HOW TO SOLVE THE APPRENTICESHIP REFORMS

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1 HOW TO SOLVE THE REFORMS A PROVIDER S GUIDE TO SUCCESS JUNE 2016

2 CONTENTS /2 /4 /6 /9 /11 /14 /18 /30 INTRODUCTION FURTHER SUPPORT USEFUL WEBSITES INTRODUCTION The Review of Apprenticeships in England was commissioned in June 2012 by the Secretaries of State for Education and Business, Innovation and Skills (BIS). The purpose of the review was to ensure that apprenticeships deliver the training, qualifications and skills that employers and learners need. The report highlighted a significant number of employers complaining that the existing frameworks are not fit for industry needs. By means of addressing this, the subsequent implementation plan acts as a strategy for redefining the shape of the apprenticeship system to meet the needs of the changing economy. The implementation plan sets out to: 1 Give employers control in designing apprenticeships 2 Increase the flexibility of delivery 3 Simplify the funding system 4 Increase the effectiveness of training City & Guilds The Latest Apprenticeships Standards and Assessment Plans SFA Funding Guidance Whilst the intention of the reforms is to give employers a leadership position at national, sectoral and delivery levels, it s also recognised that you, as training professionals, are fundamental to the delivery of innovative and high quality apprenticeships. The quality of learning and training you deliver is a vital element in allowing businesses to sustainably manage and grow talent within their workforce. In the new system, the knowledge and experience of FE Colleges and training providers such as yourselves is crucial to the successful delivery of apprenticeships. 2

3 WHY THIS REPORT IS IMPORTANT TO YOU With the changing policy on funding and a greater national emphasis on apprenticeships, providers will need to consider a different delivery model. Providers who are switching from Specifications for Apprenticeship Standards in England (SASE) Frameworks to new Standards will need to consider the changes to delivery and assessment methods, and some providers may be new to the apprenticeship market altogether. This guide has been created to help you develop a greater understanding of apprenticeships, the structure of the reforms and the implications of the changes. As you ll see, it includes a series of strategic considerations and actions for developing your new apprenticeship offer, as well as guidance on preparing your staff for the changes. REPLACING THE FRAMEWORKS It s understood that there will be a period where the Specifications of Assessment Standards for England (SASE) Frameworks are delivered alongside the new Apprenticeship Standards. However, once an existing apprenticeship Framework is covered by the new Standard, the outdated Framework will be discontinued at a point which is reasonably practical. The original intention was that all new starts would be on Trailblazer programmes from August It is now expected that the changeover (including run out of SASE) will be complete by It s also possible that both of these dates could change. Please note: This guide is only applicable for England. It represents policy as of June 2016 and will be updated as changes are made. Please refer to the most up-to-date version here. Links to other sources of information are also provided within this guide. 3

4 IN THIS SECTION YOU LL FIND: A definition of Trailblazers and the process to create a new Apprenticeship Standard Sources of further information, help and support THE FOR TRAILBLAZER GROUPS The term Trailblazer refers to a group of employers working together to design new Apprenticeship Standards for occupations within their relevant sectors. The group must consist of at least ten employers, which must include at least one Small or Medium-sized Enterprise (SME) representative. Trailblazer groups are free to work with whoever they choose to develop their Assessment Plans. So far, they have worked with awarding bodies, professional bodies and individual assessment experts. One of the employers must Chair the group. BIS guidance to Trailblazer development can be found here Expression of interest A prospective Trailblazer group submits an expression of interest form to BIS, outlining their occupation of interest. This is an application to become a Trailblazer group and to write a new Apprenticeship Standard for an occupation. There is a public consultation during this phase. Write the Apprenticeship Standard Once the group is approved and the occupation is confirmed as valid, the Trailblazer group agrees what the priorities are and then writes the new Standard. The document must clearly outline the skills, knowledge, competence and behaviours required for occupational competency. There is a public consultation during this phase. Standard approved by BIS Proposed Standards need to be submitted individually to BIS. Once approved, the Standard is published online and the Trailblazer group can begin to develop Assessment Plans. Write the Assessment Plan The Trailblazer group submits an Assessment Plan and costing template to BIS. The Assessment Plan must clearly set out what will be assessed, how the assessment will take place and the assessor requirements. It will also outline what s required to pass through the gateway to the end-point assessment. There is a public consultation during this phase. Ready for delivery Once approved for delivery, the Assessment Plan and its allocated funding band are published online. A funding cap is allocated to the approved Assessment Plans and the Standard is then ready for delivery. At this stage, the LARS number is published for each apprenticeship. This is the unique identifier for the apprenticeship and allows the provider to register an apprentice with the SFA. ü City & Guilds has published a guide for Trailblazers on writing apprenticeship Standards and Assessment Plans. 4

