Teaching Companion. Julius Caesar. Teaching Guide

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1 Teaching Companion Julius Caesar Teaching Guide Copyright 2010

2 JULIUS CAESAR Lesson Plans Table of Contents Lesson # Introduction Secret Messages... 4 Discussion... 4 Caesar vs. Pompey... 4 Lesson # Reading Act 1, Scene Dramatic Terms and Devices Pun... 5 Anticipation Questions Prophecies... 5 Reading Act 1, Scene Homework... 5 Lesson # Discussion Honor... 6 Questions Act 1, Scene Dramatic Terms and Devices Aside and Soliloquy... 6 Dramatic Terms and Devices Dramatic Irony... 6 Reading Act 1, Scene Lesson # Headlines Act Film Version Act Character Chart... 7 Lesson # Character Scrapbook Act Paraphrasing Brutus Soliloquy in Homework... 8 Lesson # Questions Act 2, Scene Reading Act 2, Scene Discussion The Conspirators Morality... 9 Reading Act 2, Scenes 3 and Lesson # Film Version Act Headlines Act Copyright

3 JULIUS CAESAR Lesson Plans Character Scrapbook Act Lesson # Planning an Assassination Dramatic Terms and Devices Dramatic Irony Film Version Act 3, Scene Planning an Assassination Continued Questions Act 3, Scene Lesson # Film Version Act 3, Scene Paraphrasing Brutus Speech Dramatic Terms and Devices Rhetorical Question Paragraph Antony s Speech Lesson # Headlines Act Character Scrapbook Act Background Notes Octavius and Lepidus Reading Act 4, Scene Lesson # Assassinations Research Project Lesson # Assassinations Research Project Continued Lesson # Research Presentations Lesson # Film Version Act 4, Scenes Headlines Act Character Scrapbook Act Lesson # Dramatic Terms and Devices Pathos Film Version Act 5, Scenes Headlines Act Character Scrapbook Act Lesson # Theme Workshop Copyright

4 JULIUS CAESAR Lesson Plans Themes in Julius Caesar Theme Paragraph Lesson # Review Jeopardy Study Tips Lesson # Unit Test Copyright

5 JULIUS CAESAR Lesson Plans Lesson #1 Introduction Secret Messages Secret Caesar Messages (students communicate without words no talking or writing) Split class into two groups. Number the students in each group so that they can find a partner with the same number in the other group. Then give each student a secret message to communicate to their partner. They can use gestures, drawings, and sounds, but no written or spoken language. The messages will relate to the play. A class set of the messages can be found in the handouts package. Just cut them into strips with one message each: A. I feel like I am on top of the world today. I hope you and I stay best friends forever and that you never stab me. B. It s almost the first day of spring and I feel great. I think I will go and stab my best friend in the back. Discussion Discuss the communication process What techniques did you rely on? Which parts of the messages were most difficult to communicate? How do you think this might relate to watching and/or studying a Shakespearean play? If you are watching a play and you don t understand all of the language being used, how do you decipher meaning? How do you read the emotions and thoughts of the characters? Caesar vs. Pompey Shakespeare s Julius Caesar begins when Caesar returns to Rome after defeating Pompey. To help students understand the historical context of the play, it is essential to give them some background. The following web address links to a three-part series of clips dramatizing the conflict between Caesar and Pompey. Each part is about 10 minutes long. Before showing it, tell your students that Pompey was the consular of Rome (sort of like the President), and that Caesar was an ambitious, powerful general. If you do not have an LCD projector or other means of showing streaming video to your class, you will have to provide historical context in a more traditional (read: boring) format such as through notes. Copyright

6 JULIUS CAESAR Lesson Plans Lesson #2 Reading Act 1, Scene 1 Assign readers for the following parts: Flavius, Marullus, Citizen 1, Citizen 2. Set the scene for your students citizens are crowding the streets to watch Caesar s triumph (like a parade celebrating his victory). Tribunes (elected officials) Flavius and Marullus are disgusted by the fickle love of the people. Begin reading 1.1 aloud. Stop often to clarify meaning and confirm understanding. Dramatic Terms and Devices Pun Distribute the Dramatic Terms and Devices Handout Define pun a play on words in which a word or phrase has a double meaning. Students are to fill in the chart with the definition and an example from the play. Anticipation Questions Prophecies Write the following statements on the board. Students are to agree or disagree with each statement and provide explanations and reasons for their position. 1. Some people can predict the future. 2. There is no such thing as destiny. 3. Superstitions are silly. Give your students a few minutes to write their responses to each statement (at least three sentences for each statement). Once students are finished writing their responses, invite them to share their thoughts and facilitate a discussion about fate, destiny, prophesies, and superstition. Reading Act 1, Scene 2 Assign readers for the following parts: Caesar, Casca, Calpurnia, Antony, Brutus, and the soothsayer. Read until Caesar and others exit (line 24). Stop often to clarify meaning and confirm understanding. Homework Students are to read the rest of 1.2 for homework. Copyright

