We will LEARN, PRACTICE, and TEACH the art and science of gardening in the Rogue Valley.

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1 Newsletter of the Jackson County Master Gardener Association October 2012 We will LEARN, PRACTICE, and TEACH the art and science of gardening in the Rogue Valley.

2 WDSG Front Page Advisor s Report page 2 President s Message page 3 This Month in the Garden page 3 It s Not Too Late! page 4 Gardening Gourmet page 5 Herban Renewal page 6 Master Gardener Profile page 7 Winter Dreams Class Schedule page 8 Election 2013 page 9 Book Review Page 9 Footsteps of the Past page 10 Membership Updates Page 10 Splinters from the Board page 11 Calendar of Upcoming Events back cover Winter Dreams Summer Gardens back cover Page 2 Inside This Issue OSU Advisor s Report It is October, the end of the Master Gardener year and time to relax, put up your feet, make some tea, and get ready for winter rain. Now you can catch up on reading all those garden books you have been meaning to read. NOT SO FAST! There is still work to be done. An internet search for garden maintenance produces a ton of lists for fall garden chores. The Garden Guide for the Rogue Valley written by great Master Gardener vegetable growers lists a number of October chores to give us food through fall and winter, and make gardening next spring easier and better. The OSU Extension Master Gardener program has its own list that you can find each month at the OSU Extension Gardening page (extension.oregonstate.edu/gardening/). That site includes links to a host of gardening stories, and information on how to become a Master Gardener. So what, I hear you say, I already took the class. Good, but the long-term health of our program and community needs new class members every year. Be sure to suggest to your gardening friends and neighbors that it is time now to call me and sign up for the class starting in January. While you are talking to them, give them a Winter Dreams/Summer Gardens flier. This year s symposium November 3 at the Higher Education Center in Medford will be the best ever. Make sure they know about all the evening and weekend classes we give throughout the year. In addition, never pass up a chance to talk about our outstanding Plant Clinic available to anyone. Master Gardeners have a couple more fall chores to complete. Think back and recollect the number of volunteer hours you donated to the program over the past twelve months. Take a minute to record them on-line at or mail, or call them in to the Extension Office. While you are doing that, make sure the Annual Master Gardener Banquet is on your calendar for Saturday, October 20. It is all part of the annual maintenance that is so important to both your garden and the Master Gardener program. Then you can sit back, pick up your tea and plan next year s garden, but be sure to also plan what Jackson County Master Gardener activities you will do next year and then send in your membership renewal. A little maintenance every month makes a great garden and a great Master Gardener Program. Bob Reynolds Jackson County OSU Home Horticulture Agent Master Gardener 2005 BEET BOX Editor Carolyn Trottmann: Graphic Design & Layout Shari Dallas: Photography Glen Risley: Proofreading Maryen Herrett: Susan Kiefer: Linda Holder: Mailing Lead: Pam Harmon Alternates: Valerie Sherier, Barbara Kellis-Ring The Garden Beet is published monthly by the OSU Jackson County Master Gardener Association, Southern Oregon Research and Extension Center, 569 Hanley Road, Central Point, Oregon Phone: Publishing Information: All articles and photos are due by the 10th of the preceding month. Articles should not exceed 400 words per column. Regular monthly articles should be ed to assigned proofreader. One time articles should be ed to the editor for review. Photos should be 300 dpi in jpeg or tiff formats. If a photo needs to be scanned, it should be dropped off at the Extension Center in Bob Reynolds office no later than the 10th of the preceding month. If a photo needs to be taken, please contact Glen Risley at the address above. Oregon State University Extension Service offers educational programs, activities, and materials without regard to race, color, national origin, sex, or disability as required by Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of Oregon State University is an Equal Opportunity Employer. All information provided by the Garden Beet is believed to be accurate. Readers must assume all responsibility for their own actions based on this information. Occasionally a product or company may be named in an article but this does not constitute an endorsement of said product by JCMGA