5 READY FOR DELIVERY BIS will publish Standards as ready for delivery once Assessment Plans are approved and funding cap bands have been allocated. This means that any employer or provider is able to deliver using the Trailblazer funding system without any SFA restrictions. There is also a national process of identifying reference providers working with each Trailblazer group on piloting implementation. We recommend talking to these nominated reference providers. You can get in touch with the Association of Colleges (AoC) or Association of Employment and Learning Providers (AELP) for further information. Although in theory, there is no restriction on your ability to deliver; in practice the decision on readiness for delivery does not always take account of the need to develop, change qualifications, or develop endpoint assessment instruments and formative assessment tools which may be devised nationally. Once the Assessment Plan is approved as ready for delivery, the SFA then lists the Apprenticeship Standard for tender by potential assessment organisations to deliver end-point assessment. There is no definitive timescale for when the Standard will be open for tender. City & Guilds is working with over two thirds of Trailblazer groups, helping to shape Apprenticeship Standards and Assessment Plans. Our teams can update you on the development of new Standards and will be able to advise you on your transition plan moving forward. For further advice, you can contact us at: 5

6 IN THIS SECTION YOU LL FIND: A summary of the components of Apprenticeship Standards Guidance on Maths and English Information on behaviours Current apprenticeship frameworks will be replaced by clear and concise Standards, defined by employer groups and recognised by industry. Each occupation will have a different Apprenticeship Standard, linked to a specific occupational level. The Standards are rigorous, challenging and require a minimum of one year training. All new Standards will be published so companies, learners and trainers can access all of the relevant information. S ARE NO LONGER DEFINED BY QUALIFICATIONS There is no mandatory requirement for qualifications within new apprenticeships unless they are required for a Licence to Practice (LTP), or used widely as a sift by employers. Trailblazer groups can however choose to build qualifications into the Standards, either mandatory (in the Standard) or recommended (in the Assessment Plan). Where qualifications are not mandatory, employers and providers have much more flexibility to choose which qualification to offer, or can develop a programme that does not include qualifications at all. Continuous assessment Continuous assessment throughout the apprenticeship programme will still be necessary. This is simply to track the progress of apprentices, gather feedback and offer employers and providers a clear perspective of apprentices readiness for final assessment. Continuous assessment might be through one-to-ones for monitoring progress, or a formal qualification that is mandatory as a precursor to the end-point assessment. NO.1 Where there is no separate qualification requiring continuous assessment, on-programme assessment will not call for the same level of quality assurance as previously required under the SASE framework. Many employers will be able to carry out all or part of this function, whereas providers currently have this responsibility in most occupations. We anticipate employers and providers will need to work in close partnership to deliver quality apprenticeships. City & Guilds is working closely with Trailblazer groups and constantly monitoring Standards as they are being developed. We will revise or develop qualifications where they are specified in Assessment Plans. In many cases, if they are not specified in the assessment plan we will also develop qualifications or programmes of study to add value to the apprenticeship. 6

7 MOVING FROM FRAMEWORKS TO SASE FRAMEWORKS (MULTI-OCCUPATIONAL) TRAILBLAZER S (INDIVIDUAL PER OCCCUPATION) Initial assessment Initial assessment On-the-job and off-the-job training Mandatory Qualification(s) NVQ and Technical Certificate or combined qualification Maths and English Personal Learning and Thinking Skills Employment Rights and Responsibilities On-programme phase: On-the-job and off-the-job training Qualifications are not mandatory Trailblazer groups can choose to build qualifications into Standards, either mandatory (in the Standard) or recommended (in the Assessment Plan). If qualifications are not written into a Standard, providers can still build them into their apprenticeship programme. Maths and English Formative assessment of behaviours Gateway Employer and provider sign off learner End-point assessment Completion and certification Completion and certification Occupational competence Occupational competence 7

8 ON-PROGRAMME MATHS AND ENGLISH Math and English are vital life skills that underpin success in all jobs and career paths. All apprenticeships therefore need to include opportunities for learners to develop their knowledge, understanding and use of Maths and English. For many apprentices this will involve having to achieve specific qualifications in these subjects as part of their programme. The minimum required to complete most Level 2 apprenticeships is a qualification in Maths and in English at Level 1 or above (e.g. Functional Skills at Level 1 or 2, or GCSE at grade E or higher), although it is important to check the relevant Apprenticeship Standards for the exact requirements as some Trailblazer groups have decided to set a higher threshold for certain job roles. Where apprentices already have Maths and English qualifications at the minimum level required to complete their apprenticeship, they should be supported to work towards the next level. All Level 3 apprenticeships require learners to have achieved Level 2 qualifications in Maths and English by the time they complete their programme. This will usually involve either Functional Skills at Level 2 or GCSE at grade C or higher, although again it is important to check as some Apprenticeship Standards have more tightly prescribed requirements. BEHAVIOURS Trailblazer Apprenticeship Standards will cover behaviour as well as skills and knowledge. Trailblazer groups will outline their expectations for behaviour in the Assessment Plan. Depending on specifications in the Assessment Plan, behaviour may or may not be formally measured, however in either event it will contribute to end-point assessment outcomes and grade. You should pay extra attention to the following: Categories of behaviour specified in the Standard The role behaviour has in the Assessment Plan Whether behaviour will be assessed separately or integrated into other areas of assessment The extent to which grades are influenced or determined by behavioural performance You will want to consider the best way to deal with behaviour for each apprenticeship you offer. Even where behaviour is not assessed separately, you may decide to focus on it as an expedient performance outcome. City & Guilds is responding to how behaviour has been incorporated across the new Apprenticeship Standards. We are developing tools and resources to help providers manage delivery efficiently and effectively. 8

