Updated Section 8, Breakfast to correct a typo related to calculating weekly grains.

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "Updated Section 8, Breakfast to correct a typo related to calculating weekly grains."

Transcription

1 Breakfast Section 8, Breakfast Update Guide May 18, 2015 April 28, 2015 Updated Section 8, Breakfast to correct a typo related to calculating weekly grains. Updated Section 8, Breakfast to incorporate the following United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) memos and guidance: USDA Memo SP (v.2) Flexibility for Whole Grain-Rich Pasta in School Years and , Questions and Answers Revised (September 30, 2014) USDA Memo SP (v.8) Questions & Answers on the Final Rule, Nutrition Standards in the National School Lunch and School Breakfast Programs (August 4, 2014) USDA Memo SP , Questions & Answers on the School Breakfast Program Meal Pattern in School Year (April 28, 2014) USDA Memo SP , Updated Offer versus Serve Guidance for the National School Lunch Program and School Breakfast Program in School year (August 1, 2014) Provided clarification on the following issues Additional or extra beverages Combination food items Communicating with students about the contents of a reimbursable meal Condiments or accompaniments Crediting Dietary specifications Fruit (vegetables substituting for fruit, grits, and starchy vegetables) Grains (breading, meat/meat alternates, and whole-grain rich) Home-canned products Juice Maximum serving recommendation for grains and meat/meat alternates Minimizing plate waste Milk (choice and smoothies) Nutrient analysis Planned, offered, and selected/served Potable water Reimbursable meal Meal service (double servings, family style meals, large food items, leftovers, offer versus serve, point of service, refused item, seconds or additional servings, and vending machines Universal breakfast requirement Texas Department of Agriculture May 18, 2015 Breakfast 8.1

2 March 5, 2014 Updated Section 8, Breakfast to provide additional information on participation in Universal Breakfast under Texas Education Code, Section as amended by Senate Bill 376, 83 rd Texas Legislature, including submitting a waiver. Added clarification to explain the difference between the state requirements for Universal Breakfast (UB) under Texas Education Code, Section as amended by Senate Bill 376, 83 rd Texas Legislature and the use of the Universal Free Breakfast Program (UFBP). December 9, 2013 December 2, 2013 October 28, 2013 Updated Section 8, Breakfast to clarify which sites are required to participate in Universal Breakfast under Texas Education Code, Section as amended by Senate Bill 376, 83 rd Texas Legislature. Updated Section 8, Breakfast to provide more clarity on the following issues: Breakfast meal time Calorie ranges CN labeling and manufacturer product formulation statements Compliance Contact information for the Texas Department of Agriculture (TDA) Dietary specification Fruit component for SY and SY Grains component, including minimum and maximums Implementation timeline for sodium Meal service options Milk component, including milk substitutes and smoothies OVS and Residential Child Care Institutions (RCCIs) OVS and the reimbursable meal Point of service (POS) Pre-K menu pattern Records retention Weighted averaging Updated Section 8, Breakfast to incorporate new guidance on Universal Breakfast based on Texas Senate Bill 376. Added contact information page after the table of contents. Updated typo related to weekly grain range. July 22, 2013 Updated Section 8, Breakfast to reflect the renumbering of Section 9C to Section 2C, Certification for Performance-Based Reimbursement in order to relocate the information on certification adjacent to Section 2, Application and Agreement since certification is now part of the application process. Deleted all references to Section 8N since that section has been removed from the Administrator s Reference Manual (ARM). CEs must follow the guidance provided in Section 8, Breakfast since Section 8N applied to SY only. Texas Department of Agriculture May 18, 2015 Breakfast 8.2

3 June 23, 2013 Updated Section 8, Breakfast to incorporate the following USDA guidance USDA Memo , Questions & Answers on the Final Rule, Nutrition Standards in the National School Lunch and School Breakfast Programs (January 25, 2013) USDA Memo , Extending Flexibility in the Meat/Meat Alternate and Grains Maximum for School Year (February 25, 2013) USDA Memo , Questions & Answers on School Breakfast Program Meal Pattern in School Year (June 13, 2013) USDA Memo , Salad Bars in the National School Lunch Program (March 27, 2013) USDA Memo , Updated Offer versus Serve Guidance for the National School Lunch Program and School Breakfast Program in School Year (June 13, 2013) and needed clarification on the following topics: Crediting: crediting salsa, meal pattern identification, pre-packaged and pre portioned breakfast delivery systems, use of Food Buying Guide for School Nutrition Programs Meal Pattern: Fruit: fruit serving requirement timeline Grains: counting grain food items, flexibility on grains maximums for school year , whole grain-rich requirements for school year , weekly average grains, and ready to eat (RTE) cereal ingredients Pre-kindergarten children: meal pattern Meats/Meat Alternates: meats/meat alternates as a substitute for grains and as an additional food item Fluid Milk: options for fluid milk Substitutions: emergencies Serving Methods: offer versus serve requirements for breakfast, and breakfast in the classroom (BIC) Record Retention: record retention explanation Texas Department of Agriculture May 18, 2015 Breakfast 8.3

4 Table of Contents School Breakfast Program Texas Education Code Requirements Related to Breakfast Universal Breakfast (UB) Waiver Timeline for Universal Breakfast Waiver Submission Waiver Submission Process Severe Need Breakfast Overview Severe Need Breakfast Reimbursement Breakfast in the Classroom (BIC), Alternative Serving Method Strategies for BIC Service Breakfast Carts Grab N Go Breakfast Nutrition Break or Second Chance Breakfast Serving Time Universal Free Breakfast Program (UFBP) Guidance for UFBP Outreach to Households on the Availability of the School Breakfast Program (SBP) Notification Meal Pattern Implementation Timeline of the Breakfast Meal Pattern Breakfast Meal Pattern Breakfast Menu Planning Food Component Food Items Menu Items Crediting Foods Age/Grade Groups Residential Child Care Institutions Weekly Menu Planning Fruit (or Vegetable) Serving Portion CEs with Shorter and Longer Weeks Menu Planning for Pre-Kindergarten Students Texas Department of Agriculture May 18, 2015 Breakfast 8.4

5 CEs with Multiple Age/Grade Group, Including Pre-Kindergarten Students Point of Service (POS) General Guidance for Point of Service (POS) Counting Choice of Milk Food Production Records Student Identification of a Reimbursable Meal Breakfast Meal Time Methods for Serving Meals Family Style Meals Multiple Choice Menus Multiple Serving Lines or Stations Offer Versus Serve (OVS) OVS and Extra Food Items Pre-Plate Delivery System Pre-Packaged or Pre-Proportioned Delivery System Salad or Theme Bars Point of Service (POS) for Salad or Theme Bars Pre-Packaging and Pre-Proportioning for Salad or Theme Bars Reimbursable Meal for Salad or Theme Bars Resources for Salad and Theme Bars Vending Machines Fruit (or Vegetable) Component of the Reimbursable Breakfast Dried Fruit Frozen Fruit with Added Sugar Vegetables Substituting for Fruits Starchy Vegetables As an Extra Food Item Not Served As a Substitute for the Fruit Component Leafy Salad Greens Fruit (or Vegetable) Juice Calculating the Weekly Juice Limit When Multiple Fruit/Vegetable Juices Are Offered Juice Concentrate Creditable Juice Creditable Juice Blends Creditable Blended Dish Items with Pureed Fruit or Vegetables Texas Department of Agriculture May 18, 2015 Breakfast 8.5

6 Non-Creditable Juice Crediting Fruits and Vegetables Crediting Dry Peas and Beans Crediting Extruded Vegetable Products Crediting Herbs As Vegetables Crediting Salsas or Picante Sauce Non-Creditable Fruit and Vegetable Food Items Offer Versus Serve (OVS) and the Fruit Component Common Problems: Fruits and Vegetables Grains Component of the Reimbursable Breakfast Minimum Grains Requirement Recommended Maximum Grain Offerings Definitions for Grains Whole Grain-Rich Foods Criteria for Whole Grain-Rich Foods for Breakfast Fifty Percent Guideline Adding Whole Grains to Menus Determining Whole Grain Rich Products Cereal Grains Corn Masa Products Formulated Grain-Fruit Product Grits Grains and Combination Food Items Ready to Eat Breakfast Cereal Allowable Whole Grains Non Creditable Grains Products Offering Whole Grain-Rich Products Determining Daily Grain Contribution Food Buying Guide for School Nutrition Programs Criteria for Determining Ounce Equivalent Serving Sizes Weekly Grains Minimum Requirement and Maximum Recommendation Breaded Products Fully Cooked Grains, Water As First Ingredient Crediting Grains Texas Department of Agriculture May 18, 2015 Breakfast 8.6

7 Reminders Regarding Grains Grains Product Labeling Common Problems: Grains Meat/Meat Alternate Component Substituting for the Grains Component of the Reimbursable Breakfast Definitions for Non Allowed Meat/Meat Alternate Component Purchased Prepared Menu Items Steps before Purchasing Any Meat, Poultry, Fish, or Tofu Product Common Problems: Meat/Meat Alternates When Served As a Substitute for the Grains Component Meat and Poultry Inspection in Texas Standards for Meat and Poultry Products Fluid Milk Component of the Reimbursable Breakfast Lactose Free Milk Organic Requirement to Take Milk Guidance for Offering Milk and Other Beverages Milk Substitutes Nutrient Analysis of Milk Substitutes Water Milk and Students with Disabilities or Other Dietary Issues Recombined/Reconstituted Milk Dispensed from a Machine Smoothies Program Operator Prepared Smoothie Commercially Prepared Smoothie Guidance about Smoothie Content and Crediting Common Problems: Milk Menu Substitutions Substitution, Emergency Situation Sulfiting Agents in Foods Home-Canned Products Reimbursable Breakfast Requirements Under OVS Combination Foods Containing More Than One Component Texas Department of Agriculture May 18, 2015 Breakfast 8.7