7 JULIUS CAESAR Lesson Plans Lesson #3 Discussion Honor Ask your students to take two minutes to write down what they think it means to be honourable. Invite students to share their thoughts. What is honor? How do we achieve it? Does the idea of honor sometimes lead to people doing things they shouldn t? What is an honorable death? Has honor disappeared, or do we still care about it? Questions Act 1, Scene 2 Write the following questions on the board. Students are to answer them in full sentences and paragraphs (where appropriate) to be handed in. 1. What does Cassius want Brutus to realize about himself? 2. What two incidents does Cassius describe that suggest Caesar is physically weak? 3. How does Cassius feel about Caesar s rise to power? Why? 4. According to Caesar, what makes Cassius dangerous? 5. What did Caesar refuse to accept from Antony three times? 6. What does Cassius plan to do to manipulate Brutus feelings? Dramatic Terms and Devices Aside and Soliloquy Students are to insert the following into their charts. Define aside occurs when a character briefly speaks his/her thoughts to the audience while on stage with other characters. Explain that it is like in a soap opera or other cheesy show when you get to hear someone s thoughts. Define soliloquy occurs when a character speaks his/her thoughts while alone on stage. Cassius description of his plan at the end of 1.2 is a soliloquy. Dramatic Terms and Devices Dramatic Irony Students are to insert the following into their charts. Define dramatic irony - occurs when the natural and/or supernatural world echoes or responds to events in the human world. Tell your students that in Shakespeare s plays, dramatic irony usually comes in the form of a tremendous storm with strange occurrences when humans conspire to commit murder. Students can leave the example column blank for now they will see an example in just a moment. Reading Act 1, Scene 3 Assign readers for the following parts: Casca, Cicero, Cassius, and Cinna. Read 1.3, stopping often to clarify meaning and confirm understanding. Copyright

8 JULIUS CAESAR Lesson Plans Lesson #4 Headlines Act 1 To review the major events of the play thus far and to ensure students understand what is going on, students are to write headlines for each scene in Act 1. Students can work with a partner or individually. Students must write one headline for each scene. The headline must convey the important events of the scene. Students should feel free to be creative and funny, just as long as they fulfill the requirements of the assignment to show they know what happened in each scene. Headline Example for Scene 1: Two Player Haters Try to Spoil Caesar s Parade Film Version Act 1 Shakespeare s Julius Caesar is a play and it is meant to be seen and heard, not simply read. To this end it is essential that you supplement your reading of the play with a film version. There are several film versions to choose from. The most famous one stars Marlon Brando as Antony. Watch to the end of Act 1. Character Chart Distribute the Character Chart handout. Explain to the students that a character trait is a distinguishing feature of his/her personality that the character possesses. Traits must be backed up by a quote or passage from the text and can be determined based on the following: What a character says; What a character does; What other characters say about the character. Students should fill out charts based on the characters of Cassius, Brutus, Caesar, Calphurnia, and Antony. Copyright

9 JULIUS CAESAR Lesson Plans Lesson #5 Character Scrapbook Act 1 The Character Scrapbook is an ongoing assignment, which students will contribute to at the end of each act. Distribute the Character Scrapbook Assignment handout. Explain to students that they must choose a single character to follow through the course of the play. Note: If their character dies before the end of the play, they will continue to write diary entries as though from the watchful spirit of the character. Students are to write their first diary entry about one page long and should refer to Caesar s apparent weaknesses and the possibility of a conspiracy forming against him. To accompany this first diary entry, students should choose one trait belonging to their character and find two images that represent or symbolize that trait. Students should hand in their diary entries and pictures to the teacher for review, but they won t be graded until the entire package is handed in at the end of the unit. Paraphrasing Brutus Soliloquy in 2.1 This activity will be challenging for students, especially if it is their first try at paraphrasing Shakespeare. The objective is for them to put the soliloquy into their own words. Essentially, they have to translate it into modern English. Describe what paraphrasing entails Putting a piece of text into your own words. Tell the students they are to read Brutus soliloquy at the beginning of 2.1 (lines 9 33), and translate his words into their own modern English. To make this more fun, they can give Brutus a new, modern persona and use slang. They can be funny, but they must still fulfill the requirements of the assignment to show they understand what is being said. This assignment will require you to circulate and assist with comprehension and translation. Homework Students are to finish reading Act 2, Scene 1 for homework. Copyright

