Ratifying the Constitution. Chapter 5 Section 3

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "Ratifying the Constitution. Chapter 5 Section 3"

Transcription

1 Ratifying the Constitution Chapter 5 Section 3

2 Focus Question: How did Americans ratify the Constitution, and what are its basic principles?

3 The Struggle Over Ratification Federalists favor strong government George Washington (VA) James Madison (VA) Alexander Hamilton (NY) Antifederalists fear a strong government Thomas Jefferson (VA) John Hancock (MA) Patrick Henry (VA)

4 HAMILTON WASHINGTON MADISON JEFFERSON HANCOCK HENRY

5 Federalists Favor Strong Government They stressed the weaknesses of the Articles. They argued that only the proposed Constitution could remedy these weaknesses. They were led by James Madison and Alexander Hamilton who, along with John Jay, published a series of essays called The Federalist.

6 Antifederalists Fear a Strong Government They feared a loss of liberties and distrusted the absence of a bill of rights. They feared concentration of power in a distant elite, believing instead that power should remain in democratically elected state governments. Leading Antifederalists included Samuel Adams, John Hancock, and Patrick Henry.

7 Farmers Were Antifederalists Antifederalists included many farmers. They feared the Constitution threatened state debtor relief laws that rescued many from foreclosure. Farmers also distrusted lawyers, merchants, and the wealthy, who were largely Federalists.

8 The Federalists Gain Support The two most trusted Americans George Washington and Benjamin Franklin favored ratification.

9 Frontiersmen felt a stronger government provided protection against the Native Americans and the British in the Northwest. Artisans in the cities and most newspapers supported ratification as well.

10 The Federalist Papers In Federalist No.10 and Federalist No. 51, Madison argued that a strong national government and the Constitution s system of checks and balances would strengthen liberty. In Federalist No. 78, Hamilton wrote of the importance of a judicial branch to protect liberty.

11 The Federalists pushed for fast approval. By mid-january 1788, five states had ratified, but nine states were needed. Federalists gained the support of Massachusetts Gov. John Hancock by hinting he may be picked as the first vice president. When the Federalists agreed to add a bill of rights, four more states quickly ratified.

12 Ratification While nine states were the minimum, the two largest states, Virginia and New York, were necessary for the nation to survive. Virginia finally ratified, despite Patrick Henry s opposition. New York ratified after New York City threatened to secede from the state.

13

14 A New Government Congress convened in New York s Federal Hall on March 4, 1789 Elect a first president (George Washington) and vice president (John Adams). Add a Bill of Rights. The last two states, Rhode Island and North Carolina, now reconsidered earlier rejections and ratified as well, bringing the total to 13 states.

15 The Bill of Rights 1. Freedom of religion, speech, press, assembly, and petition. 2. Right to keep and bear arms in order to maintain a well regulated militia. 3. No quartering of soldiers. 4. Freedom from unreasonable searches and seizures. 5. Due process of law, freedom from self-incrimination, double jeopardy 6. Rights of accused persons, e.g., right to a speedy and public trial. 7. Right of trial by jury in civil cases. 8. Freedom from excessive bail, cruel and unusual punishments. 9. Other rights of the people. 10. Powers reserved to the states.

16 The Constitution established a representative government based on six principles. Popular Sovereignty The people are the only source of the government s power Limited Government The government has only the powers that the Constitution gives it Separation of Powers Power is divided among three branches of government Federalism The federal government and state governments share power Checks and Balances Each branch of government has the power to limit the actions of the other two Representative Government Citizens elect representatives to government to make laws.

How did the Constitution become ratified?

How did the Constitution become ratified? How did the Constitution become ratified? 75 1 The Federalist Position Supporters of the new Constitution called themselves federalists because they supported a strong central government. 2 James Madison,

More information

Articles of Confederation

Articles of Confederation 1777-1789 What kind of government will we have? Defining Nationhood and the Constitutional Crises of the 1780s Successes: Articles of Confederation Won the war Land Ordinance of 1785 NW Ordinance of 1787

More information

Mr. Madison s Bill of Rights

Mr. Madison s Bill of Rights Mr. Madison s Bill of Rights Purpose: This lesson focuses student attention on how rights- particularly those enumerated in the First Amendment - help maintain popular government and more broadly, the

More information

Constitutional Convention

Constitutional Convention Constitutional Convention Section 1 Review 2-A) Where did the Constitutional Convention take place? Answer: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 2-B) What was the Constitutional Convention known as in 1787? Answer:

More information

Chapter 8 Section Review Packet

Chapter 8 Section Review Packet Name: Date: Section 8-1: The Articles of Confederation Chapter 8 Section Review Packet 1. Constitution 2. Republicanism 3. Limited government 4. Suffrage 5. Articles of Confederation 6. Ratification 7.

