EUROPEAN UROLOGY 65 (2014)

Save this PDF as:
 WORD  PNG  TXT  JPG

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "EUROPEAN UROLOGY 65 (2014) 610 619"

Transcription

1 EUROPEAN UROLOGY 65 (2014) available at journal homepage: Prostate Cancer Comparisons of the Perioperative, Functional, and Oncologic Outcomes After Robot-Assisted Versus Pure Extraperitoneal Laparoscopic Radical Prostatectomy Guillaume Ploussard *, Alexandre de la Taille, Morgan Moulin, Dimitri Vordos, Andras Hoznek, Claude-Clément Abbou, Laurent Salomon Department of Urology, Hospital Henri Mondor, 51 Avenue du Maréchal de Lattre de Tassigny, Créteil, France Article info Article history: Accepted November 22, 2012 Published online ahead of print on December 1, 2012 Keywords: Prostate neoplasm Laparoscopy Prostatectomy Robotic surgery Continence Potency Recurrence Abstract Background: In spite of the increasing use of robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RALP) worldwide, no level 1 evidence-based benefit favouring RALP versus pure laparoscopic approaches has been demonstrated in extraperitoneal laparoscopic procedures. Objective: To compare the operative, functional, and oncologic outcomes between pure laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (LRP) and RALP. Design, setting, and participants: From 2001 to 2011, 2386 extraperitoneal LRPs were performed consecutively in cases of localised prostate cancers. Intervention: A total of 1377 LRPs and 1009 RALPs were performed using an extraperitoneal approach. Outcome measurements and statistical analysis: Patient demographics, surgical parameters, pathologic features, and functional outcomes were collected into a prospective database and compared between LRP and RALP. Biochemical recurrence free survival was tested using the Kaplan-Meier method. Mean follow-up was 39 and 15.4 mo in the LRP and RALP groups, respectively. Results and limitations: Shorter durations of operative time and of hospital stay were reported in the RALP group compared with the LRP group ( p < 0.001) even beyond the 100 first cases. Mean blood loss was significantly lower in the RALP group ( p < 0.001). The overall rate and the severity of the complications did not differ between the two groups. In pt2 disease, lower rates of positive margins were reported in the RALP group ( p = 0.030; odds ratio [OR]: 0.396) in multivariable analyses. The surgical approach did not affect the continence recovery. Robot assistance was independently predictive for potency recovery ( p = 0.045; OR: 5.9). Survival analyses showed an equal oncologic control between the two groups. Limitations were the lack of randomisation and the short-term follow-up. Conclusions: Robotic assistance using an extraperitoneal approach offers better results than pure laparoscopy in terms of operative time, blood loss, and hospital stay. The robotic approach independently improves the potency recovery but not the continence recovery. When strict indications of nerve-sparing techniques are respected, RALP gives better results than LRP in terms of surgical margins in pathologically organ-confined disease. Longer follow-up is justified to reach conclusions on oncologic outcomes. # 2012 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. * Corresponding author. Tel ; Fax: address: (G. Ploussard) /$ see back matter # 2012 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

2 EUROPEAN UROLOGY 65 (2014) Introduction Radical prostatectomy (RP) is a standard treatment for localised prostate cancer. The first laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (LRP) was performed in 1991 and thought not to be feasible because of the excessive operative time [1,2]. However, in the following years, the development of minimally invasive surgery was driven by work in Europe. Some centres can now report considerable experience and are able to standardise the technique. Experienced surgeons have described the various advantages of laparoscopy [3,4]. And yet LRP remains a technically demanding procedure and requires a learning curve [4,5]. These difficulties and the emergence of robotic assistance that improves precision led laparoscopic urologists to develop the technique of robotassisted radical prostatectomy (RALP) [6 8]. One of the purposes of the robotic assistance was to reduce the learning curve, even in laparoscopically naive surgeons, without sacrificing the oncologic standards established by the open approach [8,9]. Recent reviews and meta-analyses of the literature recently highlighted the potential benefit of RALP regarding the functional outcomes [10,11]. In a recent metaanalysis, Tewari et al. also found that total perioperative complication rates were higher for LRP than for RALP [12]. Authors highlighted that the lack of randomised controlled trials were drawbacks in all published studies. The two first controlled trials comparing LRP and RALP were recently published using a transperitoneal approach [13,14]. Authors reported better functional results in terms of potency favouring RALP in both series and only in terms of continence recovery in one series. However, only a few patients were included, limiting the power of analysis in comparing low events rates such as positive margins, operative complications, and severe incontinence. Most of these series reported short-term experience with the transperitoneal (but not the extraperitoneal) approach. The aim of our study was to compare the perioperative parameters and the functional and oncologic outcomes between pure LRP and RALP using an extraperitoneal approach and performed in a high-volume laparoscopy reference centre. 2. Patients and methods 2.1. Patient selection Between July 2001 and December 2011, 2386 consecutive men underwent a LRP including 1377 pure LRPs and 1009 RALPs. Indications of surgery were identical in the cases of pure LRP or RALP. We performed the first LRP and the first RALP in our department in 2001, and we have been performing RALP routinely since The respective rates of LRP and RALP procedures for RP were 95.6% and 4.4% before 2006, 55.9% and 44.1% during the period , and have been 4.6% and 95.4% since Most of the LRPs were performed by three senior surgeons (L.S., C.C.A., A.D.L.T.), and the total number of RALPs by two senior surgeons (C.C.A., A.D.L.T.) who had performed >100 LRPs before starting the RALP learning curve. Mean follow-up in our cohort was 50.4 mo (1 138 mo). Mean follow-up was 39 and 15.4 mo in the LRP and RALP groups, respectively. The study was carried out in accordance with our local good clinical practice rules Surgical procedure The da Vinci system including three robot arms and a single console (first generation) was used for all RALPs. We described the surgical technique andthedifferent stepsofthesurgery previously [15]. The bladder neck was incised circumferentially with an attempt to spare the it except for highrisk prostate cancers at risk of seminal vesicle invasion (assessed by preoperative magnetic resonance imaging [MRI]). A standard lymphadenectomy was performed prior to the completion of the vesicourethral anastomosis in patients whose Gleason score was >6 and/or prostate-specific antigen (PSA) was >10 ng/ml. A running vesicourethral anastomosis was then performed. At the beginning of the experience, a 3-0 polyglactin suture on a 5/8 circle tapered needle was used. For 2 yr we used a bidirectionalbarbed suture to perform the running anastomosis. The anastomosis started with a posterior reconstruction of the rhabdosphincterasdescribed byrocco. An anteriorreconstruction was performed suspending the anastomosis to the Santorini plexus. Preoperatively, potent low- or intermediate-risk patients underwent a nerve-sparing procedure. An intrafascial dissection as a nerve-sparing procedure could be proposed to very low-risk patients who were potent preoperatively. Very low-risk prostate cancer was defined by a clinical T1c cancer with favourable factors including a PSA < 10 ng/ml, a moderate extent of cancer on positive cores, few cores involved with cancer, and favourable MRI findings (it1 or small it2 cancer). The urethral catheter was usually removed on postoperative day 7 with no cystogram Database and statistical analysis Data were collected prospectively into a database by a clinical research assistant (MM) including preoperative clinical and biologic characteristics, surgical data, and postoperative parameters. Pathologic assessments of RP specimens by a senior pathologist were recorded. After fixation, the apex and base (3-mm-thick slices) were removed from each specimen and examined by the cone method. The prostate body was step-sectioned at 3-mm intervals perpendicular to the long axis (apicalbasal) of the gland. Positive surgical margins were defined by the presence of tumour tissue on the inked surface of the specimen. All patients prospectively completed self-administered questionnaires concerning their quality of life (European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer QLQ-C30) and their voiding and sexual disorders (International Index of Erectile Function [IIEF]-5), preoperatively and at 1, 3, 6, 12, and 24 mo after RP. Potency was defined as the ability to achieve an erection sufficient for penetration (full erections or diminished erections are routinely sufficient for intercourse) with or without the use of a phosphodiesterase type 5 enzyme inhibitor (excluding cases with intracavernous injection of prostaglandin E or vacuum). Urinary continence was assessed by questionnaires and defined as the absence of pads (strict urinary continence). Continence and potency results were studied in the overall cohort regardless of the continence and potency status before surgery. Phosphodiesterase type 5 enzyme inhibitors were systematically proposed at patient discretion. The use of oral erectogenic medications was not statistically different between LRP and RALP groups. Biochemical recurrence was defined as any detectable serum PSA (>0.2 ng/ml). Perioperative complications were noted and reported according to the updated Clavien classification [16]. The qualitative data were tested using the chi-square or the Fisher test as appropriate. The quantitative data were analysed by the Mann-Whitney test. Multivariable analyses used a regression logistic model. In these multivariable analyses, we have only included the patients operated beyond the 100 first cases of each procedure and

