal concrete beam above the closed off south side exit door has a blown out section of concrete at corner (4 x 8 x ¼ ) with exposed steel reinforcement. There are 7 evenly spaced vertical rust stains to the right of the blown out corner all exhibiting exposed steel reinforcement. 26. To the left of this closed off exit door is a large glazing unit set in a steel frame. The upper left corner of frame is recessed 1-¼ under the concrete soffit and the upper right corner is recessed 3 so window unit is set askew in the opening. 27. The covered concrete grand jury entry bridge/stair/landing/wall system (SW side) has deteriorated badly over the years. The long span support slab is cracked, the concrete is cracked and hanging at the bottom edge and the steel reinforcement is exposed and rusting badly in several locations. Stair nosing s are severely cracked right at the nosing reinforcement and are in danger of breaking off. This entry stair system has undergone several significant repairs over the years with some successful and some not so successful. 28. A long concrete roof system covers the grand jury stair entry. The support columns have heavy duty steel connection plates attached where the roof support beam meets the columns. These plates are on both sides of two support columns. Any damages at the column junction could not be observed. 29. Severe split ribbed block discoloration exists on the east side of building. 30. Severe split ribbed block discoloration exists on the north side of building including the concrete soffits. 31. The wall surface at northwest corner of building near the 1990 building addition is discolored and wet. The following observations are taken from the main roof surface and include the building elements that rise above the main roof. These observations are not specific to any of the 3 building divisions but apply to all. 32. The horizontal joint between the bottom of the concrete parapet and the top of the split ribbed block has been sealed (toweled on) with an elastomeric sealant. 33. The split ribbed block is discolored severely in many locations (Refer: note #3 above) 34. The concrete band at the parapets has exposed steel reinforcement with rust stains at many locations. 35. The steel frames at glazing units are rusting and the original putty is dried, cracked and missing at all units. No attempt was made to document each and every deficiency on the exterior of the facility. None of the conditions which were observed or noted in this report were related to the disaster event and none appeared to have been made substantially worse by the event. The condition of the building exterior appears to indicate questionable construction quality, poor design detailing and a long history of poor maintenance practices, End of Repot

73 FEMA Task Order 12-J-0001 (4020-NY) ARCHITECTURAL BUILDING INSPECTION ASSESSMENT AND REPORT Orange County Government Center 255 Main Street, Goshen NY February 15, 2012 Page 1

74 INDEX and TABLE OF CONTENTS I. BACKGROUND AND BUILDING HISTORY II. EXISTING CONDITIONS III. ARCHITECTURAL INSPECTION S AND WEATHER EVENTS DAMAGE I. BACKGROUND AND BUILDING HISTORY IV. CONCLUSIONS Page 2

75 I. BACKGROUND AND BUILDING HISTORY This report is a visual building condition architectural assessment with emphasis on the storm caused damage on behalf of FEMA in response to claims by the Orange County Government for the Orange County Government Building. The building was constructed in 1967 and designed by The Architect Paul Rudolph. The building size is approximately 160,000 square feet of space separated into three components called Divisions that are connected by corridors and are grouped around a center courtyard. The building s structure is reinforced concrete with two way reinforced floor and roof slabs and rectangular concrete columns and shear caps. The perimeter walls are predominantly split concrete block cavity walls. Large light monitors throughout the building extend above the roof to bring light into the interior. The building predates the energy crisis and mandates on energy consumption, as well as, ADA laws of the 1990 s. Hence these later enhancements are not apparent in the present building. The general opinion of the assessment team based on visual evidence and lack of building documentation is that the building has had few significant upgrades over the years. It is surmised that the roof was replaced at some time and the previous reports by the Owner s consultants indicate that structural work was done in the 1990 s, the records, documents, and construction records are not available. Modifications to the building observed are deviations from the original plans and are predominately interior re-arrangement of offices and service spaces from the original drawings and again no documentation was available. From the previous reports by the Owners Consultants representatives dated August 16, 2011, September 9, 2011, and November 2011, as well as, complaints from the Owners, employees, and published newspaper articles documents the building s long history of roof leaking and water penetration into the interior of the building that predates the storms. The extreme weather events of tropical storms Irene on August 28, 2011 and Lee on September 5,6,7, and 8 produced large amounts of water and wind in rapid secession on the building structure and site overwhelming the existing building envelope, especially the roof. II. EXISTING CONDITIONS A. Existing Building Structure and Envelope Prior to FEMA s site assessment, the assessment team received the previous assessment reports by the county s consultants. Further, in meetings with the County the assessment team requested the records of major site, building envelope, and equipment repairs or replacement drawings including records of the roof repair, replacement, and warranties. The county indicated that these records were not available from the files. 1. Structural Roof System Floor and roof slabs are two way reinforced concrete slab 6 inches thick. Keys between the slab and vertical walls were observed in some areas on the construction documents but in general no expansion joints or construction joints were shown. General industry standards at the time construction documents were prepared did not show concrete demarcation lines (cold joints) between the horizontal and vertical pours. These items were relegated to the shop drawings Page 3

76 to allow the contractor to control the extent and size of the concrete pours during construction. These drawings would of been reviewed by the project s architects and engineers and when approved formed the final basis for the installation. The approved shop drawings were not available for review. The reinforcing was extended vertically from the horizontal slabs and cast with the vertical wall to form the light well walls but the junction between the vertical and horizontal concrete was a cold joint. There was no evidence of a water bar installed between the horizontal slab and vertical wall. The lack of this element and the method of installing the roof figures prominently in the water infiltration problem and efflorescent described in the architectural narrative and photographs. 2. Building Foundation System From the Owner furnished documentation, The foundation is a combination of spread footing, grade beams and columns. There was no evidence of slab settlement at the lowest levels as a result of the flooding and the building structure is intact. The Owner s consultant reports indicate that in their opinion modifications and component replacement is required for the roof slabs and their components. However,the visual inspection revealed that the storms did not compromise the existing structural systems and the roof is in basically the same condition as it was prior to the storms. 3. Building Exterior Wall Construction and Flashing: In general and based on the building s construction documents, the exterior walls are cavity walls 10 inches to 14 inches thick with split faced concrete block on the exterior and either split faced, plain concrete block, or cast in place concrete on the interior. The walls show a two (2 ) cavity with 1 solid insulation terminating near the roof with plastic flashing at the bottom of the cavity wall and weep holes ( to drain the cavity ) extending to the outside. The first weak link in the integrity of the wall is the base flashing. It is called plastic in the documents and very well might be an early pvc product called Neverstal in general use in the late 1960 s and early 1970 s. The product is dimensionally unstable ( it shrinks) and becomes brittle over time. Because of this flashing there is reason to believe that the existing cavity wall flashing today is non- functional. C. Roof System and Drains The waterproofing layer of the existing roof system is a loose laid membrane roof over 2 inches of rigid insulation and utilizing 2 inches of light weight concrete fill below the insulation poured directly on the structural concrete deck. The ballast is 2 inches thick concrete block approximately 12 inches square with drainage grooves, set tightly together, and dyed black. The ballast has a high absorption rate, stays wet, and breaks up during the normal freeze thaw cycles. More to the point, the ballast fills the available roof area available to contain water. As a result during the storm or a large rain event the saturated roof flood over the cap flashing, down the fascia and the dye from the block is leached out and drips down the exterior wall indicating the black stain is a result of the roof overflow. The Page 4