More information

Lecture Notes, Chapter 7 1

Lecture Notes, Chapter 7 1 What kind of democracy? Pure democracy Greeks Republican in form NOT Republican Party representative White Males only landowning Left door open to non-landowning later States Drafting of State Constitutions

More information

THE CHARTERS FREEDOM. of INDEPENDENCE THE DECLARATION THE CONSTITUTION THE BILL. of RIGHTS NATIONAL ARCHIVES MUSEUM

THE CHARTERS FREEDOM. of INDEPENDENCE THE DECLARATION THE CONSTITUTION THE BILL. of RIGHTS NATIONAL ARCHIVES MUSEUM THE CHARTERS THE DECLARATION of INDEPENDENCE THE BILL of RIGHTS NATIONAL ARCHIVES MUSEUM The Declaration of Independence, the Constitution of the United States, and the Bill of Rights are America s most

More information

The Ratification Debates of the US Constitution

The Ratification Debates of the US Constitution The Ratification Debates of the US Constitution What issues delayed the ratification of the US Constitution? How were these issues resolved? The Articles of Confederation (1777) End of the American Revolution

More information

The Constitutional Convention was a large meeting held in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania at Independence Hall from May of 1787 to Sept.

The Constitutional Convention was a large meeting held in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania at Independence Hall from May of 1787 to Sept. Essential Questions: In what ways did the Constitution deviate from the government under the Articles of Confederation? What were the Federalist and Anti-Federalist critiques regarding the new Constitution?

More information

US Constitution We the People...

US Constitution We the People... US Constitution We the People... A little rebellion, now and then, is a good thing... the tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tyrants. - Thomas Jefferson

More information

Understand why the Bill of Rights was added to the United States Constitution.

Understand why the Bill of Rights was added to the United States Constitution. Teacher s Name: Employee Number: School: Social Studies Lesson Plan- SS.5.C.1.5 Describe how concerns about individual rights led to the inclusion of the Bill of Rights in the U.S. Constitution. 1. Title:

More information

Use this chart to answer questions 4 & 5.

Use this chart to answer questions 4 & 5. Multiple Choice - Identify the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question. 1. The Articles of Confederation gave the states a. no power. b. the same power as the national government.

More information

American History Unit 4 Test Constitution of the United States of America

American History Unit 4 Test Constitution of the United States of America American History Unit 4 Test Constitution of the United States of America Name: Date: Matching: 2 pts. Per Question Word Bank: A. Popular Sovereignty B. Veto C. Constituents D. Representative Democracy

More information

Chapter 7 Creating a Republic

Chapter 7 Creating a Republic The American Nation Chapter 7 Creating a Republic 1776 1790 Copyright 2003 by Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Prentice Hall, Upper Saddle River, NJ. All rights reserved. The American Nation Chapter

More information

CONFEDERATION TO CONSTITUTION CHAPTER 8

CONFEDERATION TO CONSTITUTION CHAPTER 8 CONFEDERATION TO CONSTITUTION CHAPTER 8 SHAYS REBELLION (1786-1787) Farmers rebellion against unfair taxes in MA MA state militia stopped the rebellion Caused leaders of the new country to realize they

More information

THE CONSTITUTION. The Bill of Rights. Amendments Amendments 20-27

THE CONSTITUTION. The Bill of Rights. Amendments Amendments 20-27 THE CONSTITUTION The Bill of Rights Amendments 11-19 Amendments 20-27 ARTICLE V: AMENDMENTS PROCESS BY WHICH CHANGES CAN BE MADE TO THE CONSTITUTION PROPOSAL Amendments to the Constitution must be approved

More information

The Constitutional Convention

The Constitutional Convention The Constitutional Convention Overview The American Revolution ended with the Treaty of Paris in 1783 but the nation s problems were not solved by a long way. The first government, created by the Articles

More information

Chapter 3: The Constitution of the United States of America

Chapter 3: The Constitution of the United States of America Chapter 3: The Constitution of the United States of America Why Does the Constitution Matter? Constitution body of fundamental laws which say how a government is to operate It is the supreme law of the

More information

A New Nation Study Guide Test is

A New Nation Study Guide Test is A New Nation Study Guide Test is What were the weaknesses of the Articles of Confederation? The Articles of Confederation left most of the power with the state government. There was very little federal,

More information

Constitution Bowl Questions 5 th and 6 th Grades Student Copy

Constitution Bowl Questions 5 th and 6 th Grades Student Copy Constitution Bowl Questions 5 th and 6 th Grades Student Copy 1. Q. As stated in the preamble, what are 5 of the 6 reasons the founding fathers ordained and established the Constitution? A. To form a more

More information

17. WHO BECOMES PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES IF THE PRESIDENT SHOULD DIE? 22. HOW MANY CHANGES OR AMENDMENTS ARE THERE TO THE CONSTITUTION?