3 612 EUROPEAN UROLOGY 65 (2014) operated on by the two surgeons performing both LRP and RALP (A.D.L.T. and C.C.A.). Time-dependent variables were compared using the Kaplan-Meier method and a log-rank test. A double-sided p value <0.05 was considered statistically significant. All data were analysed using SPSS v.13.0 software (IBM Corp., Armonk, NY, USA). 3. Results 3.1. Perioperative parameters Table 1 shows the preoperative characteristics of the patient s cohort according to the surgical approach. The two groups (LRP vs RALP) were comparable in terms of PSA, body mass index, age, and clinical stage. High-grade prostate cancers involving a greater number of cores were more frequently reported in the RALP cohort ( p < 0.001). Shorter durations of operative time (129 vs 175 min) and of hospital stay (4.0 vs 5.7 d) were reported in the RALP group compared with the LRP group ( p < 0.001) even beyond the 100 first cases of each procedure (Table 2). Mean blood loss was significantly lower in the RALP group (515 vs 800 ml; p < 0.001). However, bladder catheterisation was longer in the RALP group (8.0 vs 7.2 d). The overall rate and the severity (defined by the Clavien classification) of complications did not differ between the two groups (Table 2). Detailed complications in each group are listed in Table Pathologic findings, surgical margins, and follow-up data The results of pathologic findings are listed in Table 4. Findings in RP specimens did not differ between the two Table 1 Preoperative characteristics of the overall cohort and comparisons between laparoscopic radical prostatectomy and robot-assisted radical prostatectomy subgroups Overall cohort n = 2386 LRP n = 1377 RALP n = 1009 p value Age, yr, mean (IQR) 62.7 (9.9) BMI, kg/m 2, mean (IQR) 26.5 (4.6) PSA, ng/ml, mean (IQR) 9.6 (4.8) No. of positive 4.1 (3.0) <0.001 cores, mean (IQR) Clinical stage, % T1c T2a b T2c T >T1c Biopsy GS, % < BMI = body mass index; GS = Gleason score; LRP = laparoscopic radical prostatectomy; RALP = robot-assisted radical prostatectomy; IQR = interquartile range. groups in terms of Gleason score and ptnm stage ( p = and 0.788, respectively). Patients operated on by RALP have smaller glands compared with their counterparts operated on by LRP (47.5 vs 53.0 g; p < 0.001). Overall, in univariable analysis, the rate of positive surgical margins was significantly higher in the RALP group (31.3 vs 26.6%; p = 0.038), especially in the case of pt3 cancer ( p = 0.030). Multivariable analysis is shown in Table 5. Classical prognostic factors were significantly associated with positive margins: PSA, ptnm stage, and Gleason score. The prostate volume was inversely correlated with the risk Table 2 Comparisons of intraoperative and postoperative data, complications between the laparoscopic radical prostatectomy and robotassisted radical prostatectomy groups Overall cohort n = 2386 LRP n = 1377 RALP n = 1009 p value Beyond the learning curve y p value Perioperative data Operative time, min, mean (IQR) (60.0) <0.001 <0.001 Blood loss, ml, mean (IQR) (695.0) <0.001 <0.001 Bladder catheterization, d, mean (IQR) 7.5 (4.0) <0.001 <0.001 Hospital stay, d, mean (IQR) 5.0 (3.0) <0.001 <0.001 Transfusion rate, % Lymph node excision, % Nerve-sparing procedure, % No Unilateral Bilateral Complications Clavien Anastomosis leakage, % <0.001 <0.001 Anastomosis stenosis, % LRP = laparoscopic radical prostatectomy; RALP = robot-assisted radical prostatectomy; IQR = interquartile range. Comparisons were made among the overall cohort and after excluding patients operated on during the 100 first cases of each procedure. y After excluding the first 100 LRPs and the first 100 RALPs of each surgeon.

4 EUROPEAN UROLOGY 65 (2014) Table 3 Detailed surgical and medical complications in the two laparoscopic radical prostatectomy and robot-assisted radical prostatectomy groups LRP n = 1377 RALP n = 1009 Medical complications Death 1 Urinary infection Fever 1 8 Phlebitis 2 Pulmonary embolus 1 2 Atelectasia 1 Pneumonia 6 4 Ill-being 5 3 Angor 1 1 Threat syndrome 3 1 Myocardial infarction 2 3 Renal insufficiency 2 3 Retina detachment 1 Overall, % Surgical complications Haemorrhage 6 4 Rectal injury 11 3 Epigastric injury 4 3 Wound complications Haematoma 9 14 Abscess 3 9 Retzius collection Lymphorrhea 1 2 Lymphocele 5 9 Haematuria Anastomosis leakage Ileus 2 4 Neurapraxia 1 1 Bowel injury 1 Overall, % LRP = laparoscopic radical prostatectomy; RALP = robot-assisted radical prostatectomy. of positive margins ( p = 0.004). The rate of positive surgical margins increased over time and was 1.9-fold higher in the period compared with the earlier period ( p = 0.045). Surgical experience continuously improved the margin status even beyond the 100 first cases of each procedure. The rate of surgical margins decreased by 2.6- fold after 500 procedures ( p < 0.001). In multivariable analysis, RALP was not associated with an increased rate of positive margins. On the contrary, we observed a trend toward lower rates of positive margins in the RALP group compared with LRP, but differences did not reach significance. This difference was significant in the subgroup of pt2 cancers revealing RALP as the favourable factor independently associated with better oncologic control of margins in organ-confined disease ( p = 0.030; odds ratio [OR]: 0.396). In pt3 cancers, the type of procedure (LRP vs RALP) did not affect the rate of surgical margins in multivariable analysis ( p = 0.619). Only the PSA level and surgical experience were independent predictors of positive margins in pt3 cancers ( p < and p < 0.001, respectively). Survival curves stratified by the surgical approach were not significantly different in the overall cohort and in pt2, pt3a, or pt3b subgroups (log-rank tests in Table 4) showing an equal short-term oncologic control. According to the D Amico preoperative risk groups (Fig. 1), biochemical recurrence free survival curves were not significantly different between the two procedures in the low-risk (log-rank test: p = 0.672), intermediate-risk ( p = 0.928), and high-risk groups ( p = 0.413). The surgical volume had a significant impact on the recurrence-free survival in the LRP group with better oncologic outcomes after 300 procedures compared with the 300 first LRP procedures ( p = 0.027; Fig. 2). No difference was reported in the RALP group ( p = 0.132). Overall, 221 and 92 salvage treatments were reported in the LRP (16.0%) and RALP (9.1%) groups, respectively Continence In univariable analysis, the rate of continence was significantly in favour of RALP at each postoperative visit ((Fig. 3; p < 0.001). Results of continence recovery in the overall cohort are shown in Figure 3. When considering only patients operated on beyond the learning curve of each surgeon, differences remained significant; after 6 and 12 mo, the rate of continence was 59% and 48.8% in the cases of LRP as compared with 72% and 83.6% in the cases of RALP. In the multivariable analysis shown in Table 6, the only factor independently associated with a better continence recovery was age ( p = 0.002) at each time point. Table 6 illustrates the multivariable analysis at the 12-mo visit. Surgical experience, nerve-sparing surgery, and surgical approach (LRP vs RALP) were not independent predictors for short-term (at 1, 3, and 6 mo) or long-term (at 12 and 24 mo) continence recovery. Surgical treatment for persistent incontinence was more frequent in the LRP group as compared with the RALP group ( p < 0.001). Use of the Macroplastique injection, adjustable continence therapy balloon, suburethral sling, and artificial sphincter were reported in 3, 10, 17, and 13 cases in the LRP group versus 0, 2, 5, and 0 cases in the RALP group Potency In univariable analysis, the rate of potency was significantly in favour of RALP at each postoperative visit. This difference remained significant in a subgroup of patients undergoing a bilateral nerve-sparing preservation (Fig. 4; p < 0.001). After 6 and 12 mo, 20% and 31.6% of patients were potent after LRP compared with 42% and 57.7% after RALP, respectively. In the multivariable analysis shown in Table 6, age ( p = 0.001), nerve-sparing surgery ( p = 0.033; OR: 3.9), and RALP ( p = 0.045; OR: 5.9) were significant independent predictors of potency recovery 12 mo after surgery. These factors were also associated with potency at each medical visit during follow-up. Surgical experience, the surgeon, and the date of intervention were not associated with this functional outcome. The evolution of IIEF-5 over time is reported in Table 7. Only scores from patients undergoing a bilateral nervesparing surgery were reported. The scores at baseline were comparable in the two groups. After surgery, scores were

5 614 EUROPEAN UROLOGY 65 (2014) Table 4 Comparisons of pathological features and follow-up data between the two groups (LRP versus RALP). Comparisons have been made among the overall cohort and after excluding patients operated on during the 100 first cases of each procedure. Biochemical recurrence has been tested using a log-rank test Overall cohort n = 2386 LRP n = 1377 RALP n = 1009 p value Beyond the learning curve * p value Pathologic findings Prostate weight, g, mean (IQR) 50.7 (24.0) <0.001 <0.001 Specimen GS, % Pathologic stage, % pt pt2a pt2b pt2c pt3a pt3b pt Positive surgical margins, % Overall pt pt Follow-up data PSA failure, % <0.001 Overall y y pt y y pt y y Follow-up, mo, mean (IQR) 29.1 (36.6) <0.001 <0.001 GS = Gleason score; LRP = laparoscopic radical prostatectomy; PSA = prostate-specific antigen; RALP = robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy; IQR = interquartile range. * After excluding the first 100 LRPs and the first 100 RALPs of each surgeon. y Log-rank test. higher in the RALP group as compared with those reported in the LRP at each time point. In the overall cohort, comparisons confirmed this significant difference at each time point favouring RALP. 4. Discussion The use of the robotic system reduces both the difficulty in performing complex laparoscopic techniques and the learning curve compared with the pure laparoscopic procedure. As noted earlier, the practice of the pure LRP requires a steep learning curve [17,18]. Experience can improve pathologic and operative outcomes well beyond the initial learning curve with a plateau at procedures [19]. The learning curve for RALP was thoroughly studied, and surgical teams were able to accomplish comparable operative times after 12 or 18 cases [20,21]. Some studies comparing pure LRP and RALP were also published and show interesting postoperative results for RALP [22 24]. It is interesting to notice that each of the parameters operative, pathologic, or functional requires a different learning curve that should be assessed separately in LRP and RALP procedures. The operative time should not be the single variable evaluated to define the learning curve and the surgeon s expertise. However, due to a lack of large randomised controlled trials, differences in patient characteristics or surgical experience might explain differences in outcomes between the surgical approaches. The two first controlled trials comparing LRP and RALP using a transperitoneal approach were recently published [13,14]. Authors reported better functional results in terms of potency favouring RALP in both series, and only in terms of continence recovery in one series. However, few patients were included, limiting the power of analysis in comparing low events rates such as positive margins, operative complications, and severe incontinence. Most of these series reported the midterm experience of the transperitoneal (but not extraperitoneal) approach. Concerning the extraperitoneal LRP, Rozet et al. showed equivalent operative, postoperative, and pathologic results when comparing the extraperitoneal and the transperitoneal approach [24]. Stolzenburg and co-workers also reported interesting results regarding extraperitoneal LRP in terms of operative parameters and surgical margin rate [23]. The extraperitoneal approach proved to be a safe and reproducible procedure, with a fast recovery after surgery [25]. Our results were in line with those published by transperitoneal surgeons. RALP offered advantages concerning the perioperative parameters in terms of hospital stay, operative time, and blood loss, even beyond the 100 first cases of each surgeon. The overall rate and the severity of complications did not differ between the two groups. However, there was a trend towards lower rates of anastomotic complications in favour of RALP even beyond the 100 first cases of each procedure. Robotic assistance offers technical parameters that may improve the anastomotic procedure: a magnified three-dimensional (3D) visual field, a greater range of instrument motion, and a minimisation of tremor. Advantages of RALP regarding decreased adverse events and severity of complications