9 IN THIS SECTION YOU LL FIND: Information on independent end-point assessment and assessment methods Assessment examples for the new Apprenticeship Standards Information on who will deliver end-point assessment and sources for further information At the end of an apprenticeship, the apprentice will be signed-off by their employer as ready for a final assessment of both their knowledge and their practical capabilities. The end-point assessment must show that they can perform in the occupation in a fully competent, holistic and productive way. On top of this, the assessment must be graded (in most cases) and the assessment company and assessor must be independent of and separate from the training provided by the provider and employer. In some ways it can be thought of as similar to a driving test, but one which assesses ability to drive as competently as an experienced driver across a variety of road conditions. A test that results in a good, pass or fail grade. WHAT METHODS WILL BE USED? The move to independent end-point assessment at the end of the apprenticeship programme is probably the most important reform in the changes underway for apprenticeships. The Standard and Assessment Plan written by the Trailblazer group will set out the knowledge, skills and behaviours required, together with an outline of the assessment methods to be used for the end-point assessment. Examples of different assessments methods are shown opposite. The validity, effectiveness and cost of the various methods available vary in accordance with the occupation, which could be practical, involving work that can be easily observed (e.g. plumbing, hairdressing and horticulture) or knowledge-based, where work output can sometimes be partly observable (e.g. insurance and digital). FOR ASSESSING PRACTICAL COMPETENCE Options include: Workplace observation Testing in a practical test facility Workplace projects Portfolio of work Assignments FOR ASSESSING A BODY OF KNOWLEDGE Options include: Tests Examinations Professional discussions These could involve multiple-choice tests and be administered on paper or online. FOR ASSESSING KNOWLEDGE-BASED COMPETENCE Options include: Workplace projects Projects away from work (invigilated or otherwise) Professional discussions Assessment of work output 9

10 There are multiple assessments for most Apprenticeship Standards. The table below outlines assessment methods for a selection of Apprenticeship Standards that are ready for delivery. Apprenticeship Standard Assessment 1 Assessment 2 Assessment 3 Assessment 4 Actuarial L4 Summative showcase Interview Dental Nurse L3 Synoptic project Structured interview Network Engineer L4 Summative portfolio Synoptic project Structured interview Property Maintenance L2 Motor Vehicle Service and Maintenance Technician [Light Vehicle] L3 Synoptic knowledge assessment Synoptic practical assessment Synoptic interview Behaviour assessment Knowledge test Skills test Log book Public Service Operational Delivery Officer L3 Showcase portfolio Work-based project Presentation Structured interview WHO WILL DELIVER? Once an Assessment Plan has been produced, together with its costing, BIS and the SFA will allocate a funding band and publish the Apprenticeship Standard on the government website as ready to deliver. The SFA then lists the apprenticeship for a tender by potential assessment organisations. Successful organisations will be listed on the Register of Apprentice Assessment Organisations (RoAAO). Organisations wishing to register should respond to tenders from the SFA and must prove their capacity to carry out assessments as well as their capacity to develop assessment instruments, tests, examinations and assessment centres. These can be assessment organisations such as City & Guilds, or providers (as long as they re not looking to assess their own apprentices, and have the assessment or development capacity). In some cases employers might wish to become an assessment organisation on the RoAAO, or appoint one themselves, e.g. if they want to establish a supply chain initiative. The tender process is required for each occupational Standard therefore many Assessment organisations will apply multiple times. Tender results are posted by the SFA on a monthly basis. Even when tendering has taken place, it s often the case that there s still a need to develop assessment instruments and this might take some time. Employers and training providers are usually cautious in starting apprentices before they ve seen what the end-point assessment will look like. City & Guilds will endeavour to give advice to training providers and employers on this matter, so they can start apprentices as soon as it is practicable. City & Guilds is an assessment organisation on the Register of Apprentice Assessment Organisations (RoAAO) for numerous Standards, including those listed above. For our most up-to-date end-point assessment offer, visit cityandguilds.com/apprenticeships/apprenticeship-products-services/end-assessment-service 10