77 absence of this condition at the rest of the walls below the third floor further point to the roof overflow as the cause. Drains are predominantly located at the roof to vertical wall intersections with some drains scattered in the open roof area. The roof drainage utilizes scuppers on the high roofs which drain to lower roofs and at the lower roof again scuppers drain to the main roof where roof drains pick up the water. III. ARCHITECTURAL INSPECTIONS AND WEATHER EVENTS DAMAGE A. Exterior Envelope Damage (1). Building Roofs and Roof Flashing The present condition of the roof was pre-existing prior to the storm events in August and September An inspection of the third floors of Divisions 1,2 and 3 found little interior water in the ceilings. Although the existing roof is marginally functional having a history of leaking, the most prevalent areas of damage occurred at the joint in the roof slab to vertical walls and in hair line cracks in the structural slabs themselves. The leaks here are manifest on the interior as efflorescent stains. This staining occurred on a regular basis before the storm but the amount of water in the storm intensified the water infusion through these cracks. To track the water paths from the roof the following illustrations taken from the construction drawings show the potential paths of water [Exhibit A]. The storms increased the pressure on these areas and all other weak points in the walls where water can migrate into the interior. There are many roof to wall flashings which on inspection lack the proper flashing techniques required for water seals.in addition the growth of moss at the wall roof junctions, drains, and pavers indicate accumulated standing water on the roof. ( PHOTOS: A-8,A-9,A-10,A-11,A-12,A-14,A-15) Given the condition of the roof, little actual damage of the interior due to the leaking roof was observed.. Most of the leaks are manifested as efflorescent stains. This staining has occurred on a regular basis before the storm but the amount of water in the storm intensified the water infusion through these cracks. (2). Roof Drains and Through Roof Piping Roof drains seem to be minimal and in poor condition. A few are located in the roof field but most are located at the junction of the vertical walls and the roof The roof is essentially flat. The condition of the existing roof drains, the overall lack of drains throughout the roof, lack of positive roof slopes, the inappropriate location of drains at walls, and the possible under sizing of the original drains all would reduce the ability of getting the water off the roof. (PHOTOS: A-20,A- 21,A-23,A-24,A-30,A-31,A-32,A-35) Page 5

78 There are numerous roof penetrations in the roof by drains, PVC vent piping, and electrical conduit that are not properly flashed by industry standards and will allow water to penetrate through the roof.(photos: A-32,A-33) (3). Walls Water intrusion into the interior from the roof occurs at the wall to roof slab intersection and at the hairline cracks in the structural slab.the walls themselves are in reasonable condition and only exhibit water and ballast dye stains at the third floor where the roof has overflowed.( PHOTOS: A-20,A-21,A-24,A-39) The attached illustrations taken from the actual construction documents and describe the potential paths of water into the building from the roof and walls Illustration 1. The lack of a cast in drip at the concrete fascia bottom or extension of the roof fascia over the wall below allows the water to travel down the fascia and migrate horizontally into the cavity wall. Wind and capillary action and horizontal winds serve as an enhanced water delivery system to the interior ( PHOTOS: A-10,A-11,A-18) Illustration 2. The poor installation and probable product failure of plastic flashing in the cavity wall allows the water to travel down the cavity and continue to the termination of the wall at the horizontal concrete slab. The water can then migrate horizontally and into the interior of the building( PHOTOS: A-19,A-20,A- 28,A29,A-30) Illustration 3. This detail is typical of the exposed rough formed concrete wall above the horizontal floor and roof slabs appearing throughout the facility. Although there is no cavity the wall has metal flashing. The flaw in this installation is that there is no horizontal water infusion protection from the roof in case of failure. Typically a continuous vertical water Bar is cast in the horizontal slab at the horizontal/vertical intersection (cold joint) blocking any water from entering the interior.(photos: A-12,A-25,A-26,A-27,A-28,A-29) The exterior walls are in good condition with little leaking through the wall to the interior, occurring at the wall to floor intersection. ( A-20) The wall staining is most apparent at the third floor walls below the roof. Here due to the incapacity of the roof to store water and the very low coping height at the roof edge the water overflows carrying the dye from the ballast paver down the face of the wall.(photo: A-39) Where the wall is protected by overhangs very little water and staining is observed ( PHOTOS: A-39,A-40) (4) Law Library and Adjacent Areas Evidence of leaking occurred in the Law Library and adjacent areas. The existing drawings indicate a mechanical equipment room on the roof above and one of Page 6

79 the exterior Mechanical Room walls crosses the area where the leaks occur. The deterioration of the wall /floor support beam traversing the space indicates either flooding in the mechanical room floor proper ( no water at the time of inspection) or in the vertical exterior wall above the beam at the roof. (PHOTO: A-13) (5). Electrical Switch Gear Vacant Transformer Room and Adjacent corridor Division 1 At the exterior stair landing between Unit 1 and 2 ( refer to the second floor plan Division 1) stairs between column lines 10,11, D, and E (PHOTO: A-2) a graded earth berm is sloped toward the paved landing. Water was standing on the pebble finished stair landing during the inspection. The construction joint between the landing slabs requires maintenance and there are water stains in this area from past water ponding. Under this area in the basement is the Electrical Switch Gear Room and adjacent former oil based transformer room now vacant. Water is entering the Electrical Switch Gear Room at the top of the wall (A-7). Although the landing is under cover at a higher level, the probable cause is the water getting below the landing slab and runoff from the adjacent berm which directs the water to the stair landing. In addition the leaks are present in the adjacent corridor ceiling, wall, and floor to the Switch Gear room (PHOTOS: A-4,A-5,A-6). It is not known how or to what extent the Switch Gear ceiling slab and walls were water proofed during construction or the method of doing it. (6). Internal Mechanical Piping Trenches, Valve Pits, and Sump Pump Pits Internally in the first floor of Division 3 (south side) there is a mechanical trench running along column line M between columns 2 to 7 that has water in it. The source could be external water from the grading or pipe leakage. Water bills were requested from the Country to see if possible pipe leaks could be inferred from the bills.(photo: A-1) On the north side of Division 3 further mechanical piping trenches are located started at column 7P and running east internally at the building perimeter to Column line 2 and turning south to column line O. These pits contained water and either there is leakage from the piping or ground water is seeping into the trenches. No details are available to determine if any of the trenches were water proofed during initial construction or if any foundation drainage was installed at the perimeter walls. In addition there are additional sump pits and access doors in the First Floor of Division 3 at the raised floor area in the Jury Selection Room at column lines 2 and 3 at Column line N, as well as, in the vicinity of the raised floor area at column P5. There was some water in these pits and it was not clear if these pits connect or what system they are a part of. IV CONCLUSIONS Page 7

80 The rain events of August and September 2011 overwhelmed an existing deteriorated roofing and insufficient pump systems. Below grade support spaces and pipe trenches were flooded and required pumping from an overwhelmed sump pump system. The deteriorated condition of the roof, drainage, and penetrations prior to the flood is the root cause of the subsequent problems in the interior space primarily on the third floor of all divisions.. The existing building ground floor elevations at grade and volume of water during the flood from the adjacent creek caused the flooding of the below grade service spaces. The stair landing above the of the Electrical Switch Gear Room, vacant transformer room, and adjacent corridors allowed water to seep into these spaces. Within the courtyard area the grading which is partially sloped to the building may be a contributing factor to the pipe trench flooding in the First Floor of Unit 3. Sloped grades to the north side of Unit 1 may contribute to the Electrical Switch Gear Room Flooding. The present roof depends on a single layer of roofing to protect the interior spaces and the system has failed to do that. Protection from water penetration should be provided at the last point of entry to the interior namely at the structural roof slab and vertical walls regardless of the type and composition of the final roof. The existing roof should be replaced and the amount and location of roof drains should be reconsidered. Suspected deteriorated cavity wall flashing, as well as, the apparent lack of weep holes potentially allow water in the wall to gather at the wall s base and infiltrate the building. Only one area of direct wall leaking on the floor at the interior was found.(photo: A-19). The walls are in good condition. If additional leaks on the floor develop, the walls should repaired at that actual leak location only. The vertical walls where not exposed to the third floor roof flooding showed little water absorption or staining and do not need to be replaced. (PHOTOS: A-16,A-17,A-38) Prevention of water Infusion to the lower service spaces should start with the removal of the existing stair landing slab, the area examined, and reconstructed as a watertight envelope forming the electrical Switch Gear room and adjacent spaces ceiling. The pipe trenches must have a reliable pumping system and a methods to deal with large water infiltrations as a result of protracted rain if the existing trenches and piping are to remain viable. The window systems weathered the storms in reasonable fashion with only a few water intrusion locations generally at the window heads. All the calking in the windows should be replaced. Page 8