6 Table 5 Predictive factors for positive surgical margins in multivariable analysis: overall cohort and pt2 subgroup Surgical margins p value OR 95% CI Overall cohort Age PSA <0.001 Prostate volume pt2 disease < GS 6 Ref. 1 7 < < Date of intervention Before 2006 Ref Surgeon experience beyond the learning curve Ref >500 < Nerve preservation Surgeon Procedure Pure laparoscopy Ref. 1 Robot assisted pt2 cancers Age PSA Prostate volume <0.001 GS 6 Ref. 1 7 < Date of intervention Before 2006 Ref Surgeon experience beyond the learning curve Ref > Nerve preservation Surgeon Procedure Pure laparoscopy Ref. 1 Robot assisted CI = confidence interval; GS = Gleason score; PSA = prostate-specific antigen. EUROPEAN UROLOGY 65 (2014) [(Fig._1)TD$FIG] were not found. No significant difference in rectal injuries was detected. Nevertheless, RALP demonstrated a significant improvement of perioperative parameters, shortening the duration of hospitalisation. Regarding the continence rate and the time to continence, RALP performed better than LRP in univariable models as highlighted by the recent meta-analysis from Ficarra et al. [11]. Nevertheless, the prevalence of urinary incontinence after prostatectomy is highly influenced by numerous parameters such as patient characteristics, surgeon experience, or continence definitions (no pad vs safety pad). Drawbacks of a systematic analysis must be taken into consideration such as the impossibility of controlling surgical skills and individual surgeon factors [11]. The integration of all potential predictive factors for continence recovery is mandatory before drawing major conclusions. Thus, in line with the prospective trial Fig. 1 Biochemical recurrence free survival (RFS) curves stratified by the procedure (laparoscopic radical prostatectomy [LRP] vs robot-assisted radical prostatectomy [RALP]) according to the preoperative D Amico risk group: low risk (log-rank test: p = 0.672), intermediate risk ( p = 0.928), and high risk ( p = 0.413).

7 616 [(Fig._2)TD$FIG] EUROPEAN UROLOGY 65 (2014) [(Fig._3)TD$FIG] Fig. 3 Continence recovery rates at each medical visit in the laparoscopic radical prostatectomy and the robot-assisted prostatectomy groups (overall cohort). The p values at each time point were preoperative ( p = 0.213), 1 mo ( p = 0.191), 3 mo ( p = 0.019), 6 mo ( p = 0.018), 12 mo ( p = 0.177), and 24 mo ( p = 0.024). Fig. 2 Biochemical recurrence free survival (RFS) curves stratified by the surgical volume of each surgeon ( , , >500 procedures) for the laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (LRP) and the robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RALP) groups. Curves were significantly different after 300 procedures in the LRP group (log-rank test: p = 0.027) but not in the RALP group ( p = 0.132). published by Asimakopoulos et al., we did not find any significant improvement of continence recovery in favour of RALP after integrating all potential confounding factors in multivariable analysis [14]. The impact of anterior or posterior reconstruction on functional outcomes could not be studied in our database. However, a recent review did not find a benefit of such reconstructions on shortening the time to continence recovery [26]. A recent meta-analysis based on four studies comparing potency recovery after LRP and RALP only reported a nonstatistical trend in favour of RALP [11,27,28]. Theonly two prospective studies highlighted better functional results in terms of potency favouring RALP. However, the limited number of patients included did not allow definitive conclusions. Comparisons are also subject to debate because the incidence of potency recovery is influenced by numerous factors. Our multivariable results were in line with those published in the two level 2 studies [13,14]. The use of the robot was significantly linked with a better recovery independently of surgical experience, the surgeon, the date of the intervention, and the practice of neurovascular preservation. After 6 and 12 mo, 20% and 31.6% of patients were potent after LRP compared with 42% and 57.7% after RALP, respectively. This difference remained significant after a 2-mo followup. Our surgical technique is based on a retrograde dissection using low-intensity bipolar cautery and clips. We did not perform a strict athermal dissection that might improve potency recovery [29].However,theuseof a cautery-free technique has not definitively proved its superiority and needs further evaluation. The fourth robot arm potentially provides an adequate exposition avoiding tractions of the bundles that may hinder potency outcomes. We used a three-arm robot, and our experience with the fourarm one is limited. However, the extraperitoneal approach is surely not the best approach to use this fourth arm extensively due to the limited space of the retroperitoneum. Limitations of our report on functional outcomes were that continence and potency require a short-term follow-up. Our findings from the RALP cohort need to be confirmed. Another drawback of the study is that our evaluation of the plane of neurovascular bundle dissection is subjective and not based on the pathologic outcome. Obtaining the intrafascial plane may become more frequent and easier with the robotic approach. The first statistical analysis found higher positive margin rates in the RALP cohort compared with those reported in the LRP, especially in non organ-confined disease. Several factors with an impact on the risk of margins might explain these differences. The RALP cohort included patients at higher risk of positive margins. Those patients had a significantly smaller volume of gland, frequently showed an aggressive cancer on biopsy cores, and were more often operated on using nerve-sparing techniques. When all factors potentially linked with the risk of margins were taken into account in a multivariable

8 Table 6 Predictive factors for urinary continence and potency in multivariable analysis: logistic regression model assessing the factors predictive for continence and potency recovery 12 mo after surgery p value OR 95% CI EUROPEAN UROLOGY 65 (2014) [(Fig._4)TD$FIG] Continence Age PSA Prostate volume pt2 disease GS 6 Ref Date of intervention Before 2006 Ref Surgeon experience beyond the learning curve Ref > Nerve preservation Surgeon Procedure Pure laparoscopy Ref. 1 Robot assisted Potency Age PSA Prostate volume pt2 disease GS 6 Ref Date of intervention Before 2006 Ref Surgeon experience beyond the learning curve Ref > Nerve preservation Surgeon Procedure Pure laparoscopy Ref. 1 Robot assisted CI = confidence interval; GS = Gleason score; OR = odds ratio; PSA = prostate-specific antigen. Fig. 4 Potency recovery rates at each medical visit in the laparoscopic radical prostatectomy and in the robot-assisted prostatectomy groups after bilateral nerve-sparing surgery (overall cohort). The p values at each time point were preoperative ( p = 0.716), 1 mo ( p < 0.001), 3 mo ( p = 0.001), 6 mo ( p < 0.001), 12 mo ( p < 0.001) and 24 mo ( p < 0.001). model, the pt3 margin rates were not statistically different for each surgical modality. We found lower positive surgical margin rates in pt2 disease for RALP compared with LRP in line with recent reviews [12,30]. Potential factors explaining this significant difference could be the traumatic manipulation of the gland during the neurovascular dissection in LRP and the magnified 3D vision improving the capsular preservation provided by robotic assistance. However, urologists performing RALP tend to expand indications of nerve preservation, exposing patients selected on nonstringent criteria to an increased risk of positive margins. Due to the widespread acceptance of active surveillance in low-risk prostate cancers, we have observed an important stage migration towards more aggressive and larger prostate cancers (pt3 and/or Gleason 8 10) in our surgical cohort for the past 5 yr. However, when strict indications of nerve-sparing techniques are respected, RALP performs better than LRP in terms of surgical margins in pathologically organ-confined disease and does not increase the rate of positive margins in non organ-confined cancers. Positive surgical margins and perioperative parameters are early outcome measures of importance in comparing surgical modalities. Our findings showed equivalent biochemical recurrence rates for RALP and LRP. Surgeon volume did not have an impact on the biochemical Table 7 Evolution of International Index of Erectile Function-5 scores over time and their comparisons after laparoscopic radical prostatectomy and robot-assisted radical prostatectomy * IIEF-5 scores Baseline Month 1 Month 3 Month 6 Month 12 Month 24 Bilateral preservation LRP RALP p values < <0.001 <0.001 <0.001 Overall cohort p values <0.001 <0.001 <0.001 <0.001 <0.001 IIEF = International Index of Erectile Function; LRP = laparoscopic radical prostatectomy; RALP = robot-assisted radical prostatectomy. * Overall cohort and subgroups of patients undergoing bilateral nerve-sparing surgery.