10 JULIUS CAESAR Lesson Plans Lesson #6 Questions Act 2, Scene 1 Write the following questions on the board. Students are to answer them in full sentences and paragraphs (where appropriate) to be handed in. 1. Name the conspirators who visit Brutus. 2. Who does Cassius think they should kill in addition to Caesar? 3. Why does Brutus refuse this second killing? 4. How will Decius get Caesar to come to the Capitol? Reading Act 2, Scene 2 Assign readers for the following roles: Caesar, servant, Calpurnia, Decius, Publius, Brutus, Antony, and Trebonius. Remind your students to read with emotion. Read 2.2 aloud, stopping often to check for understanding and clarify meaning. Discussion The Conspirators Morality Discuss the assassination plot with your class. Are Brutus and the others doing the right thing? Do they believe this is necessary for the greater good, or are they simply ambitious? Who might gain from this plot? Who might lose? Reading Act 2, Scenes 3 and 4 Assign readers for the following roles: Artemidorus, Portia, Lucius, and the soothsayer. Read 2.3 and 2.4 aloud, stopping often to check for understanding and clarify meaning. Lesson #7 Film Version Act 2 Watch to the end of Act 2. Headlines Act 2 To review the major events of the play thus far and to ensure students understand what is going on, students are to write headlines for each scene in Act 2. Students can work with a partner or individually. Students must write one headline for each scene. The headline must convey the important events of the scene. Students should feel free to be creative and funny, just as long as they fulfill the requirements of the assignment to show they know what happened in each scene. Headline Example for Scene 1: Brutus and the Conspirators Conspire Inconspicuously Copyright

11 JULIUS CAESAR Lesson Plans Character Scrapbook Act 2 Act 2 is dedicated to the revelation that Caesar s tragic flaw is his overconfidence and that Cassius and Brutus are power hungry. Based on these ideas, the students should dedicate their diary entries to contemplation of this idea. Explain to the students that a tragic flaw is a flaw in the character s personality that leads to his or her eventual downfall. Discuss Caesar s tragic flaw his inflated ego and overconfidence. List examples. Reinforce the idea that Cassius is hungry for power and that Brutus feels conflicted about what the honorable thing to do is. Tell students to make sure they touch upon all of these ideas in their diary entries. Students should choose one character trait for their character and search for one or two pictures that best describe the personality of their character or the way their character is currently feeling. Students should hand in their diary entries and pictures to the teacher for review. Lesson #8 Planning an Assassination Distribute the Planning an Assassination handout. Students fill in the first two sections: What do you know? How do you predict? The final box will be filled in after watching Act 3, Scene 1. Dramatic Terms and Devices Dramatic Irony Define dramatic irony occurs when the audience knows something a character does not. What do we know that Caesar does not? Film Version Act 3, Scene 1 Watch 3.1 (Caesar s assassination). Planning an Assassination Continued Students fill in the final box: Describe the Scene. Questions Act 3, Scene 1 Write the following questions on the board. Students are to answer them in full sentences and paragraphs (where appropriate) to be handed in. 1. Why isn t Artemidorus successful in his attempt to warn Caesar? 2. Who stabs Caesar first? Last? 3. Why does Cassius think it is a bad idea to let Antony speak at Caesar s funeral? Do you agree with him? Explain. Copyright

12 JULIUS CAESAR Lesson Plans Lesson #9 Film Version Act 3, Scene 2 Caesar s funeral is a key point in the play and is dominated by long speeches by Brutus and Antony. Because the speeches are long and challenging, it is a scene best watched on film instead of simply read aloud in class. After watching it, students will return to the speeches and examine them in more detail. Watch 3.2 (Caesar s funeral). Paraphrasing Brutus Speech Students will paraphrase Brutus speech at Caesar s funeral. In this speech, Brutus explains why he had to kill Caesar. He quickly convinces the people that he did the right and honorable thing. Read Brutus speech aloud to the class. Discuss the main ideas that Brutus tries to convey. Students are then to paraphrase the speech (put it into their own words). Explain that they will be graded for the accuracy and thoroughness of their translations. Circulate and assist. Dramatic Terms and Devices Rhetorical Question Define rhetorical question a figure of speech in the form of a question posed for its persuasive effect without the expectation of a reply. Students are to find three examples of rhetorical questions in Antony s speech in Act 3, Scene 2. Paragraph Antony s Speech In this assignment, students will explain what makes Marc Antony s speech so effective. Read through Antony s speech (from line ). Discuss Antony s persuasive techniques repetition, rhetorical question, etc. How does he gain the support of the people? Students are to write a fully-developed paragraph comparing Antony s and Brutus speeches and explaining why Antony s speech is more effective. Paragraphs should be at least 12-sentences long and should include at least two direct quotes. If students struggle at the beginning, help them get started by giving them a first sentence similar to the following example: At Caesar s funeral the people are moved by Brutus speech, but they find Antony far more convincing. Copyright