81 Appendix A Photographs Page 9

82 (A-1) GROUND SLOPES TOWARD BUILDING AND AREA DRAIN. MECHANICAL PIPING TRENCH BEHIND WALL CONTAINS WATER. THE AREA DRAIN IS QUITE SMALL FOR THE AREA DRAINED AND SOME PONDING WAS DETECTED. (A-2) GROUND TO THE RIGHT OF THE STAIRS SLOPES TOWARD THE STAIR LANDING. STAIRS EXPOSED TO WEATHER AND CHANNELS WATER TO LANDING. UNDER LANDING IS THE ELECTRICAL SWITCH GEAR ROOM, THE FORMER TRANSFORMER VAULT, AND ADJACENT CORIDOR. WATER WAS STANDING ON THE LANDING AT THE LAST SITE VISIT. Page 10

83 (A-3) IN THE ELECTRCIAL SWITCH GEAR ROOM THE RESULTS OF THE WATER INTRUSION FROM THE SURFACE ABOVE ARE OBVIOUS. NOTE THE ORANGE HOSE IS DRAINING A SUMP PUMP THROUGHT THE TRANSFORMER VAULT (A-4) WATER HAS LEACHED DOWN THE WALL CORRODING METAL PANEL COVERS AND CONDUIT. MOST OF THE FLOOR IS COVERED WITH WATER DURING THE LAST SITE VISIT. THIS PHOTO WAS AFTER THE SECOND VISIT IT DURING A RAIN EVENT. Page 11

84 (A-5) THE CORRIDOR OUTSIDE THE SWITCH GEAR ROOM HAS WATER FROM THE SLAB UNDER THE STAIR LANDING ABOVE. SEE PHOTOGRAPH (A-4) (A-6) CORRIDOR CEILING AT THE LEAKING ROOF SLAB. Page 12

85 (A-7) THE ASSESMENT TEAM SUSPECTS THAT THE WATERPROOFING ON THE SWITCH GEAR ROOM ROOF SLAB ABOVE IS EITHER NON EXISTANT OR COMPROMISED. ALSO THE CALK JOINT IN THE SLAB ABOVE MAY BE THE JOINT BETWEEN MULTIPLE ROOF SLABS AND REQUIRES MAINGTENANCE.. THE LACK OF DOCUMENTS PREVENTS A FIRM CONCLUSION ON THE INITIAL WATERPROOFING DETAILS OF THE ROOF SLAB. HOWEVER, THE LEAKS INTO THIS ROOM ARE LONG STANDING. B. EXISTING WALL FLASHING AT ROOF Page 13

86 (A-8) TYPICAL CONDITION OF LACK OF FLASHING CONTUNITY AND POOR MAINTANENCE (A-9) POOR TRANSITION TO WALL/COPING JUNCTION AND OPEN AREA TO INSIDE WALL BELOW Page 14

87 (A-10) POORLY MAINTENANED JOINT AT ROOF SLAB TO WALL. LACK OF THROUGH WALL FLASHING. (A-11) ATTEMPTS TO CALK THE OVERSIZED JOINT (PHOTO: A-10) JOINT WITH A PUTTY LIKE CALKING. NOTE WEATHER WEAR ON TOP OF FINS Page 15

88 (A-12) INADEQUATE WALL FLASHING AT THE LIGHT MONITORS AND ROOF FAILURE AS WELL AS ALLOWING WATER TO MIGRATE INTO THE INTERIOR AT THE ROOF SLAB. (A-13) SUPPORT BEAM FOR MECHANICAL ROOM WALL ON ROOF. WATER INFUSION FROM EITHER THE EXTERIOR WALL ABOVE OR FLOOR FLOODING HAS DETERIORATED THE CONCRETE BEAM AND LEAKED WATER INTO THE LAW LIBRARY CEILING BELOW. Page 16

89 (A-14) CONCRETE FASCIA AND CALKING DETERIORATION AND COMPROMISED REINFORCING REQUIRES EXTENSIVE REPAIR AND PROBABLLE WINDOW AND FRAME REPLACEMENT. (A-15) POOR FLASHING JUNCTION NSTALLATION Page 17

90 (A-16) THE EXISTING DOCUMENTS INDICATE CAVITY WALL FLASHING. AND WEEP HOLES TO ALLOW THE WATER TO DRAIN FROM THE WALL. FEW WEEP HOLES ARE APPARENT IN THE EXTERIOR WALLS. (A-17) WALLS PROTECTED BY OVERHANGS AND NOT EXPOSED TO VERTICAL RAINS AND THE EFFECT OF ROOF WATER OVERFLOW DO NOT EXHIBIT THE WATER AND DYE SATURATED PATTERNS. WIND DRIVEN RAINS HAVE LESS OF A WALL SATURATED PATTERN OR THE PATTERN IS NON EXISTANT. Page 18

91 (A-18) SOME WALLS HAVE PROPER FLASHING AT THE COPING AND BETWEEN THE COPING AND WALL; HOWEVER WATER OVERFLOW PATTERNS INDICATE COMPROMISED FLASHING AND WATER INFILTRATION AT THE STRUCTURAL ROOF SLAB. (A-19) THERE IS SOME EVIDENCE THAT THE LACK OF CAVITY WALL FLASHING AT THE SUPPORT SLABS CONTRIBUTES TO LEAKING WALLS AND INFILTRATION AT THE INTERIOR FLOOR LEVELS. Page 19

92 (A-20) ROOF COPING TOO LOW, JOINTS NOT FLASHED OR MAINTAINED AND ROOF CANNOT DRAIN (A-21) ROOF OVERFLOW AS A RESULT THE ROOF S INABILITY TO HOLD WATER AND ABSENSE OF PROPERLY LOCATED ROOF DRAINS. NOTE THE BALLASTS WHICH HAVE BEEN REMOVED TO ATTERMPT TO DRAIN THE ROOF AND BALLAST DEBRIE AND DYE WHICH HAS LEACHED FROM THE PAVERS. Page 20

93 (A-22) THIS FASCIA AND THE BALLAST STAINS ARE THE RESULT OF WATER STAINING AS PER PHOTOGRAPH (A-21) ABOVE (b)(6) (A-23) BALLAST DETERIORATION IS DUE TO THE POUROUS NATURE OF THE BALLAST, WATER SATUARATION AND FREEZE THAW CYCLES. THIS CONDITION IS THOROUGHOUT THE MAJORITY OF ROOF AREAS.. Page 21

94 (A-24) BALLAST REMOVED TO PROVIDE A WATER PATH TO THE DRAIN. NOTICE THE COPING TOP IN REFERENCE TO THE BALLAST. (A-25) ROOFING WATERPROOFING HAS FAILED AND WATER HAS PENETRATED INTO THE STRUCTURAL SLAB AND ENTERED THE BUILDING THROGH THE CONSTRCUTION JOINT BETWEEN THE HORIZONTAL SLAB AND VERTICAL WALL Page 22

95 ` (A-26) FAILED ROOF SYSTEM AND HAIRLINE CRACKS IN STRUCTURAL SLAB ALLOWED WATER TO PENETRATE THE CRACK IN THE SLAB. (A-27) FAILURE OF THE CAVITY WALL FLASHING AIDED BY THE SLAB TO WALL JOINT AT THE ROOF DECK AND BELOW THE BEAM ENABLED WATER TO ENTER THE INTERIOR Page 23

