Belvidere High School Advanced Placement Psychology Curriculum May, 2011

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1 Belvidere High School Advanced Placement Psychology Curriculum May, 2011 One looks back with appreciation to the brilliant teachers, but with gratitude to those who touched our human feelings. The curriculum is so much necessary raw material, but warmth is the vital element for the growing plant and for the soul of the child. - Carl Jung Social Studies Department: Christopher M. Coyle Edward Demarest Timmothy Gast Kimberly Lightcap Daniel McIntyre

2 Department Philosophy: To guide the students to understand the human experience who we are, what we are, where we have been, and where we are going. Allow students to appreciate the democratic values of our state and nation, to have an understanding of the cultures of the world, and to excel in an increasingly global community. Department Objectives: The needs of the child come first. Mutual respect and trust are the cornerstones of a learning community. The learning community consists of students, educators, parents, administrators, educational support personnel, the community and Board of Education members. A successful learning community communicates honestly and openly in a non-threatening environment. Members of our learning community have different needs at different times. There is openness to the challenge of meeting those needs in professional and supportive ways. Assessment of professionals (i.e., educators, administrators and educational support personnel) is a dynamic process that requires review and revision based on evolving research, practices and experiences. Development of desired capabilities comes in stages and is achieved through hard work, reflection and ongoing growth.

3 Belvidere High School AP Psychology Course Syllabus Course Description The Advanced Placement Program offers a course and exam in psychology to qualified students who wish to complete studies in secondary school equivalent to an introductory college course in psychology. The exam presumes at least one semester of college-level preparation, as is described in this book. The inclusion of material in the Course Description and in the exam is not intended as an endorsement by the College Board or ETS of the content, ideas, or values expressed in the material. The material has been selected by experienced high school and college and university instructors of psychology who serve as members of the AP Psychology Development Committee. In their judgment, the material printed here reflects the content of a typical introductory college course in psychology. Purpose of the Course The purpose of the Advanced Placement course in Psychology is to introduce students to the systematic and scientific study of behavior and mental processes of human beings and animals. Students are exposed to the psychological facts, principles, and phenomena associated with the major subfields within psychology. They also learn about the methods psychologists use in their science and practice. (Taken from the Advanced Placement Course Description in Psychology by the College Board) I. Course Objectives 1. Students will prepare to do acceptable work on the Advanced Placement Examination in Psychology. 2. Students will study the major core concepts and theories of psychology. They will be able to define key terms and use these terms in their everyday vocabulary. 3. Students will learn the basic skills of psychological research. They will be able to devise simple research projects, interpret and generalize from results and evaluate the validity of research reports. 4. Students will be able to apply psychological concepts to their own lives. They should be able to recognize psychological principles when they are encountered in everyday situations. 5. Students will develop critical thinking skills. They will become aware of the danger of blindly accepting or rejecting any psychological theory without careful, objective evaluation. 6. Students will build their reading, writing, and discussion skills. 7. Students will learn about psychology as a profession, and become aware of the educational requirements which must be met to pursue such careers. They will learn about the ethical standards governing the work of psychologists.

4 II. Questions to Think About Before We Begin 1. Why are you taking this class? Do you want to learn about psychology? Are you ready for a college level class? Are you serious about preparing for and taking the AP Exam in May? Would the regular Behavioral Science class better suit your goals? 2. What are your priorities? Are academics near the top of the list, or are you more concerned with athletics, social life, a part-time job, television, video games, and so on? 3. How much time will you need to devote to this class? This will depend on your own strengths and weaknesses. A rule of thumb suggested by many colleges is to spend two to three hours working outside of class for every hour you spend in class. Since most college courses meet three hours a week, this translates to about six to nine out of class hours per week. Are you willing to make this commitment? 4. Are you a strong reader? In terms of course assignments, nothing will occupy more of your time than reading and studying the text. Research has shown that the strongest prediction of success in high school AP classes is reading ability. If you are a good reader, you have a distinct advantage. If you are not a good reader, know that it is going to require extra time and effort to compensate for that weakness. 5. What is your motivation level? Your level of motivation is much more important than your ability level. If you want to succeed in AP Psychology and you are willing to put in the necessary effort, you will succeed. Attitude, study skills, determination, and discipline count for more than intelligence toward your success in this class. After considering the above, if you have any questions, concerns, etc. as to whether AP Psychology is the course for you, please see me ASAP, preferably today! III. Course Outline Marking Period 1 Unit I History and Approaches of Psychology (1 week) Essential Questions: Why study psychology? How can we begin to study behavior? How can we analyze behavior? How can knowledge of psychology be practically applied in life? What ways does Psychology approach the study of human and animal behavior? Objectives: How has psychology changed the study of human and animal behavior? How do the different perspectives compare and contrast? Who were the key individuals in the revolution of psychology as a science?