17. WHO BECOMES PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES IF THE PRESIDENT SHOULD DIE? 22. HOW MANY CHANGES OR AMENDMENTS ARE THERE TO THE CONSTITUTION? DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Immigration & Naturalization Service 100 Typical Questions 1. WHAT ARE THE COLORS OF OUR FLAG? 2. HOW MANY STARS ARE THERE IN OUR FLAG? 3. WHAT COLOR ARE THE STARS ON OUR FLAG? 4.

More information

The Bill of Rights The Term Bill of rights refers to the first 10 Amendments to the U.S. Constitution

The Bill of Rights The Term Bill of rights refers to the first 10 Amendments to the U.S. Constitution The Bill of Rights The Term Bill of rights refers to the first 10 Amendments to the U.S. Constitution These Rights are what the Anti-Federalists insisted on. The Bill of Rights lists the specific individual

More information

How to Use This Product Introduction to Primary Sources Activities Using Primary Sources Document Based Assessments...

How to Use This Product Introduction to Primary Sources Activities Using Primary Sources Document Based Assessments... How to Use This Product........... 3 Introduction to Primary Sources..... 5 Activities Using Primary Sources... 15 Photographs John Adams......................15 16 An American Founder...............15

More information

Unit Question. Chapter 4 The Road to Independence, 1754 to 1783

Unit Question. Chapter 4 The Road to Independence, 1754 to 1783 Unit Question To what extent are American political rights and institutions derived from (1) British political traditions? (2) 18 th century Enlightenment thought, and (3) developments during the colonial

More information

1. Use the information in the box and your knowledge of social studies to answer the following question.

1. Use the information in the box and your knowledge of social studies to answer the following question. Constitution Test Student Class Date 1. Use the information in the box and your knowledge of social studies to answer the following question. Which speaker is voicing a right guaranteed by the First Amendment

More information

Ratifying the Constitution

Ratifying the Constitution Ratifying the Constitution Before the Constitution was adopted, it had to be sent to each state for approval. Before it could be sent to the states, it had to be rewritten so it was easier to read. The

More information

Why a Bill of Rights? What Impact Does it Have?

Why a Bill of Rights? What Impact Does it Have? A Why a Bill of Rights? What Impact Does it Have? B A C K G R O U N D E S S AY All have heard the saying, Great minds think alike. When many great minds of the colonies gathered to create a new government,

More information

UNITED STATES HISTORY AND THE CONSTITUTION

UNITED STATES HISTORY AND THE CONSTITUTION UNITED STATES HISTORY AND THE CONSTITUTION Standard USHC-1: The student will demonstrate an understanding of the conflicts between regional and national interest in the development of democracy in the

More information

CHAPTER 2 ORIGINS OF AMERICAN GOVERNMENT

CHAPTER 2 ORIGINS OF AMERICAN GOVERNMENT CHAPTER 2 ORIGINS OF AMERICAN GOVERNMENT MULTIPLE CHOICE 1. This man wrote the "textbook of the American Revolution." a. Benjamin Franklin c. Thomas Paine b. John Locke d. Thomas Jefferson ANS: B DIF:

More information

Ch 8 - Government, Citizenship, and the Constitution

Ch 8 - Government, Citizenship, and the Constitution Ch 8 - Government, Citizenship, and the Constitution Chapter 8 1 Ch 8.1 What do the goals and principles of the Constitution mean to us today? 2 Preamble The Preamble is the introduction to the Constitution

More information

Jefferson s letter objected to the omission of a Bill of Rights providing. clearly for freedom of religion, freedom of the press, protection against

Jefferson s letter objected to the omission of a Bill of Rights providing. clearly for freedom of religion, freedom of the press, protection against The Bill of Rights The Constitution of the United States was written by the delegates to the Constitutional Convention during the summer of 1787. Nine of the 13 states would have to ratify it before it

More information

Federalists v. Anti-Federalists

Federalists v. Anti-Federalists For American political leaders in the late 1700s, designing a new government did not come easily. After committees worked to draft the Constitution, the document still needed to be ratified, or approved,