13 JULIUS CAESAR Lesson Plans Lesson #10 Headlines Act 3 To review the major events of the play thus far and to ensure students understand what is going on, students are to write headlines for each scene in Act 3. Students can work with a partner or individually. Students must write one headline for each scene. The headline must convey the important events of the scene. Students should feel free to be creative and funny, just as long as they fulfill the requirements of the assignment to show they know what happened in each scene. Character Scrapbook Act 3 The major ideas in Act 3 revolve around the assassination and the aftermath, most importantly including Antony s speech. Students should be familiar with the rhetoric that Antony uses to convince the people that the conspirators did not act in their best interest by killing Caesar. Instruct students to retell the assassination from the point of view of their character to include in the diary entry. Students should include their character s emotional and rational reactions to the assassination. How did it make them feel? What does it mean for them? Students should choose one character trait for their character and search for one or two pictures that best describe the personality of their character or the way their character is currently feeling. Students should hand in their diary entries and pictures to the teacher for review. Background Notes Octavius and Lepidus Lepidus was among Julius Caesar's greatest supporters. After Caesar's murder, Lepidus, despite assuring the senate of his loyalty, allied himself with Mark Antony in a joint bid for power. But Caesar had left an heir: Gaius Julius Caesar Octavian, his great nephew and adopted son in Caesar's will. Octavian, Antony and Lepidus met on an island in a river near Mutina (modern Modena), their armies lined along opposite banks, [6] and formed the Second Triumvirate, legalized with the name of Triumvirs for the Organization of the People by the Lex Titia of 43 BC. Reading Act 4, Scene 1 Assign readers for the following roles: Antony, Octavius, and Lepidus Read Act 4, Scene 1. Copyright

14 JULIUS CAESAR Lesson Plans Lesson #11 Assassinations Research Project This assignment will require students to conduct research in small groups, and to present their research to the class. Give your students two classes in which to conduct their research and prepare their presentations. Then it is time to present. Please consult the Assassinations Research Project handout for more details. Distribute the Assassinations Research Project handout. Read through the handout with your class. Post the sign-up sheet at the front of the room and call student up randomly or by whatever system you wish to sign up for one of the topics. Students then follow the instructions on the handout. Lesson #12 Assassinations Research Project Continued This will be the final class for students to finish their research and prepare their presentations. All groups should be ready to present tomorrow. Lesson #13 Research Presentations This class will be dedicated to group presentations. Each presentation should take approximately 10 minutes. Use the Presentation Evaluation template to assess each group. Lesson #14 Film Version Act 4, Scenes 1-3 Watch all of Act 4. Headlines Act 4 To review the major events of the play thus far and to ensure students understand what is going on, students are to write headlines for each scene in Act 4. Students can work with a partner or individually. Students must write one headline for each scene. The headline must convey the important events of the scene. Students should feel free to be creative and funny, just as long as they fulfill the requirements of the assignment to show they know what happened in each scene. Copyright