8 Double Servings Large Food Items Fruit(s) and Vegetable(s) Servings for a Reimbursable Meal Grains Grains Serving for a Reimbursable Meal Milk Serving for a Reimbursable Meal Reimbursable Meal Determination A La Carte Field Trips Free, Extra Food Offered After the Point of Service (POS) In School Suspension (ISS) Leftovers Refusing an Item Seconds or Additional Servings Nutrient Standards Target/Range Calculating Dietary Specifications for the Week Calculating Dietary Specifications for a Single Condiment or Accompaniment for a Designated Menu Item Choice Among Various Condiments or Accompaniments for a Designated Menu Item Calories Saturated Fat Sodium Trans Fat Commercially-Prepared Products Nutrition Labels and Manufacturer Specifications Nutrition Software Nutrition Goals Nutrient Analysis of Meals Weighted Averages Determining Projected Servings for Weighted Averages Processed Foods Standardized Recipes and Preparation Techniques Recipes for Salad or Theme Bars Minimize Plate Waste Texas Department of Agriculture May 18, 2015 Breakfast 8.8

9 Water Availability During Meal Service Location of and Access to Water Water Fountain Cups for Water Reasonable Costs of Providing Water Providing Potable Water in Other School Nutrition Programs Seamless Summer Option (SSO) Afterschool Care Snack Program (ASCP) Water Dispensers, Food Safety Meal Pricing TDA Forms Records Retention Food Production Documentation Planned, Offered, and Selected/Served Compliance Texas Department of Agriculture May 18, 2015 Breakfast 8.9

10 Chart Table of Contents Meal Pattern Implementation Timeline Chart Nutrition Standards in the National School Lunch Program(NSLP) and School Breakfast Program (SBP) Meal Pattern Chart Breakfast Menu Planning Example Chart Short and Long Week Adjustments for Breakfast Chart Pre-Kindergarten Traditional Food-Based Meal Pattern Chart Information Box 1, Vegetable Subgroups Calculation of Weekly Juice Amount Chart Crediting Fruits and Vegetables for a For a Reimbursable Meal Chart Milk Substitute Nutritional Profile Chart Crediting Smoothie Ingredients Chart Options for Meeting the Breakfast Requirement for a Half (½) Cup of Fruit (or Vegetable) Component Chart How to Recognize a Reimbursable Meal Chart OVS Breakfast Breakfast Nutrient Standard Chart Calculation Condiment or Accompaniment Amount Chart Sodium Limits and Timeline Chart Breakfast Sample Estimate of Number Servings Needed Chart Information Box 2, Records Retention Texas Department of Agriculture May 18, 2015 Breakfast 8.10

11 Contact Information for the Texas Department of Agriculture (TDA), Food and Nutrition When contacting TDA by phone, Contracting Entities (CEs) need to have their CE Identification Number (CE ID) (and site ID if applicable). CEs should include their name and CE ID (and site name and ID if applicable) in all communication or documentation. Website: Phone: 877-TEXMEAL, (877) Fax: (888) Physical Address: 1700 N. Congress, 11 th Floor, Austin, TX Mailing Address: PO Box 12847, Austin, TX Contact: Contact for Issues Related to Applications: National School Lunch Program, School Breakfast Program, & Special Milk Program: Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Program Seamless Summer Option: Child & Adult Care Food Program: Summer Food Service Program: Texas Department of Agriculture May 18, 2015 Breakfast 8.11

12 Breakfast School Breakfast Program The School Breakfast Program (SBP) is a federally assisted meal program administered by the Texas Department of Agriculture (TDA) and operated by public schools, nonprofit private schools and residential child care institutions (RCCIs). The SBP provides nutritionally balanced, economically priced, or free breakfasts to all students each day. Contracting entities (CEs) that choose to participate in the SBP receive reimbursement from the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) for each breakfast they serve. In return, CEs must serve breakfasts that meet the meal pattern requirements and must offer free or reduced-priced meals to eligible students. The guidance in the section does not address the regulations related to the Competitive Food Nutritional Standards. For information on competitive foods, see the Administrator s Reference Manual, Section 20, Competitive Food Nutritional Standards. Texas Education Code Requirements Related to Breakfast Texas Education Code, Section mandates that public and charter campuses participate in the SBP in the following circumstances. At least 10 percent or more of their students are eligible for free and reduced-price meals The public or charter campus must make breakfast available for all students. The amount a student is charged for a reimbursable meal is based on the student s eligibility category. Reimbursable meals are counted and claimed according to each student s eligibility category. At least 80 percent or more of their students are eligible for free and reduced-price meals The public or charter campus must offer universal breakfast (UB) 2 at no charge for all students starting in School Year (SY) Reimbursable meals are counted and claimed according to each student s eligibility category even though no child is charged for breakfast. 3 Universal Breakfast (UB) Waiver TDA and Texas Education Agency (TEA) have developed a coordinated waiver process to facilitate submission and approval of waivers. A CE may request a waiver from the UB requirement if the following guidelines are met: 1 Section was amended by Senate Bill 376, 83 rd Texas Legislature. 2 Texas CEs have long had the option to operate the Universal Free Breakfast Program (UFBP) which provides breakfast to all students at no charge. The UB requirement described in this subsection is not part of UFBP. It is a new requirement established by Senate Bill 376, 83 rd Texas Legislature. 3 See the Administrator s Reference Manual, Section 14, Financial Information Concerning School Nutrition Funds and Section 15, Meal Pricing for additional information on the use of program funds and pricing meals. Texas Department of Agriculture May 18, 2015 Breakfast 8.12

13 Timeline for Universal Breakfast Waiver Submission. CEs must apply for a waiver after March 15, but before July 1, of year preceding the SY for which the waiver applies. For Example: A CE applies on April 3, 2015 for a waiver that will apply to SY A waiver is in effect for only one school year. A CE must submit a new waiver for each year the CE chooses not to offer UB. - If a CE does not apply for a waiver during this period, the CE must implement the UB requirements as mandated by Texas Education Code in Senate Bill 376. Required Actions Related to the Decision to Submit a Waiver. Any CE that chooses to submit a waiver from the requirement must take the following actions and retain documentation that demonstrates that the required actions were taken as part of its process to apply for a waiver from the UB requirements: - The decision to apply for a waiver must be approved (1) at a regular school board meeting or (2) by the CE s governing body during an annual budget approval meeting. - The decision to apply for a waiver must be a separate item on the agenda for the meeting described above. - The school board or governing body must provide an opportunity for public comment before the decision is made at the school board meeting or governing body annual budget approval meeting. Waiver Submission Process. To submit the Universal Breakfast (UB) Waiver form, the CE must take the following actions: - Access the web-based form through the Texas Unified Nutrition Programs System (TX-UNPS). - Complete and submit the web-based form demonstrating that the CE has submitted the waiver according to the timeline as well as taken the required actions and maintained documentation of those actions. The CE will be notified about the waiver approval or disapproval. Texas Department of Agriculture May 18, 2015 Breakfast 8.13

14 Severe Need Breakfast Overview USDA established an additional breakfast reimbursement rate for CEs that serve a large percentage of needy students eligible for free and reduced-price meals. This additional reimbursement is intended to provide increased funding to support more nutritious breakfasts. The SBP regulations specify that eligibility for Severe Need Breakfast reimbursement is established on an individual site basis using the following criteria: The site s reimbursement rates under the regular SBP are insufficient to cover SBP costs. The site is currently participating in, or desiring to initiate, a SBP. In the preceding school year (SY), forty percent or more of the lunches served to students were free or reduced-price meals. Severe Need Breakfast funding is approved on a site-by-site basis and is restricted to the cost of producing and serving breakfast. Within the CE, some sites may be eligible for Severe Need Breakfast funding, and others may not. For additional information on Severe Need Breakfast reimbursement, see the Administrator's Reference Manual, Section 7, Counting and Claiming. Severe Need Breakfast Reimbursement. In addition to the regular SBP reimbursement rates for paid, free, and reduced-price breakfasts, CEs that qualify for and have applied for Severe Need Breakfast reimbursement will receive additional reimbursement. The Severe Need Breakfast reimbursement rate is subject to change every program year. Current Severe Need Breakfast reimbursement rates are posted at Breakfast in the Classroom (BIC), Alternative Serving Method Breakfast in the Classroom (BIC) is an alternative serving method that CEs may use to provide students with a nutritious meal in a familiar setting their classroom. BIC commonly results in the following outcomes: More students eat breakfast; therefore, more students are ready for learning. BIC allows teachers to accomplish routine morning tasks attendance, collecting homework, and announcements while students are eating breakfast. Therefore, little, if any, teaching time is lost. Food service staff save time since students are usually responsible for clearing away their trash. When the food service facilities are not large enough to accommodate all students at one setting, BIC allows breakfast service to be completed more quickly since the site does not have to offer staggered serving times. Texas Department of Agriculture May 18, 2015 Breakfast 8.14