More information

CONSTITUTION DAY & CITIZENSHIP DAY

CONSTITUTION DAY & CITIZENSHIP DAY CONSTITUTION DAY & CITIZENSHIP DAY September 17 Why Recognize this Document? The purpose of Constitution Day and Citizenship Day is to ensure that students in our country have an increased knowledge and

More information

The Bill of Rights. Adding the Bill of Rights BEFORE YOU READ 110 CHAPTER 4. Reading Focus. The Main Idea. Key Terms

The Bill of Rights. Adding the Bill of Rights BEFORE YOU READ 110 CHAPTER 4. Reading Focus. The Main Idea. Key Terms The Bill of Rights BEFORE YOU READ The Main Idea The freedoms spelled out in the Bill of Rights the freedoms of religion, speech, the press, and petition, and the right to a speedy and fair trial are essential

More information

The Bill of Rights. US History & Government

The Bill of Rights. US History & Government The Bill of Rights US History & Government Amendments 1-3 1. The first amendment protects these five basic rights: A Religion B Speech C Press D Assembly E Petition the government 2. The Second Amendment

More information

The Bill of Rights. The First 10 Amendments to the Constitution

The Bill of Rights. The First 10 Amendments to the Constitution The Bill of Rights The First 10 Amendments to the Constitution 1st Amendment Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the

More information

Using Primary Sources and the Internet Social Studies School Service

Using Primary Sources and the Internet Social Studies School Service DOCUMENT-BASED ACTIVITIES ON WRITING THE CONSTITUTION Using Primary Sources and the Internet Social Studies School Service www.socialstudies.com Document-Based Activities on Writing the Constitution Using

More information

Unit 2. Compare viewpoints about government in the Federalist and the Anti-Federalist Papers.

Unit 2. Compare viewpoints about government in the Federalist and the Anti-Federalist Papers. Unit 2 Compare viewpoints about government in the Federalist and the Anti-Federalist Papers. Factions Factions are smaller groups within larger groups (minority) The individuals within a faction are united

More information

Chapter 2: Confederation to Constitution

Chapter 2: Confederation to Constitution Chapter 2: Confederation to Constitution 1776-1791 In this unit, we will... Look at some of the ideas and documents that influenced the writing of the Constitution. Explore the reasons for and outcome

More information

Federalists vs. Anti-Federalists Views of the Constitution 8th Grade United States History Jennifer Cunningham, Bartow Middle School

Federalists vs. Anti-Federalists Views of the Constitution 8th Grade United States History Jennifer Cunningham, Bartow Middle School Federalists vs. Anti-Federalists Views of the Constitution 8th Grade United States History Jennifer Cunningham, Bartow Middle School When the leaders of the United States realized the Articles of Confederation

More information

relationship between states and national govt. was difficult to define people thought of the colony as the primary political unit reluctant to unite

relationship between states and national govt. was difficult to define people thought of the colony as the primary political unit reluctant to unite Warm-up for 5-1 What would happen if every player on a basketball team concentrated on setting personal records rather than working as a team to win games? What would happen to the national government

More information

The Framing of the U.S. Constitution and the Distribution of Power

The Framing of the U.S. Constitution and the Distribution of Power The Framing of the U.S. Constitution and the Distribution of Power Goals for this Section: Decision & Compromise Separation of Powers Checks and Balances The Great Compromise The 3/5 Compromise Amendability

More information

Chapter 13 The Debate Over Ratifying the Constitution

Chapter 13 The Debate Over Ratifying the Constitution Page 84 Chapter 13 The Debate Over Ratifying the Constitution Even before the Convention ended, John Lansing and Luther Martin had left for home to fight against the Constitution they had helped write.

More information

Thank you for downloading this file! I hope it can be useful to your family!

Thank you for downloading this file! I hope it can be useful to your family! BILL OF RIGHTS - Short Form This file contains a few sheets to help your child memorize a short form of The Bill of Rights. You will find: 1. Paragraph typed and illustrated 2. Interactive / self check

More information

Chapter 9 Understanding American Government

Chapter 9 Understanding American Government Chapter 9 Understanding American Government Understanding the Constitution -Overall, the Constitution created a representative democracy, sometimes known as a republic, one in which people elect others

More information

A. True or False Where the statement is true, mark T. Where it is false, mark F, and correct it in the space immediately below.

A. True or False Where the statement is true, mark T. Where it is false, mark F, and correct it in the space immediately below. AP U.S. History Mr. Mercado Name Chapter 9 The Confederation and the Constitution A. True or False Where the statement is true, mark T. Where it is false, mark F, and correct it in the space immediately

More information

The Bill of Rights 1. What rights and freedoms does the Bill of Rights protect and why are they important?