11 IN THIS SECTION YOU LL FIND: A summary of funding sources Guidance on the current and new apprenticeship funding models A breakdown of the funding bands for apprenticeship Standards The apprenticeship levy and Digital Apprenticeship Service Sources of further information, help and support Currently, there are two types of apprenticeships available for delivery by education and training providers, the Apprenticeship Frameworks (SASE) and the new Apprenticeship Standards. From 2016/17, all SASE Frameworks will have a cap applied to them (to be announced in June). Therefore, for the next academic year, the funding method will change and all apprenticeship SASE Frameworks and the new Apprenticeship Standards will have a funding cap applied, requiring a level of co-investment from the employer. Employers having direct control of apprenticeships funding is a core and non-negotiable part of the Apprenticeship Reforms; central to driving the right behaviour within the system. Following April 2017, employers will fall into one of two groups. Which group an employer falls in will depend on how the apprenticeship is funded. Employers with a pay-bill of PAYBILL UNDER 3MILLION (NON-LEVY PAYING) PAYBILL OVER 3MILLION (LEVY PAYING) Employers co-invest in the delivery of Trailblazer standards and will begin to co-invest for the delivery of ALL apprenticeships Pay an apprenticeships levy into the Digital Apprenticeship Service (DAS). Levy funds can only be spent on training and assessment of apprenticeships. 11

12 CAPS FOR For every 1 spent on training by an employer, the Government contributes 2 up to a maximum cap. THERE ARE SIX CAPS Each new Standard has a cap allocated. Note: In 2016/17, each SASE Framework still in operation will also have a funding cap allocated too. The SFA will publish further details shortly. Funding cap Core Government contribution cap ( ) Additionally, three incentive payments are available: Funding cap Recruiting a year-old ( ) Employer contribution ( ) (non-levy payers) Maximum available funds ( ) 6 18,000 9,000 27, ,000 6,500 19, ,000 4,000 12, ,000 3,000 9, ,000 1,500 4, ,000 1,000 3,000 For a small business (<50) ( ) For successful completion ( ) Maximum Incentive Payments ( ) 6 5,400 2,700 2,700 10, ,900 1,950 1,950 7, ,400 1,200 1,200 4, , , , ,600 CURRENT MODEL Co-investment The current Trailblazer funding method is in place until the SFA implements a new funding process in 2016/17. Funds are channelled through the lead provider, who will collect and confirm employer contributions. The lead provider will also receive any incentive payments and transfer them in full to the employer. MODEL Co-investment or levy-paying From April 2017, employers will fall into one of two groups, levy paying and non-levy paying. Non-levy paying employers will continue to contribute to apprenticeship costs and providers will continue to receive allocations from the SFA. Caps will also be applied to SASE Frameworks. The SFA will announce further information about co-investment, caps and incentive payments in due course. Levy-paying employers will contribute via their monthly levy payments and use the new Digital Apprenticeship Service (DAS) to manage their apprenticeships and channel funds to their chosen provider. The provider will receive this money via their monthly ILR return. Funding caps will inform the maximum spend for individual apprenticeships. The Government will fully fund qualifications in Maths and English up to Level 2. 12

13 THE LEVY AND THE DIGITAL SERVICE (DAS) The apprenticeship levy will come into effect in April It will be payable by employers in UK at 0.5% of their total paybill. All employers will receive an allowance of 15,000 to offset against payment of the levy. This effectively means that the levy will only be payable on paybill in excess of 3 million per year. The Government will top up England levy contributions by 10%. The levy can only be spent on apprentice training and assessment from an approved provider. The levy will apply to employers across all sectors, regardless of whether they employ apprentices or not. It is paid monthly through PAYE and will be payable alongside income tax and National Insurance. Levy contributions in the Digital Apprenticeship Service will expire after 18 months. The City & Guilds website contains up-to-date information on the apprenticeship funding reforms, available here. DIGITAL SERVICE (DAS) LEVY EXAMPLE: Employer of 250 employees, each with a gross salary of 20,000: Paybill: 250 x 20,000 = 5,000,000 Levy sum: 0.5% x 5,000,000 = 25,000 Minus annual allowance: 25,000-15,000 = 10,000 10% top up on annual levy payment of 10,000 = 1,000 Total amount in Digital Apprenticeship Service Account: 11,000 The Digital Apprenticeship Service (DAS) is a new virtual tool that levy-paying employers will use to manage their apprenticeships from April 2017 onwards. Levy-paying employers will be able to set up an account on the DAS from January Non-levy payers will also be able to use DAS, but only to view information. It is likely that non levy-payers will transition to using DAS to manage their apprenticeships in 2019/2020. The DAS will hold the following information: A list of education training providers and their performance records Apprenticeship vacancies A function to allow levy-paying employers to purchase apprentice training. AND TIMELINE: From April 6th 2017, if an employer has calculated that they will pay the apprenticeship levy, they will need to declare this and include it in the usual PAYE payment to HMRC. From May 2017, levy-paying employers will be able to see the amount of levy available to spend in their DAS account (the delay is the time it will take HMRC to upload information on the levy to DAS). The levy allowance will operate on a monthly basis and will accumulate throughout the year as employers make their monthly PAYE returns. At this point, employers will be able to enter the details of their chosen apprenticeship into DAS and see which providers in their area deliver that apprenticeship and what the provider performance levels are. They will then negotiate with the provider to agree the delivery requirements and costs. Once this negotiation is complete, the employer inputs the information to DAS and this informs the SFA. The provider then draws down the funding for the apprenticeship via their monthly ILR data returns. The employer will be able to request suspension of payments via the DAS, should there be any unexpected issues, such as the apprentice leaving their employment. Any unused levy allowance will be carried from one month to the next. Funds will expire 18 months after they enter the employer s DAS account. If levy-payers have used all of their levy funds, the government will implement a co-investment model for the delivery of any additional apprenticeships. Further information about the coinvestment requirements are yet to be released by SFA. SFA GUIDANCE Guidance on funding for all further education, including the Trailblazer Funding Rules is available here. The consultation outcome on channelling funding through employers is available here. Providers should refer to this page for policy updates and further guidance. 13