96 (b)(6) (A-28) SCOPE OF THIS WATER PENETRATION TO THE INTERIOR MASONRY AT THE CAVITY WALL AND WALL JOINT BELOW THE ROOF IS THROUGHOUT THE ENTIRE STAIR AT THIS LEVEL (A-29) ENLARGED DETAIL OF (D-11) ABOVE Page 24

97 (A-30) MOST ROOF DRAINS ARE LOCATED AT THE BASE OF THE VERTICAL WALLS (b)(6) (A-31) THE HIGHER ROOFS ARE DRAINED BY SCUPPERS ON THE TO THE NEXT LOWEST ROOF AND FINALLY TO THE MAIN ROOF WHERE THE WATER IS PICKED UP BY THE WALL DRAINS AT THE LOWEST ROOF. THE SCUPPERS EJECT THEIR WATER CLOSE TO THE WALLS AND NO SPLASH BLOCKS ON THE MAIN ROOF TO MIGATE THE FORCE OF THE WATER HITTING THE ROOF DECK ARE INSTALLED. NOTE THE SCUPPER ON THE LEFT SIDE OF THE PHOTO. AND ONE OF THE FEW ROOF DRAINS LOCATED IN THE MAIN ROOF AREA. Page 25

APPLICANT: ORANGE COUNTY, NEW YORK

APPLICANT: ORANGE COUNTY, NEW YORK Figure 1 Div 1 3 rd Flr Leakage in County Executives Office Figure 2 Div 1 3 rd Flr Location 067 approximately 2 SF of visible mold growth above entrance to Room 341 Figure 3 Div 1 3 rd Flr Location 067

More information

Fungal Assessment. Smith Recreation Community Centre 1019 Hwy 2A, Smith, Alberta

Fungal Assessment. Smith Recreation Community Centre 1019 Hwy 2A, Smith, Alberta Top Q A DIVISION OF TOP QUALITY INSPECTIONS INC. Fungal Assessment Smith Recreation Community Centre 1019 Hwy 2A, Smith, Alberta 2012 P. O. B o x 8 3 0 2 4, E d m o n t o n, A B T 5 T 6 S 1 P h o n e :

More information

Old Dominion University Mold Management Plan

Old Dominion University Mold Management Plan OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH AND SAFETY 5255 Hampton Blvd. Spong Hall, suite 2501 Norfolk, Virginia 23529 Phone: (757) 683-4495 Fax: (757) 683-6025 Occupational Safety & Health Environmental Health Laboratory

More information

Mold Management Plan Operations & Maintenance

Mold Management Plan Operations & Maintenance Document #: SAFETY_015 Revision Date: October 4, 2010 Mold Management Plan Operations & Maintenance Developed by: Environmental Health & Safety Approved by: Associate VP of Facilities & Campus Services

More information

DIVISION 1 THIRD FLOOR COUNTY ATTORNEY. Remediation Plan Remove approximately 6 SF of mold impacted drywall Remove all carpeting in hatched.

DIVISION 1 THIRD FLOOR COUNTY ATTORNEY. Remediation Plan Remove approximately 6 SF of mold impacted drywall Remove all carpeting in hatched. Remediation Plan Remove approximately 6 SF of mold impacted drywall Remove all carpeting in hatched area followed by HEPA vacuum of floor Remove 2 SF of mold impacted drywall on ceiling Remove 2 SF of

More information

January 23, 2009 Reference No. 055643

January 23, 2009 Reference No. 055643 1412 Oakbrook Drive, Suite #180. Norcross, GA 30093 Telephone: (770) 441-0027 Fax: (770) 441-2050 www.craworld.com January 23, 2009 Reference No. 055643 Chief Deputy Stan Copland Douglas County Sheriffs

More information

University of Vermont

University of Vermont University of Vermont Department of Physical Plant Burlington, Vermont WATER INTRUSION GUIDELINES In accordance with: IIRC S500 IIRC S520 EPA Document 402-K-01-001 REVISED AND DISTRIBUTED BY: THE UNIVERSITY

More information

BUREAU OF ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH Emergency Response/Indoor Air Quality Program

BUREAU OF ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH Emergency Response/Indoor Air Quality Program BUREAU OF ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH Emergency Response/Indoor Air Quality Program Use of Moisture Measuring Devices in Evaluating Water Damage in Buildings July 2007 The evaluation of mold colonization of building

More information

DESERT RESEARCH INSTITUTE MOLD ASSESSMENT AND REMEDIATEION PROCEDURE

DESERT RESEARCH INSTITUTE MOLD ASSESSMENT AND REMEDIATEION PROCEDURE 1.0 Introduction DESERT RESEARCH INSTITUTE This Desert Research Institute (DRI) Mold Assessment and Remediation Procedure was established to assure that consistent and uniform information is provided to

More information

WATER DAMAGE INVESTIGATION. Massachusetts Department of Public Utilities 1 South Station Boston, Massachusetts

WATER DAMAGE INVESTIGATION. Massachusetts Department of Public Utilities 1 South Station Boston, Massachusetts WATER DAMAGE INVESTIGATION Massachusetts Department of Public Utilities 1 South Station Boston, Massachusetts Prepared by: Massachusetts Department of Public Health Bureau of Environmental Health Indoor

More information

KEY ELEMENTS IN PREVENTING AND MITIGATING MOLD CLAIMS

KEY ELEMENTS IN PREVENTING AND MITIGATING MOLD CLAIMS KEY ELEMENTS IN PREVENTING AND MITIGATING MOLD CLAIMS By Jerome E. Spear, CSP, CIH Effective January 1, 2005, consultants who prepare mold management plans for buildings located in Texas must be licensed

More information

Liabilities of Vented Crawl Spaces And Their Impacts on Indoor Air Quality in Southeastern U.S. Homes

Liabilities of Vented Crawl Spaces And Their Impacts on Indoor Air Quality in Southeastern U.S. Homes Liabilities of Vented Crawl Spaces And Their Impacts on Indoor Air Quality in Southeastern U.S. Homes Jonathan Coulter, Bruce Davis, Cyrus Dastur, Melissa Malkin-Weber and Tracy Dixon Advanced Energy,

More information

Guidelines for Mold Remediation (Removal)

Guidelines for Mold Remediation (Removal) Guidelines for Mold Remediation (Removal) Indoor mold growth, water damage, or musty odors should be addressed quickly. Removing mold growth and correcting the underlying cause of water accumulation can

More information

CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH Emergency Response/Indoor Air Quality Program

CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH Emergency Response/Indoor Air Quality Program CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH Emergency Response/Indoor Air Quality Program Guidance Concerning Remediation and Prevention of Mold Growth and Water Damage in Public Schools/Buildings to Maintain Air

More information

Arbor Heights Indoor Air Quality Investigation Interim Report

Arbor Heights Indoor Air Quality Investigation Interim Report Arbor Heights Indoor Air Quality Investigation Interim Report Arbor Heights Elementary PTSA 3701 SW 104 Street Seattle, WA 98146 ENVIROTEST RESEARCH INC. 1108 NE 200 th, St. Suite 100 Shoreline, WA 98155-1136

More information

Prestige Home Inspection LLC

Prestige Home Inspection LLC Cover Page Prestige Home Inspection LLC IAC2/ESA - Mold Assessment and Water Damage Report 555 W. Brook ave., Client's town MI, 48059 Inspection prepared for: Client's name Inspection Date: 10/15/2012

More information

Mold Response and Remediation Plan

Mold Response and Remediation Plan 1.0 Policy Statement The University of New Haven has developed a mold response and remediation plan in accordance with best practices set forth by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Occupational

More information

(4020-NY) ARCHITECTURAL BUILDING INSPECTION ASSESSMENT AND REPORT

(4020-NY) ARCHITECTURAL BUILDING INSPECTION ASSESSMENT AND REPORT FEMA Task Order 12-J-0001 (4020-NY) ARCHITECTURAL BUILDING INSPECTION ASSESSMENT AND REPORT Orange County Government Center 255 Main Street, Goshen NY February 15, 2012 1 INDEX and TABLE OF CONTENTS I.