3 President s Message As I write this our old llama, Lily, is lying in the paddock after collapsing for a second time in a week. We don t know how old she is as she was rescued after being abandoned, but she appears to be very old, and although she does not appear to be suffering her time is running Michael Riding out. They say that the alternative to growing old is worse, although when you read that Steve Jobs dying words were Oh Wow, Oh Wow, Oh Wow that may not be the case. Be that as it may we older gardeners know only too well we take longer to achieve our goals and that there are some tasks that are more difficult than they used to be. But, by dint of being gardeners I am sure we grow into a more healthy old age. Remembering all those Latin names is almost like doing a crossword puzzle in Swahili! We do get out into the fresh air, when wildfires are not raging that is, and we do get our exercise. We also have the advantage of being able to grow our own food and therefore to know whence it comes. I am not sure how many of us stretch before we start our chores, I know I do not although I know I should, but nonetheless all the activities associated with having a garden certainly do add up to healthy exercise. Even as gardening is good for the mind and the body I think it also good for the soul. There s the satisfaction of growing plants from seed and the pleasure of eating our produce. The joy of having a grafted fruit tree take and watching it grow is considerable. On the other hand having those three trees defoliated by marauding deer was a bit of a let down, I suppose even souls have a let down from time to time. Add to all these pleasures the fellowship we share as Master Gardeners, we had a wonderful group splitting and potting up Marsha s daylilies on Wednesday, and we can all look forward to ageing well and growing old gracefully and happily. I think Lily has done that in her own grumpy way. This Month in the Garden Plant cover crops Protect frost-sensitive plants Mulch overwintering crops Harvest Jerusalem artichokes Prepare asparagus bed Harvest horseradish Harvest squash, peppers, pumpkins Use autumn leaves Prepare season extenders Direct seed Fava beans Transplant Garlic and shallots Average dates of first frost: October 3 October 18 The two Jackson County Master Gardener Association Garden Guides may be purchased at the Southern Oregon Research and Extension Center or at many local area nurseries and bookstores. The cost is $20 each. Michael Riding President 2012 Master Gardener 2009 Page 3

4 It s Not Too Late! Classes are filling up early this year. Make sure you get your first choices. Sign up today! If you call yourself a Master Gardener, you owe it to yourself to attend the 2012 Winter Dreams-Summer Gardens symposium. And if you register right away, you ll guarantee yourself a spot in all four of the classes you choose. When you attend this year s symposium, you ll be immersed in a unique learning environment where science-based practice and state-of-the-art thinking are seasoned with priceless hands-on experience and local garden lore. Enrollment includes your choice of four (4) 90-minute classroom sessions plus a catered gourmet lunch where you can chat with the experts and other local gardeners. Now in its 14 th season, this daylong event promises to be the biggest and best yet. Bonus: Most Winter Dreams classroom hours apply toward your annual Master Gardener recertification. Help spread the word: Don t forget to mention Winter Dreams to your neighbors and friends. When it comes to learning a new garden skill or mastering an old one they ll be proud to say they heard it from a Master Gardener! Easy to enroll: Just call today! Or Page 4

5 Gardening Gourmet ftäx fñtvx yéü f{tääéàá Frequently associated with French cuisines, shallots have been sought after by cooks since Biblical times. Their intensely piquant-sweet flavor sets them far apart from their garlic and onion relations. Their mellowness also makes them more palatable used raw as well being unsurpassed for flavoring vinaigrettes, butters and wine sauces. Although the many varieties of shallots are easy to cultivate, their soil and climate preferences differ vastly. Since our Rogue Valley is blessed with mild winters, we can cultivate a wide selection of several varieties of shallots here. If you re planting for the first time, you should acquire disease resistant bulbs cultivated from a reliable commercial source. Avoid bulbs from the market since their growth could be compromised either by chemical treatment or unknown diseases. Each shallot cluster yields many individual bulbs for planting. A single bulb produces a new cluster. For each year thereafter, each cluster leaves the gardener with a renewable supply to plant. Always keep the best bulbs for sowing next season. In our zone 7-8, shallots do best planted after autumn s first frost in late Sept-Oct. Exposure to