5 Trace the historical and philosophical development of psychology as a science Describe how the different perspectives explore and explain human behavior Identify famous psychologists and describe their contributions to the discipline Explore different career options for people who earn degrees in psychology Outline History of Psychology Current Perspectives and Approaches Subfields of Psychology Unit II Research Methodology (2 weeks) Essential Questions: What makes something scientific? What is the difference between nature and nurture? Why study psychology? How can we begin to study behavior? How can we analyze behavior? How can knowledge of psychology be practically applied in life? How do psychologists use the scientific method to study behavior and mental processes? Which methods of research are appropriate for the study of different behaviors? How do researchers draw appropriate conclusions about behavior from research? How do psychologists make ethical decisions about researching behavior with human and animal behavior? Objectives: Discuss the advantages of research over other ways of knowing Describe the different types of research and their advantages and disadvantages Identify the elements of an experiment Apply elements of an experiment to different situations Evaluate the importance of ethics in research Evaluate the importance of statistics and their use in research Outline Scientific Method Ethics of Experimentation Research Strategies

6 Correlational Studies Statistical Reasoning Unit III Neuroscience and Biological Processes (2 weeks) Essential Questions: How do biological processes relate to behavior? How does the brain communicate with itself? How does the brain communicate with the body? How does the brain communicate with the world? What influences shape the way a person behaves? How do biological processes relate to behavior? How does damage to a biological process or part affect behavior? How does the brain develop and how does this affect behavior? Objectives: Explain the process of neural communication Explain how neurotransmitters work Analyze the difference between the neural and hormonal systems Identify the parts of the brain and the functions of each Determine the role of genetics in influencing human behavior Outline Neuroanatomy Neural Transmission Nervous System Endocrine System Genetics Unit IV Sensation and Perception (2 weeks) Essential Questions: What is the difference between a sensation and a perception? How does subliminal stimulation affect us? What is light?

7 How do humans process visual information? What is sound? How do we experience pain, taste, smell? How do we perceive motion? What influences perception? How might you know something that cannot be accounted for through physical senses? How can we understand perception? How do the sensory systems operate? How does the brain process sensory signals? Objectives: Identify the major components of each sensory system and their functions Identify the views of the Gestalt psychologists related to perceptional phenomena Understand how perceptual concepts influence behavior Outline Sensory Thresholds Sensation Perception Unit V States of Consciousness (1 ½ weeks) Essential Questions: How much information do we consciously attend to at once? Why do we sleep? Why do we dream? What is hypnosis? What is addiction? How do psychologists define consciousness? What happens during the sleep cycle? What roles do REM and NREM sleep play in behavior? How does lack of sleep affect behavior? How do psychologists explain hypnosis and mediation? What is the impact of drugs on a person s consciousness? Objectives:

8 Identify levels of consciousness Describe different stages of sleep Analyze the different theories of dreaming Identify common sleep disorders and their consequences Differentiate between the different theories of hypnosis and mediation Analyze the consequences of drugs and their effects on consciousness Outline Levels of Consciousness Sleep and Dreaming Hypnosis Drugs and Consciousness Unit VI Motivation and Emotion (1 ½ weeks) Essential Questions: What is motivation? What is instinct? What factors influence hunger? What evidence points to our human need to belong? How do we experience emotion? Why do people have different emotions when faced with identical situations? What are nonverbal expressions of emotion? Are they universally understood? How can our facial expressions influence our feelings? What is the function of fear? How do we learn fear? What are the causes and consequences of anger? What are the causes and consequences of happiness? What is stress? Objectives: Identify the theories of emotion and their differences Discuss the difference between drive theory and homeostasis Explain the reasons why intrinsic motivation is more beneficial than extrinsic motivation Analyze how the body regulates weight so effectively

9 Identify physiological and physical changes that occur when people experience different emotions Determine the criteria for assessing gender differences in emotional expressions Define stress, identifying the emotional and physiological responses to stress Outline Biological Bases of Motivation and Emotion Theories of Motivation Hunger, Sex, Pain Social Motives Theories of Emotion Stress Cumulative Final Marking Period 1 Marking Period 2 Unit VII Learning (2 weeks) Essential Questions: How do psychologists define learning? How do principles of classical and operant conditioning work to create learning? What role does observation and modeling play in learning? What are the differences between the ways people learn? Objectives: Describe the elements of classical conditioning Describe the elements of operant conditioning Differentiate among the various forms of reinforcement and punishment Apply elements of classical and operant conditioning to different situations Describe observational or social learning Describe how biology influences learning Describe how cognition influences learning Outline Classical Conditioning Operant Conditioning