15 BIC works well in many types of circumstances. However, the following conditions will help to support a successful BIC: 4 Students are in the same room at the start of each day. Buses arrive just before classes begin. Teachers are supportive of the breakfast program and realize its importance to learning. The cafeteria is centrally located or has methods for delivering meals quickly to classrooms. Strategies for BIC Service TDA recommends that CEs develop a written policy on BIC before implementing this program. It is also recommended that the School Nutrition Program (SNP) staff obtain the approval and support of administrators, principals, and teachers. BIC can be served in a variety of ways. Meal in a bag Individually wrapped items Cafeteria style service, eaten in the classroom Delivery to the classroom Breakfast Carts. Breakfast Carts are used to bring meals to the students. Meals are pre-packaged for a student to pick up or to be delivered to a specific location. Grab N Go Breakfast. The Grab N Go method allows breakfast to be served where students are congregating or passing during transition period or during breaks. Meals may be consumed in a central location or at scattered locations through the building. Nutrition Break or Second Chance Breakfast. Students are served breakfast during a morning break, usually 9:00 a.m. to 10:00 a.m. Commonly reimbursable breakfasts are pre-packaged and ready to serve to each student. Food may also be served from mobile carts, tables, or the cafeteria. Serving Time. Even though BIC is commonly offered as the day starts, it can be offered later in the day. Often, older students are not ready to eat early in the morning, so a later time can increase breakfast participation for them. This strategy may also be used at other grade levels. 4 More information on breakfast in the classroom (BIC) is available from USDA at the National Food Service Management Institute at and the Food Research and Action Center at Texas Department of Agriculture May 18, 2015 Breakfast 8.15

16 Universal Free Breakfast Program (UFBP) The Universal Free Breakfast Program (UFBP) 5 allows sites to provide all students a reimbursable breakfast meal at no charge including those students that are approved for reduced-price and paid meals. Reimbursable meals served to students are counted and claimed according to each student s eligibility category. 6 CE administrators and teachers should discuss the financial impact of UFBP before implementation. Guidance for UFBP. CEs must adhere to the following guidance to participate in UFBP: Sites providing UFBP must follow the counting and claiming requirements included in Administrator s Reference Manual, Section 7, Counting and Claiming. The CE agrees to pay the program costs for all students eating at no charge if program funds are not sufficient to cover the total costs of operating the UFBP. Administrator s Reference Manual, Section 14, Financial Information Concerning School Nutrition Funds and Section 15, Meal Pricing provide additional information on allowable use of SNP funds for sites that offer UFBP. The CE must change its Policy Statement for Free and Reduced-Price Meals, Attachment B: Meal Count/Collection Procedures 7 before implementation if the site s collection or counting and claiming procedures change because of offering UFBP annually. 8 No other formal approval process is necessary to begin UFBP. Outreach to Households on the Availability of the School Breakfast Program (SBP) Research has shown that starting the day with a nutritious breakfast helps students stay alert and perform better academically. In an effort to help more students benefit from the nutritious meals served in the SBP, CEs must inform households of the availability of breakfast. Notification. A notification about the availability of breakfast must be provided to households just prior to or at the beginning of the SY. The CE should include this notification in the informational packets that are sent to each household with the free and reduced-price meal applications. In addition, CEs must send reminders regarding the availability of the SBP multiple times throughout the SY. 5 The UFBP is not a part of the Universal Breakfast (UB) requirement as established by Senate Bill 376, 83 rd Texas Legislature. See the Texas Education Code Requirements Related to Breakfast subsection in this section for additional information on requirements related to the UB requirement. 6 See the Administrator s Reference Manual, Section 7, Counting and Claiming for more information on this topic. 7 Available at 8 See the Administrator s Reference Manual, Section 3, Records Retention for more information on the deadline. Texas Department of Agriculture May 18, 2015 Breakfast 8.16

17 CEs can provide reminders to students through public address systems or through means normally used to communicate with the households of the enrolled students. Other acceptable outreach activities may include developing or disseminating printed or electronic material to households and students. 9 TDA encourages CEs to use the information in USDA s SBP toolkit, Discover School Breakfast Toolkit, a resource for outreach and expansion activities which is located at Meal Pattern Under SBP, breakfasts must meet the regulations outlined in the final rule (77 FR 4088) titled Nutrition Standards in the National School Lunch and School Breakfast Programs as a result of the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010 and the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans. The meal pattern outlined in the rule is food-based and divided by age/grade groups. The meal pattern also focuses on specific nutrient standards: calories, sodium, and saturated and trans fat. Adopting the meal pattern results in the following changes: Three-component meal pattern: fruit, grains, and milk. A required daily serving of fruit. Increased quantity of fruits. Weekly grains ranges plus daily minimum requirements. All grains offered during the serving week must be whole grain-rich. Fat-free (unflavored or flavored) and unflavored 1 percent low-fat milk only. Meat/meat alternates may be offered after minimum grains requirement per day is met. Under Offer versus Serve (OVS), the student must select at least ½ cup of the fruit (or vegetable) component for the meal to be considered a reimbursable breakfast. Calorie minimum and maximum levels based on age/grade groups. Sodium limits starting SY Limit on saturated fat; elimination of trans fat. 9 CEs must retain documentation about these efforts. See the Records Retention subsection of the section for additional information on this topic. Texas Department of Agriculture May 18, 2015 Breakfast 8.17

18 Implementation Timeline of the Breakfast Meal Pattern. The Meal Pattern Implementation Timeline Chart shows the timeline of implementation for breakfast (B) and lunch (L) by school year (SY). Breakfast Meal Pattern The new meal requirements are food-based and specify kinds and amounts of food for the three required breakfast food components. The Nutrition Standards in the National School Lunch Program (NSLP) and School Breakfast Program (SBP) Meal Pattern Chart provides detailed information on the minimum meal pattern requirements for meals to be served for each age/grade group. Components must meet requirements for both daily and weekly servings. The nutrient specifications must be met weekly. (NOTE: CEs may use the Traditional Food Based Meal Pattern for Pre-Kindergarten (Pre-K) Children, ages 1 2 and ages 3 4 years, 10 or they may use the K-5 age/grade meal pattern. USDA will be reevaluating the meal patterns for pre-k in the coming years.) The meal pattern is food-based and consists of three components: Fruit (or Vegetable) Grains (NOTE: The term bread is no longer used.) Milk The meal pattern is divided into three age/grade groups: Grades K 5 (ages 5 10) Grades 6 8 (ages 11 13) Grades 9 12 (ages 14 18) 10 See the Meal Planning for Pre-Kindergarten Children subsection in this section for additional information on this topic. Texas Department of Agriculture May 18, 2015 Breakfast 8.18

19 Fruit component Requirements Offer fruit daily L Fruit quantity increase (5 cups/ week; minimum 1 cup per day) Vegetables Component Offer vegetable subgroups weekly Grains component Half of grains must be whole grain-rich All grains must be whole grainrich Offer weekly grains ranges L B Meat/Meat Alternate Component Offer weekly meat/meat alternate ranges (daily minimum) Milk Component Offer only fat-free (unflavored and flavored) and 1% low fat (unflavored) milk Meal Pattern Implementation Timeline Chart Implementation (School Year) for NSLP (L) and SBP (B) L L L L, B Dietary Specifications (to be met on average over a week) Calorie ranges L B Saturated fat limit (no change) L, B Sodium Targets 11 Zero grams of trans fat per portion Menu Planning A single FBMP approach L B Age/Grade Groups Establish age/grade groups: K 5, 6-8, 9 12 Offer Versus Serve Reimbursable meals must contain a fruit (or vegetable) (½ cup minimum) Monitoring Three-year administrative review cycle Conduct weighted nutrient analysis on one week of menus L L L L B B B L, B B B L, B Target 1 L, B B Target 2 L, B Final L, B 11 See the Sodium subsection in this section for the specific amount of sodium for each target. Texas Department of Agriculture May 18, 2015 Breakfast 8.19

20 Nutrition Standards in the National School Lunch Program (NSLP) and School Breakfast Program (SBP) Meal Pattern Chart [Minimum Amount of Food Component b Per Week (Minimum Offering Per Day)] Meal Pattern Grades K 5 a Breakfast Meal Pattern Grades 6 8 a Grades 9 12 a Grades K-12 Grades K 5 Lunch Meal Pattern Fruits (cups) c, d 5 (1) e 5 (1) e 5 (1) e 5 (1) 2½ (½) 2½ (½) 2½ (½) 5 (1) Vegetables (cups) c, d ¾ (¾) 3¾ (¾) 3¾ (¾) 5 (1) Dark Green f ½ ½ ½ ½ Red/Orange f ¾ ¾ ¾ 1¼ Beans/Peas (Legumes) f ½ ½ ½ ½ Starchy f ½ ½ ½ ½ Other f, g ½ ½ ½ ¾ Additional Vegetable to Reach Total h ½ Grains (oz eq) i 7-10 (1) 8-10 (1) 9-10 (1) 9-10 (1) 8-9 (1) 8-10 (1) 8-9 (1) (2) Meat/Meat Alternates (oz eq) 0 k 0 k 0 k (1) 9-10 (1) 9-10 (1) (2) Fluid Milk (cups) l 5 (1) 5 (1) 5 (1) 5 (1) 5 (1) 5 (1) 5 (1) 5 (1) Other Nutrient Specifications: Daily Amount Based on the Average for a 5-Day Week Min-Max Calories (kcal) m, n Saturated Fat (% of total calories) n < 10 < 10 < 10 < 10 < 10 < 10 < 10 < 10 Sodium Target 1 (mg) n, p 540 n, p 600 n, p 640 n, p n, p 1360 n, p 1230 n, p 142 n, p Trans Fat n Grades 6 8 Grades K-8 Grades 9 12 Product nutrition label/manufacturer specification must indicate 0 grams of trans fat per serving. a See the Pre-Kindergarten Traditional Food-Based Meal Pattern Chart for information on portion sizes for pre-k students using the Traditional Food-Based Menu Planning, or CEs may use the K-5 age/grade group meal pattern for pre-k children. b Food items included in each food group and subgroup and amount equivalents. Minimum creditable serving is ⅛ cup. c One quarter (¼) cup of dried fruit counts as ½ cup of fruit; 1 cup of leafy greens counts as ½ cup of vegetables. No more than one half of the fruit (or vegetable) offerings may be in the form of juice. All juice must be 100% full-strength. d For breakfast, vegetables may be substituted for fruits. The first two cups per week of any such substitutions menued must be from the Dark Green, Red/Orange, Beans/Peas (Legumes) or Other vegetables subgroups. e The fruit quantity requirement for the SBP (5 cups/week; minimum of 1 cup/day) is effective July 1, f Larger amounts of these vegetables may be served. g This category consists of Other vegetables as defined in regulations; this requirement may be met with any additional amounts from the Dark Green, Red/Orange, and Beans/Peas (Legumes) vegetable subgroups. h Any vegetable subgroup may be offered to meet the total weekly vegetable requirement. i All grains must be whole grain-rich in the NSLP and the SBP beginning July 1, k There is no separate meat/meat alternate component in the SBP. For SBP CEs may substitute 1.0 oz eq of meat/meat alternates for 1.0 oz eq of grains after the minimum daily grains requirement is menued for the week for the SBP. l Fluid milk must be low fat (1 percent milk fat or less, unflavored) or fat free (unflavored or flavored). m The average daily amount of calories for a 5-day serving week must be within the range (at least the minimum and no more than the maximum values). n Discretionary sources of calories (solid fats and added sugars) may be added to the meal pattern if within the specifications for calories, saturated fat, trans fat, and sodium. Foods of minimal nutritional value and fluid milk with fat content greater than 1 percent milk fat are not allowed. p Final sodium specifications are to be reached by SY ( July 1, 2022). Intermediate sodium specifications are established for SY and SY See the Sodium subsection in this section for the specific sodium targets. Texas Department of Agriculture May 18, 2015 Breakfast 8.20