mild freezing, called vernalization, usually gives the gardener a greater abundance of larger more flavorful bulbs. Before setting out shallots, make sure the soil meets their persnickety standards. Shallots sulk and eventually succumb in soggy soil. Rake soil amended with a generous amount of good compost into rows 8" apart with 4" raised ridges for good drainage. Place individual bulbs 6" apart and 2"- 3" deep. Cover the roots and ¼ of the bulbs base leaving the remainder of the top exposed above the soil level. Generously dust with fine wood ashes. Although they night appear as desolate soldiers left in the barren battlefield, both the exposed bulb and ashes help deter rotting. Newly planted bulbs need regular watering to grow. When fall rain is in short supply, hand water until Recipe: Shallot Butter nature takes over. Once shallots establish themselves in early winter, their emerald-green shoots (these can be snipped into a savory sauté or left to produce a larger bulb) reward both gardener and garden with their color and flavor. When spring growth starts, give shallots a light feeding of equal parts of fish and kelp fertilizer. Too much fish gives a lot of long greens and no bulbs. A generous coat of mulch, straw, pine needles or rotted leaves, makes bulbs moist and cozy. Keep consistently moist while spring growth is vigorous. When tops start turning golden, cease all watering. Once tops have fallen over, soak soil to soften it just before harvesting. Gently loosen ground with a spading fork placed below the bulbs so you won t damage them. Shake excess soil from plants then tie in bundles. Hang bundles in a shady-dry spot with good air circulation to cure about a month. When the shallot skins become papery, remove tops and store bulbs in a cool-dry-dark place. Remember to select and save out the best bulbs if you re planning on another season s planting. Then it s time to savor those long sought after shallots from your own soil and share them with special friends. Sources for shallot sets: The following companies offer a good selection of different varieties of shallots. The classic gray shallot, so esteemed by the French, is unsurpassed for flavor as well as storage. Dutch yellow, Brittany red and Sweet Besancon, grow well and are good keepers too. Irish Eyes with a Hint of Garlic, PO Box 307, Ellensburg, WA 98926, 509/ ; LeJardin du Gourmet, PO Box 75, St. Johnsbury Ctr., VT 05863; 800/ , Nichols Garden Nursery, 1190 N. Pacific Hwy, Albany, OR 97321; 541/ ; Southern Exposure Seed Exchange, PO Box 460, Mineral, VA 23117; 540/ ; Sydney Jordan Brown Master Gardener whole shallot clusters, cleaned of debris with skins intact Extra virgin olive oil Sea salt Place shallots in a plastic bag and drizzle over them about 1-2 tablespoons olive oil. Sprinkle in ½ tsp salt and gently massage in bag to coat with salt and oil. Place shallots on a large piece of heavy foil. Pour in about ¼ cup white wine. Seal foil in to a packet and place on low heat barbecue grill or 350 oven. Grill or roast for about 35 minutes or until shallots are soft when gently squeezed. Cool completely and squeeze cooked shallots from skins. Keep paste in a jar in the refrigerator. Paste keeps up to 10 days or longer in the freezer. Wonderful squeezed on crostini, mashed in cream cheese, egg salad, used in sauces or rubs for meat, fish or poultry. Page 5

6 HERBAN RENEWAL Deadly Nightshade (Atropa belladonna) Deadly nightshade, often known by its species name, belladonna, has some fellow black sheep relatives including henbane, European mandrake, tobacco and jimsonweed. Other members of its family, Solanaceae, are good guys, which we enjoy: potatoes, tomatoes, peppers and eggplants. Belladonna is a very toxic short lived somewhat shrubby perennial with purplish herbaceous stems that are usually 2' or 3' tall but under the right growing conditions can reach 6' and a width of 2'. Although it prefers deep moist chalky soil with good drainage and a ph range of , belladonna grows happily in Zones 6-9 in meadows and waste places. It is native to Europe, Asia and North Africa but is cultivated in England, northern India, central Europe and this country where it has naturalized in the east. The dusky green leaves with purplish midribs and prominent veins on both sides are alternate, ovate and pointed. The leaves are 3" - 9" long and can reach a width of 4" but the leaves on the upper portion of the plant are smaller and often grow in small clusters. In mid-summer the purplish brown 1" bell-shaped drooping flowers appear individually from the axils of the leaves. The resulting fruit is a roundish ½" berry that turns from green to purple to black and yields an intensely sweet purple juice. The plant may be propagated from the kidney shaped seeds; germination will occur in days