More information

bout your HOUSE before you start Renovating Your Basement Moisture Problems

bout your HOUSE before you start Renovating Your Basement Moisture Problems A bout your HOUSE before you start Renovating Your Basement Moisture Problems CE 28 c Condensation of cold surfaces, efflorescence Water leak in corner on floor Mold and decay on floor joists and sill

More information

MOLD RESPONSE AND REMEDIATION PLAN

MOLD RESPONSE AND REMEDIATION PLAN MOLD RESPONSE AND REMEDIATION PLAN Prepared By: Triumvirate Environmental Developed: April 2011 Last Revised: March 2015 Program Approval Associate Vice President of Public Safety & Administrative Services

More information

Supplemental Investigation Summary Report

Supplemental Investigation Summary Report 130 Liberty Street New York, New York Supplemental Investigation Summary Report Visual Mold Inspection Summary Prepared for: Lower Manhattan Development Corporation One Liberty Plaza, 20 th Floor, New

More information

bout your house before you start Renovating Your Basement Moisture Problems

bout your house before you start Renovating Your Basement Moisture Problems A bout your house CE 28c before you start Renovating Your Basement Moisture Problems Mold and decay on floor joists and sill plates Stuffy air, high humidity, poor air circulation Water draining in from

More information

PROPERTY INSPECTION OR ASSESSMENT OF DAMAGES

PROPERTY INSPECTION OR ASSESSMENT OF DAMAGES PROPERTY INSPECTION OR ASSESSMENT OF DAMAGES ADDRESS: 123 MAIN ST MIAMI, FL CLIENT: BUYER ID No: 2014193 DATE: 5/13/2014 INSPECTION OR ASSESSMENT BY: GAIA CONSTRUCTION INC. CGC 1516136 FLORIDA HI-2792

More information

Molds and mildew are fungi that grow

Molds and mildew are fungi that grow Appendix C: Moisture, Mold and Mildew Molds and mildew are fungi that grow on the surfaces of objects, within pores, and in deteriorated materials. They can cause discoloration and odor problems, deteriorate

More information

Mold In Your Home and at Work

Mold In Your Home and at Work Mold In Your Home and at Work Forsyth County Office of Environmental Assistance and Protection What is mold? Mold is a term used to describe a type of fungus that can be found all year round both indoors

More information

Case Studies of the Cause and Origin of Fungal Growth in Residential and Commercial Structures

Case Studies of the Cause and Origin of Fungal Growth in Residential and Commercial Structures Case Studies of the Cause and Origin of Fungal Growth in Residential and Commercial Structures Stewart M. Verhulst, M.S., P.E. 1 Erik L. Nelson, Ph.D., P.E., M.ASCE 2 Deepak Ahuja, M.S., P.E.,M.ASCE 3

More information

Foundation. Foundation

Foundation. Foundation Moisture Aside from structural concerns, the most important consideration for foundation design is moisture. No client wants a wet basement. No client wants a damp basement. No client wants mold in their

More information

Mold Inspection Report (Initial Assessment)

Mold Inspection Report (Initial Assessment) Morlin Home Services, LLC 4435 Nanticoke Court Sw Lilburn, GA. 30047 Phone: (770) 564-1505 Fax: (770) 564-1575 Cell: (770) 344-7416 InspectorRick@Bellsouth.net www.morlinpropertyinspections.com Mold Inspection

More information

IAQ - indoor ventilation Air contaminants Molds Requirements for growth Health effects Mold prevention - moisture EH&S mold checks & removal

IAQ - indoor ventilation Air contaminants Molds Requirements for growth Health effects Mold prevention - moisture EH&S mold checks & removal Indoor Air Quality & Mold Class Spring 2012 Building Monitors Meeting Presentation Agenda IAQ - indoor ventilation Air contaminants Molds Requirements for growth Health effects Mold prevention - moisture

More information

BUILDING ASSESSMENT QUESTIONNAIRE. B. TENANTS Is there more than one tenant in the building? YES

BUILDING ASSESSMENT QUESTIONNAIRE. B. TENANTS Is there more than one tenant in the building? YES Department of Health and Human Services, Division of Public Health Occupational and Environmental Epidemiology Branch 1912 Mail Service Center, Raleigh, North Carolina 27699-1912 BUILDING ASSESSMENT QUESTIONNAIRE

More information

about your house Before You Start Renovating Your Basement Moisture Problems Figure 1 Moisture problems to solve

about your house Before You Start Renovating Your Basement Moisture Problems Figure 1 Moisture problems to solve about your house CE 28 c Before You Start Renovating Your Basement Moisture Problems Mold and decay on floor joists and sill plates Stuffy air, high humidity, poor air circulation Water draining in from

More information

WATER DAMAGE/MOLD INVESTIGATION. Massachusetts Department of Developmental Services 68 North Main Street Carver, Massachusetts

WATER DAMAGE/MOLD INVESTIGATION. Massachusetts Department of Developmental Services 68 North Main Street Carver, Massachusetts WATER DAMAGE/MOLD INVESTIGATION Massachusetts Department of Developmental Services 68 North Main Street Carver, Massachusetts Prepared by: Massachusetts Department of Public Health Bureau of Environmental

More information

NORMI Professional Guidance for DIY Projects

NORMI Professional Guidance for DIY Projects NORMI Professional Guidance for DIY Projects In general, a well-trained and experienced indoor mold remediation professional (CMR) should be consulted when performing remediation. You may find a NORMI

More information

49 th Annual Convention Society of Wood Science and Technology Newport Beach, California June 25, 2006

49 th Annual Convention Society of Wood Science and Technology Newport Beach, California June 25, 2006 Remediation of Fungal Growth on Wood and Wood-based Building Materials: Challenges to the Forest Products Industry by Stephen L. Quarles University of California Cooperative Extension Richmond Field Station,

More information

GHS Flood Final Report CTA Architects Engineers March 31, 2011

GHS Flood Final Report CTA Architects Engineers March 31, 2011 GHS Flood Final Report CTA Architects Engineers March 31, 2011 INTRODUCTION: Glacier High School underwent extensive flooding due to a broken frozen fire sprinkler joint of the ceiling in the Small Conference

More information

University of Nevada, Reno Facilities Services Department STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE. Facilities Maintenance Services

University of Nevada, Reno Facilities Services Department STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE. Facilities Maintenance Services University of Nevada, Reno Facilities Services Department STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE Facilities Maintenance Services Indoor Flood Cleanup and Mold Prevention DATE: 6/24/15 REVISED: PURPOSE This University

More information

Environmental Science and Engineering Inc. P.O. Box 1026 Rolla, MO 65402. Mold and Indoor Air Quality Assessment

Environmental Science and Engineering Inc. P.O. Box 1026 Rolla, MO 65402. Mold and Indoor Air Quality Assessment TRIANGLE Environmental Science and Engineering Inc. P.O. Box 1026 Rolla, MO 65402 Mold and Indoor Air Quality Assessment Of MARK TWAIN NATIONAL FOREST Roby Ranger Station Roby, MO MARCH 20 2015 Prepared

More information

APPENDIX B. EPA s Investigating, Evaluating, and Remediating Moisture and Mold Problems (see EPA website for complete details)