The Bill of Rights 1. What rights and freedoms does the Bill of Rights protect and why are they important? The Bill of Rights What rights and freedoms does the Bill of Rights protect and why are they important? P R E V I E W Carefully read the Parents Constitution. Then answer these questions on another sheet

More information

BILL OF RIGHTS. 1st 10 Amendments to the US Constitution

BILL OF RIGHTS. 1st 10 Amendments to the US Constitution BILL OF RIGHTS 1st 10 Amendments to the US Constitution Congress cannot limit the ability of the press to publish information that is critical of the government or other individuals. The exception is libel

More information

A More Perfect Union

A More Perfect Union A More Perfect Union Lesson Instructions for Older Students Overview This lesson, prepared especially for Constitution Day, introduces students to the U.S. Constitution. Students watch a slide show on

More information

The Origins of the Bill of Rights

The Origins of the Bill of Rights A The Origins of the Bill of Rights B A C K G R O U N D E S S AY Many American colonists felt betrayed by the British government as their rights were taken away. The colonists were forced to allow British

More information

Unit 1: Charters of Freedom_reordered

Unit 1: Charters of Freedom_reordered Name Date Mastering the Content Circle the letter next to the best answer. Unit 1: Charters of Freedom_reordered 1. Why does the president of the United States have the power to make treaties with foreign

More information

Ratification and the Constitution

Ratification and the Constitution Unit 1 Foundation of American Government Ratification and the Constitution Mr. Ahlberg Notes #3 James Madison Father of the Constitution Wrote most of the Constitution Kept a detailed Journal of the Convention

More information

Chapter 7 Founding a Nation,

Chapter 7 Founding a Nation, OUTLINE Chapter 7 Founding a Nation, 1783-1789 This chapter discusses the challenges of governing the new United States during the first five years after the War of Independence. The focus is on the creation

More information

Chapter 2: Origins of American

Chapter 2: Origins of American Chapter 2: Origins of American Government Objectives Students Will Be Able To: a. explain the significance and impact of the English on the government in the USA b. identify the steps that led to the independence

More information

Constitutional Ratification: The Federalist Papers, Key Figures, and Bill of Rights

Constitutional Ratification: The Federalist Papers, Key Figures, and Bill of Rights Brian Brodie TAH 9/25/08 Constitutional Ratification: The Federalist Papers, Key Figures, and Bill of Rights This following curriculum unit is for an elective course, American Government, offered to juniors

More information

Constitution Kids Pledge:

Constitution Kids Pledge: CK Lesson #1 Free Enterprise Constitution Signed: September, 1787 Advantages of Free Enterprise 1. You choose what you do. 2. is always needed for success. 3. Personal is an important privilege of free

More information

Multiple Choice: In the blank provided, write the letter of the correct answer for each statement or question. (1 pt. each)

Multiple Choice: In the blank provided, write the letter of the correct answer for each statement or question. (1 pt. each) U. S. Constitution Test (100 points) True or False: Put a T in the blank next to the statement if it is true. Put an F in the blank if the statement is false. (1 pt. each) 1. Congress has the authority

More information

Amendments to the Constitution

Amendments to the Constitution 1 Amendments to the Constitution Freedom of Religion Freedom of Speech Freedom of Assembly Freedom of the Press Freedom to Petition the Government for redress of grievances Right to Bear Arms Right of

More information

4. There are three qualifications from becoming a member of the House of Representatives

4. There are three qualifications from becoming a member of the House of Representatives Article I Legislative Branch 1. The job of the legislative branch is to Make laws Name Period Federal Constitution Study Guide 2. The legislative branch is divided into two parts or two houses which are

More information

To Form A More Perfect Union

To Form A More Perfect Union To Form A More Perfect Union Definition o A constitution is a nation s basic law. It creates political institutions, assigns or divides powers in government, and often provides certain guarantees to citizens.