or the thick, fleshy, whitish 6" long branching root may be divided. Probably for good reason, the plant is almost pest free; only flea beetles seem to be a problem. Deadly nightshade is extremely toxic because of the solanaceous alkaloids, which are found in high concentration especially in the root. The sap of the plant can cause dermatitis and handling the berries can cause severe skin eruptions and visual disorders. Dogs and cats are poisoned by the berries but many other animals can eat them without a problem. Human adults have been poisoned after eating rabbits and birds that had consumed the berries; children have died after eating just 3 berries. Even handling the plant, and it shouldn t be done if there are abrasions on the hands, may produce signs of poisoning, which show up within 15 minutes. Our old friend Gerard said, banish therefore these pernicious plants out of your gardens...where children do resort. The history of deadly nightshade is long and fascinating. In the Middle Ages the herb was considered a favorite plant of the devil. Sorcerers and witches added the plant s juices to their brews. Belladonna was mixed with aconite (wolfsbane/monkshood) and rubbed on bodies, which produced heart irregularities and a delirious sensation of flying. The genus name of the herb is derived from Atropos, 1 of the 3 Greek goddesses of fate who cuts the thread of life. The specific epithet, belladonna, means beautiful lady and comes from the practice of Italian women using the plant juice as eyewash to dilate the pupils. It is believed the Roman Emperors, Augustus and Claudius, were poisoned with belladonna by their wives and that it was Juliet s sleeping potion in Shakespeare s play. During the 16 th and 17 th centuries the herb was known in apothecaries as Solatrum mortale, which translates as deadly nightshade. During the 1960s the hippies experimented with it as a hallucinogen but it never became a drug of choice since the trips were often terrifying. There are several common names: devil s cherries, naughty man s cherries, divale, dwayberry, black cherry, devil s herb, great morel and Fair Lady. The only culinary use was at wild orgies where deadly nightshade was reportedly used as an ingredient in the refreshments. Deadly nightshade has medicinal uses but the therapeutic dose is very close to the toxic amount. At one time compounds from the herb were combined with morphine and used during childbirth until it was discovered infant mortality increased. The plant has also been used in truth serums. During World War II atropine was used as an antidote against nerve gas and in 1967 it served as an effective antidote against a deadly insecticide that contaminated bread in Tijuana, Mexico. Today the compound is used by ophthalmologists and as an antidote for muscarine, opium and chloral hydrate poisoning. Extracts have been used in the treatment of Parkinson s disease, psychiatric disorders and epilepsy. In the late 19 th century root extracts were used to lessen the pain of sciatica, rheumatism, gout and nerve problems. Both the efficacy and toxicity are attributed to the activity of the belladonna alkaloids as antagonists to the important neurotransmitter, acetylcholine. My final warning comes from Gerard: Follow my counsell, deale not with the same in any case, and banish it from your gardens and the use of it also, being a plant so furious and deadly: for it bringeth such as have eaten thereof into a dead sleepe wherein many have died... Ellen Scannell Master Gardener 1986 Page 6

7 Master Gardener Profile Jane Thomas probably has gardening in her genes, although she was not initially aware of it. It was just a fact of life. She grew up in Iowa on a corn and soybean farm, where she and her three siblings worked in the family garden to raise the food that eventually ended up on the kitchen table. Jane's first husband was a career military man. In 1982 they were happily basking in the balmy climate of Jane Thomas Florida when he received notice of transfer to Alaska. Jane's response? Well, you can imagine. She made it pretty clear: "No way am I moving to Alaska. I'm not going!" Needless to say, she went, and it only took twenty more years to make the move back to the lower forty-eight. After living eleven years in Anchorage and nine in Valdez, she came to have a much more nuanced opinion of the 49th state. In fact, she speaks glowingly of many aspects of her life there, not to mention the stunning beauty of the land itself. She eventually divorced her first husband, and several years later married her present partner, Michael. Michael, although originally from California, has spent 30 years in Alaska. They both found employment with the Alyeska Pipeline Service Company, Jane as an HR manager. For several reasons, it is a pretty