Hats off to BNSF s 2008 Employees of the Year!

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1 The Employee Magazine of Team BNSF SUMMER 2009 Hats off to BNSF s 2008 Employees of the Year! In 2008, nearly 440 BNSF Achievement Awards were presented to members of Team BNSF. Of those, 19 outstanding individual and team achievements, representing 100 employees, were selected as best reflecting BNSF s Vision and Values. These employees, along with six Safety Employees of the Year and 33 Best of the Best leaders who led work groups with exceptional safety performance, were honored during the Employees of the Year Program in April. Inside this issue of Railway, read how your co-workers efforts are further improving safety, efficiency and service at BNSF. Fight the Spike: Summer initiative under way Although BNSF s injury-frequency and severity ratios are improving overall, an effort is under way to address seasonal injury spikes in certain divisions. Called Fight the Spike, the program will focus attention on safe work practices to prevent the peaks in injuries that can occur at some locations. Page 9 BNSF s Robert Johnson wins Hammond Award Northtown (Minneapolis) Diesel Shop Machinist Robert Johnson, one of BNSF s six Safety Employees of the Year, was our nominee for the Hammond Award, a national award recognizing railroad employees efforts to improve safety. In May, BNSF learned that Johnson was named the winner. Congratulations, Bob! Page 10

2 Our vision is to realize the tremendous potential of BNSF Railway Company by providing transportation services that consistently meet our customers expectations. VP, Corporate Relations John Ambler General Director, Internal Communications Kristen Rabe H A T S O F F Editor Susan Green Contributing Photographers Jeff Buehner, Steve Crise, Bob Heine, David Lustig and Newslink Got a story idea? Send story ideas to BNSF Railway Editor, via Outlook to: Communications, Corporate, or send by Internet to: or mail to: BNSF Corporate Relations P.O. Box , Texas Address Changes Employees: To review your address, call company line or dial or review and change your address online via BNSF s Intranet site at employee.bnsf.com. Go to the Employee tab, click on Life Events, Personal Changes, then Change of Address. Or you may complete and return a Personal Information Change Form (#12796) to the administrative office; mail it to Human Resources Information Systems, P.O. Box ,, Texas ; or fax it to Retirees: Send address changes and requests to receive Railway after you retire to BNSF Corporate Relations, P.O. Box ,, Texas Please include your former employee ID number. ON THE COVER Some of the 2008 Employees of the Year honorees: Top row, left to right: Tracy Alves, assistant manager Michael Garrison, manager Aaron Hegeman, public projects partnerships director Second row, left to right: Mark Grubbs, general foreman III Donald Hust, general foreman II Third row, left to right: Brian Aman, director Tim Cousineau, mechanical foreman II Rudy Jaramillo Jr., mechanical foreman II Steve Kuzma, manager Bottom row, left to right: Mark Riley, general foreman Tonya Whang, senior analyst Inset: Jonathan Higginson, switchman to BNSF s 2008 Employees of the Year! BNSF faced many challenges in 2008, including record flooding, hurricanes and the economic recession. Despite the obstacles, BNSF people demonstrated time and again energy, drive, vision and even courage. For their outstanding contributions in 2008 to helping BNSF realize its Vision and Values, nearly 440 BNSF Achievement Awards were presented to members of Team BNSF. From those who received an Achievement Award, 19 outstanding individual and team achievements representing 100 honorees were recognized at this year s Employees of the Year (EOY) program. Held in in late April, the annual EOY recognition event also honored six Safety Employees of the Year, each representing a different segment of Operations. Also honored were 33 Best of the Best leaders who led work groups with exceptional safety performance. (Please see Focus on Safety on pages ) The Achievement Award successes honored were as varied as the individuals. Not all of the team members were able to attend the EOY event, so a team representative is indicated in some of the larger groups. Here are the top Achievement Award recipients honored at the 2008 EOY. (For more information about the Achievement Award program and how employees are nominated, please see page 8.) 2 RAILWAY I SUMMER 2009

3 Pure high-cube shuttle trains BNSF is known for running a strong, efficient railroad. One four-person team that exemplifies the term efficient worked on a project to increase the purity of high-cube capacity shuttle trains that, in turn, made the railroad run more efficiently. A pure shuttle set is one that operates with at least 95 percent new, high-cube cars to increase the efficiency of each set. When shuttle trains operate with high-cube capacity cars, BNSF and customers benefit. First, the process of loading and unloading is more efficient, which decreases customer wait times and increases satisfaction. Secondly, pure trains carry 10 percent more grain, which equates to equivalent gains in revenueper-car measures. The cross-functional BNSF team began this project in early 2007, when only 60 percent of our shuttle trains were pure. Their first step was to establish metrics, then identify trains to be purified. Next, they outlined when and where the trains would be purified, then communicated progress and barriers. Finally, they developed processes and protocols to sustain progress. The end result was a $16 million value in 2007 that BNSF derived from this project by operating more efficiently. By mid-july 2008, the team has sustained that level, bringing the total valuation to $24 