APPENDIX B. EPA s Investigating, Evaluating, and Remediating Moisture and Mold Problems (see EPA website for complete details) APPENDIX B. EPA s Investigating, Evaluating, and Remediating Moisture and Mold Problems (see EPA website for complete details) Table 1: Water Damage - Cleanup and Mold Prevention Table 1 presents strategies

More information

Risk Bulletin. Mold Prevention and Control for Mechanical and HVAC Contractors. XL Group Insurance

Risk Bulletin. Mold Prevention and Control for Mechanical and HVAC Contractors. XL Group Insurance XL Group Insurance Risk Bulletin Mold Prevention and Control for Mechanical and HVAC Contractors Mechanical contractors have an inherent risk of mold claims arising out of the heating, ventilation, and

More information

Structure Survey Findings:

Structure Survey Findings: Structure Survey Findings: Visible portions of the following were observed: foundations; structure to walls, columns, floors, roofs, overhang posts, and columns; attached or firmly abutting decks, balconies,

More information

MOISTURE MANAGEMENT DURING THE CONSTRUCTION PROCESS

MOISTURE MANAGEMENT DURING THE CONSTRUCTION PROCESS MOISTURE MANAGEMENT DURING THE CONSTRUCTION PROCESS Ed Light 1,*, James Bailey 1, and Roger Gay 1 1 Building Dynamics, LLC, Ashton, MD (USA) *Corresponding email: ELight@building-dynamics.com Published

More information

If you touch buildings, YOU can benefit from the Moisture Encounter Plus

If you touch buildings, YOU can benefit from the Moisture Encounter Plus If you touch buildings, YOU can benefit from the Moisture Encounter Plus In our experience, whatever it is you are doing working on buildings, at some time you have to deal with moisture Surveying, roofing,

More information

Restoring your Property: How to be prepared for Rapid Response to Flood Damage

Restoring your Property: How to be prepared for Rapid Response to Flood Damage Restoring your Property: How to be prepared for Rapid Response to Flood Damage After a flood, the restoration process can be long and complex, particularly for large commercial properties. Failure to apply

More information

ASBESTOS SCIENCE TECHNOLOGIES, INC.

ASBESTOS SCIENCE TECHNOLOGIES, INC. ASBESTOS SCIENCE TECHNOLOGIES, INC. P.O. Box 505 Bangor, CA 95914 Phone (530) 518-0934 Email - astinc17@yahoo.com Report for Lincoln Elementary School 1582 Lincoln Road Yuba City, Ca. 95993 Mold Report

More information

STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES FOR MOLD REMEDIATION

STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES FOR MOLD REMEDIATION West Virginia University Environmental Health and Safety STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES FOR MOLD REMEDIATION Origination Date August 2013. Contents Purpose:... 2 Job Scope... 2 Definitions... 2 Roles/Responsibilities:...

More information

MOLD REMEDIATION KEY STEPS

MOLD REMEDIATION KEY STEPS MOLD REMEDIATION KEY STEPS The EPA has developed the following guidelines for mold remediation managers. These guidelines are generally helpful, but we believe an expert in the industry should be consulted

More information

Liabilities of Vented Crawl Spaces, Their Impacts on Indoor Air Quality in Southeastern U.S. Homes and One Intervention Strategy

Liabilities of Vented Crawl Spaces, Their Impacts on Indoor Air Quality in Southeastern U.S. Homes and One Intervention Strategy Liabilities of Vented Crawl Spaces, Their Impacts on Indoor Air Quality in Southeastern U.S. Homes and One Intervention Strategy Jonathan Coulter 1 ABSTRACT This paper documents the influences vented crawl

More information

Specifications for Removal and Replacement of Water Damaged/Mold Impacted Materials

Specifications for Removal and Replacement of Water Damaged/Mold Impacted Materials Specifications for Removal and Replacement of Water Damaged/Mold Impacted Materials Park Potomac Place 12500 Park Potomac Avenue Potomac, Maryland 20854 KEM Project # 21703 Prepared for: Park Potomac Place

More information

Signature on File For Custodial Supervisor Use Only

Signature on File For Custodial Supervisor Use Only THE SCHOOL BOARD OF BROWARD COUNTY, FLORIDA ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH & SAFETY DEPARTMENT TELEPHONE (754) 321-4200 FACSIMILE: (754) 321-4285 August 13, 2015 Signature on File For Custodial Supervisor Use Only

More information

Inspecting to a higher standard.

Inspecting to a higher standard. Inspecting to a higher standard. Rob Hopkin Silver Spring, MD 20902 Monday, June 2, 2014 ProTec Inspection Services Inc. 19736 Selby Ave Poolesville, MD 20837 301-972-8531 www.protec-inspections.com rob@protec-inspections.com

More information

NYU Safety Policy Manual

NYU Safety Policy Manual NYU Safety Policy Manual Page 1 of 6 Subject: Mold Prevention, Assessment, and Remediation Program Policy No. 167 ISSUE DATE REPLACES ORIGINATOR APPLICATION NYU Washington Square Campus PURPOSE The purpose

More information

Building Foundation and Structure

Building Foundation and Structure Building Foundation and Structure Overview The construction of the Hall of Waters building began in 1936, and was constructed over the original site of the Siloam and Sulpho-Saline Springs. The original

More information

Mold and Mildew Mold and mildew can be detected by sight, smell and touch.

Mold and Mildew Mold and mildew can be detected by sight, smell and touch. Mold and Mildew Mold and mildew can be detected by sight, smell and touch. Molds are usually black (not unlike the molds that grow in showers and between grout), green or tan in color, but can be in various

More information

WHEN IT RAINS, IT POURS WATER DAMAGE RESTORATION

WHEN IT RAINS, IT POURS WATER DAMAGE RESTORATION WHEN IT RAINS, IT POURS WATER DAMAGE RESTORATION SUMMARY Damage to a facility from water can come in many forms. From a sprinkler malfunction to a hurricane, water damage can damage and destroy a building

More information

Mold, Mildew, Fungi What s the Difference? Mold: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly

Mold, Mildew, Fungi What s the Difference? Mold: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly CEILING SYSTEMS Mold is receiving more attention within the construction industry than ever before. One reason is that it is becoming an increasingly visible subject in the media. Another is an increased

More information

SECTION 00 0110 TABLE OF CONTENTS. H. 00 2115.01 - Proposed Material, Product or Equipment Substitution Request

SECTION 00 0110 TABLE OF CONTENTS. H. 00 2115.01 - Proposed Material, Product or Equipment Substitution Request SECTION 00 0110 PROCUREMENT AND CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS 1.1 DIVISION 00 -- PROCUREMENT AND CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS A. 00 0101 - Project Title Page B. 00 0105 - Certifications Page C. 00 0110 - Table

More information

PROPERTY INSPECTION OR ASSESSMENT OF DAMAGES

PROPERTY INSPECTION OR ASSESSMENT OF DAMAGES PROPERTY INSPECTION OR ASSESSMENT OF DAMAGES ADDRESS: Somewhere, FL CLIENT: GAIA GC ID No: 2015000 DATE: 12/31/2015 INSPECTION OR ASSESSMENT BY: GAIA CONSTRUCTION INC. CGC 1516136 FLORIDA HI-2792 FLORIDA

More information

Mold Questions and Answers Questions and Answers on Stachybotrys chartarum and other molds

Mold Questions and Answers Questions and Answers on Stachybotrys chartarum and other molds Questions and Answers on Stachybotrys chartarum and other molds Questions and Answers 1. I heard about "toxic molds" that grow in homes and other buildings. Should I be concerned about a serious health

More information

ECHO System for Basements

ECHO System for Basements ECHO System for Basements Homeowners looking for more space are all too familiar with the cold, damp and dingy basement. Now, the Enclosure Conditioned Housing (ECHO) System TM, winner of the Ottawa-Carleton