9 618 EUROPEAN UROLOGY 65 (2014) recurrence survival in our series. However, this lack of difference based on surgeon volume might reflect a low power effect and be related to the short follow-up. Sooriakumaran et al. previously reported that lower surgeon volume was associated with an increased risk of recurrence after >5-yr follow-up [31]. Biochemical recurrences, metastases, and survival statistics require long-term follow-up to assess [9]. Although we previously reported the oncologic safety of extraperitoneal LRP, a longer followup is warranted to confirm it in RALP [25]. We would also like to emphasise that data were collected prospectively but reviewed in a retrospective manner that introduced an interpretation bias. Our statistical analyses highlighted that several factors must be taken into account when determining functional outcomes after RP. Many published studies did not include all these factors with impact, thus limiting the power of their conclusions. Level of surgical experience, changes of surgical details over time, cancer characteristics, patient characteristics, or extension of nerve-sparing surgery could play a part in differential outcomes and introduce interpretation biases when comparing surgical techniques. Systematic reviews and meta-analyses are also limited by multiple designs, and methodological factors have to be considered too. The strength of our series was that we chose to control all these potential confounding factors in multivariable analyses. 5. Conclusions Robotic assistance using an extraperitoneal approach confers better results than the pure laparoscopic procedure in terms of operative time, blood loss, and hospital stay. There was no independent impact on continence by surgical approach. The robotic approach improves potency recovery at short-term follow-up compared with pure laparoscopy. Urologists performing RALP tend to expand indications of nerve preservation exposing patients selected on nonstringent criteria to an increased risk of positive margins. However, when strict indications of nerve-sparing techniques are respected, RALP does not increasetherateofpositivemargins.thisstudydidnot lead us to a definitive recommendation for the robot assistance approach, but it does suggests improved perioperative parameters and potency recovery without compromising oncologic control. Author contributions: Guillaume Ploussard had full access to all the data in the study and takes responsibility for the integrity of the data and the accuracy of the data analysis. Study concept and design: Ploussard, de la Taille, Salomon. Acquisition of data: Ploussard, de la Taille, Moulin, Salomon. Analysis and interpretation of data: Ploussard, de la Taille, Salomon. Drafting of the manuscript: Ploussard. Critical revision of the manuscript for important intellectual content: Ploussard, de la Taille, Moulin, Vordos, Hoznek, Abbou, Salomon. Statistical analysis: Ploussard. Obtaining funding: None. Administrative, technical, or material support: None. Supervision: de la Taille, Abbou, Salomon. Other (specify): None. Financial disclosures: Guillaume Ploussard certifies that all conflicts of interest, including specific financial interests and relationships and affiliations relevant to the subject matter or materials discussed in the manuscript (eg, employment/affiliation, grants or funding, consultancies, honoraria, stock ownership or options, expert testimony, royalties, or patents filed, received, or pending), are the following: None. Funding/Support and role of the sponsor: None. References [1] Schuessler WW, Schulam PG, Clayman RV, et al. Laparoscopic radical prostatectomy: initial short-term experience. Urology 1997;50: [2] Guillonneau B, Vallancien G. Laparoscopic radical prostatectomy: the Montsouris experience. J Urol 2000;163: [3] Rassweiler J, Schulze M, Teber D, et al. Laparoscopic radical prostatectomy: functional and oncological outcomes. Curr Opin Urol 2004;14: [4] Stolzenburg JU, Rabenalt R, Do M, et al. Endoscopic extraperitoneal radical prostatectomy: oncological and functional results after 700 procedures. J Urol 2005;174: [5] Rassweiler J, Hruza M, Teber D, Su L-M. Laparoscopic and robotic assisted radical prostatectomy critical analysis of the results. Eur Urol 2006;49: [6] Salomon L, Levrel O, de la Taille A, et al. Radical prostatectomy by the retropubic, perineal and laparoscopic approach: 12 years of experience in one center. Eur Urol 2002;42: [7] Guillonneau B, El-fettouh H, Baumert H, et al. Laparoscopic radical prostatectomy: oncologic evaluation after 1000 cases at Montsouris institute. J Urol 2003;169:1261. [8] Rassweiler J, Schulze M, Teber D, et al. Laparoscopic radical prostatectomy with the Heilbronn technique: oncologic results in the first 500 patients. J Urol 2005;173: [9] Novara G, Ficarra V, Mocellin S, et al. Systematic review and metaanalysis of studies reporting oncologic outcome after robot-assisted radical prostatectomy. Eur Urol 2012;62: [10] Ficarra V, Novara G, Ahlering TE, et al. Systematic review and metaanalysis of studies reporting potency rates after robot-assisted radical prostatectomy. Eur Urol 2012;62: [11] Ficarra V, Novara G, Rosen RC, et al. Systematic review and metaanalysis of studies reporting urinary continence recovery after robot-assisted radical prostatectomy. Eur Urol 2012;62: [12] Tewari A, Sooriakumaran P, Bloch DA, Seshadri-Kreaden U, Hebert AE, Wiklund P. Positive surgical margin and perioperative complication rates of primary surgical treatments for prostate cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis comparing retropubic, laparoscopic, and robotic prostatectomy. Eur Urol 2012;62:1 15. [13] Porpiglia F, Morra I, Lucci Chiarissi M, et al. Randomised controlled trial comparing laparoscopic and robot-asisted radical prostatectomy. Eur Urol 2013;63: [14] Asimakopoulos AD, Pereira Fraga CT, et al. Randomized comparison between laparoscopic and robot-assisted nerve-sparing radical prostatectomy. J Sex Med 2011;8: [15] Ploussard G, Xylinas E, Salomon L, et al. Robot-assisted extraperitoneal laparoscopic radical prostatectomy: experience in a highvolume laparoscopy reference centre. BJU Int 2010;105: [16] Dindo D, Demartines N, Clavien PA. Classification of surgical complications: a new proposal with evaluation in a cohort of 6336 patients and results of a survey. Ann Surg 2004;240:

10 EUROPEAN UROLOGY 65 (2014) [17] Poulakis V, Dillenburg W, Moeckel M, et al. Laparoscopic radical prostatectomy: prospective evaluation of the learning curve. Eur Urol 2005;47: [18] Bollens R, Sandhu S, Roumeguere T, et al. Laparoscopic radical prostatectomy: the learning curve. Curr Opin Urol 2005;15: [19] Secin FP, Savage C, Abbou C, et al. The learning curve for laparoscopic radical prostatectomy: an international multicenter study. J Urol 2010;184: [20] Patel VR, Tully AS, Holmes R, et al. Robotic radical prostatectomy in the community setting the learning curve and beyond: initial 200 cases. J Urol 2005;174: [21] Ahlering TE, Skarecky D, Lee D, et al. Successful transfer of open surgical skills to a laparoscopic environment using a robotic interface: initial experience with laparoscopic radical prostatectomy. J Urol 2003;170: [22] Joseph JV, Vicente I, Madeb R, et al. Robot-assisted vs pure laparoscopic radical prostatectomy: are there any differences? BJU Int 2005;96: [23] Stolzenburg JU, Rabenalt R, Do M, et al. Endoscopic extraperitoneal radical prostatectomy: the University of Leipzig experience of 1,300 cases. World J Urol 2007;25: [24] Rozet F, Jaffe J, Braud G, et al. A direct comparison of robotic assisted versus pure laparoscopic radical prostatectomy: a single institution experience. J Urol 2007;178: [25] Paul A, Ploussard G, Nicolaiew N, et al. Oncologic outcome after extraperitoneal laparoscopic radical prostatectomy: midterm follow-up of 1115 procedures. Eur Urol 2010;57: [26] Rocco B, Cozzi G, Spinelli MG, et al. Posterior musculofascial reconstruction after radical prostatectomy: a systematic review of the literature. Eur Urol 2012;62: [27] Park JW, Won Lee H, Kim W, et al. Comparative assessment of a single surgeon s series of laparoscopic radical prostatectomy: conventional versus robot-assisted. J Endourol 2011;25: [28] Hakimi AA, Blitstein J, Feder M, et al. Direct comparison of surgical and functional outcomes of robotic-assisted versus pure laparoscopic radical prostatectomy: single-surgeon experience. Urology 2009;73: [29] Ahlering TE, Rodriguez E, Skarecky DW. Overcoming obstacles: nerve-sparing issues in radical prostatectomy. J Endourol 2008;22: [30] Coelho RF, Rocco B, Patel MB, et al. Retropubic, laparoscopic, and robot-assisted radical prostatectomy: a critical review of outcomes reported by high-volume centers. J Endourol 2010;24: [31] Sooriakumaran P, Haendler L, Nyberg T, et al. Biochemical recurrence after robot-assisted radical prostatectomy in a European single-centre cohort with a minimum follow-up time of 5 years. Eur Urol 2012;62:

Robotic Radical Prostatectomy: What s s the Advantage? Matthew T. Gettman, M.D. Associate Professor Department of Urology

Robotic Radical Prostatectomy: What s s the Advantage? Matthew T. Gettman, M.D. Associate Professor Department of Urology Robotic Radical Prostatectomy: What s s the Advantage? Matthew T. Gettman, M.D. Associate Professor Department of Urology Prostate Cancer Epidemiology: 2009 Estimated new cases: 230,000 Estimated deaths:

More information

LEARNING CURVE OF ROBOTIC RADICAL PROSTATECTOMY

LEARNING CURVE OF ROBOTIC RADICAL PROSTATECTOMY LEARNING CURVE OF ROBOTIC RADICAL PROSTATECTOMY Muhammed Ersagun Arslan, 1 *Abdullah Erdem Canda, 2 Ali Fuat Atmaca, 2 Mevlana Derya Balbay, 3 Ziya Akbulut, 2 Serkan Altinova, 1 Ahmet Tunc Ozdemir 4 1.