million. Tracy Alves, assistant manager, Marketing, Industrial Products, Michael Garrison, manager, Grain Operations, Agricultural Products, Grover Smith, manager, Grain Operations, Agricultural Products, Tonya Whang, senior analyst, Agricultural Planning Left to right: Michael Garrison, Tonya Whang, Tracy Alves and Grover Smith Equipment modification on covered grain hoppers For the past two years, a group of employees made it their mission to proactively modify a fleet of covered grain hoppers to help improve customer service and reduce mechanical failures. This group championed a significant equipment modification on the BNSF-owned covered hopper fleet in the Midwest and Pacific Northwest. Due to some failures on a specific design of roller bearing adapters on the BNSF grain fleet, BNSF Mechanical decided to modify the affected cars by changing to standard adapters. This was done at Newton and Kansas City, Kan., Kansas City, Mo., and Pasco, Wash. all locations with high grain traffic. Then, these employees went above and beyond by using technology paired with each car s historical data to gather information used to develop preventive maintenance plans on each grain hopper at their respective terminals. While inspecting each car, they also used information gathered from wayside detectors to replace wheels and bearings, increasing inservice time for each covered grain hopper. To date, these employees have replaced adapters on more than 3,000 cars. Their efforts also returned track to service, where necessary, for servicing the hoppers and maintaining fluidity at the terminals. And by completing the work in-house, they saved the company nearly $500,000. These trains were released back into service within 24 hours close to 90 percent of the time, making our customers very happy. Tim Cousineau,* mechanical foreman II, Mechanical, Pasco, Wash. Mark Grubbs, general foreman III, Mechanical, Kansas City, Kan. Donald Hust,* general foreman II, Mechanical, Pasco, Wash. Rudy Jaramillo Jr.,* mechanical foreman II, Mechanical, Newton, Kan. Rick Kulmus, assistant general foreman, Mechanical, Pasco, Wash. Mark Riley,* general foreman, Mechanical, Newton, Kan. Charles Sherrill III,* general foreman II, Mechanical, Kansas City, Kan. Ronnie Thomas,* assistant general foreman, Mechanical, Kansas City, Kan. * team representative at EOY Left to right: Rudy Jaramillo Jr., Mark Riley, Donald Hust, Charles Sherrill III, Ronnie Thomas and Tim Cousineau Road salt trains Large organizations are perceived to move slowly when it comes to embracing new opportunities. But one BNSF team exemplifies how employees can work together on a hot prospect for a new line of revenue. It all started last year, when a hard winter led to a shortage of road salt in the Pacific Northwest and the Midwest. It turns out there is great demand for this product, and a Marketing team saw opportunity. The team worked with various BNSF departments to coordinate unit trains to deliver road salt from two origin mines to three destinations. This effort takes a lot of coordination and cooperation internally, not to mention the negotiations with the salt mines one in Utah and one in Kansas. The effort required the development of a unit train. It took cost analysis to ensure accurate pricing, and it required obtaining the right equipment to run the unit-train opportunities. Acting quickly, with sound marketing, cost analysis and coordination with the Equipment and Operations teams, this effort realized nearly $4 million in additional revenue and established a new unit-train destination site in the Midwest, which will bring in revenue in years to come. Steve Bryant,* senior project manager, Cost/Profit Analysis, Marketing, David Danielson,* manager, Trackage Operations, Safety, Omaha, Neb. Chuck Johnson, manager, Opportunity Management, Marketing, Gene Knipp,* senior manager, Service Design, Shane Markham,* assistant manager, Marketing, Tom Martin,* manager, Unit Train Operations, Service Design, Pat Mitchell,* manager, Freight Equipment, Marketing, John Roberts,* manager, Unit Train Operations, Service Design, Kreigh Valkenaar,* manager, Sales, Marketing, Carrie Whitman,* director, Marketing, * team representative at EOY Front row, left to right: Gene Knipp, Carrie Whitman, Pat Mitchell, Steve Bryant; Back row, left to right: John Roberts, Shane Markham, David Danielson and Kreigh Valkenaar; not pictured: Tom Martin Winnipeg grain opportunities Finding new customers and expanding market opportunities is never easy. You ve got to be innovative, explore new territories and develop a solid business plan. Thinking out of the boundaries is literally what one multidepartmental team did. In 2007, they looked outside of the U.S. boundaries and successfully cultivated a new relationship with grain customers in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. The team comes from Network Development, Agricultural Commodities Marketing, Service Design Grain Operations and Twin Cities Division Operations. Although they have different experiences, years of service and backgrounds, there is one common element: The drive to close the deal. In 2007, they made initial contacts with potential customers and cultivated relationships. Then, they opened communications with the Province of Manitoba s Ministries of Transportation, Economic Development and Trade, and as a result, were asked to participate in the Manitoba International Gateway Council, a part of the Mayor s Trade Council. And in 2008, they successfully opened up a seventh grain elevator (the third unit-train elevator BNSF has access to) and grew organic soybean volumes. All in all, this new opportunity has generated 4,300 new railcars serving the area and several million dollars in new contribution. Patricia Collins,* agricultural marketing director, Agricultural Products, Frederick (Fritz) Doll, grain operations manager, Service Design, Peiter Hjertstedt,* terminal manager, Transportation, Grand Forks, N.D. Patrick Ryan,* trainmaster/road foreman, Transportation, Grand Forks, N.D. Jeffrey Smith,* grain operations manager, Service Design, Jim Titsworth,* interline development director, Network Development, * team representative at EOY Left to right: Jeffrey Smith, Patrick Ryan, Patricia Collins, Jim Titsworth and Peiter Hjertstedt RAILWAY I SUMMER