14 IN THIS SECTION YOU LL FIND: A summary on the implications of the changes and advice on what you ll need to consider when planning for the changes Measures to ensure quality of training, learning and assessment in apprenticeships SWITCHING: THE IMPLICATIONS OF THE REFORMS In short, the reforms involve radical changes to the basic design of apprenticeships. The move to independent end-point assessment at the end of apprenticeships gives employers, FE colleges and training providers a higher degree of flexibility in the delivery of training. It also gives them opportunities to design their own apprenticeship programmes. This section will take you through what s changing, examine the implications and provide you with practical advice and sources of support. We begin by illustrating the differences between the SASE Apprenticeship Frameworks and the new Apprenticeship Standards. When switching to the new Apprenticeship Standards you ll need to consider the following implications. WHAT IS CHANGING? Individual Standards are written per occupation whereas Frameworks were multi-occupational Each Standard has a destination occupational level. For example, the apprentice may start at Level 2 and complete at Level 3. IMPLICATIONS FOR PROVIDERS An increase from approximately 250 SASE Frameworks to potentially over 800 Standards. This may be difficult for multi-standard Occupation Code (SOC) providers to manage The primary level relates specifically to the occupation, however there are potentially a variety of levels for the varying skills that underpin the occupation More Level 3 and Level 4 apprenticeships, with programmes that aim for the destination level Care needed to choose the occupation and level for entrants to apprenticeships, based on the employers work role The new Standards may take longer, which could affect timely completions and the success rate The focus is widening to include more higher level apprenticeships, up to Level 7 Qualifications are not mandatory, unless specifically required by the Trailblazer group. In the SASE Frameworks qualifications were mandatory, so this is a major change Increased flexibility for the employer and provider because any relevant qualification of any size can be used, e.g. Technical, NVQ-style, combined, unless a specific qualification is mandatory and written into the Apprenticeship Standard If no qualification or detailed specification is set, a curriculum that meets the new Apprenticeship Standard may be determined by the provider Providers will need to decide on multiple offers to employers and apprentices Provider programmes can be accredited by third parties if required, e.g. City & Guilds Providers and employers can specify approved prior learning (APL) for apprentices recruited from full-time vocationally relevant courses, where stated in the Assessment Plan 14

15 WHAT IS CHANGING? Holistic assessment of occupational competence is delivered by an independent assessor at the end of the programme. There is no continuous formal assessment of occupational competence Sign-off from the employer is required to confirm the apprentice is ready for end-point assessment Apprenticeships are graded Assessment of behaviours is required in the Apprenticeship Standards Personal Learning and Thinking Skills are no longer required There is no requirement for employment rights and responsibilities Standards can be underpinned by National Occupational Standards (NOS). This is decided by the Trailblazer group writing the Standard Apprenticeship certificates will be issued by the Federation for Industry Skills & Standards (FISS). The assessment organisation will make the submission to FISS rather than the providers. IMPLICATIONS FOR PROVIDERS Providers must design on-programme assessment where no work-based qualification is specified On-programme assessment can be delivered by employers with provider support The provider and employer will have to consider the implications of working with independent end-point assessment organisations, along with preparing the apprentice for the assessment Providers will need to design a method for employers to formally sign-off as ready for end-point assessment Grading is confirmed at the end-point assessment Providers will need to give feedback to apprentices during the training process so progression can be monitored Providers will need to determine how to assess behaviours out of context and prepare apprentices for end-point assessment. There are a variety of behaviours that are suited to different occupations Providers will be able to include if they believe they add value to their programme, or if required by the employer Providers will be able to include if they believe they add value to their programme, or if required by the employer If the employer group is in favour of the existing NOS, it s likely that there will be stronger synergies with the content and delivery in the current related SASE Framework Employers and providers may find NOS very useful for programme design Providers will still need to share evidence of on-programme completion with the assessment organisation. 15