10 Social Learning Cognitive Processes in Learning Unit VIII Memory and Cognition (2 weeks) Essential Questions: How do we know when something is true? What is memory? What makes us remember some things and forget others? How does the brain store memories? How might it be possible to improve our ability to remember? Why do we forget? What is creativity? What are problem solving skills? Does everyone have them? Why or why not? What influences judgment? How do we learn language? How are language and thinking related? Objectives: Analyze how humans encode, store, and retrieve information in memory Identify and apply memory enhancement techniques Describe the characteristics of language and evaluate it s importance Differentiate between algorithms and heuristics Analyze methods that influence the ability to solve problems Outline Language Thinking Problem Solving Memory Unit IX Developmental Psychology (3 weeks) Essential Questions: How do people grow and develop across the lifespan in the following areas? 1. Physical Development

11 2. Cognitive Development 3. Social/Emotional Development How do nature and nurture influence human development? What psychological theories explain human development? Objectives: Describe the physical development of humans from conception to adulthood Describe and analyze cognitive development of humans from childhood through adulthood Describe and analyze social/emotional development of humans from childhood through adulthood Describe and analyze Kohlberg s theory of moral reasoning Describe how nature and nurture affect development Analyze how gender roles influence individual and social behavior throughout the lifespan Describe how developmental psychologists research development over the lifespan Outline Life Span Approach Physical Development Cognitive Development Social/Emotional Development Reflections on Nature/Nurture Gender Roles Developmental Theorists Unit X Personality (1 week) Essential Questions: How do psychologists define and study personality? How do the different personality perspectives compare and contrast? How do psychologists interpret personality s role in behavior? Objectives: Explain how the different perspectives of personality approach the study of personality Evaluate the advantages and draw backs of each theory of personality Determine how psychologist assess and explain personality according to various perspectives Outline Factors that Influence Personality

12 Personality Theories Assessment Techniques Unit XI Testing and Individual Differences (1 week) Essential Questions: How do psychologists define and study intelligence? How did the use of intelligence tests evolve throughout the last two centuries? What are standards and rules in intelligence testing? What issues and factors influence intelligence tests? How do psychologists know whether a test is reliable and/or valid? What are multiple intelligences? Objectives: Trace the historical development of intelligence testing and individual contributions to this development Compare and contrast Gardner s and Sternberg s theories of intelligence Identify factors that could influence an intelligence test score Explain the difference between reliability and validity Describe the bell curve and norms in intelligence testing Outline Standardization and Norms Reliability and Validity Ethics and Standards in Testing Intelligence Heredity/Environment in Intelligence Multiple Intelligence Cumulative Final Marking Periods 1 and 2 Marking Period 3: Units XII and XIII Psychological Disorders and Treatments (2 weeks) Essential Questions How do psychologists define and measure abnormal behavior?

13 How are the various psychological disorders identified and studied? What impact do these psychological disorders have on individuals, families, communities and society? What options are available to treat psychological disorders? How should we draw the line between normality and disorder? What perspective can help us understand psychological disorders? How and why do clinicians classify psychological disorders? When is anxiety normal? When is it abnormal? Outcomes: Identify the criteria psychologists use to diagnose psychological disorders Differentiate among the different perspectives psychologists take to understand psychological disorders. Identify the different classifications of psychological disorders Describe the different treatment options for the various types of psychological disorders Describe preventative approaches to psychological disorders Outline Definitions of Abnormality Classifications of Disorders Diagnosis of Psychopathy Treatment Approaches and Modes of Therapy Prevention Unit XIV Social Psychology (2 weeks) Essential Questions How do people attribute behaviors/attitudes to others? How do groups affect individuals? How do individuals affect groups? How do psychologists understand culture and its influence? Outcomes Differentiate between situational and depositional attribution Identify the conditions in which people are more likely to conform and obey Determine how the presence of others influences actions Differentiate among terms prejudice, stereotype and discrimination Determine the biological and social contributors to aggressive behavior

14 Define culture and how it develops Outline: Group Dynamics Attribution Process Interpersonal Perception Conformity, Compliance, Obedience Attitudes Aggression Cumulative Final Exam Marking Periods 1, 2 and 3 AP Test Prep (Marking Period 4) IV. Grading Grades are based on a point scale. All activities, tests, homework, labs, etc. receive a certain number of points. Quarter and semester grades are based on adding the student's total number of points and dividing by the total points possible to get a percentage. The letter grade is determined by putting the percentage on the scale below. 94% - 100% A 85% - 93% B 74% - 84% C 65% - 73% D 65% - 0% F Since the grades are recorded on a computer, you will be regularly informed of your grade throughout the year through the use of grade sheets in class. Because this is an Advanced Placement course, you will probably find it more difficult to earn top grades in this class compared to other classes you have taken. In general, students have found the course difficult at first but have done better as the year progresses. V. Discussion/Participation Grade Discussion is an integral part of any psychology class. Included in each of the four quarters is a discussion/participation grade. The total number of points for this grade is approximately 20% of the quarter's points, usually around 100 points. Class discussion, lab work, Black Book work, class work, audio visual days, etc. are factors included in the participation grade. Below is a general guide for determination of the participation grade.