More information

Roof Inspection. Summary Report

Roof Inspection. Summary Report Phone: (561) 866 9956 www.real-estate-inspections.com Roof Inspection Summary Report Subject Property File Number: 05-15-RF-002 Inspector: Craig Milliken, PE CPM Real Estate Inspections, Inc. Date of Inspection:

More information

Roof Inspection. Summary Report

Roof Inspection. Summary Report www.real-estate-inspections.com Roof Inspection Summary Report Subject Property Prepared for: File Number: Client in Detroit 05-15-RF-004 Inspector: Craig Milliken, PE # 32779 CPM Real Estate Inspections,

More information

Stachybotrys chartarum a mold that may be found in water-damaged homes

Stachybotrys chartarum a mold that may be found in water-damaged homes Stachybotrys chartarum a mold that may be found in water-damaged homes November 2000 Environmental Health Investigations Branch California Department of Health Services Stachybotrys chartarum ecology Stachybotrys

More information

WATER DAMAGE INVESTIGATION. Massachusetts Gaming Commission 101 Federal Street Boston, Massachusetts

WATER DAMAGE INVESTIGATION. Massachusetts Gaming Commission 101 Federal Street Boston, Massachusetts WATER DAMAGE INVESTIGATION Massachusetts Gaming Commission 101 Federal Street Boston, Massachusetts Prepared by: Massachusetts Department of Public Health Bureau of Environmental Health Indoor Air Quality

More information

Infrared Moisture Detection

Infrared Moisture Detection What it can do for you... what it can t and why 1. Infrared camera basics 2. Examples Lew Harriman MoistureDM.com 3. Summary - The 4 most important facts about infrared moisture detection 1 of 19 Infrared

More information

Envirotest Research Inc. 1108 NE 200 th St. Suite 100 Shoreline, WA 98155-1136 206-522-5449 Fax: 985-9430 email: drdave@airmon.com

Envirotest Research Inc. 1108 NE 200 th St. Suite 100 Shoreline, WA 98155-1136 206-522-5449 Fax: 985-9430 email: drdave@airmon.com Envirotest Research Inc. 1108 NE 200 th St. Suite 100 Shoreline, WA 98155-1136 206-522-5449 Fax: 985-9430 email: drdave@airmon.com Arbor Heights Elementary Indoor Air Investigation Final Report November

More information

March 2007. Get The Mold Out: Mold Clean-Up Guidance for Residences. Introduction

March 2007. Get The Mold Out: Mold Clean-Up Guidance for Residences. Introduction March 2007 Connecticut Department of Public Health Environmental Health Section Environmental & Occupational Health Assessment Program 410 Capitol Avenue MS # 11EOH, PO Box 340308 Hartford, CT 06134-0308

More information

Water Incursion Standard Operating Procedure

Water Incursion Standard Operating Procedure Water Incursion Standard Operating Procedure Purpose: To provide a standardized procedure in the event of water incursion into any Penn State University facility. References: A Brief Guide to Mold, Moisture

More information

Integrating Healthy Housing Considerations into Weatherization Inspections. Jim LaRue

Integrating Healthy Housing Considerations into Weatherization Inspections. Jim LaRue Cleveland Cuyahoga County Healthy House Project Training Integrating Healthy Housing Considerations into Weatherization Inspections Jim LaRue Joint inspections for housing health hazards Weatherization

More information

EAST LYME HIGH SCHOOL

EAST LYME HIGH SCHOOL Overview: 1971 N 1966 GYM 1966 CLASSROOM WING 1966 AUD. 1971 GYM 1998 1998 POOL EAST LYME HIGH SCHOOL Original 1966 Building: The original East Lyme High School was constructed in 1966 and was composed

More information

MOLD ASSESSMENT. Charles A. Bernazzani Elementary School 701 Furnace Brook Parkway Quincy, Massachusetts

MOLD ASSESSMENT. Charles A. Bernazzani Elementary School 701 Furnace Brook Parkway Quincy, Massachusetts MOLD ASSESSMENT Charles A. Bernazzani Elementary School 701 Furnace Brook Parkway Quincy, Massachusetts Prepared by: Massachusetts Department of Public Health Bureau of Environmental Health Indoor Air

More information

ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH CONSULTANTS

ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH CONSULTANTS Ti Forensic Analytical ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH CONSULTANTS Mold Investigation Report Findings of Initial Assessment Emerson Elementary School 2800 Forest Avenue Berkeley, CA July 18, 2013 Prepared for: Kevin

More information

CLOSED CRAWLSPACES. Have you ever been in your crawlspace? If not, have you ever even

CLOSED CRAWLSPACES. Have you ever been in your crawlspace? If not, have you ever even CLOSED CRAWLSPACES What s In the Crawlspace? Wet Sagging Fiberglass Improper Drainage Have you ever been in your crawlspace? If not, have you ever even opened the door to look inside and see what it looked

More information

STAYFLEX CORROSION CONTROL AND THERMAL INSULATION SYSTEM

STAYFLEX CORROSION CONTROL AND THERMAL INSULATION SYSTEM STAYFLEX CORROSION CONTROL AND THERMAL INSULATION SYSTEM Installed in Pre-engineered Steel Buildings Provides Lowest Cost Construction Method for CORROSIVE AND WET Environments PREFERRED SOLUTIONS, INC.

More information

Mold Remediation Practices

Mold Remediation Practices Lorman Educational Services Mold Remediation Practices Presented by: A. James Partridge, PE James Partridge Consulting, LLC 925 South Adams Road Birmingham MI 48009-7039 248.645.1465 voice 248.645.1590

More information

National Academy of Forensic Engineers FE ANALYSIS OF LATENT WATER DAMAGE TO BUILDINGS

National Academy of Forensic Engineers FE ANALYSIS OF LATENT WATER DAMAGE TO BUILDINGS National Academy of Forensic Engineers FE ANALYSIS OF LATENT WATER DAMAGE TO BUILDINGS July 10, 2005 CHICAGO RENAISSANCE HOTEL How Could Anything So Small Cause So Much Damage? PRESENTED BY PAUL J. HALYARD,

More information

Water Management & Damage Prevention:

Water Management & Damage Prevention: Water Management & Damage Prevention: A Guide for Homeowners This article provides homeowners with basic information to make these decisions and take the appropriate actions to keep their homes dry and

More information

Preventing Ice Dams on Roofs

Preventing Ice Dams on Roofs Preventing Ice Dams on Roofs Facility Manager November/December 2005 When a roof leaks, facility managers inevitably receive complaints from building occupants. If it is winter, ice dams are often the

More information

Mould Mould A Basic Guide

Mould Mould A Basic Guide Mould A Basic Guide Summary Mould is a fact of life. Moulds will grow practically everywhere people live and work. Mould is recognized as an occupational hazard for indoor workers as well as outdoor workers

More information

IUB Water Damage Restoration Guideline

IUB Water Damage Restoration Guideline IUB Water Damage Restoration Guideline Purpose The IUB Water Damage Restoration guideline was developed to ensure that all water intrusions are handled in a professional manner which includes the latest

More information

IEQ Management Plan. Denver Museum of Nature and Science ECF Addition

IEQ Management Plan. Denver Museum of Nature and Science ECF Addition IEQ Management Plan GH Phipps Construction Companies 5995 Greenwood Plaza Blvd., Suite 100 Greenwood Village, Colorado 80111-4710 303.571.5377 PHONE www.ghphipps.com Denver Museum of Nature and Science

More information

WET/DAMP BASEMENTS ANSWER: BASEMENT WALLS AND FLOORS CAN BECOME WET BY A LEAK, CAPILLARY SUCTION OR CONDENSATION.