More information

Chapter 7: A More Perfect Union. Section 1: The Articles of Confederation

Chapter 7: A More Perfect Union. Section 1: The Articles of Confederation Chapter 7: A More Perfect Union Section 1: The Articles of Confederation From Independent States to Republic State Constitutions By 1780, each state had its own constitution All limited power of government

More information

Basic Timeline 1776 Declaration of Independence 1781 Articles of Confederation 1787 U.S. Constitution 1861-1865 Civil War 1865-1877 Reconstruction

Basic Timeline 1776 Declaration of Independence 1781 Articles of Confederation 1787 U.S. Constitution 1861-1865 Civil War 1865-1877 Reconstruction Basic Timeline 1781 Articles of Confederation 1776 Declaration of Independence 1861-1865 Civil War 1787 U.S. Constitution 1865-1877 Reconstruction Historical Context: The Revolution The American Revolution

More information

AMENDMENTS TO THE CONSTITION: FACT SHEETS

AMENDMENTS TO THE CONSTITION: FACT SHEETS AMENDMENTS TO THE CONSTITION: FACT SHEETS Prepared by John Thurlow www.johnthurlow.com See two lists below The Bill of Rights (the first ten amendments) 1 Freedom of speech, press, religion, assembly and

More information

Water Bill of Rights Project WET Curriculum and Activity Guide

Water Bill of Rights Project WET Curriculum and Activity Guide Water Bill of Rights Project WET Curriculum and Activity Guide Grade Level: Middle School, High School Subject Areas: History, Government, Environmental Science Duration: Preparation: 10 minutes; Activity

More information

Concept Web Directions: Complete each part of the web by writing the correct word or phrase from the list below where it belongs.

Concept Web Directions: Complete each part of the web by writing the correct word or phrase from the list below where it belongs. Chapter 7, Legislative Branch Worksheet. Fill in the Blanks What Do You Know? THE LEGISLATIVE BRANCH Concept Web Directions: Complete each part of the web by writing the correct word or phrase from the

More information

Social Studies Lesson Plan- SS.5.C.1.6. Compare Federalist and Anti-Federalist views of government.

Social Studies Lesson Plan- SS.5.C.1.6. Compare Federalist and Anti-Federalist views of government. Teacher s Name: Employee Number: School: Social Studies Lesson Plan- SS.5.C.1.6 Compare Federalist and Anti-Federalist views of government 1. Title: Federalists vs. Anti-Federalists - Fifth Grade 2. Overview

More information

The Constitution, the Bill of Rights, and the Amendments. Unit Focus

The Constitution, the Bill of Rights, and the Amendments. Unit Focus Unit 3 The, the Bill of Rights, and the Amendments Unit Focus The of the United States The Bill of Rights The Amendments to the Spotlight Reading: Benjamin Franklin Liberty Bell Key Vocabulary Preview

More information

WEB CODES FOR SELF-TEST. Ch. 1.mqa-1014 CH. 2 mqa-1026 Ch. 3 mqa CH 1 Self test p. 25 code : mqa-1014

WEB CODES FOR SELF-TEST. Ch. 1.mqa-1014 CH. 2 mqa-1026 Ch. 3 mqa CH 1 Self test p. 25 code : mqa-1014 Magruder s American Government Textbook chapter self test Online test: http://www.phschool.com/webcodes10/index.cfm?fuseaction=home.gotowebcode&wcprefix=mqk&w csuffix=1000 WEB CODES FOR SELF-TEST Ch. 1.mqa-1014

More information

Select the link to the article A More Perfect Union

Select the link to the article A More Perfect Union Name Period The Charters of Freedom Constitution & Bill of Rights 60 Points Answer the following questions in complete sentences, except where you can fill in the blanks, by following the directions to

More information

Basic Civics Test: Correct Answer: d. Freedom of speech and freedom of worship.

Basic Civics Test: Correct Answer: d. Freedom of speech and freedom of worship. Basic Civics Test: Here is a sample test using 50 of the 100 United States Customs and Immigration Services (USCIS) Civics Test questions. The multiple-choice questions and answers were selected from the

More information

You ve Got Rights! STEP BY STEP

You ve Got Rights! STEP BY STEP Teacher s Guide You ve Got Rights! Time Needed: One class period Materials Needed: Student worksheets Scissors, glue (optional) Copy Instructions: Anticipation Activity (half-sheet; class set) Reading

More information

Many years ago the people who lived where we live today experienced what they viewed as a very serious

Many years ago the people who lived where we live today experienced what they viewed as a very serious The First Scare Many years ago the people who lived where we live today experienced what they viewed as a very serious scare The first 10 Amendments [or changes] to the United States Constitution. Original

More information

QUIZ. To be used with lyrics to RRR songs What Does the Constitution Do?, The Bill of (Your) Rights, and The Rest of the Amendments

QUIZ. To be used with lyrics to RRR songs What Does the Constitution Do?, The Bill of (Your) Rights, and The Rest of the Amendments QUIZ To be used with lyrics to RRR songs What Does the Constitution Do?, The Bill of (Your) Rights, and The Rest of the Amendments Circle the correct answer to each question ARTICLE AND AMENDMENT PROCESS

More information

American Government Unit 1: Foundations of Government

American Government Unit 1: Foundations of Government American Government Unit 1: Foundations of Government CHAPTER 1: PRINCIPLES OF GOVERNMENT Section 1 What is Government? Legislative Power make laws Executive Power carry out laws Judicial Power interpret

More information

Work on the Federalist Papers handout.