More information

da Vinci Prostatectomy Information Guide (Robotically-Assisted Radical Prostatectomy)

da Vinci Prostatectomy Information Guide (Robotically-Assisted Radical Prostatectomy) da Vinci Prostatectomy Information Guide (Robotically-Assisted Radical Prostatectomy) Prostate Cancer Overview Prostate cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the tissues of the

More information

Facing Prostate Cancer Surgery? Learn about minimally invasive da Vinci Surgery

Facing Prostate Cancer Surgery? Learn about minimally invasive da Vinci Surgery Facing Prostate Cancer Surgery? Learn about minimally invasive da Vinci Surgery The Condition: Prostate Cancer Your prostate is a walnut-sized gland that is part of the male reproductive system. The prostate

More information

Oncological and functional outcomes of laparoscopic radical prostatectomy following fellowship training.

Oncological and functional outcomes of laparoscopic radical prostatectomy following fellowship training. Oncological and functional outcomes of laparoscopic radical prostatectomy following fellowship training. Journal: BJU International Manuscript ID: Draft Manuscript Type: Original Article Date Submitted

More information

Thomas A. Kollmorgen, M.D. Oregon Urology Institute

Thomas A. Kollmorgen, M.D. Oregon Urology Institute Thomas A. Kollmorgen, M.D. Oregon Urology Institute None 240,000 new diagnosis per year, and an estimated 28,100 deaths (2012) 2 nd leading cause of death from cancer in U.S.A. Approximately 1 in 6 men

More information

ROBOT-ASSISTED LAPAROSCOPIC RADICAL PROSTATECTOMY: A REVIEW OF TECHNIQUE AND OUTCOMES

ROBOT-ASSISTED LAPAROSCOPIC RADICAL PROSTATECTOMY: A REVIEW OF TECHNIQUE AND OUTCOMES ROBOT-ASSISTED LAPAROSCOPIC RADICAL PROSTATECTOMY: A REVIEW OF TECHNIQUE AND OUTCOMES Taner Kargi, 1 *Nevzat Can Sener 2 1. Department of Urology, Balikligol State Hospital, Sanliurfa, Turkey 2. Department

More information

A New Anatomic Approach for Robot-Assisted Laparoscopic Prostatectomy: A Feasibility Study for Completely Intrafascial Surgery

A New Anatomic Approach for Robot-Assisted Laparoscopic Prostatectomy: A Feasibility Study for Completely Intrafascial Surgery EUROPEAN UROLOGY 58 (2010) 457 461 available at www.sciencedirect.com journal homepage: www.europeanurology.com Case Series of the Month A New Anatomic Approach for Robot-Assisted Laparoscopic Prostatectomy:

More information

Short-term outcome of patients with robot-assisted versus open radical prostatectomy: for localised carcinoma of prostate

Short-term outcome of patients with robot-assisted versus open radical prostatectomy: for localised carcinoma of prostate O R I G I N A L A R T I C L E Short-term outcome of patients with robot-assisted versus open radical prostatectomy: for localised carcinoma of prostate KL Lo CF Ng Cleo NY Lam Simon SM Hou KF To Sidney

More information

Precise, Minimally Invasive Prostate Cancer Removal

Precise, Minimally Invasive Prostate Cancer Removal Precise, Minimally Invasive Prostate Cancer Removal Learn why da Vinci Surgery may be your best treatment option 1 Beyond Minimally Invasive For Prostate Cancer 1 Facing Prostate Cancer Prostate cancer

More information

Facing Prostate Cancer?

Facing Prostate Cancer? The Enabling Technology: The da Vinci Surgical System Your doctor is one of the growing number of surgeons worldwide offering da Vinci Surgery for a range of complex conditions. The da Vinci Surgical System

More information

These rare variants often act aggressively and may respond differently to therapy than the more common prostate adenocarcinoma.

These rare variants often act aggressively and may respond differently to therapy than the more common prostate adenocarcinoma. Prostate Cancer OVERVIEW Prostate cancer is the second most common cancer diagnosed among American men, accounting for nearly 200,000 new cancer cases in the United States each year. Greater than 65% of

More information

7. Prostate cancer in PSA relapse

7. Prostate cancer in PSA relapse 7. Prostate cancer in PSA relapse A patient with prostate cancer in PSA relapse is one who, having received a primary treatment with intent to cure, has a raised PSA (prostate-specific antigen) level defined

More information

da Vinci Prostatectomy (Robotically Assisted Radical Prostatectomy)

da Vinci Prostatectomy (Robotically Assisted Radical Prostatectomy) Peninsula Urology Center, Inc. Dieter Bruno, M.D, F.A.C.S Chris Threat, M.D. 3351 El Camino. Real, Suite 101 Atherton, CA 94027 (650) 306-1016 dbrunomd@pucenter.com http://www.pucenter.com/ da Vinci Prostatectomy

More information

PROSTATE CANCER. Get the facts, know your options. Samay Jain, MD, Assistant Professor,The University of Toledo Chief, Division of Urologic Oncology

PROSTATE CANCER. Get the facts, know your options. Samay Jain, MD, Assistant Professor,The University of Toledo Chief, Division of Urologic Oncology PROSTATE CANCER Get the facts, know your options Samay Jain, MD, Assistant Professor,The University of Toledo Chief, Division of Urologic Oncology i What is the Prostate? Unfortunately, you have prostate

More information

Learning curve in robotic surgery: Review of the literature (RALP, RAPN and RARC)

Learning curve in robotic surgery: Review of the literature (RALP, RAPN and RARC) Learning curve in robotic surgery: Review of the literature (RALP, RAPN and RARC) G. De Naeyer, P. Schatteman, P. Carpentier, A. Mottrie Department of Urology, OLV Clinic, Aalst, Belgium Learning Learning

More information

Comparison of Robotic-assisted versus Retropubic Radical Prostatectomy Performed by a Single Surgeon

Comparison of Robotic-assisted versus Retropubic Radical Prostatectomy Performed by a Single Surgeon Comparison of Robotic-assisted versus Retropubic Radical Prostatectomy Performed by a Single Surgeon YEN-CHUAN OU 1, CHI-REI YANG 1, JOHN WANG 2, CHEN-LI CHENG 1 and VIPUL R. PATEL 3 1 Division of Urology,

More information

Does my patient need more therapy after prostate cancer surgery?

Does my patient need more therapy after prostate cancer surgery? Does my patient need more therapy after prostate cancer surgery? Contact the GenomeDx Patient Care Team at: 1.888.792.1601 (toll-free) or e-mail: client.service@genomedx.com Prostate Cancer Classifier

More information

Management of Localized Prostate Cancer. Treatment Options

Management of Localized Prostate Cancer. Treatment Options Management of Localized Prostate Cancer Surgery James A. Eastham, MD Chief, Urology Service Memorial lsloan Kettering Cancer Center Treatment Options 1. Active surveillance/watchful waiting 2. Focal therapy

More information

Overcoming Obstacles: Nerve-Sparing Issues in Radical Prostatectomy. THOMAS E. AHLERING, M.D., ESEQUIEL RODRIGUEZ, M.D., and DOUGLAS W. SKARECKY, B.S.

Overcoming Obstacles: Nerve-Sparing Issues in Radical Prostatectomy. THOMAS E. AHLERING, M.D., ESEQUIEL RODRIGUEZ, M.D., and DOUGLAS W. SKARECKY, B.S. JOURNAL OF ENDOUROLOGY Volume 22, Number 4, April 2008 Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. DOI: 10.1089/end.2007.9834 Overcoming Obstacles: Nerve-Sparing Issues in Radical Prostatectomy THOMAS E. AHLERING, M.D., ESEQUIEL

More information

Robot-assisted radical prostatectomy is a safe procedure

Robot-assisted radical prostatectomy is a safe procedure Dan Med J 6/9 September 213 danish medical JOURNAL 1 Robot-assisted radical prostatectomy is a safe procedure Frederik Birkebæk Thomsen 1, Kasper Drimer Berg 1, Helle Hvarness 2, Jon Nielsen 2 & Peter

More information

Summary of Harms from Screening and Treatment for Prostate Cancer

Summary of Harms from Screening and Treatment for Prostate Cancer DRAFT: Advice from Dr John Childs MoH advisor Summary of Harms from Screening and Treatment for Prostate Cancer There are minimal risks directly attributable to PSA testing or transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)

More information

Therapies for Prostate Cancer and Treatment Selection

Therapies for Prostate Cancer and Treatment Selection Prostatic Diseases Therapies for Prostate Cancer and Treatment Selection JMAJ 47(12): 555 560, 2004 Yoichi ARAI Professor and Chairman, Department of Urology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine

More information

Surgeon perception is not a good predictor of peri-operative outcomes in robot-assisted radical prostatectomy

Surgeon perception is not a good predictor of peri-operative outcomes in robot-assisted radical prostatectomy DOI 10.1007/s11701-011-0293-4 ORIGINAL ARTICLE Surgeon perception is not a good predictor of peri-operative outcomes in robot-assisted radical prostatectomy Joshua Stern Saurabh Sharma Pierre Mendoza Mary

More information

Yip, SKH; Yee, CH; Ng, CF; Lam, NY; Ho, KL; Ma, WK; Li, CM; Hou, SM; Tam, PC; Yiu, MK; Fan, CW

Yip, SKH; Yee, CH; Ng, CF; Lam, NY; Ho, KL; Ma, WK; Li, CM; Hou, SM; Tam, PC; Yiu, MK; Fan, CW Title Robot-assisted radical prostatectomy in Hong Kong: a review of 235 cases Author(s) Yip, SKH; Yee, CH; Ng, CF; Lam, NY; Ho, KL; Ma, WK; Li, CM; Hou, SM; Tam, PC; Yiu, MK; Fan, CW Citation Journal

More information

Prostate cancer. Christopher Eden. The Royal Surrey County Hospital, Guildford & The Hampshire Clinic, Old Basing.