15 JULIUS CAESAR Lesson Plans Character Scrapbook Act 4 This act focuses on the idea of revenge and questions whether the characters are acting in an honorable fashion. Students should be able to understand the differences between Antony and Brutus and who is a stronger character. (Antony is aware of his greed, while Brutus is struggling to understand himself). Ask students to find examples of greed in this act. List them on the board. Ask students if Antony is honorable in his revenge or if his greed has negated his original nobility. Instruct them to include their thoughts in the diary entry from the perspective of their character. Ask students to find examples of Brutus s weakness (he is affected by the death of his wife. Perhaps?) How does his greed cause him to betray (or try to betray) his friend Cassius? Students should also include these ideas in their entries. Students should choose one character trait for their character and search for one or two pictures that best describe the personality of their character or the way their character is currently feeling. Students should hand in their diary entries and pictures to the teacher for review. Lesson #15 Dramatic Terms and Devices Pathos Define pathos a feeling of sympathy or pity evoked by a tragedy. Are there any characters for whom you feel pathos? Revisit this question after finishing the play. Film Version Act 5, Scenes 1-5 Watch the rest of Julius Caesar. Headlines Act 5 To review the major events of the play thus far and to ensure students understand what is going on, students are to write headlines for each scene in Act 5. Students can work with a partner or individually. Students must write one headline for each scene. The headline must convey the important events of the scene. Students should feel free to be creative and funny, just as long as they fulfill the requirements of the assignment to show they know what happened in each scene. Character Scrapbook Act 5 Because many characters die during the final act, students may wish to write the entry as a ghost. The focus of this act is the tragic flaws of Cassius and Brutus. Ask students to recall what a tragic flaw is. Ask them what they think were the tragic flaws of Cassius and Brutus. Tell them to refer to this in their diary entries. Copyright

16 JULIUS CAESAR Lesson Plans Ask students if they think that Brutus is a hero. Refer to the final speech of Antony. Do they feel that Antony thinks of Brutus as a hero? Why? They should also refer to this in their diary entry. Students should choose one character trait for their character and search for one or two pictures that best describe the personality of their character or the way their character is currently feeling. The complete scrapbook is due next class. It must include the following: Cover Page Five diary entries At least five images Explanations for at least five of the images Students may enhance their scrapbooks beyond this for bonus points. Lesson #16 Theme Workshop Define theme Theme is a central message or idea in a text, which says something about life. A theme must be more than just a one-word topic. It is more than just a topic; it is what the text says about that topic. To help them get it straight, give them the following formula: TTTTTTTTTT = TTTTTTTTTT + IIIIIIIIIIIIII To come up with a theme, you have to identify what insight the text adds to a topic. Themes in Julius Caesar Ask your students to identify topics in Julius Caesar. Make a master list on the board which your students should of course copy into their notes. Your students should come up with things like ambition, honor, deceit, justice, etc. Once you have a good list of topics, ask your students what Shakespeare s Julius Caesar says about each topic? After discussing, your students should each draft three theme statements (they are not allowed to do one on courage as that was done in a previous lesson) using the following format: William Shakespeare s Julius Caesar shows that... Copyright

17 JULIUS CAESAR Lesson Plans Theme Paragraph Students are to write a paragraph discussing a major theme from Animal Farm. Tell them to start with a theme statement such as the ones they have already written. Then simply explain how Orwell communicates this theme and provide examples from the text to back you up. Paragraphs should be at least 8-12 sentences long. Lesson #17 Review Jeopardy Divide your class into three equal groups (usually just according to where people sit left, middle, right). Each group is to choose an animal noise that they will use to buzz in. The noise should be loud and distinctive. Write the Category headings on the board with dollar amounts under them just like on the show jeopardy. Start by randomly selecting a group to choose a category and amount, and ask the corresponding question. Groups make their noise to buzz in. Any group and any group member may answer any question. When someone gets a question right, they get to choose the next category and amount. Record their points on the board. Jeopardy Questions Characters Events Terms Misc. 1. Who is most loyal to Caesar? 1. What celebration is going on in 1.1? 1. A feeling of pity. 1. How many acts does the play have? 2. Who plants the first seed of rebellion in Brutus mind? 2. What is Caesar warned to beware of? 2. Word or phrase with a double meaning. 2. What are Caesar s final words? 3. Who kills herself by swallowing hot coals? 4. Name the members of the second triumvirate. 5. Who writes a letter to warn Caesar of the assassination plot? 3. Who stabs Caesar last? 4. How does Cassius make Caesar think the people want him to rule? 5. How does Brutus die? 3. Leads to a character s downfall. 4. A speech from a character alone on stage. 5. When the audience knows something a character doesn t. 3. When the natural world echoes events in the human world. 4. Who did Caesar defeat to take control of Rome? 5. Name three conspirators not named Brutus. Copyright