Work on the Federalist Papers handout. STANDARD: USHC 1.6 Analyze the development of the twoparty system during the presidency of George Washington, including controversies over domestic and foreign policies and the regional interests of the

More information

The Constitution Chapter 2. Roots of the New American Nation

The Constitution Chapter 2. Roots of the New American Nation The Constitution Chapter 2 Preamble We the People of the United States, in Order to form a more perfect Union, establish Justice, insure domestic Tranquility, provide for the common defense, promote the

More information

The Road to Change. From the Declaration of Independence to the Constitution

The Road to Change. From the Declaration of Independence to the Constitution The Road to Change From the Declaration of Independence to the Constitution From the Declaration of Independence to the Constitution 1776: Colonists sign the Declaration of Independence 1783: Colonists

More information

The Early Republic: Conflicts at Home and Abroad, The Early Republic: Conflicts at Home and Abroad,

The Early Republic: Conflicts at Home and Abroad, The Early Republic: Conflicts at Home and Abroad, First Congress, April 1789 Four immediate tasks: Raising Revenue to support new government Addressing Bill of Rights Setting up Executive departments Organizing Federal Judiciary James Madison becomes

More information

US History, October 13

US History, October 13 US History, October 13 Entry Task: Fill out the top of your paper. Announcements: Grades have been updated! (Currently - *s (stars/excused) in for: Legislative Branch, Sen/Rep Research, and Letter Template

More information

LESSON TWO: THE FEDERALIST PAPERS

LESSON TWO: THE FEDERALIST PAPERS LESSON TWO: THE FEDERALIST PAPERS OVERVIEW OBJECTIVES Students will be able to: Identify the Articles of Confederation and explain why it failed. Explain the argument over the need for a bill of rights

More information

United States Constitution Interactive Cloze Activity. The Bill of Rights

United States Constitution Interactive Cloze Activity. The Bill of Rights The Bill of Rights The Bill of Rights guarantees certain rights to citizens. We will study those rights during the next few days. In addition, citizens have duties and responsibilities. Duties are things

More information

1. Which document was written to let the world know that the colonists wanted to be free to make their own decisions in their own nation?

1. Which document was written to let the world know that the colonists wanted to be free to make their own decisions in their own nation? 5 th Grade Civics Integration Pre/Post Test 1. Which document was written to let the world know that the colonists wanted to be free to make their own decisions in their own nation? a. The Citizenship

More information

The Bill of Rights By James Madison 1791

The Bill of Rights By James Madison 1791 Name: Class: The Bill of Rights By James Madison 1791 The Preamble to the Bill of Rights [1] Congress of the United States begun and held at the City of New-York on Wednesday the fourth of March, one thousand

More information

Creating and Ratifying the Constitution

Creating and Ratifying the Constitution SECTION Creating and Ratifying the Constitution GUIDE TO READING Main Idea Delegates to the Constitutional Convention arrived with varying ideas and plans of government, which meant that compromise would

More information

AP UNITED STATES HISTORY 2011 SCORING GUIDELINES (Form B)

AP UNITED STATES HISTORY 2011 SCORING GUIDELINES (Form B) AP UNITED STATES HISTORY 2011 SCORING GUIDELINES (Form B) Question 3 Analyze the ways in which the political, economic, and diplomatic crises of the 1780s shaped the provisions of the United States Constitution.

More information

Unit 2: The Constitution

Unit 2: The Constitution Unit 2: The Constitution Name Per Lesson 1: Lesson one has two main assignments. At the end of these assignments you will take a closed note quiz. After these lessons you will be expected to be able to:

More information

Quiz. Civics Benchmarks: SS.7.C.2.4 and SS.7.C Which of the following is protected by the First Amendment?

Quiz. Civics Benchmarks: SS.7.C.2.4 and SS.7.C Which of the following is protected by the First Amendment? Attachment G Title of Lesson: Evaluating the rights contained in the Bill of Rights and other amendments to the Constitution and distinguishing how the Constitution safeguards and limits individual rights.