4 Port of Vancouver agreements As the world s population continues to grow, and as global economies continue to expand and become interconnected, the need for efficient transportation in and out of ports is becoming more crucial. One of the world s busiest ports is the Port of Vancouver, Wash., North America s gateway for Asia-Pacific trade. According to the Port, it trades $43 billion in goods with more than 90 trading economies annually. To meet this demand, and anticipated future demand, a team of four people structured and concluded agreements over a 15-month period to begin the West Vancouver Freight Access Project, which will result in a port and public investment of $137 million of rail-access infrastructure. This deal will also expand port capacity for rail-served customers, provide near-term infrastructure for efficient unit-train operations across BNSF s main lines, and eliminate a major bottleneck to BNSF Pacific Northwest operations through construction of a grade-separated port access route by Overseeing this project took many skills: diligence, innovation, endurance, sensitivity to the community, excellent communication and, perhaps above all, teamwork. This small group shouldered the majority of this $137-million project and weathered many challenges, including a declining economy, yet remained focused on the end result. Brian Aman, contracts-north director, Safety, Christopher Delargy, terminal superintendent, Transportation, Vancouver, Wash. Aaron Hegeman, public projects partnerships director, Network Development, Steve Kuzma, land revenue management manager, Facilities and Property Management,, Left to right: Steve Kuzma, Aaron Hegeman, Brian Aman and Christopher Delargy TSS Xpress Technology seems to be ever-changing. Not a year, or sometimes even a month, goes by without some announcement about a new or improved technological method or device. However, although it seems like technology changes as fast as service plans, many times, it takes months or years of planning, testing, implementing and communicating. The new TSS Xpress is no exception to the process. Beginning in late 2006 and spanning through 2008, almost 40 people ranging from technicians to first-line supervisors and implementers, from both and field locations pulled together to build a front-end to the Transportation Support System (TSS). For new employees, TSS can seem a little daunting. TSS Xpress was designed to help new Transportation employees become proficient in TSS quicker. Building TSS Xpress was not easy. But this team achieved the goal through a common vision; they inspired each other and showed mutual respect; they communicated why things 4 RAILWAY I SUMMER 2009 were being done; and they listened, became involved, and set high standards. Michael Acosta, manager II, Technology Services, Brandon Archambeau, corridor superintendent, Transportation, Rick Batten, yardmaster, Transportation, Lincoln, Neb. Heather Booth, senior systems developer I, Technology Services, Fletcher Bornschlegl,* consulting systems developer II, Technology Services, Paula Corniel, senior technical analyst I, Technology Services, Mick Fitzpatrick, senior systems developer II, Technology Services, Janet Galassi, director, Technology Services, James Gibson, senior consulting systems engineer, Technology Services, Richard Goodwin,* consulting systems developer II, Technology Services, Terry Gordon, senior systems developer II, Technology Services, Mike Griffin, consulting systems engineer II, Technology Services, Amy Hall, implementation coordinator, Technology Services, Chris Hui,* consulting systems developer II, Technology Services, Kent Julian, manager II, Technology Services, Carolyn Kamperman, senior systems developer II, Technology Services, Mark Kowalczyk,* technical consultant II, Technology Services, Bob Kremer, trainmaster, Transportation, LaCrosse, Wis. Shawn Kuiper, terminal manager, Transportation, Guernsey, Wyo. Tom Maahs,* manager I, Technology Services, Jack Mattox, yardmaster, Transportation, Alliance, Neb. Jennifer Maxwell,* manager I, Technology Services, Burt McCoy,* manager I, Technology Services, Shannon McGovern, director, Technology Services, Steve Nettleton, terminal superintendent, Transportation, Alliance, Texas Silvina Petersilge, consulting systems developer II, Technology Services, David Priest, senior systems developer II, Technology Services, Rance Randle, terminal superintendent, Transportation, Alliance, Texas Lucky Randolph, manager II, Technology Services, Scott Riffel,* consulting systems developer II, Technology Services, Kimberly Ross,* consulting systems developer II, Technology Services, Sharon Swagerty, senior systems developer I, Technology Services, Jeff Talley, senior systems engineer II, Technology Services, Christy Thomas,* manager I, Technology Services, Jay Tollerene, systems developer, Technology Services, Dale Trepanier, terminal manager, Transportation, Minneapolis * team representative at EOY Front row, left to right: Fletcher Bornschlegl, Mark Kowalczyk, Burt McCoy, Scott Riffel, Tom Maahs; Back row, left to right: Chris Hui, Kimberly Ross, Christy Thomas, Jennifer Maxwell and Richard Goodwin Best Way Service Excellence Just one year since its inception, the Best Way