21 Breakfast Menu Planning To meet the requirements of the meal pattern, a reimbursable breakfast must contain a specified quantity of each of the food components. The quantities for the food components vary by age/grade group. Refer to the breakfast meal pattern part of the Nutrition Standards in the National School Lunch Program (NSLP) and School Breakfast Program (SBP) Meal pattern Chart for information regarding specific quantities per age/grade group. Understanding the difference between components, food items, and menu items is essential when planning menus that meet requirements. The Breakfast Menu Planning Chart provides examples of components, food items, and menu items. Breakfast Menu Planning Example Chart Components Food Items Menu Items 1. Fruit 1. Peaches 1. Fresh Fruit of the Day 2. Grains 2. Whole Grain Muffin 2. Muffin Surprise 3. Milk 3. Fat Free Milk 3. Milk or Chocolate Milk Food Component A food component 12 means one of the three food groups fruit (or vegetable), grain, and fluid milk that make up a reimbursable breakfast meal. Each of the three food components must be offered prior to the point of service (POS) 13 in order for the meal to be reimbursable. At breakfast, vegetables may be substituted for fruit. See the Fruit (or Vegetables) Component of the Reimbursable Breakfast subsection in this section for additional information on substituting vegetables for fruit servings. Food Items Food items means a specific food offered that contains one or more of the three food components. 12 For breakfast there are three food components. 13 See the Point of Service (POS) subsection in this section for additional information on this topic. Texas Department of Agriculture May 18, 2015 Breakfast 8.21

22 Menu Items Menu items are the actual foods served such as breakfast tacos, fruit salad, or muffins. Menu items may contain one or more components or food items. 14 The Breakfast Menu Planning Chart provides examples of components, food items, and menu items. Whether a menu item consists of one or more components, all three required food components must be offered in the required amount for the meal to be reimbursable. All menu items should be offered prior to the POS. 15 Crediting Foods Crediting is determined by rounding the food component down to the nearest 0.25 ounce equivalency (oz eq) for grain and meat/meat alternate components or ⅛ cup for fruit, vegetable, and milk components Age/Grade Groups The meal pattern is divided into three age/grade groups: Grades K 5 (ages 5 10) Grades 6 8 (ages 11 13) Grades 9 12 (ages 14 18) CEs must use the meal pattern age/grade groups to plan the menus. Because of the three distinct age/grade groups, CEs cannot offer the same meal portions to all grade levels. CE may use the age/grade group K 12 for breakfast. However, in menu planning, the menued items must fall into the overlap for number of servings, portion size, and calories across all age/grade groups and meet the sodium standard for the lowest age/grade group. Menu planners must (1) meet requirements both daily and weekly and (2) meet the nutrient specifications weekly. Residential Child Care Institutions Residential child care institutions (RCCIs) are not waived from the meal pattern requirements including the nutrient standards. 16 To meet the caloric needs of students in RCCIs, the menu planner may increase the calories provided through other meal services such as snacks and the supper meal. If it is not possible to use the established grade groups, RCCI CEs do have some flexibility. See the Administrator's Reference Manual, Section 26, Residential Child Care Institutions, for additional information on this topic. 14 See the Reimbursable Breakfast Requirements subsection in this section for additional information on combined food items. 15 See the Point of Service (POS) subsection in this section for additional information on this topic. 16 See to Administrator's Reference Manual, Section 26, Residential Child Care Institutions, for additional information on this topic. Texas Department of Agriculture May 18, 2015 Breakfast 8.22

23 Weekly Menu Planning The reimbursable breakfast requires that students be served specific portion sizes by age/grade group for each of the three breakfast components per day and per week: 17 Component Fruit (Vegetables) 18 Grains : Age/ Grade Minimum Amount Offered Each Day/Week K-12 1 cup serving per day 5 cups per week K 5 1 oz eq serving per day 7-10 oz eq per week oz eq serving per day 8-10 oz eq per week oz eq serving per day 9-10 oz eq per week Milk: K-12 1 cup serving per day 5 cups per week The following requirements apply to serving meat/meat alternates and vegetables at breakfast: Full-strength Fruit/Vegetable Juice May not be used to meet more than one-half of the weekly total fruit requirement. Meat/Meat Alternates May be counted toward meeting the total grains requirement or may be served as an Extra food item. If the meat/meat alternate is counted as an Extra food item, it must be included in the weekly nutrient analysis. Meat/meat Alternates May be offered as long as the minimum grains requirement for the day is also met. Vegetables Served in Place of Fruits May be served if the first 2 cups of vegetables menued for the week comes from the Dark Green, Red/Orange, Beans/Peas (Legumes), or Other vegetables subgroups. Starchy Vegetables May be served if two cups of non-starchy vegetables are menued over the course of the week before the Starchy vegetables are added to the menu. However, the non-starchy or Starchy vegetables may be offered in any order over the course of the week. 17 See the Pre-Kindergarten Meal Pattern Chart for requirements for preschool children. 18 See the Fruit (or Vegetable) Component of the Reimbursable Breakfast, Grains Component of the Reimbursable Breakfast, Fluid Milk Component of the Reimbursable Breakfast subsections in this section for the implementation timeline for the serving size portions. Texas Department of Agriculture May 18, 2015 Breakfast 8.23

24 In individual cases where a CE has an unusual age/grade configuration that prevents the use of the required age/grade groups, the CE may serve the same breakfast to all students in grades K 12 as long as serving sizes, weekly ranges of minimum amounts, and calories fall into the overlap of requirements for all age/grade groups served and meet the sodium standard for the lowest age/grade group. (NOTE: The calorie range that fits all age/grade groups is quite narrow calories. The weekly range of grains for age/grade group K 12 must be age/grade group 9 10 as this range is the overlap for the number grain servings for all three age/grade groups. However, the sodium standards must be the lowest age-grade group K-5.) CEs should also plan their menus so that the sum of the daily recommended maximum offerings 19 for grains and meat/meat alternates is equal to or less than the weekly recommended maximum offering limit in order to meet the weekly dietary specifications. Therefore, the sum of daily minimums must meet the weekly minimum requirement and the sum of the daily recommended maximum offerings should not exceed the weekly recommended maximum offerings. Fruit (or Vegetable) Serving Portion. Larger servings of fruit (or vegetables) may be served at meals to improve student acceptability, to satisfy students appetites, to provide additional energy, and, if carefully chosen, to increase the nutritional quality of the breakfast. CEs with Shorter and Longer Weeks CEs that regularly and consistently serve breakfast more than five days per week must increase the weekly component quantities by 20 percent (⅕) for each additional day. Similarly, CEs that regularly and consistently serve breakfast less than five days per week must decrease the weekly component quantities by 20 percent (⅕) for each day less than five. The Short and Long Week Adjustments for Breakfast Chart provides detailed information for planning menus for shorter and longer weeks. 19 USDA has waived the maximum serving amounts for grains and meat/meat alternates. Texas Department of Agriculture May 18, 2015 Breakfast 8.24

25 For CEs with occasional decreases in the week length because of holidays, snow days, etc., the menus do not have to be adjusted. However, menu planners must plan their menus in a way that is consistent with the intent of the meal patterns. CEs should make sure they do not consistently fail to offer grains in portions that would exceed the weekly recommended ranges. Short and Long Week Adjustments* for Breakfast Chart Age/Grades K 5 Weekly (Daily) Three-Day Week Age/Grade 6 8 Weekly (Daily) Fruits (cups) 3 (1) 3 (1) 3 (1) Age/Grade 9 12 Weekly (Daily) Grains (oz eq) 4 6 (1) 5 6 (1) (1) Fluid Milk (cups) 3 (1) 3 (1) 3 (1) Four-Day Week Fruits (cups) 4 (1) 4 (1) 4 (1) Grains (oz eq) (1) (1) 7 8 (1) Fluid Milk (cups) 4 (1) 4 (1) 4 (1) Six-Day Week Fruits (cups) a 6 (1) 6 (1) 6 (1) Grains (oz eq) (1) (1) (1) Fluid Milk (cups) 6 (1) 6 (1) 6 (1) Seven-Day Week Fruits (cups) a 7 (1) 7 (1) 7 (1) Grains (oz eq) (1) (1) (1) Fluid Milk (cups) 7 (1) 7 (1) 7 (1) * These calculations are rounded to the nearest 0.5 oz eq or ¼ cup. (NOTE: Since the dietary specifications are based on average daily amounts, they are unaffected by varied week lengths. They represent an average over length of the week, whether consisting of three or seven days.) Texas Department of Agriculture May 18, 2015 Breakfast 8.25