18 JULIUS CAESAR Lesson Plans Jeopardy Answers Characters Events Terms Misc. 1. Antony 1. Caesar s triumph 1. Pathos 1. Five 2. Cassius 2. The ides of March 2. Pun 2. Et tu Brute? 3. Portia 3. Brutus 3. Tragic Flaw 3. Pathetic Fallacy 4. Antony, Octavius, Lepidus 4. By sending flattering letters addressed from citizens 5. Artemidorus 5. Kills himself by running on a sword 4. Soliloquy 4. Pompey 5. Dramatic Irony 5. Cassius, Casca, Decius, Cinna, Metellus Cimber, Trebonius Study Tips Students should study the following: Characters and events: What are the important events in the play and who are the important characters? Important quotes: Study the important speeches and soliloquies (ex. Antony s funeral speech, Brutus soliloquy before the conspirators arrive at his house, the first conversation between Brutus and Cassius). Dramatic Terms and Devices: Study your chart. Know the definitions and be able to identify examples. Themes: Be prepared to discuss the main themes in Julius Caesar. Lesson #18 Unit Test Administer the unit test. You Are Finished Copyright

19 Dramatic Terms and Devices Term Definition Example

20 Dramatic Terms and Devices Teacher Copy Term Definition Example Pun A pun is a play on words in which a word or phrase has a double meaning. Soliloquy Aside Metaphor A soliloquy occurs when a character speaks their thoughts in an extended speech while alone on stage. An aside occurs when a character briefly speaks their thoughts to the audience while there are other characters on stage. A metaphor is a direct comparison. Pathetic Fallacy Tragic Hero Tragic Flaw Dramatic Irony Pathos When the natural and/or supernatural world echoes events in the human world. The tragic hero is the protagonist who experiences a rise in fortune followed by a sudden downfall that results in death. A tragic flaw is the lack or excess of a character trait that leads to the protagonist s downfall. Dramatic irony occurs when the audience knows something a character does not. Pathos is a feeling of sympathy or sadness evoked by a play.

21 Character Chart Character Description Quote

22 Character Scrapbook Assignment You will put together a diary/scrapbook for one character in Julius Caesar. It will contain the following: a) A diary entry for each act. b) Pictures from magazines that illustrate the character s personality. c) A letter from your character to another character. d) A letter from another character to your character. After each act is completed, you will write a diary entry for that act. The letters will be homework assignments and will be completed when assigned. You should be cutting out pictures as we read the play. They will be used to decorate your scrapbook. The scrapbook will be worked on in class, but you must have all the components before we start. 1. Each diary entry should be at least one page typed (double spaced). It should include references to the major events in the act. If your character was not present for the events, you should think of a way the character had learned of the events. For example, Antony may suspect that Cassius is up to something in Act 1 because of Caesar s suspicion. 2. The pictures you cut out should be selected in reference to the character trait charts you are filling out throughout the play. You will be required to reference them in your scrapbook. Look for pictures that tell a story. For example, Brutus s personality in Act 1 shows his indecision. A picture of someone thinking would fit. 3. The letters should be at least one page typed (double spaced) and should show some necessity for as its purpose. Why was it necessary to write a letter or receive this letter that is saved in the scrapbook? You will decorate the cover of the scrapbook in class so come prepared with ideas.

23 Planning an Assassination: Julius Caesar What do you KNOW? About the conspirators? How they want to appear? How do you PREDICT they will assassinate Caesar? AFTER you read: In your own words, describe the scene of the assassination.

24 Assassinations Research Project Objectives Students will Practice research skills. Learn about famous assassinations. Prepare a presentation. Work on public speaking skills. Assignment Students are to work in small groups (no more than four) to conduct research about famous assassinations. Each group will present their findings to the class. Presentations will each be approximately 10 minutes long and must include all group members. Assassinations Students will research the following assassinations: Malcolm X Robert Kennedy Martin Luther King Abraham Lincoln Franz Ferdinand John F. Kennedy Benazir Bhutto Tasks 1. Join a group by signing up for one of the assassinations. 2. Determine how the research will be divided among the group you will be far more efficient if you divide the research in to sections (ex. biographical information, the assassination, the killer(s), motives and effects). 3. Conduct your research using books from the library and the internet. Take notes remember, you must put things in your own words. 4. Prepare a presentation for the class. Your presentation should provide background information about the person assassinated, describe the assassination, provide information about the killer(s), discuss possible motives for the assassination, and discuss the effects and/or impacts of the assassination. Your presentation should be engaging and informative. Make sure everyone is equally involved. Include visuals (poster, pictures, dramatic re-enactment, etc.).