Service Excellence team has already improved overall terminal performance. As its name suggests, the initiative identifies the best ways to run a terminal and then turns those best practices into processes that are implemented across BNSF. A project like this is no small order, and a cross-craft team that led the first two Best Way Service Excellence implementations at the Argentine Yard in Kansas City, Kan., and at Galesburg, Ill., has proven it is up to the challenge. Implementation includes: Standardizing plans Identifying and simplifying metrics and improving dialogues at each location Refining and supporting new processes Defining roles and responsibilities Matching each terminal s needs with resources The proof of the team s success is in the numbers. Within one year of implementation, Argentine Yard s dwell time dropped from an average 34 hours to an average 29 hours a 14-percent improvement. And the Galesburg Yard set a new on-time record, departing 203 consecutive merchandise trains on time a 282-percent performance improvement. Craig Anderson, yardmaster, Transportation, Galesburg, Ill. Brandon Archambeau, corridor superintendent, Transportation, Lori Armstrong, service excellence trainmaster, Transportation, James Arneson, manager, Technology Services, Hank Bridges,* senior implementation leader, Mechanical, Clifford Brown, service excellence manager, Mechanical, Joshua Burgland, clerk tower operator, Transportation, Galesburg, Ill. Jeff Craun,* value engineering manager, Mechanical, Ted Eason, service excellence terminal manager, Transportation, Dianne Foulkes,* implementation leader, Mechanical, Cindy Godsil, clerk tower operator, Transportation, Galesburg, Ill. Rick Goodwin, TS support consulting systems developer, Technology Services, Stephen Grachan, service excellence trainmaster, Transportation, Timothy Graham, service excellence trainmaster, Transportation, Jesus Guajardo, implementation leader, Mechanical, Jeffrey Guelker, service design director, Marketing, Tom Hallaron, senior implementation leader, Mechanical, John Hepfer, trainmaster, Transportation, Nicole Herbst, terminal manager, Transportation, Kansas City, Kan. Steve Hill, implementation leader, Mechanical, Brian Hurla, consulting systems developer, Transportation, Topeka, Kan. Brian Hurt, service excellence implementation leader, Mechanical, Jerry Inman,* value engineering manager, Mechanical, Paul Kaiser,* senior implementation leader, Mechanical, Larry Kurz, senior implementation leader, Mechanical, Matt Lepper,* yardmaster, Transportation, Galesburg, Ill. Karl Lewin, value engineering manager, Mechanical, Scott Maddox, value engineering manager, Mechanical, Drew Marting,* service excellence senior implementation leader, Mechanical, Mike Martucci, service excellence trainmaster, Transportation, Rick McGill, lead carman, Mechanical, Galesburg, Ill.

5 Jason Ornelas,* implementation leader, Mechanical, Derek Powell, yardmaster, Transportation, Galesburg, Ill. Dan Smith,* senior implementation leader, Mechanical, Karen Swedlund, yardmaster, Transportation, Galesburg, Ill. Paula Willette,* senior implementation leader, Mechanical, Rod Wilson, hostler/local chairman, Transportation, Galesburg, Ill. John Young, service excellence trainmaster, Transportation, * team representative at EOY Front row, left to right: Drew Marting, Dan Smith, Hank Bridges, Jerry Inman and Jeff Craun; Back row, left to right: Dianne Foulkes, Paul Kaiser, Paula Willette, Jason Ornelas and Matt Lepper Lafayette catastrophic accident response When catastrophe strikes, it s vital to arrive at the scene with qualified responders and excellent coordination and management. At BNSF, incidents are handled by dedicated and professional catastrophic accident response teams. One of these incidents occurred in May 2008 in Lafayette, La., when an accidental hazardous material spill forced the evacuation of 3,000 residents from their homes. In addition to the countless responders in the areas of Operations and Engineering, more than 30 people were involved in this community s claims response. This cross-departmental team, including Resource Protection, Corporate Relations and Claims, worked 12- to 14-hour days for more than a week overseeing the claims process, responding to community concerns and assisting with the recovery process. Shawn Avants, claims representative, Law, Suzanne Belmarez Jaroch, senior special agent, Resource Protection Solutions Team, Temple, Texas Steve Brockwell, claims manager, Law, Albuquerque, N.M. Larry Dodd, senior claims representative, Law, Oklahoma City Jeanne Exford, claims analyst, Law, Joseph Faust,* regional public affairs director, Corporate Relations, Dan Fisher, senior claims representative, Law, Daniel Flatten Jr.,* claims representative, Law, Beaumont, Texas David Fortis, senior claims representative, Law, Stockton, Calif. Dustin Foster, claims representative, Law, Galesburg, Ill. John Franklin,* senior claims representative, Law, Tulsa, Okla. Benjamin Gilliam, claims representative, Law, Flagstaff, Ariz. Daniel Harrison, senior claims representative, Law, Memphis, Tenn. Chris Hawk, claims representative, Law, Kansas City, Kan. Sue Houser, senior claims representative, Law, Lubbock, Texas Daniel Hutchinson, special agent I, Resource Protection Solutions Team, Houston Sandra Jacobs, claims representative, Law, Memphis, Tenn. Robert Jeffries, claims manager, Law, Houston Carol Landes, claims analyst, Law, Shaun Lewis,* senior claims representative, Law, Gary Matson, senior claims representative, Law, Houston Randy Merrick, senior special agent, Resource Protection Solutions Team, Lubbock, Texas Drew Moorman,* claims representative, Law, Steve Mueller, senior claims representative, Law, Amarillo, Texas Benjamin Parra, claims manager, Law, John