26 Menu Planning for Pre-Kindergarten Students Pre-K students are generally grouped by ages 1 2 and 3 4 for meal planning. CEs may use Traditional Food Based Menu Planning or the K-5 age/grade group meal pattern for pre-k students. The Pre-Kindergarten Traditional Food-Based Meal Pattern Chart provides detailed information on pre-k Traditional Food-Based Menu Planning. Food Components Pre-Kindergarten Traditional Food-Based Meal Pattern Chart 20 Food Items (Daily Requirements) Minimum Requirements Ages 1 and 2 Ages 3, 4 & 5 (Preschool) Milk Milk, fluid (beverage, on cereal, or both) ½ cup (4.0 fl oz) ¾ cup (6.0 fl oz) Juice/Fruit/ Vegetable Fruit and/or vegetable, full-strength fruit and/or vegetable juice ¼ cup ½ cup Select One Serving From Each of the Following Components; or Two From One Component or an Equivalent Combination: 1 Grains/ Breads 2 Meat/Meat Alternates 3,4,5 Whole-grain bread ½ slice ½ slice Whole-grain biscuit, roll, muffin, etc. ½ serving ½ serving Whole-grain, enriched, or fortified cereal 0.33 oz (¼ cup) 0.5 oz (⅓ cup) Lean meat, poultry or fish 0.5 oz 0.5 oz Alternate protein products oz 0.5 oz Cheese 0.5 oz 0.5 oz Egg ½ large egg ½ large egg Peanut butter or other nut or seed butters 1 tbsp 1 tbsp Cooked dry beans and peas 2 tbsp 2 tbsp Nuts and/or seeds (as listed in program guidance) 4,5 0.5 oz 0.5 oz Yogurt (plain or flavored, unsweetened, or sweetened commercially prepared) ¼ cup (2.0 oz) 1 Minimum servings for meat/meat alternates = 0.25 ounce and for Grains/Breads = ¼ serving. ¼ cup (2.0 oz) 2 Grains/Breads must be whole grain-rich or made from whole grain-rich flour or meal that may include bran and/or germ. 3 Alternate protein products must meet requirements in Appendix A of 7 CFR Part No more than 1 oz of nuts and/or seeds may be served in any one breakfast. 5 Nuts and seeds are generally not recommended to be served to children ages 1-3 since they present a choking hazard. If served, nuts and seeds should be finely minced. 20 CEs may use the Traditional Food-Based Meal Pattern for pre-k children or the SBP K-5 age/grade group meal pattern. Texas Department of Agriculture May 18, 2015 Breakfast 8.26

27 CEs with Multiple Age/Grade Group, Including Pre-Kindergarten Students Some CEs or institutions include pre-kindergarten (pre-k) students as well as children in other age/grade groups in their breakfast meal service. If CEs intend to serve the same meal to these students, the meal may be planned to 1. serve the younger children a meal based on the pre-k traditional food-based meal pattern requirements and the kindergarten and older children based on the SBP meal pattern or 2. serve all children the SBP meal pattern for the K-5 age/grade group. See the Residential Child Care Institutions subsection in this section for additional information on age/grade requirements specific to RCCIs as well as the Administrator's Reference Manual, Section 26, Residential Child Care Institutions. Point of Service (POS) The POS must be located at the end of the service line. If a site is not able to put all of the food components (e.g., fruit salad bar) prior to the POS, the CE should indicate the alternative POS process on Policy Statement for Free and Reduced-Price Meals, Attachment B: Meal Count/Collection Procedures. 21 For the purpose of identifying a reimbursable meal at the POS, the menu planner must provide students and cashiers with details about the various combinations of menu items (including various entrees) that may constitute a reimbursable meal to ensure the accuracy of meal counts. Information Box 1 Vegetable Subgroups The following vegetable subgroups may be used: Dark Green, such as bok choy, broccoli, collard greens, Dark Green leafy lettuce, kale, mesclun, mustard greens, romaine lettuce, spinach, turnip greens and watercress Red/Orange, such as acorn squash, butternut squash, carrots, pumpkin, tomatoes, tomato juice and sweet potatoes Dry Beans/Peas (Legumes), such as black beans, garbanzo beans, lentils, kidney beans, mature lima beans, navy beans, pinto beans and split peas Starchy, such as corn, cassava, green bananas, green peas, green lima beans, plantains, taro, water chestnuts, and white potatoes Other Vegetable, which includes all other fresh, frozen and canned vegetables, such as artichokes, asparagus, avocado, bean sprouts, beets, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, cauliflower, celery, cucumbers, eggplant, green beans, green peppers, iceberg lettuce, mushrooms, okra, onions, parsnips, turnips, wax beans and zucchini The category for any unusual vegetables may be found at the following websites: SDAFoodPatterns/ItemClustersAndRepFo ods.pdf 21 Located at and in the Download Forms screen in TX-UNPS. Texas Department of Agriculture May 18, 2015 Breakfast 8.27

Final Rule Nutrition Standards in the National School Lunch and School Breakfast Programs. Questions & Answers for Program Operators Revised 2/23/12

Final Rule Nutrition Standards in the National School Lunch and School Breakfast Programs. Questions & Answers for Program Operators Revised 2/23/12 Final Rule Nutrition Standards in the National School Lunch and School Breakfast Programs General: Questions & Answers for Program Operators Revised 2/23/12 (New or Revised Q/As are italicized) 1. Why

More information

Nutrition Guidelines. Financial Implications

Nutrition Guidelines. Financial Implications Nutrition Guidelines School meals must meet federally defined nutrition standards that are based on the Dietary Guidelines for Americans. With the passage of the Healthy, Hunger Free Kids Act, schools

More information

Implementing the School Breakfast Program

Implementing the School Breakfast Program Implementing the School Breakfast Program January 21, 2014 Illinois State Board of Education Nutrition and Wellness Programs Division Agenda FY2009-FY2013 NSLP/SBP Meal Data Trends Meal Pattern Requirement

More information

SP 10-2012 - REVISED. Questions & Answers on the Final Rule, Nutrition Standards in the National School Lunch and School Breakfast Programs

SP 10-2012 - REVISED. Questions & Answers on the Final Rule, Nutrition Standards in the National School Lunch and School Breakfast Programs United States Department of Agriculture Food and Nutrition Service 3101 Park Center Drive Alexandria, VA 22302-1500 DATE: MEMO CODE: SUBJECT: TO: April 27, 2012 SP 10-2012 - REVISED Questions & Answers

More information

Meal Pricing Student and Adult Meals; Equity in Meal Pricing Paid Lunch Equity and Revenue from Nonprogram Foods

Meal Pricing Student and Adult Meals; Equity in Meal Pricing Paid Lunch Equity and Revenue from Nonprogram Foods Meal Pricing Student and Adult Meals; Equity in Meal Pricing Paid Lunch Equity and Revenue from Nonprogram Foods Section 15 Update Guide February 3, 2016 April 27, 2015 Updated Section 15, Meal Pricing

More information

Meal Pattern Success Stories

Meal Pattern Success Stories Meal Pattern Success Stories Lori Adkins, SNS Oakland Schools, MI Amy Harkey, SNS Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools, NC Adam Simmons Fayetteville Public Schools, AR Copyright 2012 School Nutrition Association.

More information

Competitive Food Nutritional Standards

Competitive Food Nutritional Standards Competitive Food Nutritional Standards Section 20 Update Guide August 1, 2014 Updated Section 23 Competitive Food Nutrition Standards to incorporate the following United States Department of Agriculture

More information

NSLP October 15, Contact: Charlene S. Allert, M.P.H. PH:

NSLP October 15, Contact: Charlene S. Allert, M.P.H. PH: NSLP 54-12 October 15, 2012 Subject: Questions & Answers on the Final Rule Contact: Charlene S. Allert, M.P.H. PH: 801-538-7563 Questions & Answers on the Final Rule Nutrition Standards in the National

More information

New Meal Pattern. Standards. USDA s National School Lunch and School Breakfast Programs

New Meal Pattern. Standards. USDA s National School Lunch and School Breakfast Programs New Meal Pattern Requirements and Nutrition Standards USDA s National School Lunch and School Breakfast Programs Agenda Welcome Training i Overview New Meal Pattern Meal Components Dietary Specifications

More information

Snack Foods and Beverages In New Mexico Schools A comparison of state policy with USDA s nutrition standards

Snack Foods and Beverages In New Mexico Schools A comparison of state policy with USDA s nutrition standards A data table from The Pew Charitable Trusts and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Jan 2015 Snack Foods and Beverages In New Mexico Schools A comparison of state policy with USDA s nutrition standards

More information

Nutrition Requirements for Foods and Beverages Sold During the Regular School Day throughout the School Campus

Nutrition Requirements for Foods and Beverages Sold During the Regular School Day throughout the School Campus Nutrition s for Foods and Beverages Sold During the Regular School Day throughout the School Campus THIS RULE PERTAINS TO ALL SCHOOLS THAT PARTICIPATE IN THE NATIONAL SCHOOL LUNCH PROGRAM (NSLP) In June

More information

Snack Foods and Beverages In Utah Schools A comparison of state policy with USDA s nutrition standards

Snack Foods and Beverages In Utah Schools A comparison of state policy with USDA s nutrition standards A data table from The Pew Charitable Trusts and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Jan 2015 Snack Foods and Beverages In Utah Schools A comparison of state policy with USDA s nutrition standards In 2008,

More information

Snack Foods and Beverages In Washington D.C. Schools A comparison of state policy with USDA s nutrition standards

Snack Foods and Beverages In Washington D.C. Schools A comparison of state policy with USDA s nutrition standards A data table from The Pew Charitable Trusts and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Jan 2015 Snack Foods and Beverages In Washington D.C. Schools A comparison of state policy with USDA s nutrition standards

More information

Snack Foods and Beverages In Pennsylvania Schools A comparison of state policy with USDA s nutrition standards

Snack Foods and Beverages In Pennsylvania Schools A comparison of state policy with USDA s nutrition standards A data table from The Pew Charitable Trusts and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Jan 2015 Snack Foods and Beverages In Pennsylvania Schools A comparison of state policy with USDA s nutrition standards

More information

Smoothies Offered in Child Nutrition Programs Guidance

Smoothies Offered in Child Nutrition Programs Guidance Smoothies Offered in Child Nutrition Programs Guidance 1. Can smoothies be offered to meet the fluid milk, meat/meat alternate, vegetable, fruit, and grain components? a) Milk and fruit can be credited

More information

Now that I have diabetes, do I have to give up my favorite foods?