hard sell to convince anyone to move to Valdez. It is small, with a population of just 4,000; it is remote a six hour, often icy and hazardous drive from Anchorage; it has weather that is truly an endurance test averaging 350 inches of annual snowfall, to say nothing of the howling winds. Jane and Michael saw opportunity though, so off they went. There is an old saying: "Time to spare, go by air." Jane found the truth of that when she naively decided to pop into Anchorage from Valdez for a dental appointment and return the same day. It was only a thirty-five minute flight each way. She got into Anchorage just fine and kept her appointment. Three days later she got on the airplane to go home to Valdez. Rule of thumb in Alaska? Never leave home without your toothbrush and a change of clothes. In 2002 Michael and Jane retired. Although they share an abiding love for Alaska, the specter of endless long winter nights, burrowing their way through snow drifts as high as their second-story windows was too much. Warmer climes got the nod, and they found their retirement home in the Rogue Valley, along the banks of the river in Gold Hill. After leaving her childhood home, Jane didn't think much about gardening or even consider herself a gardener until she and Michael settled here. They bought a place with ample gardening space, and after a couple of years experimenting, Jane signed up for the 2006 Master Gardener class. She is also a certified Family Food Educator. (Those long winter nights in Valdez gave her ample opportunity to develop her interest in cooking.) All those years of not gardening must have been analogous to water building up behind a dam. Apparently, the dam ruptured, as Jane currently volunteers two days a week as co-manager of the Access Garden, growing fresh produce for the local food bank. She was instrumental in starting the Kitchen Garden, for which she is also a mentor. And then, there is her own garden. Maybe though, the Access Garden doesn't really count as gardening; given the volume of production, it is more akin to small farming. Most years, she and her coworkers donate an average 10,000 pounds of produce to Access. The gardening season lasts about six months for Jane, which leaves six months to pursue other interests. She spends much of that time taking OLLI (Osher Lifelong Learning Institute) courses at the community college campus in Medford. Presently she is studying the "Plight of the Honey Bee," and "History of the Supreme Court." The growing season is starting to wind down, but before it does, you can stroll out north of the orchards and vineyard on a Tuesday or Thursday morning, and see what the Access Garden is all about. An extra pair of hands is always welcome! Carolyn Wolf & Michael Fowell Master Gardeners 2008 Page 7

8 Winter Dreams Classes for 2012 Timely topics plus an all-star cast of experts. Choose your favorites and register today! How to Prune Fruit Trees Jim Bauermeister Mediterranean Gardens for the Rogue Valley Myrl Bishop Seed Saving Techniques Tal Blankenship Landscaping With Native Plants Tal Blankenship The Wide World of Orchids Marydee Bombick Growing Roses in the Rogue Valley Ron Bombick How To Identify Woody Landscape Plants Patrick Breen Hardscapes: How to Design and Build Pete Cislo The Cutting Edge: Propagate Your Favorite Plants Peggy Corum Romaine to Radicchio and Beyond: Growing Fall and Winter Vegetables Vicki Hames Getting the Most from Rogue Valley Fruit Trees Rick Hilton A Future Rogue Climate: Master Gardening for the Change Alan Journet Residential Landscape Design from Concept to Implementation Kerry Kencairn The Science of GMO Gail Langellotto To Till or Not to Till? Stan Mapolski The Care and Pruning of Wisteria Patrick Marcus Beyond Birds and Bees: The Miracle of Pollination Linda McMahan Plants That Can Hurt You Jeri Mendelsen Basic Composting Denny Morrelli Advanced Composting Denny Morrelli A Year in the Life of a Locavore Jane Moyer Gardening With Children I Susan Muller/Tracy Harding/Rebecca Slosberg Gardening With Children II Susan Muller/Tracy Harding/Rebecca Slosberg Gardening With Children III Susan Muller/Tracy Harding/Rebecca Slosberg How to Use Color in the Ornamental Garden Marjorie Neal Basic Food Preservation at Home Nelllie Oehler How to Dehydrate, Freeze and Pickle for Guests or Gifts Nelllie Oehler Square Foot Gardening Carol Oneal Preventing and/or Treating Gardening Aches and Pains Mike Pennington Gardening in a Home Greenhouse Doug Perkins A Bee-utiful Garden: The History of Humans, Bees, Flowers and Food Sarah Red-Laird Beyond the Gumdrop: Natural Shrub Shaping Steve Renquist Shooting Flowers: Photography Made Easy and Fun! Bob Reynolds Planting and Caring for Lawns and Ground Covers Pam Rouhier The Healthy Landscape: Selecting Trees for Home Gardens Rhianna Simms Put Earthworms to Work for You! Rhianna Simms Four Seasons of Color for Home Gardens Katy Smith Is Your Thumb Blue? Water Efficiency Starts With You! Julie Smitherman Introduction to Irrigation System Design Don Steyskal How to Grow Great Blueberries George Tiger Carnivorous Plants for Home Gardens Floyd Williams For detailed class descriptions, visit Page 8