Sawicki,* claims manager, Law, Brian Snell, claims representative, Law, Denver Sharon Stevens,* assistant manager, special projects, Law, Steve Stone, senior special agent, Resource Protection Solutions Team, Haslet, Texas Robin Strodtz, claims analyst, Law, Charles Traylor, claims manager, Law, Memphis, Tenn. Chris Van Norman, senior claims representative, Law, Galesburg, Ill. Rick Vest, claims representative, Law, Lincoln, Neb. Thomas Wilson,* claims director, Law, St. Paul, Minn. Donald Wind, claims services director, Law, * team representative at EOY Front row, left to right: Joe Faust, Thomas Wilson, Sharon Stevens, Shaun Lewis; Back row, left to right: Drew Moorman, John Franklin, John Sawicki and Daniel Flatten Jr. Seattle Sound transit Teamwork and dedication are two reasons why a team of 40 individuals accomplished an insurmountable task that will help improve mobility for people and freight in the Seattle area. These individuals successfully completed the Seattle-to-Tacoma, Wash., corridor amid many schedule delays, and they brought the whole project in under budget. It started in 1991 with an agreement between Sound Transit (a public transportation authority) and BNSF to improve commuter operations and increase BNSF freight capacity. Sound Transit invested more than $550 million in track and signal improvement, and in October 2008, all track and signal construction between Tacoma and Seattle was completed. During construction, the team helped to maintain on-time service of 99 percent for Sound Transit, including during mainline switch installations and cutovers. The team s commitment to this project never waned even when an earthquake struck Seattle, testing their resilience. Joseph Albinger, commuter operations manager, Engineering, Seattle Christopher Anderson, interlocking systems engineer, Engineering, Seattle Kevin Benson, welder, Engineering, Seattle Jeffery Bykonen, flagman, Engineering, Seattle Joseph Campos,* track foreman, Engineering, Seattle Frederick Christian, flagman, Engineering, Seattle Anthony Clarke, signal maintainer, Engineering, Seattle Marshall Flores, track foreman, Engineering, Seattle Glen Gaz,* budgets manager, Engineering, Seattle Gary Geiss, machine operator, Engineering, Seattle Mark Gillings, machine operator, Engineering, Seattle James Goedert, signal inspector, Engineering, Seattle Daniel Gosser, welder, Engineering, Seattle Kevin Harper,* track foreman, Engineering, Seattle Kristopher Harris, construction assistant roadmaster, Engineering, Seattle Glen Haug,* commuter construction director, Engineering, Seattle Donald Herron, laborer, Engineering, Seattle Brian Hipol,* commuter construction division engineer, Engineering, Seattle Kasie Holle, construction roadmaster, Engineering, Seattle John Houston,* signal construction general supervisor, Engineering, Seattle Roger Jacobsen, suburban operations superintendent, Safety, Seattle Dean Keller, machine operator, Engineering, Seattle Scott Kipperberg, structures supervisor, Engineering, Seattle Mark Meissner, signal foreman, Engineering, Seattle Valree Michael,* senior analyst, Revenue Management, Seattle Enrique Mondragon, project engineer, Engineering, Seattle Charles Moore, project engineer, Engineering, Seattle Seth Ogan, construction assistant roadmaster, Engineering, Seattle Donald Omsberg,* manager, Engineering, Seattle Frederick Parker, machine operator, Engineering, Seattle Robert Raglin, field safety manager, Safety, Seattle Gary Rollings, machine operator, Engineering, Seattle Indalecio Sandoval, construction roadmaster, Engineering, Seattle Steven Shaffstall,* signal inspector, Engineering, Seattle Curtis Shockey, machine operator, Engineering, Seattle Thomas Smith, project manager, Engineering, Seattle Kenneth Toizumi, signal supervisor, Engineering, Seattle Bill Troxell, flagman, Engineering, Seattle John Veal Jr., machine operator, Engineering, Seattle Norman Vlasak, machine operator, Engineering, Seattle * team representative at EOY Front row, left to right: Donald Omsberg, Kevin Harper, Valree Michael, Brian Hipol and John Houston; Back row, left to right: Joseph Campos, Glen Haug, Steven Shaffstall and Glen Gaz EZ Pay Imagine you ve just put in a day on the job, and it s time to go home to the family, the ball game or church meeting. But before you can get paid for your day s work, you have to spend several more minutes recalling what you did and claiming your pay capturing detail about what you and your co-workers did that day and manually entering it into a computer. For decades, that s how it was for train, yard & engine (TY&E) people. But EZ Pay changed that. In 2007, a crossfunctional team had a better idea and began to tackle the TY&E claims-based pay system. BNSF people from Transportation, Labor Relations, Technology Services, Corporate Relations and Corporate Audit both scheduled and exempt joined together to develop and implement a new pay process for BNSF s TY&E people. They fittingly called it EZ Pay. Initially, the team focused on throughfreight and then local and road switcher crews. Ultimately, they eliminated the decades-long need for manual entry of data. The new system automatically pays employees what s due in real time and improves the pay system. Kevin Fischer,* senior systems developer II, Technology Services, Topeka, Kan. Joe Ivy,* conductor, Transportation, Haslet, Texas Bob Jacobson, director, Technology Services, Pam Jones,* TYE compensation systems manager, Labor Relations, Topeka, Kan. Armond Landavazo,* consulting systems developer I, Technology Services, Topeka, Kan. RAILWAY I SUMMER