16 A WAY OF WORKING WITH EMPLOYERS As Trailblazer apprenticeships are not centred on qualifications, the quality measures will be changing. The new Standards are not required to align to national Standards and are designed by employers, for employers with the condition that employers co-invest in the apprenticeship cost. Providers will be assessed and held accountable for the results of the apprenticeship, without control of decisions on training. To continually ensure and measure quality, providers and employers will need a three-way agreement (if one does not already exist). Apprenticeships are a unique opportunity to work in partnership with employers and enable them to add value to their business; hence are a worthwhile investment for employers. A provider s expertise will benefit employers in various ways including allowing employers to manage and grow talent within their workforce and working with apprentices to prepare them for assessment. TIPS FOR ADDING VALUE FOR EMPLOYERS An employer s success is your success and therefore how you engage with employers and add value to your offer, is vitally important. UNDERSTANDING EMPLOYER BUSINESS Where can apprenticeships add value to a business? Consider working with employers to identify and analyse their current skills gaps and develop a programme with suitable current Frameworks or new Trailblazer apprenticeships to develop the talent they need. Consider also a business future workforce requirements and develop a plan to have apprentices in place to meet those needs. Consider support programmes or consultancy to professionally develop apprenticeships within their business, including staff training and planning. Working in partnership with employers produces higher quality apprenticeships with an increase in completion rates, and results in increased productivity for businesses. PRODUCE A PIPELINE OF TALENT SO YOU CAN ENGAGE WITH EMPLOYERS Consider full-time prior learning such as City & Guilds TechBac which could enhance a learner s opportunity for apprenticeship roles by ensuring they are work-ready. Prior learning may also reduce the duration of the apprenticeship for the employer. Find out more about how you can partner with and tips for adding value for employers here. 16

17 QUALITY LEARNING, TRAINING AND IN S Real growth in sustainable volumes of apprenticeships can only be secured through a strategy with quality at its heart. The City & Guilds Industry Skills Board has carefully considered what would really achieve actual and perceived quality as the central theme in apprenticeships. The full report Making Apprenticeships Work can be downloaded here. The group concluded that this would be: 1 Recruitment into apprenticeships that are intrinsically demanding and worthwhile 2 Training and learning programmes that use a range of effective methods, and are built on the support of highly skilled adults in the workplace 3 High Standards built into a demanding assessment at the end of the apprenticeship 4 Progression opportunities that display the potential career routes beyond the initial apprenticeship MAKING S WORK: THE QUALITY MODEL A model for these four components of quality (illustrated in the following diagram) has been developed based on the lessons from Remaking Apprenticeships *, the experiences of Industry Skills Board members and the current Government Apprenticeship Reforms. heart the at apprenticeships LEARNING Putting of REAL EXPERIENCE, PRACTICE AND PROBLEM SOLVING... RECRUITMENT Initial assessment Apprenticeship agreement Induction On-the-job training and learning from and with others (experts and peers) Off-the-job education, training and on-line learning Coaching, mentoring, formative assessments, review and feedback A nurturing, supportive and visible learning environment where apprentices have a voice MASTERY Routine expertise Resourcefulness Craftsmanship Functional skills Business-like attitudes Wider skills and behaviours Autonomy SIGN-OFF BY EMPLOYER Qualification(s) Licence to practice Certification CONTINUING OCCUPATIONAL & MANAGEMENT DEVELOPMENT...TO ACHIEVE PRODUCTIVITY AND AUTONOMY * The City & Guilds Alliance s 2014 report Remaking Apprenticeships was written by Professor Bill Lucas and Ellen Spencer of the Centre for Real-World Learning at the University of Winchester. 17

18 IN THIS SECTION YOU LL FIND: An 8-step action plan to help guide your transition to the new Apprenticeship Standards Guidance on developing your apprenticeship offer and a breakdown of different models and their implications Advice on selecting an assessment partner Questions you ll need to ask to evaluate the business opportunity for transitioning to the new Apprenticeship Standards Guidance on pricing and negotiating contracts STEP 1 STEP 2 STEP 3 STEP 4 STEP 5 STEP 6 STEP 7 STEP 8 Research and decide on occupational coverage Test your findings by engaging with local employers Choose which apprenticeships to offer Develop your on-programme offer Choose your end assessment organisation Evaluate your capability and capacity Consider pricing and affordability Finalise contracts, systems and processes 18

19 STEP 1. RESEARCH AND DECIDE ON OCCUPATIONAL COVERAGE A good place to begin is determining the skills requirement for your local area, and which programmes might have a high demand. You can find out by researching online or by making contact with: Local Enterprise Partnerships (LEPs) Industrial Partnerships (IPs) Sector Skills Councils (SSCs) Trailblazer groups, individual employers involved are listed online City & Guilds recently partnered with EMSI to develop an interactive map showing predicted annual job openings per region from Discover predicted job openings in your regions here. This tool was developed as part of a research project with YouGov to learn more about the career aspirations for year olds. Find out more about the research, Great Expectations here. STEP 2. TEST YOUR FINDINGS BY ENGAGING WITH LOCAL EMPLOYERS The system is moving to a much more employer-led approach, so your greatest asset will be your relationships with employers, for example, many providers are already setting up events to enhance their relationship with employers. With this in mind, we suggest that you consult your employer contacts when developing your offer, to test local demand and ensure you re meeting their overall requirements. It is also advisable to identify the characteristics of the types of business you wish to work with. In the new system, employers may be more likely to work with a provider who can offer the full range of occupations they employ, rather than use a number of different providers. This does not mean that you need fully-bespoke offers for each employer. Rather you need to develop one or more offers related to each occupation which employers can choose from, whilst allowing yourself the flexibility to tailor programmes to suit employers. 19