9 Election of 2013 Jackson County Master Gardener Board of Directors You will soon be receiving a ballot for the election of the 2013 Board of Directors. Below, for your reference, is a copy of Article III of the bylaws that addresses the Election of Officers. ARTICLE III. ELECTION OF OFFICERS Section 1. Nominating Committee. The President Elect shall chair the Nominating committee. Four other members from the Association membership shall be elected to the Nominating Committee at the August Board meeting. The Nominating committee will secure consent of eligible nominees to hold office for the ensuing year. Section 2. Nominations from the Membership. The Membership Secretary shall communicate to the active membership a notice requesting: 1. members to volunteer to serve on the Board, and/or, 2. nominations for candidates to serve on the Board for the ensuing year. The notices shall be sent in August after the regular monthly Board meeting, but no later than the 10 th of the month. Notices shall be returned in person, or by mail, to the Master Gardener office no later than the 15 th of September. Section 3. Nominees. The Nominating committee shall confirm that the members who volunteer, or are nominated for the Offices and Members-at-Large positions, are eligible and willing to serve. These names are then automatically on the election ballot. Section 4. Confirmation by the Board. The Chairman of the Nominating committee will announce the candidates for office at the October Board meeting. The President shall ask the Board to approve the slate. Section 5. Ballots. The Membership Secretary will mail to all active members the slate of designated candidates with notice that write-in nominations will be considered for all positions. Members shall return their ballots in person, or by mail, to the Master Gardener office and placed in a secure ballot box. The Membership Secretary and the Recording Secretary, the Tellers, will tabulate the results on the morning prior to the November Board meeting. The Membership Secretary will announce the results at the meeting. Section 6. Election. Candidates receiving the most votes shall be considered elected and assume their Board duties on the following January 1st. Section 7. Unfilled Positions. If a position is unfilled at the time the ballots are mailed and votes are received for write-in candidates, and if these candidates have not received a majority of the votes cast, they are not automatically elected. A majority vote of the Board shall be required to fill the position. Section 8. Vacancies. Board members, including those who resign before assuming office or during their term, and those removed by vote of the board shall be replaced at the recommendation of the President, and with the approval of the board, by individuals who are eligible and willing to serve the remainder of the term. Book Review I recently discovered this wonderful tree identification book and thought I would share it with you. It is one of the easiest guides to use that I have found. It is published by the Oregon State University Extension Service and is available at their Publications and Multimedia Catalog website seriesno=ec+1450 for $ Carolyn Trottmann Master Gardener 2007 Description: A full-color field guide to tree identification in Oregon. Contains keys to identifying common conifer and broadleaf trees and discusses ornamental, shade, and fruit trees as well. For each species, provides identifying characteristics, range, and distinctive features. Includes hundreds of photos and drawings and a list of Oregon's champion trees. Indexed by common and scientific tree name. This 60th anniversary edition includes over 70 new color photos "In the garden, Autumn is, indeed the crowning glory of the year, bringing us the fruition of months of thought and care and toil. And at no season, safe perhaps in Daffodil time, do we get such superb colour effects as from August to November."- Rose G. Kingsley, The Autumn Garden, 1905 Page 9