15 94-100% Always on task in labs, class activities and class work. Actively pays attention during class notes, discussions and AV days. Outstanding contributions to class discussions showing initiative and thought % Always on task in labs, class activities and class work. Actively pays attention during class notes, discussions and AV days. Volunteers pertinent information frequently % Normally on task in labs, class activities and class work. Pays attention during class notes, discussions and AV days. Answers questions when called upon, occasionally volunteers % Normally on task in labs, class activities and class work. Pays attention during class notes, discussions and AV days. Rarely contributes to class discussion. 0-65% Usually NOT on task in labs, class activities and class work. Usually does not pay attention during class notes, discussion and AV days (i.e. doing other work, sleeping, talking, etc.) Does not contribute to class discussions. VI. Notebooks Each student is to have a notebook (3 Ring Binder-1 1/2 inch to 2 inch) and bring it to class each day. Notebooks may be collected at any point in the year so please keep them as neat as possible. Along with reading the textbook, taking notes is the primary way you will learn psychology. The points below may help you in your note taking. 1. Take complete, dated class notes. 2. Your notes should be more than just what items are listed on the chalkboard or screen. 3. Put the notes in your own words. Don t write down something you don t understand without asking about it. 4. Leave some blank spaces on each page to make additions and/or clarifications. 5. Review your class notes each day while they are fresh in your mind. Expand them, clarify them, and add examples so they will make sense when you go back to study them later. Note anything that doesn t make sense and ask questions in class the following day. 6. Before class look over the notes from the proceeding class. This is especially important if a topic is presented over multiple days. 7. If you are absent on class note days, you are responsible for obtaining the notes from other students. VII. Assignments All written work for the class, i.e. chapter questions, reports, lab reports, data sheets, etc., should be typed or written legibly. Anything written which is unable to be read will be marked wrong. Written work should be an attempt to communicate one's thoughts, ideas or feelings. Sloppy work, one word answers, and poor spelling/grammar fail in their goal of communicating.

16 Late papers. In almost all cases students are given more than adequate time, at minimum of 48 hours, to finish assignments so there should be few possible reasons for late papers. Assignments are due at the beginning of class. If you know you are going to be absent on the day an assignment is due please make an effort to hand in the assignment early. Since I realize emergencies or problems do come up, once a quarter, students will be allowed one extra day to hand in work late without penalty. Please indicate on the assignment that you are taking advantage of this option. Absentee papers. If you are absent on a due date the assignment is due upon your return. Exceptions will be made for extended absences. VIII. Attendance All students will be accounted for each class on STI. Keep an up-to-date log of your attendance so that you maintain credit for the course. It is the student's responsibility to see that their absences are excused and to turn in any assignments due that day. Unexcused absences will result in not being able to make up the work for the day and prevent a student from receiving the day s discussion/participation points. IX. Honesty and respect from all to all X. Textbook Myers, David (2011) Psychology (9th edition) New York, NY; Worth Publishers. Each student will be issued a copy of the Myers Psychology text. This text is used at many colleges and universities throughout the country for their Introductory Psychology course. If you were taking this course in college and had to purchase the text, it would cost you well over $95. Use the book, get the most information about psychology from it you can, but please handle it with extra care. I would strongly recommend putting some type of cover on the text. Any damage to the text will be the responsibility of the student. Do not bring the book with you to class on a daily basis. Some helpful hints in reading the text include: 1. Keep up with the reading assignments! Don t fall behind! Set a schedule for yourself and be disciplined enough to stick to it. Be prepared in class to discuss the reading assigned for that day and/or take a quiz on the material. 2. Learn to read more effectively. a. Read actively; don t just look at the words. If you spend a half hour reading but are unable to recall anything when you are done, you have wasted your time. Reading a college level text requires a great deal more effort and concentration than the latest novel does. b. Do not try to read the entire chapter at once. Each chapter of your text is divided into several major sections. Limit your reading to one of these sections at a sitting. c. Do NOT ignore pictures, diagrams, tables, sidebars, etc. in your textbook. These features were added to your text for a reason. They make the text more interesting and usually provide important information.