20 STEP 3. CHOOSE WHICH S TO OFFER You will need to evaluate when the time is right to start delivering the new Apprenticeships Standards. Keep an eye on updates on the SASE Frameworks and the Standards currently under development (along with those ready for delivery). Our website also gives you an overview of the Trailblazer activity in each sector. If you require further information, please feel free to contact us. MAPPING YOUR SASE DELIVERY TO It is advisable to begin to map your current delivery of SASE pathways to new Trailblazer occupations. You can then look at the status of the new occupation and decide when to transition from SASE. The table below is an example for Level 3 Retail. SASE Framework title SASE Pathway Occupational Standard Sales Professional Retail Level 3 Retail Management Retail team leader Visual Merchandising There may be pathways that do not currently have equivalent Standards approved, but are in development. You can find the Trailblazer status update for each occupation here. Some SASE pathways, such as administration, may have multiple equivalent Trailblazer occupations. In this case, the new Standards might be more industry specific so you will need to consider which one is most appropriate for your employers. If there is no Standard in development, providers can look to partner with an employer to develop one. 20

21 Confirming direction of travel Does your leadership team have a clear direction of travel for your centre s apprenticeship provision? Your centre will need to develop and agree on the proposition to ensure future investment is sustainable. The model below outlines key considerations when evaluating the business opportunity for transition. If you re new to the occupational area it may be more cost-effective to offer the new Standards as you ll need to adopt these in 2-3 years regardless. EXAMPLE: DECISION TO GROW BUSINESS IN THE HEALTHCARE SECTOR FOLLOWING INITIAL RESEARCH I am new to the sector I deliver SASE apprenticeships in the sector What is currently available in SASE and what is or will be covered by the new Standards? What is or will be covered by the new Standards? THE BENEFITS OF DELIVERING ü THE MAY BE: What are the financial advantages for delivering SASE vs the new Standards? If there s a new Standard for the occupation, and I choose to enter with SASE, would it be a false economy? What are the financial advantages of moving to the new Standards? If I choose to continue delivering SASE until the funding is switched off, what are the risks? Better funding More attractive to employers new Standards may better meet small business requirements Attractiveness to learners and better quality of learners Staying ahead of competitors establishing your centre as a leader in new apprenticeships 21

22 STEP 4. DEVELOP YOUR ON-PROGRAMME OFFER Designing your delivery model In determining the appropriate approach for each apprenticeship offer, you ll need to consider the following: One or more qualifications The provider s own programme(s) (aligned to the assessment plan) The provider s own programme, accredited by an awarding body An employer training programme End-point assessment organisation engagement Where there are mandatory qualifications, the process remains similar to how it has traditionally been. Where there are no mandatory qualifications, employers and providers have a range of choices to make and development work to carry out. In either case, City & Guilds is here to assist you. Find out more about our qualifications, on-programme tools and end-point assessment here. The first step is to decide whether your offer will have a qualification, no qualification or a combination of both. It is also likely that you will make more than one offer for many occupations (see page 21). Funding will be available whether a qualification is used or not. It s worth remembering that the funding band represents a cap, not a price. The actual price is negotiable between the employer and provider. Employers can only draw on provider funds by spending money with approved providers, currently on a ratio of 1:2. In developing your delivery model and offer to an employer, the priority is to understand the content and requirements of the Standard and Assessment Plan for each occupation. 22

23 VARIATIONS IN PROVIDERS OFFER(S) FOR ON-PROGRAMME TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT QUALIFICATION-BASED Qualifications have traditionally been the core component of an apprenticeship, providing the basis of training and development. Where they still exist as a mandatory requirement in a new apprenticeship Standard, the delivery model will continue to include the learning and practical training to prepare for these embedded qualifications. The provider may still need to design on-the-job training and will need to consider continuous assessment, off-the-job training and possibilities of e-learning. A BESPOKE PROGRAMME Where qualifications are not a mandatory component, a provider will need to create a programme with structure and content to develop the knowledge, skills and behaviour required for the apprentice to be ready to move on to end-point assessment. To add value, there may be an opportunity to embed a qualification into the programme when available and relevant to the Standard. If qualifications are not embedded, the quality of these apprenticeships will largely rest on end-point assessment, so independence and high standards will be very important. A BESPOKE PROGRAMME WITH ACCREDITATION To add value and differentiate themselves in the marketplace, a provider can chose to accredit their programme with a globally recognised awarding organisation such as City & Guilds. Providers developing an accredited programme will need to consider an external check on quality and will need to work with an awarding body to establish accreditation for the programme. 23