Prostate cancer. Christopher Eden. The Royal Surrey County Hospital, Guildford & The Hampshire Clinic, Old Basing. Prostate cancer Christopher Eden The Royal Surrey County Hospital, Guildford & The Hampshire Clinic, Old Basing. Screening Screening men for PCa (prostate cancer) using PSA (Prostate Specific Antigen blood

More information

ROBOTIC ASSISTED RADICAL PROSTATECTOMY

ROBOTIC ASSISTED RADICAL PROSTATECTOMY Associates: Dr Kim Pese Dr Kym Horsell Dr Michael Chong Dr Jason Lee The Tennyson Centre Suite 19, First Floor 520 South Road Kurralta Park SA 5037 Appointments: 08 8292 2399 Fax: 08 8292 2388 admin@urologicalsolutions.com.au

More information

Robotic Radical Prostatectomy: Operative Technique, Outcomes, and Learning Curve

Robotic Radical Prostatectomy: Operative Technique, Outcomes, and Learning Curve SCIENTIFIC PAPER Robotic Radical Prostatectomy: Operative Technique, Outcomes, and Learning Curve Jay D. Raman, MD, Steven Dong, MD, Adam Levinson, MD, David Samadi, MD, Douglas S. Scherr, MD ABSTRACT

More information

Preventing Complications in Robotic Prostatic Surgery

Preventing Complications in Robotic Prostatic Surgery EUROPEAN UROLOGY SUPPLEMENTS 9 (2010) 388 393 available at www.sciencedirect.com journal homepage: www.europeanurology.com Preventing Complications in Robotic Prostatic Surgery Rafael Sanchez-Salas, Vincent

More information

Prostate Cancer Treatment Comparison

Prostate Cancer Treatment Comparison Prostate Cancer Treatment Comparison Treatment Comparative Data Outcome Comparison: Surgery vs. Radiotherapy Outcome Radical Prostatectomy* Radiation** Survival duration compared to conservative disease

More information

Prostate Cancer Treatment Comparison

Prostate Cancer Treatment Comparison Prostate Cancer Treatment Comparison Treatment Comparative Data Outcome Comparison: Surgery vs. Radiotherapy Outcome Radical Prostatectomy* Radiation** Survival duration compared to conservative disease

More information

Surgical learning curve for open radical prostatectomy: Is there an end to the learning curve?

Surgical learning curve for open radical prostatectomy: Is there an end to the learning curve? Surgical learning curve for open radical prostatectomy: Is there an end to the learning curve? Alexander Kretschmer, Philipp Mandel, Alexander Buchner, Christian G. Stief & Derya Tilki World Journal of

More information

Radical Prostatectomy

Radical Prostatectomy Radical Prostatectomy Table of Contents Surgery Overview What To Expect After Surgery Why It Is Done How Well It Works Risks What To Think About References Credits Surgery Overview A radical prostatectomy

More information

Incidents and complications in our first 200 davinci radical prostatectomies

Incidents and complications in our first 200 davinci radical prostatectomies Incidents and complications in our first 200 davinci radical prostatectomies II International Symposium Robotic Surgery and New technologies in Urology. Bilbao 5-65 March,, 2009 PATIENTS AND METHODS Period:

More information

PSA Screening for Prostate Cancer Information for Care Providers

PSA Screening for Prostate Cancer Information for Care Providers All men should know they are having a PSA test and be informed of the implications prior to testing. This booklet was created to help primary care providers offer men information about the risks and benefits

More information

Historical Basis for Concern

Historical Basis for Concern Androgens After : Are We Ready? Mohit Khera, MD, MBA Assistant Professor of Urology Division of Male Reproductive Medicine and Surgery Scott Department of Urology Baylor College of Medicine Historical

More information

NERVE GRAFT TO RESTORE ERECTILE FUNCTION DURING RADICAL PROSTATECTOMY

NERVE GRAFT TO RESTORE ERECTILE FUNCTION DURING RADICAL PROSTATECTOMY CLINICAL POLICY NERVE GRAFT TO RESTORE ERECTILE FUNCTION DURING RADICAL PROSTATECTOMY Policy Number: SURGERY 043.13 T Effective Date: October 1, 015 Table of Contents BENEFIT CONSIDERATIONS. APPLICABLE

More information

855-DRSAMADI or 212-241-8779

855-DRSAMADI or 212-241-8779 SMART SURGERY NEWS MARCH 2013 Dr. David Samadi 855-DRSAMADI or 212-241-8779 YOUR PROSTATE CANCER NEWS PREVENTION DIAGNOSIS TREATMENT LIFE AFTER PROSTATE CANCER PREVENTION Prostate Cancer Need-to-Knows

More information

Prostatectomy. da Vinci prostatectomy. How does the da Vinci surgical system work?

Prostatectomy. da Vinci prostatectomy. How does the da Vinci surgical system work? Prostatectomy da Vinci prostatectomy How does the da Vinci surgical system work? The da Vinci surgical system, developed in the USA, is the most state-of-the-art system for minimally invasive surgery.

More information

East Lancashire Surgical Robot

East Lancashire Surgical Robot East Lancashire Surgical Robot For ALL patients in Lancashire Prostate cancer claims the life of one man every hour and by 2030 will be the most common cancer; it is already the most common male cancer.

More information

Robotic radical prostatectomy: our bridge to the future Cesare Selli

Robotic radical prostatectomy: our bridge to the future Cesare Selli Robotic radical prostatectomy: our bridge to the future Cesare Selli Cattedra e Scuola di Specializzazione in Urologia Università di Pisa Robotic RP: our bridge to the future New personal challenge: to

More information

Quality of Life After Radical Prostatectomy

Quality of Life After Radical Prostatectomy Quality of Life After Radical Prostatectomy Bernard H. Bochner, MD FACS Attending Surgeon, Urology Service Vice Chairman, Department of Surgery Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center Quality of Life After

More information

Prostate Cancer What Are the Outcomes of Radical Prostatectomy for High-risk Prostate Cancer?

Prostate Cancer What Are the Outcomes of Radical Prostatectomy for High-risk Prostate Cancer? Prostate Cancer What Are the Outcomes of Radical Prostatectomy for High-risk Prostate Cancer? Stacy Loeb, Edward M. Schaeffer, Bruce J. Trock, Jonathan I. Epstein, Elizabeth B. Humphreys, and Patrick C.

More information

Prostatectomy, pelvic lymphadenect. Med age 63 years Mean followup 53 months No other cancer related therapy before recurrence. Negative.

Prostatectomy, pelvic lymphadenect. Med age 63 years Mean followup 53 months No other cancer related therapy before recurrence. Negative. Adjuvante und Salvage Radiotherapie Ludwig Plasswilm Klinik für Radio-Onkologie, KSSG CANCER CONTROL WITH RADICAL PROSTATECTOMY ALONE IN 1,000 CONSECUTIVE PATIENTS 1983 1998 Clinical stage T1 and T2 Mean

More information

A Gene Expression Test to Predict Prostate Cancer Aggressiveness. Use Prolaris as a guide in your medical and surgical management

A Gene Expression Test to Predict Prostate Cancer Aggressiveness. Use Prolaris as a guide in your medical and surgical management A Gene Expression Test to Predict Prostate Cancer Aggressiveness Use Prolaris as a guide in your medical and surgical management What is Prolaris? A direct molecular measure of prostate cancer tumor biology

More information

Robotic Assisted Laparoscopic Salvage Prostatectomy for Radiation Resistant Prostate Cancer

Robotic Assisted Laparoscopic Salvage Prostatectomy for Radiation Resistant Prostate Cancer Robotic Assisted Laparoscopic Salvage Prostatectomy for Radiation Resistant Prostate Cancer Jonathan A. Eandi,* Brian A. Link, Rebecca A. Nelson, David Y. Josephson, Clayton Lau, Mark H. Kawachi and Timothy

More information

Laparoscopy/Robotics. Seung Jun Son, Sang Chul Lee 1, Chang Wook Jeong 1, Seong Jin Jeong 1, Seok Soo Byun 1, Sang Eun Lee 1

Laparoscopy/Robotics. Seung Jun Son, Sang Chul Lee 1, Chang Wook Jeong 1, Seong Jin Jeong 1, Seok Soo Byun 1, Sang Eun Lee 1 www.kjurology.org http://dx.doi.org/10.4111/kju.2013.54.9.598 Laparoscopy/Robotics Comparison of Continence Recovery Between Robot-Assisted Laparoscopic Prostatectomy and Open Radical Retropubic Prostatectomy:

More information

The prostate and kidney cancer specialists. Robot-assisted surgery for prostate and kidney cancer

The prostate and kidney cancer specialists. Robot-assisted surgery for prostate and kidney cancer The prostate and kidney cancer specialists Robot-assisted surgery for prostate and kidney cancer ROBOT-ASSISTED SURGERY AT HARLEY STREET UROLOGY Mr Marc Laniado, Consultant Urologist Robot-assisted prostatectomy,

More information

Facing Surgery for. Learn about minimally invasive da Vinci Surgery

Facing Surgery for. Learn about minimally invasive da Vinci Surgery Facing Surgery for Colorectal Cancer? Learn about minimally invasive da Vinci Surgery The Condition: Colorectal Cancer The colon and rectum are part of your large intestine. Their main function is to pass

More information

Saturation Biopsy for Diagnosis and Staging of Prostate Cancer. Original Policy Date

Saturation Biopsy for Diagnosis and Staging of Prostate Cancer. Original Policy Date MP 7.01.101 Saturation Biopsy for Diagnosis and Staging of Prostate Cancer Medical Policy Section Surgery Issue 12/2013 Original Policy Date 12/2013 Last Review Status/Date /12/2013 Return to Medical Policy

More information

PADUA score guided surgery for T1 RCC

PADUA score guided surgery for T1 RCC PADUA score guided surgery for T1 RCC - Renal Cell Carcinoma - Vassilis Poulakis MD, PhD, FEBU Ass. Professor of Urology, University of Frankfurt, Germany Director of Urologic Clinic Metropolitan Hospital

More information

Beyond the PSA: Genomic Testing in Localized Prostate Cancer

Beyond the PSA: Genomic Testing in Localized Prostate Cancer Beyond the PSA: Genomic Testing in Localized Prostate Cancer Kelvin A. Moses, MD, PhD Vanderbilt University Medical Center Wednesday, December 2, 2015 5:00 p.m. ET/2:00 p.m. PT About ZERO ZERO s mission

More information

Understanding the. Controversies of. testosterone replacement. therapy in hypogonadal men with prostate cancer. controversies surrounding

Understanding the. Controversies of. testosterone replacement. therapy in hypogonadal men with prostate cancer. controversies surrounding Controversies of testosterone replacement therapy in hypogonadal men with prostate cancer Samuel Deem, DO CULTURA CREATIVE (RF) / ALAMY Understanding the controversies surrounding testosterone replacement

More information

Treatment of Incidental Prostate Cancer Diagnosed during BPH Surgery with Radical Prostatectomy: Appropriate or over Treatment?