17 XI. d. Preview the chapter before you start reading. Read the chapter summary when you finish. e. Take notes as you read. If you can condense a 30 page chapter to a few pages of good notes, it s going to be much easier to review. Tests and Quizzes Unit Tests At the conclusion of each unit a test will be given. All tests for the class are scored using the scanner so a #2 pencil is needed. Tests are usually announced well in advance therefore only those absent the day of the test should need to take a makeup. If a student misses only the test date they will take the test on their return during a study hall or after school. In a few cases the test may be taken during the class dependent on the class activities of the day. Students missing for more than just the test day must make up the test outside of class time within a week of the missed test. Exceptions will be made for extended absences. Cumulative Tests To help prepare for the AP Exam in May, a cumulative test will be given at the end of the first, second, and third quarters, and prior to the AP Exam. Each test will cover all the material from the beginning of the school year to that point. Semester Final Exams At the end of each semester a final exam will be given consisting of 200 questions. The questions will be taken from previous unit and cumulative tests from that semester. The second semester final exam will NOT be cumulative for the complete school year. Quizzes Announced or unannounced quizzes may be given at anytime during the year. Usually quizzes are based on the activities of the previous day or the assigned reading for the day. XII. Getting Help Please don t be afraid to get help if you do not understand something. The ultimate responsibility to learn psychology is yours but I am willing to help you in any way I can. To get help you can: 1. Ask questions before, during and/or after class. 2. See me before or after school. On most days, I am in the school building around 7:10 am and usually leave about 3:00 pm. If possible, try to coordinate a time with me so I can make sure I m available. 3. Arrange to meet with me during my preparation periods: 4. If you have access to or the Internet you can me at XIII. NO CELL PHONES IN CLASS cell phones MUST be turned off before entering the class. If a cell phone is not turned off and interrupts the class (ringing, vibrating, use of text messages, use of cameras, etc.) it will be confiscated and turned over to the administration. XIV. Other Helpful Hints to Succeed in AP Psychology

18 These are ideas to help you succeed in the course other than those already stated. 1. A large portion of psychology is learning various terms and concepts. One way to help learn the items is to create vocabulary flashcards on 3X5 index cards. On one side is the term, name or concept, on the other is a definition or an explanation. The flashcards will help you in the following ways: a. Making the cards helps you learn the vocabulary. b. You can easily separate the terms you know from those you need to work on. This makes for efficient studying. c. You can look at the terms and practice the definitions, or you can look at the definitions and practice the terms. d. The cards provide an excellent review which will be very useful for the cumulative tests and the AP Exam in May. 2. Form a study group with other students. This is an excellent way to help each other. Beware that working in groups does have some disadvantages. Before forming a group make sure each member is willing to put in their fair share of the work. I d be happy to meet with any group that wants to discuss ways they can work together. 3. If you re having trouble understanding the Myers textbook, you might want to borrow a different introductory psychology text. Sometimes students find reading a different author s explanation of a concept helps them better understand our text. DO NOT substitute for reading the Myers textbook by reading a different text. Each author does not necessarily cover the same material. For the class tests you are responsible for the material in the Myers text. 4. If you have Internet access, there are various sites which are designed to help students who are learning psychology. Some sites include explanations of concepts and even practice tests you may take. I will be happy to give you URL s for the sites I am aware of. 5. In your reading, studying for tests, taking notes, etc. always remember you will be tested on the material not only in the test at the end of that particular unit, but the cumulative tests at the end of each quarter and the AP Exam in May. At the end of each unit look over the material and organize it for later review. It is my sincere hope that years from now, you will remember this course as one of the best you ever took; a course that challenged you and encouraged you to learn all you could about a most fascinating subject -psychology. I look forward to working with you this year. Good Luck!!!

19 Content Area: AP Psychology Era: N/A Unit Title: History and Approaches Target Course/Grade Level: 12 th Grade Advanced Placement Advanced Placement Psychology Curriculum Unit Overview Unit Summary: Psychology has evolved markedly since its inception as a discipline in There have been significant changes in the theories that psychologists use to explain behavior and mental processes. In addition, the methodology of psychological research has expanded to include a diversity of approaches to data gathering. Unit Rationale: Perspectives of Psychology will be defined to illustrate the differences between psychologist theories, ideas and research from multiple perspectives. Learning Targets Standards: American Psychological Association and National Standards for High School Psychology Curricula Content Statements: Students will gather a brief overview of the course and perspectives of psychology. Students will relate perspectives to individual psychological theories. CPI # IA- 2.1 IA-6.1 IA-6.2 Cumulative Progress Indicator (CPI) List and explain the major subfields of psychology. a. Identifying the different subfields of psychology, such as clinical, counseling, social, experimental, school, and developmental psychology b. Recognizing applied specializations, including forensic, community, industrial/organizational, human factors, cross-cultural, sports, or rehabilitation psychology, among others c. Explaining the differences between a psychologist and psychiatrist d. Exploring career opportunities for college graduates with psychology majors Discuss psychology s roots in philosophy and natural science. a. Describing the form psychology took before the 20th century (e.g., Aristotle, Locke) b. Summarizing some 19th century scientific research findings (e.g., Helmholtz, Weber, and Fechner) c. Analyzing how philosophical issues become psychological when tested empirically Describe the emergence of experimental psychology.