24 Actions for all providers For all of these models, providers will need to: Assess qualifications available and decide whether to include any that are surplus to Trailblazer requirements Determine APL relationship to vocational qualifications of potential recruits Determine expected duration range Create method for assessment of employers capabilities Define skills needed to assess employer work roles Assess costs and negotiation price with the employer Agree on behaviours assessment tool Agree format for employer sign-off Integrate Maths and English learning into programmes ADDING VALUE TO YOUR OFFER It s important that employers see that you can deliver added value. This being the case, you might wish to consider: Support in recruitment, initial assessment and prior learning in the new apprenticeship system there s greater incentive for employers to recruit learners with relevant experience from full-time programmes. This leads to the completion of training via an apprenticeship in such a way that the transition to apprenticeship is managed and supported. If an apprentice has previously attended a full-time vocational course in an area with a relatively high off-the-job training requirement (e.g. electrical, plumbing, digital, engineering and accountancy) they will represent considerable savings for employers Awareness days increasing employer engagement Offering the appointment and training of employers staff as mentors and/or workplace trainers. Providers will need ways of assessing and supporting employers in this by devising their own assessment programme(s) Recognition and reward programmes, for example, on-programme assessment may include interim certification or badges to help keep learners motivated Training methods it should be recognised that employers now have far greater choice regarding the delivery methods of training in apprenticeship programmes. They may be more scrupulous in ensuring the efficiency of off-the-job training and consider evening and weekend delivery. They may also be interested in training methods such as e-learning and resource-based learning 24

25 STEP 5. CHOOSE YOUR END ORGANISATION The Register of Apprentice Assessment Organisations (RoAAO) is a list of organisations that have been approved by the Skills Funding Agency as suitable to conduct independent end-point assessment of apprentices and be in receipt of public funds. As a training provider you can recommend an organisation that is listed on the register but the final choice is down to the employer. If you are delivering the apprentices training and development you cannot be involved in the end-point assessment. As the lead provider you will contract with, and pay your end assessment organisation as part of your overall agreement with the employer. However, you will need to agree a provisional price, and later a confirmed price, for the assessment with the organisation. This confirmed price must be communicated to the employer. CITY & GUILDS HOW IT WORKS City & Guilds is an approved assessment organisation provider for several Apprenticeships Standards. For more information click here. We expect City & Guilds to deliver end-point assessment in a variety of ways, as required by the sector s model of assessment and partly by operational considerations such as volumes, peaks and troughs. End-point assessment delivery options might be: 1 Contracting freelance assessors directly 2 Arranging for release and contracting assessors from employers, partner providers and colleges (to assess apprentices that they ve had no part in training) 4 3 Hiring venues Subcontracting for from partner use of assessors from organisations partner providers and colleges To discuss partnering with City & Guilds in the delivery of end-point assessment please contact 25

26 CONSIDERATIONS COSTS City & Guilds has developed a costing model for various assessment methods. We are advising a number of Trailblazer groups on optimising costs and effectiveness and assisting them with their cost submissions to BIS/SFA. The common expense in all assessment methods is the time taken by independent assessors. This includes their time taken in face-to-face, online or telephone assessment work, marking projects etc. The second significant costs issue is whether more than one apprentice can be assessed at the same time. Although use of a practical test facility means more cost in setting up and running, it also means that apprentices can be assessed in groups by one assessor. Some sectors already have such facilities and some training providers and colleges are willing to loan or hire them out to assessment organisations. It must be said though, with the exception of a few specific occupations, assessment in an artificial environment is not the same as real work, and so usually needs to be complemented by other methods. Although assessment costs have generally ranged between 500 and 1500, it s important to note that we have not yet priced any occupations and the actual price may well be lower. Assessment costs generally will be a small proportion of the funding for the apprenticeship, which might be capped with government and private funding combined at 12k or 27k for example. Where the lowest funding bands are concerned they could be a more significant proportion, but this is dependent on the assessment method(s) that the employer group has chosen. Costs of end-point assessment only relate in part to the cost of training and so are not directly proportional. Where no NVQ is involved, the saving for the training provider on assessment could be substantial. This being the case, training providers might see a net reduction in overall costs or increased capacity to deliver training and learning elsewhere. Whatever the cost, it is included in the submission to BIS/SFA and is therefore, part of the total funding available, including the employer s contribution. 26

27 STEP 6. EVALUATE YOUR CAPABILITY AND CAPACITY Whilst deciding on your on-programme and end-point assessment delivery models, it s essential that you continually evaluate your capacity and your capability to deliver. This is a question of what you currently do and what you will be required to do. As providers you ll need to consider the following: Do you have any current apprenticeship experience in the related SASE apprenticeships? Will you have to review and invest in new technology and delivery for cost-effectiveness and increased quality? What are the capabilities of staff will you need to upskill them? Will staff need sales or negotiation skills training to work with employers? What are the implications on the broader resources that you ll need to have in place? Over what period of time can you make any necessary changes? How are you going to monitor, review and evaluate the success of your apprenticeship programmes? Do you have the ability to draw up three-way agreements between provider, employer and learners? How you will develop templates for contracts with apprentices. How you will develop pricing structures that clearly define what s included and what would be an additional cost to employers. TRANSITION Working through the points above you will need to evaluate your current delivery system when planning your transition to the new Standards. Consider the following: Gaps in current capability Changes in current work practices Resource implications Investment implications 27

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