6 Anthony Martinez, program manager, Corporate Audit, Denise Ovalle,* internal communications manager, Corporate Relations Crystal Russell,* TYE compensation systems manager, Labor Relations, Topeka, Kan. David Smith,* ISS manager II, Technology Services, Topeka, Kan. Barry Stoltz, TYE compensation systems manager, Labor Relations, Topeka, Kan. Lee Tibbetts,* senior systems developer I, Technology Services, Topeka, Kan. Gary Trowbridge,* locomotive engineer, Transportation, Haslet, Texas Cristen White,* TYE compensation systems manager, Labor Relations, Topeka, Kan. George Wong, TYE compensation systems director, Labor Relations, Topeka, Kan. * team representative at EOY Front row, left to right: Denise Ovalle, David Smith, Joe Ivy, Gary Trowbridge, Lee Tibbetts and Cristen White; Back row, left to right: Armond Landavazo, Pam Jones, Crystal Russell and Kevin Fischer HazMat emergency response BNSF has a networkwide Hazardous Materials Emergency Response Team; members are additional-duty responders, which means that they serve as HazMat responders in addition to their regular duties. Made up of 198 individuals based in 52 locations, the team is responsible for ensuring the safety of BNSF employees and of the surrounding communities in the event of an accidental release of a hazardous material or the threat of a release. It s a big job that requires extensive knowledge as well as the presence of mind to work in stressful situations. Last year, BNSF experienced more than 100 of these incidents systemwide. Curiously, more than one-third occurred in or around three areas: Barstow, Calif.; Amarillo, Texas; and Houston. The 16 HazMat emergency responders in those three areas served countless hours responding to incidents, and they did it with dedication and professionalism. Darrell Cannon, mechanical foreman, Mechanical, Houston Brian Carlson,* mechanical foreman, Mechanical, Barstow, Calif. Roman Cisneros, general foreman, Mechanical, Amarillo, Texas Jess Contreras,* mechanical foreman, Mechanical, Barstow, Calif. Bill Dunlap,* mechanical foreman, Mechanical, Amarillo, Texas William Hamm, mechanical foreman, Mechanical, Barstow, Calif. Aaron Marshall, general foreman, Mechanical, Houston Steve Martin,* mechanical foreman, Mechanical, Barstow, Calif. Lonnie McGinnis,* mechanical foreman, Mechanical, Amarillo, Texas Tony Mestas, assistant general foreman, Mechanical, Barstow, Calif. Bill Perry, mechanical foreman, Mechanical, Houston W. Petermann,* assistant general foreman, Mechanical, Barstow, Calif. Dan Rodriguez,* general foreman, Mechanical, Barstow, Calif. Robert Saffle, mechanical foreman, Mechanical, Barstow, Calif. 6 RAILWAY I SUMMER 2009 Randell Seaman, mechanical foreman, Mechanical, Barstow, Calif. Lonnie Walker,* mechanical foreman, Mechanical, Houston * team representative at EOY Front row, left to right: Lonnie Walker, Jess Contreras, Dan Rodriguez and Bill Dunlap; Back row, left to right: W. Petermann, Steve Martin, Brian Carlson and Lonnie McGinnis Van lessons on the Chicago Division Shuttling crew members safely and on time to their destinations is important to BNSF s success. It also requires that a lot of things are going right. The vans must be in serviceable condition, coordination between crews and locations must be organized, and then, hopefully, the weather conditions cooperate. In the Chicago Division, van service issues were growing and the costs to provide this service were escalating. In response, the Vans Lessons Learned team formed, comprised of BNSF managers, labor leaders and service providers. The goal was to determine a root cause for each service issue, assign a person to tackle the issue, and then implement corrective action and all on a timeline. The team conducted weekly conference calls to address issues identified by the Chicago Division Labor Team through the division hotline and 12-hour reports. Over the last year, the team had many successes, including improved crew morale, which was also noted by the local chairman. On-time performance improved 15 percent, the use of secondary providers has decreased and the number of crews on duty more 12 hours has decreased. The Vans Lessons Learned model has been recognized by BNSF as a best practice and will be rolled out across all divisions. Gordy Cutright,* locomotive engineer, Transportation, Chicago John Edwards,* conductor, Transportation, Chicago J.J. McGovern, locomotive engineer, Transportation, Chicago Randy McMahan,* assistant terminal superintendent, Transportation, Chicago Jeff Thomas,* field training manager, Transportation, Chicago * team representative at EOY Front row, left to right: John Edwards, Gordy Cutright and Jeff Thomas; Back row: Randy McMahan UPS receivables and disputes resolution BNSF is a preferred intermodal carrier because BNSF employees work hard to create, maintain and strengthen customer relationships. A prime example is Intermodal Rating Supervisor Gary Possert, who went above and beyond to strengthen our relationship with United Parcel Service one of our largest intermodal customers. UPS s receivables were commonly in dispute or showing greater than 90 days unpaid at BNSF. In fact, the total unpaid balance typically hovered around the $1-million mark at any given time. Possert took it upon himself to help clear UPS s disputes and unpaid balance and figure out the root cause. He identified that UPS had late bills on the books because bills of lading were being issued for trailers that never arrived at BNSF terminals. UPS was paying for these Gary Possert no-show units, creating overpayments in their account. Possert requested new reports, identified the no-show units as such and forwarded the reports to UPS account representatives with an explanation and a proposed resolution. UPS canceled the bills of lading, which prevented overpayments. And, continuing his quest to partner with customers to benefit both parties, Possert continued to work with UPS to identify and collect on