Now that I have diabetes, do I have to give up my favorite foods? 14 STAYIng HeALTHY with Diabetes: Simple Steps for HeALTHY Eating Eating healthy can keep your blood sugar in good control. Eating healthy also helps avoid weight gain. These simple steps will get you

More information

Energizing Your Students With School Breakfast and Lunch

Energizing Your Students With School Breakfast and Lunch Energizing Your Students With School Breakfast and Lunch PRESENTERS: Sara L Olson, ScM, RD Alicia White, MS, RD Food and Nutrition Service U.S. Department of Agriculture Today s Session Recap what s new

More information

Competitive Food and Beverage Rules. Integrating USDA Smart Snacks in School and California Requirements

Competitive Food and Beverage Rules. Integrating USDA Smart Snacks in School and California Requirements 0 Competitive Food and Beverage Rules Integrating USDA Smart Snacks in School and California Requirements 1 Objectives Review Important Dates Describe the four governing organizations that make school

More information

SMART SNACKS IN SCHOOL. USDA s All Foods Sold in School Nutrition Standards New for Snacks and Beverages

SMART SNACKS IN SCHOOL. USDA s All Foods Sold in School Nutrition Standards New for Snacks and Beverages SMART SNACKS IN SCHOOL USDA s All Foods Sold in School Nutrition Standards New for Snacks and Beverages Presentation Outline Overview of USDA s Smart Snacks in School Nutrition Standards What is the purpose

More information

Small Steps for Healthy Meals to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

Small Steps for Healthy Meals to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes Small Steps for Healthy Meals to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes When it comes to eating healthy to lose weight, the three most important steps are: 1. Take in fewer calories than you burn during the day. 2. Eat

More information

Take Control Nutrition Tools for Diabetes. 50/50 plate Portions Servings

Take Control Nutrition Tools for Diabetes. 50/50 plate Portions Servings Take Control Nutrition Tools for Diabetes 50/50 plate Portions Servings Eat more Vegetables Especially non starchy vegetables Choosing Foods to manage blood glucose Select a variety of colors and types

More information

ro INTROduct ioninint

ro INTROduct ioninint ro INTROduct ioninint Chapter 6: Menu Planning and Sample Menus For some participants, the food they eat at the CACFP adult day care program will be the tastiest and healthiest food they will have all

More information

Snack Foods and Beverages In Oklahoma Schools A comparison of state policy with USDA s nutrition standards

Snack Foods and Beverages In Oklahoma Schools A comparison of state policy with USDA s nutrition standards A data table from The Pew Charitable Trusts and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Jan 2015 Snack Foods and Beverages In Oklahoma Schools A comparison of state policy with USDA s nutrition standards This

More information

New School Meal Standards Digesting the Details By Linda Antinoro, JD, RD, LDN, CDE

New School Meal Standards Digesting the Details By Linda Antinoro, JD, RD, LDN, CDE New School Meal Standards Digesting the Details By Linda Antinoro, JD, RD, LDN, CDE In 1946, Congress tasked the USDA with regulating nutrition standards for school meals, according to the agency s Food

More information

Snack Foods and Beverages In Texas Schools A comparison of state policy with USDA s nutrition standards

Snack Foods and Beverages In Texas Schools A comparison of state policy with USDA s nutrition standards A data table from The Pew Charitable Trusts and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Jan 2015 Snack Foods and Beverages In Texas Schools A comparison of state policy with USDA s nutrition standards The Food

More information

Snack Foods and Beverages In New York Schools A comparison of state policy with USDA s nutrition standards

Snack Foods and Beverages In New York Schools A comparison of state policy with USDA s nutrition standards A data table from The Pew Charitable Trusts and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Jan 2015 Snack Foods and Beverages In New York Schools A comparison of state policy with USDA s nutrition standards Education

More information

Snack Foods and Beverages In Alabama Schools A comparison of state policy with USDA s nutrition standards

Snack Foods and Beverages In Alabama Schools A comparison of state policy with USDA s nutrition standards A data table from The Pew Charitable Trusts and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Jan 2015 Snack Foods and Beverages In Alabama Schools A comparison of state policy with USDA s nutrition standards Alabama

More information

Vegetables, Fruits, Whole Grains, and Beans

Vegetables, Fruits, Whole Grains, and Beans Vegetables, Fruits, Session 2 Background Information Tips Goals Background Information Vegetables, Fruit, Why Are Vegetables and Fruits Important? Eating plenty of vegetables and fruits is a very important

More information

Snack Foods and Beverages In South Carolina Schools A comparison of state policy with USDA s nutrition standards

Snack Foods and Beverages In South Carolina Schools A comparison of state policy with USDA s nutrition standards A data table from The Pew Charitable Trusts and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Jan 2015 Snack Foods and Beverages In South Carolina Schools A comparison of state policy with USDA s nutrition standards

More information

Food Production Records Handbook

Food Production Records Handbook Child and Adult Nutrition Services Food Production Records Handbook Website: http://doe.sd.gov/cans/nslp.aspx 2016 T H I S I N S T I T U T I O N I S A N E Q U A L O P P O R T U N I T Y P R O V I D E R

More information

Boston Public Health Commission Healthy Food Procurement Guidelines. Standards for Purchased Beverages and Foods

Boston Public Health Commission Healthy Food Procurement Guidelines. Standards for Purchased Beverages and Foods Boston Public Health Commission Healthy Food Procurement Guidelines Standards for Purchased Beverages and Foods Boston Public Health Commission Healthy Food Procurement Guidelines Standards for Purchased

More information

Protein Values in Foods

Protein Values in Foods Protein Values in Foods This document is used as reference material to support the Alternative Health Improvement Center s Newsletter article: Eat your Protein! Stay Healthy! located at http://ahicatlanta.com/articles/eat-your-protein-to-stay-healthy.html.

More information

Smart Snacks in School USDA s All Foods Sold in Schools Standards

Smart Snacks in School USDA s All Foods Sold in Schools Standards USDA s All Foods Sold in Schools Standards USDA recently published practical, science-based nutrition standards for snack foods and beverages sold to children at school during the school day. The standards,

More information

Getting Started: General Guidelines (based on a 2,000 calorie/day diet) week 3 itinerary: My Plate and the Pyramid. $30 Bookstore Gift Card

Getting Started: General Guidelines (based on a 2,000 calorie/day diet) week 3 itinerary: My Plate and the Pyramid. $30 Bookstore Gift Card week 3 itinerary: My Plate and the Pyramid Getting Started: What types of food should I choose? What is a serving size? How much should I eat? These are questions we all ask and it takes a lot of Nergy

More information

Department of Agriculture

Department of Agriculture Vol. 77 Thursday, No. 17 January 26, 2012 Part II Department of Agriculture Food and Nutrition Service 7 CFR Parts 210 and 220 Nutrition Standards in the National School Lunch and School Breakfast Programs;

More information

Supporting School Food Guidelines. information for parents and caregivers

Supporting School Food Guidelines. information for parents and caregivers Supporting School Food Guidelines information for parents and caregivers HEALTHY STUDENTS HEALTHY SCHOOLS 2008 3 Healthy choices available in our schools This brochure provides parents and caregivers with

More information

Ready, Set, Start Counting!

Ready, Set, Start Counting! Ready, Set, Start Counting! Carbohydrate Counting a Tool to Help Manage Your Blood Glucose When you have diabetes, keeping your blood glucose in a healthy range will help you feel your best today and in

More information

Food Groups To Encourage. chapter OVERVIEW

Food Groups To Encourage. chapter OVERVIEW 23 chapter 5 Food Groups To Encourage OVERVIEW Increased intakes of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and fat free or low fat milk and milk products are likely to have important health benefits for most

More information

Healthy eating for toddlers

Healthy eating for toddlers Healthy eating for toddlers Toddlerhood is a time where children learn about new foods and where life long eating habits are often established. To help children grow up to be healthy adults, it is important

More information

Instructions for Using the Meal Plan and Daily Food Checklist:

Instructions for Using the Meal Plan and Daily Food Checklist: Instructions for Using the Meal Plan and Daily Food Checklist: 1. Start by selecting your calorie level based on the below chart. For example, if you would like to maintain your body weight, find your

More information

Healthy Lifestyles Workshop

Healthy Lifestyles Workshop Healthy Lifestyles Workshop Healthy Snacks and Lunches on the Go Presented by: Tatiana Burton Objectives Adopting Lifestyle Changes Menu Planning Portion Control Identifying Healthy Snacks Tips to remember

More information

Mealtime Memo. Accommodating Vegetarian Diets

Mealtime Memo. Accommodating Vegetarian Diets Mealtime Memo National Food Service Management Institute The University of Mississippi for Child Care No., 200 Updated January 202 Accommodating Vegetarian Diets Many families have adopted a vegetarian

More information

** In the beginning it is best to limit your food options. We have provided 3 examples for each meal. You will do best by sticking to this.