WET/DAMP BASEMENTS ANSWER: BASEMENT WALLS AND FLOORS CAN BECOME WET BY A LEAK, CAPILLARY SUCTION OR CONDENSATION. WET/DAMP BASEMENTS PROBLEM. IS THIS BASEMENT LEAKING OR COULD WE HAVE ANOTHER PROBLEM? Water line arching up on wall in corners of basement. Water collecting on concrete floor starting in corners. ANSWER:

More information

Simpson Engineering A state licensed engineering firm F-1607

Simpson Engineering A state licensed engineering firm F-1607 Simpson Engineering A state licensed engineering firm F-1607 4126 Allencrest 13901 Midway Lane, Dallas, Road, Texas Ste.102-136 75244 Telephone: 214-351-1637 Dallas, - Fax: TX 214-351-1639 75244-4388 Telephone:

More information

Common Problems with Walls

Common Problems with Walls Common Problems with Walls Common Problems with Walls There are problems and concerns that are shared by all walls and siding installations. In this article, we will learn about the following commonly

More information

Joseph Laquatra Cornell University

Joseph Laquatra Cornell University Joseph Laquatra Cornell University Animals get displaced during floods May enter homes If there is standing water in the home: Turn off power from a dry location if possible Don t turn power off or use

More information

MOLD REMEDIATION Kathleen Parrott, Ph.D. Professor of Housing, Virginia Tech

MOLD REMEDIATION Kathleen Parrott, Ph.D. Professor of Housing, Virginia Tech MOLD REMEDIATION Kathleen Parrott, Ph.D. Professor of Housing, Virginia Tech Virginia Cooperative Extension has three publications to help you deal with mold in your home: Mold Basics: What is mold? How

More information

Envelope INSULATION BATT (2) Avoid Using Batt Insulation With Metal Framing. Pressure or Friction Fit

Envelope INSULATION BATT (2) Avoid Using Batt Insulation With Metal Framing. Pressure or Friction Fit R-H-DI1 INSULATION BATT NR-E-IB1 Avoid Using Batt Insulation With Metal Framing Batt insulation should not be used with metal framing systems. Although it is common to see fiberglass batt insulation installed

More information

MOLD FAQs. 1. What is mold and where does it live? 2. How can mold affect my health?

MOLD FAQs. 1. What is mold and where does it live? 2. How can mold affect my health? MOLD FAQs 1. What is mold and where does it live? Molds are microscopic fungi that are part of the natural environment. They can grow almost anywhere (inside and out), but live especially in the soil outside.

More information

DEPARTMENT OF CODES AND BUILDING SAFETY FLOOD RECOVERY INFORMATION

DEPARTMENT OF CODES AND BUILDING SAFETY FLOOD RECOVERY INFORMATION May 2010 DEPARTMENT OF CODES AND BUILDING SAFETY FLOOD RECOVERY INFORMATION GUIDELINES FOR PERMITS ASSOCIATED WITH THE REPAIR OF FLOOD DAMAGED HOMES AND BUILDINGS The Department of Codes and Building Safety

More information

Safety Policy Manual Policy No. 112

Safety Policy Manual Policy No. 112 Policy: Mold Prevention, Assessment and Remediation Program Page 1 of 9 APPLICATION NYU Langone Medical Center (NYULMC) POLICY SUMMARY NYULMC is committed to protecting employees, patients, and visitors

More information

Mold Basics. Why is mold growing in my home?

Mold Basics. Why is mold growing in my home? Mold Basics The key to mold control is moisture control. If mold is a problem in your home, you should clean up the mold promptly and fix the water problem. It is important to dry water-damaged areas and

More information

Clean Water: Supply side potable water, not wastewater. Gray Water/Sewage: Wastewater originating from a drain (sink, toilet, urinal).

Clean Water: Supply side potable water, not wastewater. Gray Water/Sewage: Wastewater originating from a drain (sink, toilet, urinal). Procedures for Emergency Responses to Flooding and Building Water Intrusion PURPOSE: To establish uniform, sanitary, and systematic procedures for responding to flooding and water intrusion emergencies.

More information

Course Agenda. Mold in Commercial Buildings: Overview of Mold Contamination in Buildings. Overview of Mold Contamination in Buildings

Course Agenda. Mold in Commercial Buildings: Overview of Mold Contamination in Buildings. Overview of Mold Contamination in Buildings 1 Course Agenda What is Mold What to look for Mold in Commercial Buildings: What you should know and look for Presented by David Krause, PhD, MSPH, CIH How to respond to a mold problem Why is mold considered

More information

*Trademark of The Dow Chemical Company A business unit of The Dow Chemical Company and its subsidiaries Copyright 2003 The Dow Chemical Company.

*Trademark of The Dow Chemical Company A business unit of The Dow Chemical Company and its subsidiaries Copyright 2003 The Dow Chemical Company. Dow Chemical is a Registered Provider with The American Institute of Architects Continuing Education Systems. Credit earned on completion of this program will be reported to CES Records for AIA members.

More information

Mould & Moisture Assessment Parkside Elementary School

Mould & Moisture Assessment Parkside Elementary School Mould & Moisture Assessment Parkside Elementary School Project No. 12620 Prepared for: PEI Dept. Transportation & Infrastructure Renewal P.O. Box 2000 Charlottetown, PE C1A 7N7 March 9, 2011 92 Queen Street,

More information

Carson Dorn, Inc. December 18, 2012. Patrick Holmes Associate Manager Juneau I, LLC 645 G Street, Suite 100-604 Anchorage, AK 99501. Dear Mr.

Carson Dorn, Inc. December 18, 2012. Patrick Holmes Associate Manager Juneau I, LLC 645 G Street, Suite 100-604 Anchorage, AK 99501. Dear Mr. Carson Dorn, Inc. 712 West 12th Street Juneau, Alaska 9981 December 18, 212 Patrick Holmes Associate Manager Juneau I, LLC 645 G Street, Suite 1-64 Anchorage, AK 9951 Dear Mr. Holmes, The renovation of

More information

Mold. Guidelines for New Jersey Residents. Understanding Mold Investigations & Remediation

Mold. Guidelines for New Jersey Residents. Understanding Mold Investigations & Remediation Mold Guidelines for New Jersey Residents Understanding Mold Investigations & Remediation What Services Should I Ask For? What Are Important Inspection Procedures? Is Mold Sampling Helpful? What Information

More information

Queen's University Environmental Health & Safety. 1.0 Introduction

Queen's University Environmental Health & Safety. 1.0 Introduction 1 Introduction The were developed by the Department of Environmental Health & Safety in accordance with the University s Policy Statement on Health and Safety and to ensure compliance with the Ontario

More information

Basement Repair Services. Check your basement for Water Stains, Cracks and Bad Odors.

Basement Repair Services. Check your basement for Water Stains, Cracks and Bad Odors. Basement Repair Services Check your basement for Water Stains, Cracks and Bad Odors. Basement Basics Check your basement for Water Stains, Cracks and Bad Odors. Basement Repair Services The foundation

More information

WEBSTER ELEMENTARY SCHOOL New Rochelle, New York Evaluation of Collapsed Ceiling Room 204

WEBSTER ELEMENTARY SCHOOL New Rochelle, New York Evaluation of Collapsed Ceiling Room 204 WEBSTER ELEMENTARY SCHOOL New Rochelle, New York Evaluation of Collapsed Ceiling Room 204 Structural Inspection Report Client: CSArch Architecture Engineering Construction Management 19 Front Street, Newburgh,

More information

Non Invasive Roof Leak Detection Using Infrared Thermography

Non Invasive Roof Leak Detection Using Infrared Thermography Non Invasive Roof Leak Detection Using Infrared Thermography Scott Wood Four Star Cleaning and Restoration, Inc. ABSTRACT Residential roofs without attics are typically inspected for leaks by installing

More information