Treatment of Incidental Prostate Cancer Diagnosed during BPH Surgery with Radical Prostatectomy: Appropriate or over Treatment? Journal of Cancer Therapy, 2012, 3, 256-262 http://dx.doi.org/10.4236/jct.2012.34036 Published Online August 2012 (http://www.scirp.org/journal/jct) Treatment of Incidental Prostate Cancer Diagnosed during

More information

New Technologies in Surgery

New Technologies in Surgery New Technologies in Surgery Jim C. Hu MD, MPH Center for Advanced Surgical and Interventional Technology (CASIT) Director of Robotic and Minimally Invasive Surgery Associate Professor Department of Urology

More information

Steward Robotics Surgery Services at St. Elizabeth s Medical Center: Quality Outcomes

Steward Robotics Surgery Services at St. Elizabeth s Medical Center: Quality Outcomes Steward Health Forum Steward Robotics Surgery Services at St. Elizabeth s Medical Center: Quality Outcomes Steward Health Care System, LLC Published: June 2013 736 Cambridge Street, Brighton, MA 02135

More information

the risk of developing skeletal metastases or local recurrence.

the risk of developing skeletal metastases or local recurrence. Original Article SERUM PSA AND CLINICAL RECURRENCE AFTER RRP FOR LOCALIZED PROSTATE CANCER HAUKAAS et al. Is preoperative serum prostate-specific antigen level significantly related to clinical recurrence

More information

Minimally Invasive Surgical Treatment of Prostate Cancer: Robots, Microwaves, and Freezers

Minimally Invasive Surgical Treatment of Prostate Cancer: Robots, Microwaves, and Freezers Minimally Invasive Surgical Treatment of Prostate Cancer: Robots, Microwaves, and Freezers Paul D. Maroni, MD Assistant Professor Department of Surgery/Urology Disclosures Relevant EDAP HIFU - investigator

More information

Gleason Score. Oncotype DX GPS. identified for. about surveillance. time to get sophisticated

Gleason Score. Oncotype DX GPS. identified for. about surveillance. time to get sophisticated patient: MARK SMITH PSA 6.2 Gleason Score 6 Oncotype DX GPS 8 identified for active surveillance time to get sophisticated about surveillance Accurate prediction of prostate cancer risk is needed at the

More information

Clinical Practice Assessment Robotic surgery

Clinical Practice Assessment Robotic surgery Clinical Practice Assessment Robotic surgery Background: Surgery is by nature invasive. Efforts have been made over time to reduce complications and the trauma inherently associated with surgery through

More information

Detection and staging of recurrent prostate cancer is still one of the important clinical problems in prostate cancer. A rise in PSA or biochemical

Detection and staging of recurrent prostate cancer is still one of the important clinical problems in prostate cancer. A rise in PSA or biochemical Summary. 111 Detection and staging of recurrent prostate cancer is still one of the important clinical problems in prostate cancer. A rise in PSA or biochemical recurrence (BCR) is the first sign of recurrent

More information

BJUI. Do pelvic dimensions and prostate location contribute to the risk of experiencing complications after radical prostatectomy?

BJUI. Do pelvic dimensions and prostate location contribute to the risk of experiencing complications after radical prostatectomy? ; 2011 Urological Oncology COMPLICATIONS AFTER RADICAL PROSTATECTOMY VON BODMAN ET AL. BJUI Do pelvic dimensions and prostate location contribute to the risk of experiencing complications after radical

More information

The 4Kscore blood test for risk of aggressive prostate cancer

The 4Kscore blood test for risk of aggressive prostate cancer The 4Kscore blood test for risk of aggressive prostate cancer Prostate cancer tests When to use the 4Kscore Test? Screening Prior to 1 st biopsy Prior to negative previous biopsy Prognosis in Gleason 6

More information

TITLE: Robot-assisted Surgery for Prostatectomy and Hysterectomy: A Review of the Clinical and Cost-Effectiveness An Update

TITLE: Robot-assisted Surgery for Prostatectomy and Hysterectomy: A Review of the Clinical and Cost-Effectiveness An Update TITLE: Robot-assisted Surgery for Prostatectomy and Hysterectomy: A Review of the Clinical and Cost-Effectiveness An Update DATE: 07 November 2012 CONTEXT AND POLICY ISSUES Robotic surgery for prostatectomy,

More information

Role of Robotic Surgery in Obese Women with Endometrial Cancer

Role of Robotic Surgery in Obese Women with Endometrial Cancer Role of Robotic Surgery in Obese Women with Endometrial Cancer Anil Tailor Consultant Gynaecological Oncologist Royal Surrey County Hospital Guildford, Surrey, UK St Peters Hospital Chertsey, Surrey, UK

More information

Milestones in Robotic Kidney Surgery at Henry Ford Hospital

Milestones in Robotic Kidney Surgery at Henry Ford Hospital Milestones in Robotic Kidney Surgery at Henry Ford Hospital Craig Rogers MD, FACS Director of Renal Surgery Director of Urologic Oncology Fellowship Director Vattikuti Urology Institute, Detroit, Michigan

More information

Adenocarcinoma Cancer that occurs in the cells of a gland, such as the prostate gland. The majority of prostate cancers are adenocarcinomas.

Adenocarcinoma Cancer that occurs in the cells of a gland, such as the prostate gland. The majority of prostate cancers are adenocarcinomas. A Active surveillance A relatively new way of monitoring prostate cancer which aims to avoid unnecessary treatment in men with low-risk cancer. It involves close monitoring of PSA, with repeat biopsy,

More information

Your Health Matters. Localized Prostate Cancer and Its Treatment

Your Health Matters. Localized Prostate Cancer and Its Treatment Your Health Matters Localized Prostate Cancer and Its Treatment Greetings! Understanding prostate cancer and choosing among the various treatment options can be a difficult and anxiety-arousing process.

More information

PROSTATE CANCER. Diagnosis and Treatment

PROSTATE CANCER. Diagnosis and Treatment Diagnosis and Treatment Table of Contents Introduction... 1 Patient and Coach Information... 1 About Your Prostate... 1 What You Should Know About Prostate Cancer... 2 Screening and Diagnosis... 2 Digital

More information

DIAGNOSIS OF PROSTATE CANCER

DIAGNOSIS OF PROSTATE CANCER DIAGNOSIS OF PROSTATE CANCER Determining the presence of prostate cancer generally involves a series of tests and exams. Before starting the testing process, the physician will ask questions about the

More information

Latest da Vinci Xi Robotic Surgical System First Introduced in Asia by Hong Kong Sanatorium & Hospital

Latest da Vinci Xi Robotic Surgical System First Introduced in Asia by Hong Kong Sanatorium & Hospital For Immediate Release Latest da Vinci Xi Robotic Surgical System First Introduced in Asia by Hong Kong Sanatorium & Hospital (25 September 2014 Hong Kong) Hong Kong Sanatorium & Hospital (HKSH) has installed

More information

A New Biomarker in Prostate Cancer Care: Oncotype Dx. David M Albala, MD Chief of Urology Crouse Hospital Syracuse, NY

A New Biomarker in Prostate Cancer Care: Oncotype Dx. David M Albala, MD Chief of Urology Crouse Hospital Syracuse, NY A New Biomarker in Prostate Cancer Care: Oncotype Dx David M Albala, MD Chief of Urology Crouse Hospital Syracuse, NY Learning Objectives Review the current challenges in the prediction and prognosis of

More information

Advances in Diagnostic and Molecular Testing in Prostate Cancer

Advances in Diagnostic and Molecular Testing in Prostate Cancer Advances in Diagnostic and Molecular Testing in Prostate Cancer Ashley E. Ross MD PhD Assistant Professor Urology, Oncology, Pathology Johns Hopkins School of Medicine September 24, 2015 1 Disclosures

More information

Prognostic factors in locally advanced prostate cancer as determined by biochemistry, imaging studies and pathology

Prognostic factors in locally advanced prostate cancer as determined by biochemistry, imaging studies and pathology Prognostic factors in locally advanced prostate cancer as determined by biochemistry, imaging studies and pathology Authors Key words C.Y. Hsu, S. Joniau, R. Oyen, T. Roskams, H. Van Poppel Prognostic

More information

Precise, Minimally Invasive Prostate Cancer Removal

Precise, Minimally Invasive Prostate Cancer Removal Precise, Minimally Invasive Prostate Cancer Removal Why da Vinci Surgery may be your best treatment option 1 Beyond Minimally Invasive For Prostate Cancer 1 Facing Prostate Cancer Prostate cancer is the