20 IA-6.3 IA-6.4 a. Defining psychophysics and describing its impact on empirical psychology b. Identifying Wilhelm Wundt s contributions to experimental psychology c. Comparing philosophical argument with the empirical method Recognize the diversity of psychological theories in the 20th and 21st centuries. a. Describing the 20th and 21st centuries schools of psychology (e.g., behaviorism, Gestalt psychology, psychoanalysis, humanistic psychology, cognitive psychology) b. Showing how different theories of psychology produce different explanations of a particular behavior (e.g., truancy, altruism) c. Explaining the growing influence of new approaches to psychology (e.g., positive psychology, behavioral genetics, or the study and practice of psychology at the beginning of the 21st century) IA-6.4 Describe psychology s increasing inclusiveness of diverse interests and constituents. a. Comparing the diverse topics that generate contemporary research with early research emphases b. Identifying how research biases have influenced research design and scope c. Exploring reasons why psychology had more limited participation from women and ethnic minorities in its early stages d. Highlighting contributions by ethnic minority psychologists e. Describing historical events and processes affecting the experiences and opportunities of minority groups Unit Essential Questions What makes something scientific? What is the difference between nature and nurture? Why study psychology? How can we begin to study behavior? How can we analyze behavior? How can knowledge of psychology be practically applied in life? What ways does Psychology approach the study of human and animal behavior? How has psychology changed the study of human and animal behavior? How do the different perspectives compare and contrast? Unit Enduring Understandings Psychology initially developed as a combination of biology and philosophy. Psychology attempts to answer cause and effect questions regarding human and animal behavior. The biological versus environmental catalysts of behavior, known as the nature versus nurture controversy are continually analyzed in psychology. The introduction of the use of the scientific method to the study of psychology transformed the field into a true science. The four goals of psychology are to describe, explain predict and control behavior Historical perspectives in Psychology include structuralism, functionalism, behaviorism, humanism, and psychoanalysis. The three main levels of analysis are biological, psychological and social-cultural. The different approaches to the study of behavior include biological, evolutionary, psychodynamic, behavioral, cognitive, humanistic and social-cultural. There are many sub-fields within the field of psychology.

21 Who were the key individuals in the revolution of psychology as a science? Instructional Focus: Learning facts, principles, theories and maps; then, Developing an understanding of the relationships among facts, concepts, principles, theories and maps; then, using these relationships understand and interpret historical significance. Evidence of Learning Summative Assessment (10 days) -Format: Project and Exam on material. Exam may be split into 2 sessions for full assessment of understanding Formative Assessment: Student understanding will be assessed based on discussion and dialogue as well as quizzes throughout the unit. Equipment needed: Projector, TV. Blackboard or Dry Erase board, Computer labs, , other applicable technological items. Teacher Notes: Lesson Plans will be Attached Curriculum Development Resources New Jersey Core Content Standards, Examples, APA standards, AP Central Course Description Content Area: AP Psychology Era: N/A Unit Title: Research Methods Unit Overview Target Course/Grade Level: 12 th Grade Advanced Placement Unit Summary: Psychology is an empirical discipline. Psychologists develop knowledge by doing research. Research provides guidance for psychologists who develop theories to explain behavior and who apply theories to solve problems in behavior. Unit Rationale: Students learn the models and fields of psychology, while also studying the basics of psychological research. A discussion of ethics in psychology is included in this unit.

22 Learning Targets Standards: American Psychological Association and National Standards for High School Psychology Curricula Content Statements: Students learn the models and fields of psychology, while also studying the basics of psychological research. A discussion of ethics in psychology is included in this unit. CPI # IA- 3.1 IA-3.2 IA-3.3 IA-4.1 IA-4.2 IA-4.3 Cumulative Progress Indicator (CPI) Describe the elements of an experiment. a. Identifying the independent and dependent variables, possible confounding variables, and control and experimental groups in a description of an experiment b. Designing an experiment in which the hypothesis, population, sample, independent variable, dependent variable, random assignment, and experimental and control groups are properly identified Explain the importance of sampling and random assignment in psychological research. a. Identifying examples of representative and biased samples in research designs b. Specifying how random assignment permits causal inferences c. Explaining the importance of being able to generalize results of research d. Describing how sample selection (e.g., representation of gender, ethnicity, age, etc.) influences results Describe and compare quantitative and qualitative research strategies. a. Explaining the characteristics of surveys, naturalistic observation, case studies, longitudinal studies, cross-sectional research, and experiments b. Identifying the suitability of a given method for testing a given hypothesis c. Specifying the populations to which a particular research result may be generalized Define descriptive statistics and explain how they are used by behavioral scientists. a. Providing examples of situations in which descriptive statistics can be used to organize and analyze information b. Explaining how statistical analysis can add value to the interpretation of behavior c. Citing a statistical finding to strengthen an argument Explain and describe measures of central tendency and variability. a. Calculating the mean, median, and mode for a set of data b. Explaining the characteristics of a normal distribution c. Providing examples of psychological variables that tend to be normally distributed d. Applying the concepts of variability, such as range and standard deviation to supplement information about central tendency in a normal distribution Describe the concept of correlation and explain how it is used in psychology.