25 Assassination Sign-up Sheet Malcolm X Robert Kennedy Martin Luther King Abraham Lincoln 1. 2.

26 3. 4. Franz Ferdinand John F. Kennedy Benazir Bhutto

27 Presentation Evaluation Topic: Group Members: Information (thorough, accurate, important) /10 Delivery (volume, eye-contact, confidence) /5 Creativity (original, entertaining, interesting) /5 Total / Presentation Evaluation Topic: Group Members: Information (thorough, accurate, important) /10 Delivery (volume, eye-contact, confidence) /5 Creativity (original, entertaining, interesting) /5 Total /20

28 A. I feel like I m on top of the world today. I hope you and I stay best friends forever and that you never stab me. A. I feel like I m on top of the world today. I hope you and I stay best friends forever and that you never stab me. A. I feel like I m on top of the world today. I hope you and I stay best friends forever and that you never stab me. A. I feel like I m on top of the world today. I hope you and I stay best friends forever and that you never stab me. A. I feel like I m on top of the world today. I hope you and I stay best friends forever and that you never stab me. A. I feel like I m on top of the world today. I hope you and I stay best friends forever and that you never stab me. A. I feel like I m on top of the world today. I hope you and I stay best friends forever and that you never stab me. A. I feel like I m on top of the world today. I hope you and I stay best friends forever and that you never stab me. A. I feel like I m on top of the world today. I hope you and I stay best friends forever and that you never stab me. A. I feel like I m on top of the world today. I hope you and I stay best friends forever and that you never stab me. A. I feel like I m on top of the world today. I hope you and I stay best friends forever and that you never stab me. A. I feel like I m on top of the world today. I hope you and I stay best friends forever and that you never stab me.

29 B. It s almost the first day of spring and I feel great. I think I will go stab my best friend in the back. B. It s almost the first day of spring and I feel great. I think I will go stab my best friend in the back. B. It s almost the first day of spring and I feel great. I think I will go stab my best friend in the back. B. It s almost the first day of spring and I feel great. I think I will go stab my best friend in the back. B. It s almost the first day of spring and I feel great. I think I will go stab my best friend in the back. B. It s almost the first day of spring and I feel great. I think I will go stab my best friend in the back. B. It s almost the first day of spring and I feel great. I think I will go stab my best friend in the back. B. It s almost the first day of spring and I feel great. I think I will go stab my best friend in the back. B. It s almost the first day of spring and I feel great. I think I will go stab my best friend in the back. B. It s almost the first day of spring and I feel great. I think I will go stab my best friend in the back. B. It s almost the first day of spring and I feel great. I think I will go stab my best friend in the back. B. It s almost the first day of spring and I feel great. I think I will go stab my best friend in the back.

30 Elizabethan England Trivia 1. What was the name of Shakespeare s theatre? 2. Briefly describe the appearance of the Globe Theatre. 3. How did it burn down in 1613? 4. Where was Shakespeare born? 5. Who was Queen Elizabeth s father? 6. How did Elizabeth s mother die? 7. For how long did Elizabeth rule England? 8. What is a vagrant? 9. List three snack foods eaten in Elizabethan England. 10. What was the worst punishment for criminals used in Elizabethan times?

31 Julius Caesar Unit Test Section A Matching 1. Dramatic Irony 2. Pun 3. Pathos 4. Soliloquy 5. Tragic Flaw 6. Pathetic Fallacy A. Feeling of pity or sympathy evoked by a tragedy. B. Occurs when the natural and/or supernatural world echoes events in the human world. C. Lack or excess of a trait that leads to a character s downfall. D. Play on words in which a word or phrase has a double meaning. E. Occurs when the audience knows something a character doesn t. F. When a character speaks his/her thoughts alone on stage. Section B Multiple Choice 1. In Act I Scene 1, why do Flavius and Marullus try to disrupt the festivities? A. they think the holiday disrupts the feast of Lupercal B. they resent the defeat and murder of Pompey C. they worry that Caesar will be offended by the crowd s smell and manners D. they feel that Caesar will be embarrassed by the festival 2. How does Caesar first enter the play? A. in disgrace; he has been captured B. in defeat C. in triumph; he has defeated Pompey D. in disguise 3. What does Cassius first ask Brutus in Act I Scene 2? A. what happened at the battle B. where is his wife C. why has he been so distant and thoughtful lately D. whether he wants to be king instead of Caesar