10 Membership Updates This article was previously published in the Garden Beet. HARVESTING AND STORING Unless you are going to eat your entire crop right away, you should think about the best method for storing the remainder. Such vegetables as garlic, onions and winter squash fall into this category. These vegetables are not compatible with canning, freezing or dehydrating, although onions do well dehydrated. POTATOES When the plants turn brown and start to die, the potatoes can be harvested anytime until first frost. Using a garden fork, choose a time when the soil and plants are not water-logged. DO NOT WASH. Store only potatoes that have no cuts or bruises which beget spoilage. Before storing, cure the potatoes for 2 weeks in a dark humid room at F, and then move them to a dark, dry, cool, well-ventilated place, like a basement. To prevent sprouting, keep stored potatoes away from light or make sure temperature remains below 50 F. Do not store in air tight containers - use wooden barrels, baskets or crates. All WINTER SQUASH need to be cured for a few weeks in a dark, warm, well-ventilated room to dry and harden their skins. After curing, squashes should ideally be stored in a single layer again, for ventilation on open shelves in a dry place that stays about F all winter, such as your garage. About your ONIONS AND GARLIC: When onion tops have turned brown and the stalks droop to the ground, this is a sign the bulbs have matured. Then you can pull the plants, being careful not to pull the stalks from the bulb. After thoroughly dried, these stalks can be clipped off 1-2 inches from the bulb for cleaner storage. (If you wish to braid your onions, don t cut the stalks). Pull up garlic plants when their lower stems and leaves start turning yellow. Both onions and garlic bulbs must be dried slightly before long term storage so their skins toughen or cure. They can cure on the ground or spread on sheets of newspaper. After drying, they can be packed in wooden crates or baskets no more than 2 layers deep, or suspended in mesh bags or twisted into braids for hanging. Circulating air helps prevent storage rot. For onions, storage at F is preferable; garlic does best at 50 F. Transfer to Jackson County Hannah Ancel 256 B Street Ashland, OR Address Changes Mike Sornson 3550 N. River Rd. Gold Hill, OR Kerry Reynolds 737 Stevens St. Apt. 204 Medford, OR Terry Halter 2552 Thorn Oak Dr., #4 Medford, OR Joyce DeZell (class of 2012) 1604 Crown Ave. Medford, OR Don't miss voting in the upcoming 2013 Jackson County Master Gardener Board of Directors election. Ballots will be sent by post office mail in October, so be sure to any new address changes to Sharon May at or call at or send the address change to the extension office. If you have some 1 or 2 gallon pots and can bring them in to help out the Daylily Garden folks they would be most appreciative. Wanda Hauser Master Gardener 1989 Page 10

11 Splinters from the Board Welcome and Introductions - Michael Riding introduced Brenda Sousa, who along with Michele Kaplowitz was the guiding light behind the JCMGA Picnic. Both were thanked for putting together one of our biggest picnics. Extra food was sent to the Mission. MATTERS FOR DISCUSSION Financial Report - Judy Williams was absent. Michael Riding shared the expense for the Compost Garden has gone up, but will come out of Nathan Swofford s budget. Winter Dreams Linda Greenstone reported that WD process is coming along. We have articles coming out in the local papers and the Beet; posters are ready; take aways will be ready soon; there are notices in the Plant Clinic; letters have gone out to current and upcoming MG class members; there will be information given out at the local harvest festivals. The major concern is we have no one to take over chairmanship of Winter Dreams for Cindy Williams is now working and has a position on a State Board; and Linda Greenstone has been a co-chair for the past three years. We need one or two people to take over the chair position/s. Now would be a good time to join because they can be involved in the current planning of WD Cindy is putting together a book on how and what is needed for WD. Linda will still be on the WD committee, as will most current chairs. So the person/s who volunteers will have lots of guidance. If you are interested please contact Linda Greenstone, Cindy Williams, Michael Riding, or Bob Reynolds. Compost Garden Debra Osborn reported the new shredder is working well, and will be a cost saving item. They have gotten permission from Phil to plant a crop of winter peas for a nitrogen crop, which will be added to our compost. The apprentices are now working in teams to prepare two different types of compost School Grants Barbara Davidson reported there is a teacher who is late in applying but would like a grant. It was decided, because we still have money in the School Grants budget, that we give this teacher a grant. MATTERS FOR INFORMATION Plant Clinic - Linda Greenstone reported for Wendy Purslow. We had 419 problems solved in the clinic and 101 at the Grower s Markets. Jackson County Master Gardener Association Board of Directors Meeting September 5, 2012 become more complicated due to the growing size of the JCMGA. It