23 IA-4.4 IA-5.1 Unit Essential Questions What makes something scientific? What is the difference between nature and nurture? Why study psychology? How can we begin to study behavior? How can we analyze behavior? How can knowledge of psychology be practically applied in life? How do psychologists use the scientific method to study behavior and mental processes? Which methods of research are appropriate for the study of different behaviors? How do researchers draw appropriate conclusions about behavior from a. Differentiating between positive, negative, and zero correlations b. Identifying and providing examples of how correlations can be used to predict future behavior or performance c. Explaining the difference between correlation and causation Recognize how inferential statistics are used in psychological research. a. Recognizing the basic process that psychologists use to draw statistical inferences b. Defining statistical significance as a statement of probability c. Recognizing limitations in interpretation of statistical significance Identify ethical issues in psychological research. a. Discussing ethical issues in psychological research b. Identifying historical examples of research that may have departed from contemporary ethical standards c. Acknowledging the importance of adhering to APA and government ethical standards and procedures (i.e., Institutional Review Boards) for working with humans and other animals d. Explaining the use and value of humans and other animals in behavioral research, including their ethical treatment Unit Enduring Understandings Answers that flow from the scientific approach are more reliable than those based on intuition and common sense. Critical thinking examines assumptions, discerns hidden values, evaluates evidence and assesses conclusions. Psychological science evaluates competing ideas with careful observation and rigorous, objective and systematic analysis. The scientific method is a self-correcting process for asking questions and observing answers. Good theories are explained by organizing and linking observed facts. Implying hypotheses offer testable predictions and practical applications. Different behaviors require different and specific types of research design. Independent, dependent, confounding and controlling variables must all be carefully considered in order to design a valid experiment. Concise measures of variation offer answers about correlation and cause and effect relationships. Measures of central tendency and variation are used to describe data and interpret relationships between variables. Many professional associations and funding agencies set guidelines ensuring humane

24 research? How do psychologists make ethical decisions about researching behavior with human and animal behavior? treatment of experimental subjects because of ethical reasons but also because pain and stress would distort behavior during experiments. Instructional Focus: Learning facts, principles, theories and maps; then, Developing an understanding of the relationships among facts, concepts, principles, theories and maps; then, using these relationships understand and interpret historical significance. Evidence of Learning Summative Assessment (15 days) -Format: Project and Exam on material. Exam may be split into 2 sessions for full assessment of understanding Formative Assessment: Student understanding will be assessed based on discussion and dialogue as well as quizzes throughout the unit. Equipment needed: Projector, TV. Blackboard or Dry Erase board, Computer labs, , other applicable technological items. Teacher Notes: Lesson Plans will be Attached. Curriculum Development Resources New Jersey Core Content Standards, Examples, APA standards, AP Central Course Description Content Area: Advanced Placement Psychology Era: N/A Unit Title: Biological Bases of Behavior Unit Overview Target Course/Grade Level: 12 th Grade Advanced Placement Unit Summary: An effective introduction to the relationship between physiological processes and behavior including the influence of neural function, the nervous system and the brain, and genetic contributions to behavior is an important element in the AP

25 course. Unit Rationale: Human behavior is examined in this unit from the biological perspective. Various components of the brain are discussed, as well as the structure of the neuron and chemistry of the brain. Case studies of split-brained and other brain damaged patients are also explored in this unit. Learning Targets Standards: American Psychological Association and National Standards for High School Psychology Curricula Content Statements: An effective introduction to the relationship between physiological processes and behavior including the influence of neural function, the nervous system and the brain, and genetic contributions to behavior is an important element in the AP course. CPI # IA. 1-1 IIA-1.1 IIA-1.2 IIA-1.3 IIA-2.1 National CPI Describe and compare the biological, behavioral, cognitive, sociocultural, humanistic, and psychodynamic perspectives. a. Analyzing how each perspective would explain concepts, e.g., aggression, altruism b. Evaluating the limitations of each perspective in assessing behavior and mental processes c. Comparing primary emphases of the different perspectives d. Examining historical factors that influenced the popularity of a selected perspective Identify the neuron as the basis for neural communication. a. Using diagrams, models, and/or computer programs to identify the structure and function of different parts of a neuron b. Discussing how internal and external stimuli initiate the communication process in the neuron c. Describing the electrochemical process that propagates the neural impulse Describe how information is transmitted and integrated in the nervous system. Students may indicate this by (performance indicators) a. Describing the process of synaptic transmission b. Contrasting excitatory and inhibitory transmission Analyze how the process of neurotransmission can be modified by heredity and environment. a. Comparing the effects of certain drugs or toxins with the effects of neurotransmitters in relation to synaptic transmission b. Discussing the role of neurotransmitters in Parkinson s disease, hyperactivity, and/or multiple sclerosis c. Describing how learning affects neural transmission (e.g., Eric Kandel s work) Classify the major divisions and subdivisions of the nervous system. a. Describing how views of the nervous system have evolved