32 4. In Act I Scene 2, Cassius characterizes Caesar as... A. sincere and proud B. courteous and humble C. weak and sick D. fierce and warlike 5. What does Cassius admit to Brutus in this scene? A. that his wife is dead B. that he and Antony have had an argument C. that he thinks the Senate is doomed D. that he fears the people want Caesar for their king 6. The three shouts from the crowd that Brutus and Cassius hear in Act I represent... A. Caesar asking for his throat to be cut B. Caesar turning down the crown offered by Antony C. Caesar accepting the crown offered by Antony D. Caesar describing his victory to the crowd 7. Casca s description of Caesar s behavior when he is offered the crown in Act I Scene 2, suggests that Caesar owes his success most of all to... A. his family connections and wealth B. his personal heroism and charm C. the support of a few noblemen D. his manipulation of the masses 8. Which of the following images is meant to convey a sense of suspicion and mistrust? A. owl in the marketplace at midday B. Caesar offering his bared throat C. Caesar as a colossus D. Cassius with a lean and hungry look 9. What is the main purpose of the terrible storm in Act I Scene 3? A. it scares Casca B. it shows the courage of Cassius C. it alerts Caesar to danger D. it gives hint or warning of the dangers to come 10. What finally convinces Brutus to join the conspirators? A. forged letters planted by Cinna B. visits from the citizens C. his intuition D. the omens

33 11. In Act II, what important decision is made? A. Caesar agrees to stay home to please Calpurnia B. Caesar resolves to banish Publius Cimber C. Brutus makes up his mind to join the conspiracy D. Decius decides to offer the crown to Caesar 12. Why does Brutus refuse to take an oath to kill Caesar? A. his word as a Roman is good enough B. he does not want to commit himself C. he intends to back out of the plot D. he does not trust the other conspirators 13. What is the first major mistake that Brutus makes? A. not killing Caesar B. not killing Antony C. telling Portia his secret D. reading the letters written by Cassius 14. When Caesar appears in Scene 2, he seems to be... A. bold and reckless B. timid and superstitious C. sneaky and conspiratorial D. trusting and dignified 15. Why does Calpurnia urge Caesar to stay home rather than appear at the Senate? A. he travels too much; they have hardly seen each other lately B. he does not appear presentable enough C. she has had nightmares about his death D. they are expecting company and she does not want to be alone 16. Why does Caesar ignore Calpurnia s warnings? A. he is deaf in one ear and fails to hear her correctly B. Decius convinces him that Calpurnia s dream and the omens mean nothing bad C. he wants fresh air D. he wants to go out to meet with his friends 17. What does Artemidorus offer Caesar in the street? A. a crown B. a new shield C. money D. a letter 18. What do the conspirators do at the Senate? A. kneel around Caesar B. stab Caesar to death C. proclaim tyranny is dead D. all of these

34 19. Caesar s final words reflect which emotion? A. depression B. betrayal C. anger D. joy 20. What does Antony do when he arrives at Caesar s body? A. he swears allegiance to Brutus B. he weeps over Caesar s body C. he shakes hands with the conspirators D. all of the above 21. How are Antony s true feelings about the conspirators first revealed? A. in dialogue with the conspirators B. in his soliloquy over Caesar s body C. in his funeral oration for Caesar D. in a series of asides in conversation 22. What is Brutus explanation for killing Caesar? A. Caesar was evil B. Caesar was ambitious C. Caesar was weak D. Brutus hated Caesar 23. What does Antony tell the crowd? A. that Brutus is an honorable man B. that Caesar brought riches to Rome and turned down the crown C. that Caesar bequeathed all of the citizens a large sum of money D. A and C E. A and B F. all of these 24. What impression did Shakespeare give of the commoners in Act III? A. they are easily manipulated B. they are men of principle C. they respect noblemen D. they do not care for politics 25. What is shown by scene 3, in which a group of commoners murders a poet? A. the poet was a murderer B. workers hate the arts C. Romans are barbarians D. mob rule now governs 26. The Tragedy of Julius Caesar is classified as what type of play? A. comedy B. history C. dramatic D. tragedy

35 27. The Tragedy of Julius Caesar is a play mainly about... A. Caesar s murder B. Caesar s military victories C. Caesar s marriage D. Caesar s dictatorship in Rome 28. The tragic hero of this play is... A. Cassius B. Brutus C. Caesar D. Antony 29. Julius Caesar was murdered on... A. March 15 B. May 14 C. April 13 D. March Which of the following is NOT a theme found in the play? A. language is a powerful weapon that can be used to manipulate others B. chaos results when the prescribed social order is broken C. violence and bloodshed can often have morally good results D. the best intentions of good, noble men can lead to tragedy

36 Julius Caesar Unit Test Answers Section A 1. E 2. D 3. A 4. F 5. C 6. B Section B 1. B 2. C 3. C 4. C 5. D 6. B 7. D 8. D 9. D 10. A 11. C 12. A 13. B 14. D 15. C 16. B 17. D 18. D 19. B 20. D 21. B 22. B 23. F 24. A 25. D 26. D 27. A 28. B 29. A 30. C

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