bills that were more than 90 days old. Not only did he help UPS bring its account current, but he also helped BNSF collect more than $1.3 million that was more than 90 days past due. Improvement of Interbay Locomotive Facility operations Green used to be simply a color; now it s a way of life for more and more people and organizations. At BNSF, many individuals serve as champions for the greening of the railway. One of these is Dale Spohn, general foreman at the Interbay Locomotive Facility in Seattle. Spohn has achieved major environmental successes while serving as the environmental incident commander and general foreman at the Interbay facility. For this location, he champions the Environmental Management Continual Improvement Process. Spohn is not a newcomer to environmental concerns. In his previous role as supervisor at the Lincoln, Neb., Diesel Shop, he championed and led many successful initiatives to decrease that facility s environmental footprint. For instance, he identified and installed new boilers that are 80 percent more efficient than the ones they replaced, significantly reducing emissions. The new boilers also burn fuel oil recovered from the locomotive Dale Spohn

7 facility s wastewater treatment plant. Spohn also improved the used oil collection system and developed a collection/storage system that reclaims and reuses locomotive cooling water at Lincoln. Recently, Spohn was recognized for his efforts by being nominated for the Association of American Railroad s John H. Chaffee Environmental Excellence Award for Observed and reported derailed rail car from highway When you work around trains for years, you develop an eye for noticing when things are going right or when they re going wrong. Looking for problems becomes instinctive. That instinct was definitely tuned in for Clayton Hubbard, a locomotive engineer in Haslet, Texas. Hubbard was off-duty, driving on a highway on the Wichita Falls, Texas, Clayton Hubbard subdivision, when he noticed a passing train with a derailed car. This derailed car was still coupled with the rest of the train, and the crew had not yet noticed the problem. Hubbard immediately notified the Network Operations Center and requested the train be stopped. Upon inspection, it was discovered that the car had a burnt journal. This situation would have caused a major derailment. Hubbard s instinct to spot trouble, even when off-duty, helped prevent a serious situation. Design and implementation of new channel plates To run reliable, BNSF needs reliable trains, reliable track and reliable people. Kingman, Ariz., Roadmaster Steve Marino epitomizes reliability. Several years ago, Marino, who has 29 years experience in Engineering, noticed that track switch ties and tie plates were rapidly deteriorating an issue affecting BNSF s reliability. Marino went to work on a solution. In the Kingman yard, he found a piece of channel iron, and, working with a local welding shop, he designed a plate that simulated the current plates. He installed these plates in two of his worstperforming switches, and his tests showed that these plates eliminated longitudinal movement and needed less maintenance. Steve Marino As a result of Marino s concern, these plates are being deployed as a standard item on all new turnouts on the Southwest Division this year. Hurricane Ike recovery Hurricane Ike was the third most-destructive hurricane ever to hit the United States. When Ike made landfall in Galveston, Texas, last September, the storm was packing 145-mph winds. Nearly 200 people died, and 34 have never been found. After the human cost, Ike caused more than $24 billion damage. In and around Houston, power outages were a major problem, and many Rickey Rooks residents were stranded without electricity for up to three weeks after Ike s landfall. Some parts of Houston were not expected to have power for months. During this mayhem, one man stood out because of his actions and his concern for the well-being of others. Rickey Rooks, manager, Safety & Rules, for the Gulf Division, saw people suffering and decided to do something about it. In the aftermath of Ike, Rooks took the reins of delivering and keeping track of the many generators deployed to BNSF employees. He prioritized the needs of all, considering that some had extreme needs, such as medical conditions. He personally delivered, installed, refueled and retrieved these generators, only to again deliver them to someone else in need and begin the process all over again. Rooks did this without being asked; he did it because of his sincere concern for fellow coworkers and neighbors. Children saved from burning apartment Not often in a person s life must he or she make a life-saving decision in a matter of seconds. Those who have found themselves in this situation say that they had no choice but to act. These people are heroes because they selflessly think only of others who need help. This is the Jonathan Higginson situation that faced Jonathan Higginson, a switchman in Spokane, Wash. Higginson was walking home the evening of June 25, 2005, when he heard a woman screaming for someone to help her two children who were inside a burning building. Immediately, he ran up the stairs; finding the heat and smoke too intense, Higginson had to turn back. Then he saw a second-floor balcony and without hesitation, he climbed to it. By now, others were helping, and someone gave him a shirt soaked in water. He used that to cover his face against very thick smoke. Crawling through the home, Higginson found the 1-year-old girl and 3-year-old boy, and passed them from the balcony. He then drove the mother to the hospital and checked on both kids to make sure they were going to be OK. When it was all over, he said, I didn t think about going in there or my safety. I