More information

Standard 1 Review. Opening: Answer the multiple-choice questions on pages and

Standard 1 Review. Opening: Answer the multiple-choice questions on pages and Opening: Standard 1 Review Answer the multiple-choice questions on pages 32-34 and 57-60. Correct answers will be counted as extra credit on your quiz. Standard 1.1 Massachusetts New York Pennsylvania

More information

Chapter 2: Origins of American Government Section 2

Chapter 2: Origins of American Government Section 2 Chapter 2: Origins of American Government Section 2 Objectives 1. Explain how Britain s colonial policies contributed to the growth of self-government in the colonies. 2. Identify the major steps that

More information

Creating a New Constitution

Creating a New Constitution netw rks York July 26, 1788 Rhode May 2 Connecticu Jan. 9, 178 New Jersey Dec. 18, 1787 Pennsylvania Dec. 12, 1787 There s More Online! GRAPHIC ORGANIZER The Great Compromise Virginia V ne 25, 1788 MAP

More information

The United States Constitution Origin. The Second Continental Congress

The United States Constitution Origin. The Second Continental Congress The United States Constitution Origin The Second Continental Congress Date: May 1775 Place: Philadelphia Number of Colonies Sending Delegates: Thirteen President: John Hancock (Massachusetts) Purpose:

More information

AP UNITED STATES HISTORY 2008 SCORING GUIDELINES (Form B)

AP UNITED STATES HISTORY 2008 SCORING GUIDELINES (Form B) AP UNITED STATES HISTORY 2008 SCORING GUIDELINES (Form B) Question 2 Analyze the reasons for the Anti-Federalists opposition to ratifying the Constitution. The 8 9 Essay Contains a clear, well-developed

More information

Chapter Seven American History Creating a Republic

Chapter Seven American History Creating a Republic Chapter Seven American History Creating a Republic During the Revolutionary War, state governments began to dissolve In July of 1776, the Congress began to organize a national government Source: National

More information

Chapter 5 Citizenship and the Constitution

Chapter 5 Citizenship and the Constitution Chapter 5 Citizenship and the Constitution Section Notes Understanding the Constitution The Bill of Rights Rights and Responsibilities of Citizenship Quick Facts Separation of Powers Checks and Balances

More information

U.S. History Homework Packet The Constitution Ms. Peckham 10/22-11/06

U.S. History Homework Packet The Constitution Ms. Peckham 10/22-11/06 U.S. History Homework Packet The Constitution Ms. Peckham 10/22-11/06 Tuesday (10/23): Read Chapter 2, Section 1, The Delegates Meet in Philadelphia Wednesday (10/24): Read Chapter 2, Section 2, Convention

More information

Homework: 1. Begin preparing for discussions by completing a discussion post on Canvas (directions are on Canvas): Red = Fri 9/4 Purple = Tues 9/8

Homework: 1. Begin preparing for discussions by completing a discussion post on Canvas (directions are on Canvas): Red = Fri 9/4 Purple = Tues 9/8 Class 1: Colonial History Review The Founding Period: Ideals, Contradictions, and Uncertainties Agenda Objective: 1. To refresh our memory of colonial American history. 2. To analyze the Declaration of

More information

Bill of Rights Matching Cards

Bill of Rights Matching Cards Introduction: The Bill of Rights Matching Cards game is designed as a fun review of all ten of the Bill of Rights. QUEST INSTRUCTIONS 1. Print out the card sheets. The Online Teacher Resource Suite Constitution

More information

Course/Grade Level: 5 th Grade. Lesson Title: Bill of Rights. Teacher: Dawn Granath

Course/Grade Level: 5 th Grade. Lesson Title: Bill of Rights. Teacher: Dawn Granath Course/Grade Level: 5 th Grade Lesson Title: Bill of Rights Teacher: Dawn Granath 1. Set Induction Have another teacher or someone come into the room and pretend to take the teacher out of the room. The

More information

The Bill of Rights and Tracking in the U.S.

The Bill of Rights and Tracking in the U.S. www.trackedinamerica.org The Bill of Rights and Tracking in the U.S. Introduction The Bill of Rights was designed to protect the basic freedoms of all U.S. citizens. As demonstrated on this Web site the

More information

CIVICS End of Course Examination SAMPLE. This is a SECURE Test. DO NOT DUPLICATE. For all students enrolled in the following courses:

CIVICS End of Course Examination SAMPLE. This is a SECURE Test. DO NOT DUPLICATE. For all students enrolled in the following courses: CIVICS End of Course Examination SAMPLE This is a SECURE Test. DO NOT DUPLICATE. For all students enrolled in the following courses: Directions: M/J Civics 2106010 M/J Civics-Advanced 2106020 - Mark your

More information