** In the beginning it is best to limit your food options. We have provided 3 examples for each meal. You will do best by sticking to this. Female Fat Loss Formula Diet: This is the diet you will follow. There are no foods that are off limits, but rather foods that are emphasized and those that are minimized. Here are the general rules you

More information

Healthy Foods for my School

Healthy Foods for my School yum, yum, yum, yum, yum, yum, yum, yum, yum, yum, yum, yum, yum, yum, yum, yum, yum, yum, yum, yum, yum, Healthy Foods for my School Nutrition Standards for Saskatchewan Schools Schools are an ideal place

More information

Healthy Eating for Diabetes

Healthy Eating for Diabetes Healthy Eating for Diabetes What is diabetes? Diabetes is when your blood sugar (glucose) levels are higher than normal. For some people, this is because the insulin in their body doesn t work as well

More information

Diabetes Eating Healthy

Diabetes Eating Healthy How do I manage my diabetes? Diabetes Eating Healthy It is important to control diabetes by living a healthy lifestyle. This includes: eating healthy remaining active watching your weight taking medication

More information

TEXAS DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FOOD AND NUTRITION DIVISION

TEXAS DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FOOD AND NUTRITION DIVISION TEXAS DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FOOD AND NUTRITION DIVISION PERMANENT AGREEMENT County/District or Uniform Contract Number (UCN) National School Lunch Program, School Breakfast Program, Summer Food Service

More information

Birth through 3 Months. of formula 1 or breastmilk 2,3. Infant formula and dry infant cereal must be iron-fortified. continued

Birth through 3 Months. of formula 1 or breastmilk 2,3. Infant formula and dry infant cereal must be iron-fortified. continued POLICY ALERT TODD STAPLES, COMMISSIONER Date: January 5, 008 Reference: # NSLP/SBP 008-5 To: National School Lunch Program/School Breakfast Program (NSLP/SBP) Contractors Subject: Meal Pattern Charts Infants

More information

Chicago Public Schools Policy Manual

Chicago Public Schools Policy Manual Chicago Public Schools Policy Manual Title: HEALTHY SNACK AND BEVERAGE Section: 407.3 Board Report: 12-1114-PO1 Date Adopted: November 14, 2012 Policy: THE CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER RECOMMENDS: That the

More information

Verification. Section 6 Update Guide. - Validation of program participation

Verification. Section 6 Update Guide. - Validation of program participation Verification Section 6 Update Guide December 16, 2015 Updated Section 6, Verification to incorporate the following USDA memos and guidance: - USDA Memo SP 40-2015, 2015 Edition of Eligibility Manual for

More information

Section 4000 Managing the Program

Section 4000 Managing the Program Section 4000 Managing the Program Table of Contents 4100 Reimbursable Meals 4110 Meal Service 4111 Planning of Meal Service 4112 Meal Pattern Requirements 4112.1 Meal Pattern Chart 4112.2 Alternate Protein

More information

Carbohydrate Counting for Patients with Diabetes. Lauren Dorman, MS RD CDE Registered Dietitian & Certified Diabetes Educator

Carbohydrate Counting for Patients with Diabetes. Lauren Dorman, MS RD CDE Registered Dietitian & Certified Diabetes Educator Carbohydrate Counting for Patients with Diabetes Lauren Dorman, MS RD CDE Registered Dietitian & Certified Diabetes Educator Program Purpose To increase knowledge of carbohydrate counting skills for nurses

More information

Understanding the Carbohydrate Portions in Gluten Free Foods 1 Portion/Exchange = 15g

Understanding the Carbohydrate Portions in Gluten Free Foods 1 Portion/Exchange = 15g Understanding the Carbohydrate Portions in luten Free Foods 1 Portion/Exchange = 15g Know your Carbohydrate Foods Dairy Fruit Starchy vegetables Breads, cereals, rice, pasta/noodles, biscuits, flour(s)

More information

Calculating Grains for School Meals

Calculating Grains for School Meals Calculating Grains for School Meals California Healthy Kids Resource Center and the California Department of Education, Nutrition Services Division Partner: California Department of Education, Nutrition

More information

fruits and vegetables

fruits and vegetables How to use fruits and vegetables to help manage your weight. Department of Health and Human Services Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Fruits and vegetables are part of a well-balanced and healthy

More information

Understanding the Carbohydrate Portion 1 Portion/ Exchange= 15g

Understanding the Carbohydrate Portion 1 Portion/ Exchange= 15g Understanding the Carbohydrate Portion 1 Portion/ Exchange= 15g Know your Carbohydrate Foods Dairy Fruit Starchy vegetables Breads, cereals, rice, pasta/noodles, biscuits (plain), flour(s) Extras e.g.

More information

Ready, Set, Start Counting!

Ready, Set, Start Counting! Ready, Set, Start Counting! Carbohydrate Counting a Tool to Help Manage Your Blood Glucose When you have diabetes, keeping your blood glucose in a healthy range can help you feel your best today and in

More information

Grains in the National School Lunch and Breakfast Programs What are the new requirements? 2:00pm Wednesday, May 2, 2012

Grains in the National School Lunch and Breakfast Programs What are the new requirements? 2:00pm Wednesday, May 2, 2012 Grains in the National School Lunch and Breakfast Programs What are the new requirements? 2:00pm Wednesday, May 2, 2012 Presentation slides, resources, and CEU form available at: www.schoolnutrition.org/webinar

More information

Smart Snacks in School March 2015

Smart Snacks in School March 2015 Smart Snacks in School March 2015 Adrienne Davenport, MPH, RDN Smart Snacks & FFVP Contact School Nutrition Programs Michigan Dept. of Education E: davenporta1@michigan.gov P: 517-241-1762 Objectives Smart

More information

MENU STANDARDS: CONGREGATE AND HOME DELIVERED MEALS

MENU STANDARDS: CONGREGATE AND HOME DELIVERED MEALS FY 2016-19 Standards and Definitions Title III-C Menu Standards Page 1 MENU STANDARDS: CONGREGATE AND HOME DELIVERED MEALS Adequate and balanced nutrition is recognized as a prime component of older adults'

More information

CPHN Market Basket Prices ($), by food group

CPHN Market Basket Prices ($), by food group Items Safeway Fred QFC Albertsons Whole Metropol. PCC Meyer Foods Market Frozen yogurt, low-fat desert, 1 qt. 3.57 3.31 3.71 3.71 8.28 10.26 7.38 Yogurt, fat-free, 32 oz. 3.49 1.79 2.99 2.69 2.84 3.59

More information

Making Pregnancy Meal Plans 3 steps to custom

Making Pregnancy Meal Plans 3 steps to custom Making Pregnancy Meal Plans 3 steps to custom meal plans you can really use! For more detailed instructions as well as examples, read Making Pregnancy Meal Plans in 3 Simple Steps. Step 1 Create a daily

More information

Understanding the Carbohydrate Portions in Gluten Free Foods 1 Portion/Exchange = 10g

Understanding the Carbohydrate Portions in Gluten Free Foods 1 Portion/Exchange = 10g Understanding the Carbohydrate Portions in luten Free Foods 1 Portion/Exchange = 10g Know your Carbohydrate Foods Dairy Fruit Starchy vegetables Breads, cereals, rice, pasta/noodles, biscuits, flour(s)

More information

Diabetes and Your Diet July 2011

Diabetes and Your Diet July 2011 These are general guidelines to help improve blood sugar levels. Talk to your dietitian about how they fit into your specific kidney diet. Foods are made up of protein, fat and carbohydrate. Protein (meat

More information

Healthy Eating. 6 th grade Family & Consumer Sciences

Healthy Eating. 6 th grade Family & Consumer Sciences Healthy Eating 6 th grade Family & Consumer Sciences What are some reasons we eat? Hunger or Appetite Nutritional Requirements The Need For Energy Our Attitude towards a food Our Emotions The Smell, texture,

More information

Lee Haney s 60 Day Weight Loss Challenge

Lee Haney s 60 Day Weight Loss Challenge I,, do agree with Lee Haney s 60 Day Loss Challenge that I will begin the following 60 Day Loss Challenge program as of 2014. 1. I will participate in an exercise program on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday

More information

4/4/2014. Starting and ending times Break times Lunch time and arrangements Restrooms, telephones, & amenities Participant materials

4/4/2014. Starting and ending times Break times Lunch time and arrangements Restrooms, telephones, & amenities Participant materials April 2, 2014 Kansas State Department of Education Child Nutrition & Wellness Starting and ending times Break times Lunch time and arrangements Restrooms, telephones, & amenities Participant materials

More information

Eat More, Weigh Less?

Eat More, Weigh Less? Eat More, Weigh Less? How to manage your weight without being hungry 607 calories 293 calories Department of Health and Human Services Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Can you weigh less without

More information

Ultimate. Food Plan. page 1

Ultimate. Food Plan. page 1 Ultimate Food Plan page 1 TAIslim Ultimate Food Plan Half a kilogram of body fat equals 3,850 calories. That means to lose half a kilogram of fat per week, you need to take in 3,850 fewer calories per

More information

Blood Sugar. Support Program Program. Support Program. Reshape. Your Life. IN10 Days. 1

Blood Sugar. Support Program Program. Support Program. Reshape. Your Life. IN10 Days.  1 Blood Blood Sugar Sugar Support Program Program Blood Sugar Support Program Reshape Your Life IN10 Days ar www.standardprocess.com/10-day-programs 1 2 BLOOD SUGAR Blood Blood Sugar Sugar Support Program

More information

Canada s Food Guide Jeopardy

Canada s Food Guide Jeopardy Canada s Food Guide Jeopardy Drafted: July 2008 Revised: December 2012 Eating Well with Canada s Food Guide Veg & Fruit Grain Products Milk & Alternatives Meat & Alternatives Physical Activity Miscellaneous

More information

List of Low Glycemic Foods

List of Low Glycemic Foods On this list the low glycemic carbs that are carb dense and would therefore have a high glycemic load have an asterik *after them. Don t eat more than 1 serving per meal and for most people no more than

More information

Chapter 20 Food Production Records. Table of Contents

Chapter 20 Food Production Records. Table of Contents South Carolina School Food Service Program Reference Manual Contributors: Krystal Jones, Ellen Mason, and Laura Oliver Chapter 20 Food Production Records Table of Contents Purpose of Food Production Records...