26 IIA-2.2 IIA-3.1 IIA-3.2 IIA-3.3 IIA-4.1 IIA-5.1 IIA-6.1 b. Identifying the central nervous system and its component parts c. Identifying the peripheral nervous system and its subdivisions Differentiate the functions of the various subdivisions of the nervous system. a. Comparing the functions of the somatic and autonomic nervous systems b. Explaining the function of the sympathetic and the parasympathetic nervous systems on heart rate or other physiological responses in an emotional situation Identify the structure and function of the major regions of the brain. Identifying the regions of the brain by using diagrams and/or computer-generated diagrams Summarizing the functions of the major brain regions Recognize that specific functions are centered in specific lobes of the cerebral cortex. Describing the functions controlled by the frontal, parietal, occipital, and temporal lobes of the cerebral cortex Relating examples of research on cortical functioning Describe lateralization of brain functions a. Identifying the role of the corpus callosum in hemispheric communication b. Identifying how vision, motor, language, and other functions are regulated by the hemispheres c. Explaining the purpose and findings of split-brain research d. Analyzing critically popular conceptions of hemispheric specialization Explain how research and technology have provided methods to analyze brain behavior and disease. a. Describing how lesions and electrical stimulation in animal research provide information about brain functions b. Discussing how the use of the CT scan, PET scan, MRI, fmri, and EEG provides information about the brain Describe how the endocrine glands are linked to the nervous system. a. Discussing the effect of the hypothalamus on the endocrine system b. Identifying the influence of fetal hormones on sexual differentiation of the central nervous system c. Giving examples of how hormones are linked to behavior and behavioral problems Assess the effects of heredity and environment on behavior. a. Identifying the relationships among DNA, genes, and chromosomes b. Differentiating between genotype and phenotype c. Explaining how chromosomal abnormalities can cause Down and/or Turner s syndrome d. Using twin and adoption studies to assess the influence of heredity and environment on behavior

27 IIA-7.1 e. Comparing results from inbred and outbred strains of rats and mice Explain how evolved tendencies interact with the present environment and culture to determine behavior. a. Describing how the environment selects traits and behaviors that increase the survival rate of organisms b. Comparing and contrasting sleeping behavior in animals and humans Unit Enduring Understandings The body is composed of cells, among these are nerve cells that talk to one another by sending chemical messages across a tiny gap that separates them. Specific brain systems serve specific functions, humans integrate information processed in these different brain systems to construct experience of sights and sounds, meanings and memories, pain and passion. Our adaptive brain is wired by our experience. The brain and spinal cord form the body s central nervous system which communicates with the body s sensory receptors, muscles and glands via the peripheral nervous system. Interconnected with the nervous system is a second communication system called the endocrine system. The glands of that system secrete hormones which travel through the bloodstream and affect other tissues including the brain. Brain imaging technology has made it possible for today s scientists to electrically, chemically and magnetically stimulate various parts of the brain and note the effects. Heredity, environment and evolution work together adaptively and shape behavior Historically many key contributors and contributions have come together to shape our understanding of the body and behavior and continue to expand our increasing knowledge. Unit Essential Questions How do biological processes relate to behavior? How does the brain communicate with itself? How does the brain communicate with the body? How does the brain communicate with the world? What influences shape the way a person behaves? How do biological processes relate to behavior? How does damage to a biological process or part affect behavior? How does the brain develop and how does this affect behavior? Instructional Focus: Learning facts, principles, theories and maps; then, Developing an understanding of the relationships among facts, concepts, principles, theories and maps; then, using these relationships understand and interpret historical significance. Evidence of Learning Summative Assessment (15 days) -Format: Project and Exam on material. Exam may be split into 2 sessions for full assessment of understanding Formative Assessment: Student understanding will be assessed based on discussion and dialogue as well as quizzes throughout the unit. Equipment needed: Projector, TV. Blackboard or Dry Erase board, Computer labs, , other applicable technological items.

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