is also becoming more difficult to find someone with the desire and skills to fill this position. She asked the Board if a committee could be formed to look into changing term limits or dividing the position into two positions, etc. Michael Riding will develop a committee to look into this matter. The committee should include the current Treasurer, Judy Williams, and members with nonprofit experience or corporate background. Award Banquet Jody Willis reported the Awards Banquet would be held on October 20. She still needs to have reports on members who should receive awards. Please get that information to her ASAP. Michele Kaplowitz is planning the food with the help of Sue Bowden. OSU Advisor Bob Reynolds reported that we have currently reported 8,426.6 hours. The apprentices have reported most of these hours. All MGs need to report their hours NOW. We currently have 147 people who have shown an interested in the MG class for We usually keep about half that number if it follows suit, which would make our 2013 class full. The International Master Gardener Association meeting in September 2013 will be aboard an Alaskan cruise. If anyone is interested see Bob for information. Community Outreach - Bonnie Martin reported the Mission garden has been cleaned up and they re planting a winter garden. She will be at Talent Harvest Festival on October 6 and would like volunteers. Please contact Bonnie if you are interested. The Spanish version of the MG Handbook should be out soon. Practicum - Jane Moyer shared that she has had the first meeting with this year s mentors and they are revamping the curriculum. The large greenhouse will be re-roofed. Terry Halter has donated his personal greenhouse to the Practicum. It will be put next to the lathe house, where we will take down the apple tree ANY OTHER BUSINESS Speakers Bureau - Genevieve Smith reported we need people who would be interested in speaking to Garden Clubs on a variety of topics. NEXT MEETING DATE-The next Board meeting will be on October 5 at 10 am in the Extension Building Auditorium. Nominations For Board Members Jody Willis reported the slate would be presented to the Board at the October meeting. The ballot will be redesigned due to the new bylaw. Jody shared that the position of Treasurer has Recording Secretary Linda Greenstone Recording Secretary Page 11

12 JACKSON COUNTY MASTER GARDENER ASSOCIATION Southern Oregon Research and Extension Center 569 Hanley Road, Central Point, OR Return Service Requested NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATION U.S. POSTAGE PAID Medford, OR Permit No. 127 Calendar of Upcoming Events Winter Dreams-Summer Gardens October 5, Friday, 10 am, Jackson County Master Gardener Board Meeting, Extension Auditorium October 6, Saturday, Talent Harvest Festival Calendar of Upcoming Events *October 8, Monday, 7-9 pm, Seed Saving, Tal Blankenship, January 6, 2012, retired Friday, Master 10 Gardener am noon, Advisor JCMGA and Board arborist. meeting, Extension auditorium October January 20, 6, 2012, 6 pm, Friday, Saturday, Deadline Jackson for County applications Master for Gardener Community Awards Garden Banquet, Grants. Kid s Application Unlimited. information is *October available 24, at the Wednesday, Extension 7-9 Office pm, located Chinese at 569 Classical Hanley Gardens, Road, Central Myrl or Bishop, can be Master downloaded Gardener at November 1 March 31; 10 am 2 pm, Tuesday and Monetary awards will be given to qualifying Community Thursday, Plant Clinic Winter Hours Gardens on February 15, November 3, Saturday, 2012 Winter Dreams/Summer Gardens January at 18 the - April RCC 11, Higher 2012, Education Wednesday, Center 9 am in 4 pm, Medford. Master Gardener For information Program, Extension Auditorium. Current Master Gardeners are encouraged to attend and earn credits toward re-certification. *November 11, Wednesday, 7-9 pm, Growing Bamboo for You, Thielsen Lebo, Lebeau Bamboo *December February 11, 6, Saturday, Thursday, am pm, noon, Tool * Grape Care for Pruning, the Home Chris Gardener, Hubert, Oregon Kraig Vineyard Rucker, Grange Supply Coop All classes are held in the Jackson County Extension Auditorium February 18, Saturday, 9 am noon, * Fruit Tree Pruning, Terry Helfrich, Professional Orchardist *Qualifies for recertification All classes are held at the Southern Oregon Research Center Auditorium What: The 14 th Annual Winter Dreams-Summer Gardens Symposium When: Saturday, November 3, 9:00 4:30 Where: RCC/SOU Higher Education Center, 101 South Bartlett Street, Medford Cost: $40 fee includes four 90-minute sessions plus lunch. Downtown Medford parking is FREE. *Qualifies for recertification Unless noted, all classes will be held in the Extension Center JCMGA website:

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