More information

CACFP Annual Training

CACFP Annual Training CACFP Annual Training There are several important aspects of record keeping for Childcare Providers to consider when participating in the Child and Adult Care Food Program. The objective of this Training

More information

Making Healthy Food Choices. Section 2: Module 5

Making Healthy Food Choices. Section 2: Module 5 Making Healthy Food Choices Section 2: Module 5 1 Nutrition For Health What is healthy Tips on planning meals Making a shopping list/ Bulk orders Using WIC foods Cook and freeze What foods to choose How

More information

Dietary Intervention

Dietary Intervention The Dietary Advice to Stop Hypertension eating plan 1 The Dietary Advice to Stop Hypertension (DASH) eating plan, developed by United States National Institute of Health, features plenty of fruits, vegetables,

More information

Nutrition Science for Life

Nutrition Science for Life Page1 Slide 1 Nutrition Science for Life Page2 Slide 2 Copyright Copyright Texas Education Agency, 2013. These Materials are copyrighted and trademarked as the property of the Texas Education Agency (TEA)

More information

Breakfast 1 egg, hard boiled 1/2 meat and alternative ½ c. fruit salad ½ c. high fiber cereal (to top salad)

Breakfast 1 egg, hard boiled 1/2 meat and alternative ½ c. fruit salad ½ c. high fiber cereal (to top salad) Monday 1 egg, hard boiled 1/ ½ c. fruit salad ½ c. high fiber cereal (to top salad) ¾ c. low-fat yogurt, plain 1 c. herbal tea ½ c. orange juice Tuna pita: ½ c. canned tuna, packaged in water 1 tsp reduced

More information

Kidney Disease and Potassium

Kidney Disease and Potassium What is potassium? Kidney Disease and Potassium Potassium is a mineral found in food. Your muscles and nerves need potassium to work well. Your heart muscle needs potassium for a strong beat. Your kidneys

More information

Breakfast 1 egg, hard boiled 1/2 meat and alternative ½ c. fruit salad ½ c. high fiber cereal (to top salad)

Breakfast 1 egg, hard boiled 1/2 meat and alternative ½ c. fruit salad ½ c. high fiber cereal (to top salad) Monday 1 egg, hard boiled 1/2 meat and alternative ½ c. fruit salad ½ c. high fiber cereal (to top salad) ¾ c. low-fat yogurt, plain 1 c. herbal tea Tuna pita: ½ c. canned tuna, packaged in water 1 tsp

More information

Carbohydrate Counting for Patients With Diabetes. Review Date 4/08 D-0503

Carbohydrate Counting for Patients With Diabetes. Review Date 4/08 D-0503 Carbohydrate Counting for Patients With Diabetes Review Date 4/08 D-0503 Program Objectives At the end of the session you will know how to: Define carbohydrate counting Identify the relationship between

More information

Easy Ways to Eat More Fruits and Vegetables.

Easy Ways to Eat More Fruits and Vegetables. Easy Ways to Eat More Fruits and Vegetables. Eating your fruits and vegetables is a lot easier than you might think. Once cup-equivalent of most fruits and vegetables is the amount that would fit in a

More information

Coach on Call. But not all vegetarian diets are healthy. Use the guidelines below to help you make a meatless lifestyle a healthy one.

Coach on Call. But not all vegetarian diets are healthy. Use the guidelines below to help you make a meatless lifestyle a healthy one. Coach on Call There are many health benefits of a vegetarian diet. Vegetarians tend to have lower rates of: Heart disease High blood pressure Type 2 diabetes Some types of cancer But not all vegetarian

More information

Bagged Lunch vs. School Lunch

Bagged Lunch vs. School Lunch Bagged Lunch vs. School Lunch Parents: A breakdown of what a typical bagged lunch may cost VS. the cost of school lunch at Olmsted Falls Schools! (Prices are based on average retail costs of lunch ingredients.

More information

Section 12, Seamless Summer Option (SSO)

Section 12, Seamless Summer Option (SSO) Section 12, Seamless Summer Option (SSO) Section 12 Update Guide October 17, 2014 October 3, 2014 Updated Section 12, Seamless Summer Option (SSO) to address typos in the Update Guide Updated Section 12,

More information

High Potassium Eating

High Potassium Eating High Eating Why is eating a high potassium diet important? is a mineral found naturally in many foods. It can help lower blood pressure and may lower the risk of heart disease and stroke. It is used in

More information

FOOD WASTE OPPORTUNITIES CHALLENGES

FOOD WASTE OPPORTUNITIES CHALLENGES FOOD WASTE AMONG SCHOOL OPPORTUNITIES ELEMENTARY CHALLENGES CHILDREN: & MICHAEL MARCENELLE, SCHOOL NUTRITION DIRECTOR, MONTGOMERY COUNTY PUBLIC SCHOOLS CARMEN BYKER, ASSISTANT PROFESSOR, MONTANA STATE

More information

Vegetarian Nutrients of Concern Food Lists

Vegetarian Nutrients of Concern Food Lists Vegetarian Nutrients of Concern Food Lists Vegan Zinc Food Sources Food Serving Size Zinc (mg) Almonds, boiled 1/4 cup 1.1 Broccoli, chopped, cooked 1/2 cup 0.4 Cashews, dry roasted 1/4 cup 1.9 Chia seeds

More information

Resources for Carbohydrate Counting

Resources for Carbohydrate Counting Resources for Carbohydrate Counting The Diabetes Carbohydrate and Fat Gram Guide By LeaAnn Holzmeister, RD, CDE American Diabetes Association See contact information below The Doctor s Pocket Calorie,

More information

1200 Calorie Menus Breakfast

1200 Calorie Menus Breakfast 1200 Calorie Menus Breakfast Choose one of these menus for breakfast: 1. ½ c. unsweetened 60 15 g. 0 1 fruit pineapple ½ English muffin 60 15 g. 0.5 g. 1 starch 2 tsp. low-sugar jelly 16 4 g. 0 Free Coffee

More information

health information Healthy Eating with Type 2 Diabetes (Chinese Foods)

health information Healthy Eating with Type 2 Diabetes (Chinese Foods) health information Healthy Eating with Type 2 Diabetes (Chinese Foods) Eating healthy is very important when you have type 2 diabetes. It can help to keep your blood glucose (sugar) in a healthy range.

More information

Nutrition for Runners

Nutrition for Runners Nutrition for Runners Nutrition is an important part of training A healthy balanced diet can help you feel and perform your best. Both fueling and refueling with high quality foods and beverages is important

More information

STAGE 1: THE RAPID START PLAN: 14 DAYS OF SAMPLE MENUS

STAGE 1: THE RAPID START PLAN: 14 DAYS OF SAMPLE MENUS 54 \ T HE U LTIMATE W EIGHT S OLUTION F OOD G UIDE STAGE 1: THE RAPID START PLAN: 14 DAYS OF SAMPLE MENUS The Rapid Start menus supply an average of 1,100 to 1,200 calories a day, with approximately 30

More information

Participant Group Nutrition Education outline: Get the Skinny on Milk

Participant Group Nutrition Education outline: Get the Skinny on Milk Participant Group Nutrition Education outline: Get the Skinny on Milk Lesson Plan adapted from California WIC This group NE outline uses a facilitated discussion format, including a tasting activity. Select

More information

My Diabetic Meal Plan during Pregnancy

My Diabetic Meal Plan during Pregnancy My Diabetic Meal Plan during Pregnancy When you have diabetes and are pregnant, you need to eat small meals and snacks throughout the day to help control your blood sugar. This also helps you get in enough

More information

Creating Healthy Menus with USDA Foods SNA ANC 2013

Creating Healthy Menus with USDA Foods SNA ANC 2013 Creating Healthy Menus with USDA Foods SNA ANC 2013 Overview USDA Foods Background Christina Riley, MS, RD Nutritionist, Food and Nutrition Service School Meals Recipe Resources Scott Richardson, MBA Director

More information

The South African Guidelines for Healthy Eating and Food Guide

The South African Guidelines for Healthy Eating and Food Guide The South African Guidelines for Healthy Eating and Food Guide For more information contact: Department of Health. Directorate: Nutrition Private Bag X828; Pretoria 0001. This information pamphlet provides

More information

Nutrition Guidelines for Diabetes

Nutrition Guidelines for Diabetes Nutrition Guidelines for Diabetes Eating healthy foods and keeping a healthy body weight are very important parts of a diabetes treatment plan. A healthy diet and weight helps to keep your blood sugar

More information

State of Arizona Department of Education MEMORANDUM

State of Arizona Department of Education MEMORANDUM State of Arizona Department of Education HNS 21-2013 USDA SP 32-2013 MEMORANDUM TO: FROM: Sponsors of the National School Lunch Program Mary Szafranski, Deputy Associate Superintendent Arizona Department

More information

The Five Food Groups and Nutrition Facts

The Five Food Groups and Nutrition Facts session 4 The Five Food Groups and Nutrition Facts (Note to the presenter: Comments in parentheses are instructions to follow while giving the presentation. Do not read the comments to participants. This

More information