More information

Early Prostate Cancer: Questions and Answers. Key Points

Early Prostate Cancer: Questions and Answers. Key Points CANCER FACTS N a t i o n a l C a n c e r I n s t i t u t e N a t i o n a l I n s t i t u t e s o f H e a l t h D e p a r t m e n t o f H e a l t h a n d H u m a n S e r v i c e s Early Prostate Cancer:

More information

Analysis of Prostate Cancer at Easter Connecticut Health Network Using Cancer Registry Data

Analysis of Prostate Cancer at Easter Connecticut Health Network Using Cancer Registry Data The 2014 Cancer Program Annual Public Reporting of Outcomes/Annual Site Analysis Statistical Data from 2013 More than 70 percent of all newly diagnosed cancer patients are treated in the more than 1,500

More information

KIDNEY FUNCTION RELATION TO SIZE OF THE TUMOR IN RENAL CELL CANCINOMA

KIDNEY FUNCTION RELATION TO SIZE OF THE TUMOR IN RENAL CELL CANCINOMA KIDNEY FUNCTION RELATION TO SIZE OF THE TUMOR IN RENAL CELL CANCINOMA O.E. Stakhvoskyi, E.O. Stakhovsky, Y.V. Vitruk, O.A. Voylenko, P.S. Vukalovich, V.A. Kotov, O.M. Gavriluk National Canсer Institute,

More information

Recovery of Erectile Function After Radical Prostatectomy Vanderbilt University Department of Urologic Surgery

Recovery of Erectile Function After Radical Prostatectomy Vanderbilt University Department of Urologic Surgery Recovery of Erectile Function After Radical Prostatectomy Vanderbilt University Department of Urologic Surgery Postoperative erectile dysfunction is a potential risk of surgery for prostate cancer, whether

More information

A Woman s Guide to Prostate Cancer Treatment

A Woman s Guide to Prostate Cancer Treatment A Woman s Guide to Prostate Cancer Treatment Supporting the man in your life Providing prostate cancer support and resources for women and families WOMEN AGAINST PROSTATE CANCER A Woman s Guide to Prostate

More information

Guideline for Optimization of Surgical and Pathological Quality Performance for Radical Prostatectomy in Prostate Cancer Management

Guideline for Optimization of Surgical and Pathological Quality Performance for Radical Prostatectomy in Prostate Cancer Management Evidence-Based Series 17-3 IN REVIEW A Quality Initiative of the Program in Evidence-based Care (PEBC), Cancer Care Ontario (CCO) Guideline for Optimization of Surgical and Pathological Quality Performance

More information

Robotic Assisted Radical Prostatectomy. Department of Urology Information for patients

Robotic Assisted Radical Prostatectomy. Department of Urology Information for patients Robotic Assisted Radical Prostatectomy Department of Urology Information for patients i Introduction The prostate is a small gland, which is found only in men. It is found at the base of the bladder and

More information

Secondary Cancer and Relapse Rates Following Radical Prostatectomy for Prostate-Confined Cancer

Secondary Cancer and Relapse Rates Following Radical Prostatectomy for Prostate-Confined Cancer Copyright E 2007 Journal of Insurance Medicine J Insur Med 2007;39:242 250 MORTALITY Secondary Cancer and Relapse Rates Following Radical Prostatectomy for Prostate-Confined Cancer David Wesley, MD; Hugh

More information

The Business of Prostate Cancer Care: A Clinician-Researcher s Perspective

The Business of Prostate Cancer Care: A Clinician-Researcher s Perspective The Business of Prostate Cancer Care: A Clinician-Researcher s Perspective David F. Penson, MD, MPH Departments of Urology and Preventive Medicine Keck School of Medicine University of Southern California

More information

For further information on screening and early detection of prostate cancer, see the Section entitled Screening for Prostate Cancer.

For further information on screening and early detection of prostate cancer, see the Section entitled Screening for Prostate Cancer. Prostate Cancer For many older men, prostate cancer may be present but never cause symptoms or problems and many men will die with their prostate cancer rather than of their prostate cancer. Yet it remains

More information

Risk factors for biochemical recurrence after robotic assisted radical prostatectomy: a single surgeon experience

Risk factors for biochemical recurrence after robotic assisted radical prostatectomy: a single surgeon experience Tanimoto et al. BMC Urology (2015) 15:27 DOI 10.1186/s12894-015-0024-7 RESEARCH ARTICLE Open Access Risk factors for biochemical recurrence after robotic assisted radical prostatectomy: a single surgeon

More information

Robotic-Assisted Laparoscopic Radical Prostatectomy

Robotic-Assisted Laparoscopic Radical Prostatectomy RALRP is the procedure of choice when treating localized prostate cancer. Sofía Cáceres Nazario. Flower Gardener, 2015 (Detail). Acrylic on canvas, 12" 16". Robotic-Assisted Laparoscopic Radical Prostatectomy

More information

Facing a Hysterectomy? If you ve been diagnosed with early stage gynecologic cancer, learn about minimally invasive da Vinci Surgery

Facing a Hysterectomy? If you ve been diagnosed with early stage gynecologic cancer, learn about minimally invasive da Vinci Surgery Facing a Hysterectomy? If you ve been diagnosed with early stage gynecologic cancer, learn about minimally invasive da Vinci Surgery The Condition: Early Stage Gynecologic Cancer A variety of gynecologic

More information

PROSTATE CANCER: LOCAL CONTROL, SURVIVAL AND HIGH DOSE RADIATION THERAPY. Riccardo Santoni. Radiation Oncology University of Tor Vergata Rome

PROSTATE CANCER: LOCAL CONTROL, SURVIVAL AND HIGH DOSE RADIATION THERAPY. Riccardo Santoni. Radiation Oncology University of Tor Vergata Rome PROSTATE CANCER: LOCAL CONTROL, SURVIVAL AND HIGH DOSE RADIATION THERAPY Riccardo Santoni Radiation Oncology University of Tor Vergata Rome Problems: the epidemic prostate cancer and its implications USA

More information

Partial nephrectomy by hydrodissection. J.-V. Zambon, Urologist Orbis Medical Center Sittard / Laurentius Hospital Roermond

Partial nephrectomy by hydrodissection. J.-V. Zambon, Urologist Orbis Medical Center Sittard / Laurentius Hospital Roermond Partial nephrectomy by hydrodissection J.-V. Zambon, Urologist Orbis Medical Center Sittard / Laurentius Hospital Roermond Partial nephrectomy by hydrodissection J.-V. Zambon, Urologist Laurentius Hospital

More information

Prostate Cancer. Treatments as unique as you are

Prostate Cancer. Treatments as unique as you are Prostate Cancer Treatments as unique as you are UCLA Prostate Cancer Program Prostate cancer is the second most common cancer among men. The UCLA Prostate Cancer Program brings together the elements essential

More information

Questions to ask my doctor: About prostate cancer

Questions to ask my doctor: About prostate cancer Questions to ask my doctor: About prostate cancer Being diagnosed with prostate cancer can be scary and stressful. You probably have a lot of questions and concerns. Learning about the disease, how it

More information

Questions to Ask My Doctor About Prostate Cancer

Questions to Ask My Doctor About Prostate Cancer Questions to Ask My Doctor Being told you have prostate cancer can be scary and stressful. You probably have a lot of questions and concerns. Learning about the disease, how it s treated, and how this

More information

Real Time MRI guided Focal Laser Ablation Therapy for Prostate Cancer

Real Time MRI guided Focal Laser Ablation Therapy for Prostate Cancer Real Time MRI guided Focal Laser Ablation Therapy for Prostate Cancer A/Prof Celi Varol and Dr Orit Raz Uro-Oncologist Nepean and Macquarie Hospital Trial at Macquarie University Hospital Ethics board

More information

Robotic Radical Prostatectomy

Robotic Radical Prostatectomy Robotic Radical Prostatectomy This booklet gives you information about a procedure which uses keyhole surgery to remove the prostate using robot assistance. It is called Robot Assisted Laparoscopic Prostatectomy

More information

The 4Kscore blood test for risk of aggressive prostate cancer

The 4Kscore blood test for risk of aggressive prostate cancer The 4Kscore blood test for risk of aggressive prostate cancer Early detection of aggressive prostate cancer Challenges Serum PSA has a high false positive rate Over 1 million prostate biopsies performed

More information

Understanding Prostate Cancer. The Urology Group Guide for Newly Diagnosed Patients. Advanced Care. Improving Lives.

Understanding Prostate Cancer. The Urology Group Guide for Newly Diagnosed Patients. Advanced Care. Improving Lives. Understanding Prostate Cancer The Urology Group Guide for Newly Diagnosed Patients Advanced Care. Improving Lives. UNDERSTANDING PROSTATE CANCER The Urology Group has created this publication to provide

More information

An Introduction to PROSTATE CANCER

An Introduction to PROSTATE CANCER An Introduction to PROSTATE CANCER Being diagnosed with prostate cancer can be a life-altering experience. It requires making some very difficult decisions about treatments that can affect not only the

More information

VATTIKUTI INSTITUTE PROSTATECTOMY (VIP) AND CURRENT RESULTS.

VATTIKUTI INSTITUTE PROSTATECTOMY (VIP) AND CURRENT RESULTS. UROLOGY ROBOTIC SURGERY Arch. Esp. Urol., 60, 4 (397-407), 2007 VATTIKUTI INSTITUTE PROSTATECTOMY (VIP) AND CURRENT RESULTS. Mahendra Bhandari and Mani Menon. Vattikuti Urology Institute. Henry Ford Health

More information

about prostate health.

about prostate health. about prostate health. ABOUT THE DISEASE Prostate cancer is one of the most common types of cancer in American men, with more than 200,000 new cases diagnosed annually. It is also the second-leading cause

More information