just knew what I had to do. Young child saved in train yard Historical figure and minister John Wesley once said, Do all the good you can, by all the means you can, in all the ways you can, in all the places you can. John Wesley could very well have been speaking about Mike Sanderholm, track supervisor from Arkansas City, Kan. On a summer morning last year, Sanderholm went to work, inspecting mainline track as he does every day. And, as always, he was very aware of his surroundings so he could identify anything out of the ordinary. That particular morning, there was a lot of movement in the yard and on the mainline track, so Sanderholm sat in his vehicle, waiting for the Mike Sanderholm tracks to clear. While waiting, something out of the corner of his eye unusual movement in the yard caught his attention. Sanderholm got out of his vehicle to get a better look. Very quickly, he realized the erratic and random movements were those of a toddler walking in the yard. He immediately radioed the yard engineer to request that all movements stop. Sanderholm then contacted the train dispatcher and requested that all mainline traffic also be stopped. Then he picked the child up, placed him in his company vehicle and notified the local authorities. Local police officers soon arrived and took the child into custody. Do all the good you can, by all the means you can, in all the ways you can, in all the places you can. Congratulations again to BNSF s 2008 Employees of the Year, whose efforts are further improving safety, efficiency and service at BNSF. RAILWAY I SUMMER

8 Answers to Your Achievement Award Questions BNSF s Achievement Award program helps to recognize employees who are succeeding in their personal and professional growth. Here are answers to questions about how it works. What is an Achievement Award, and when did this program begin? The BNSF Achievement Award, developed in 1999, recognizes employees who demonstrate BNSF s Vision and Values through initiative, efficiency, timeliness, vigilance, knowledge or innovation beyond what their normal job requires. Employees may receive multiple Achievement Awards over their career. The first award is a bronze, followed by a silver and gold. If the employee goes beyond a gold medal, he or she will receive platinum certificates. What s the process for nominating and reviewing achievements for this award? To nominate someone for an Achievement Award, go to the employee portal; under the Communications Tab you ll see an Achievement Awards section among the channels on the right. Who is eligible to receive an Achievement Award? Any active BNSF employee, scheduled or exempt, is eligible. An exempt employee must be a grade 33 or below. Who is eligible to nominate an employee for an Achievement Award? Any employee or supervisor may nominate someone for an award. All award nominations must be approved by the supervisor and the departmental vice president. What types of achievements receive an award? Employees have received recognition for many different types of actions; some have saved a life or prevented a derailment, while others have improved efficiency or done an exceptional job of serving customers. If an achievement was accomplished by a team, will every member get an award? Yes, every team member receives an award as nominated by the supervisor or team leader. How does the Achievement Award program tie in to the Employees of the Year program? From all of the Achievement Awards each year, the BNSF Leadership Team selects the top ones that best represent BNSF s Vision and Values. Those teams or individuals are then presented to the Executive Team for review and approval. National Merit Scholarship Winners for Named Congratulations to three high school seniors who are the children of BNSF employees and who have been selected as 2009 BNSF National Merit Scholarship winners. Each will receive from the BNSF Foundation Scholarship Program an annual $2,500 grant, renewable for up to four years of undergraduate college education beginning this fall. Student s Name Parent/Guardian Title Location Christopher Corey Bruce Corey Locomotive Engineer La Junta, Colo. Madison Hollan George Hollan Locomotive Engineer Amarillo, Texas Evaleena Struttman Mary Struttman Senior Analyst Topeka, Kan. BNSF Foundation Scholarship Winners Announced The BNSF Foundation has awarded scholarships to 32 children of BNSF employees in recognition of their outstanding high school academic achievements. Each high school senior will receive a $2,500 scholarship, renewable annually for four years. The Foundation established the Scholarship Program to recognize and reward outstanding academic achievement and to assist a limited number of college-bound children of BNSF employees with some college expenses. Student s Name Parent/Guardian Title Location Michael Agnew Garrick Agnew General Director, Service Design & Performance, Texas Emily Amundson Troy Amundson Locomotive Engineer/Conductor Enid, Okla. Robert Berchild Nicholas Berchild B&B Mechanical/Carpenter Superior, Wis. Aaron Burkhart Cary Burkhart Switchman Denver Matthew Cooksley Daniel Cooksley Machinist Topeka, Kan. Christopher Dachniwsky O.B. Dachniwsky Senior General Attorney, Texas Charles DeBolt Chuck DeBolt Director, Strategic Sourcing, Texas Noah Dorcey Francis Dorcey Signal Inspector Lincoln, Neb. Danielle Guillen Daniel Guillen Locomotive Engineer San Bernardino, Calif. Katelyn Hardcastle George Hardcastle Locomotive Engineer Haslet, Texas Alex Hofmann Mark Hofmann Director, Labor Relations, Texas John Kelly Edward Kelly Conductor Havre, Mont. Shelby Kinlund Bracken Kinlund Locomotive Engineer Sterling, Colo. Charlotte Lane Christopher Lane Conductor Kansas City, Kan. Zachary Lawrence Duane Lawrence Machinist Belen, N.M. Jerome Link Thomas Link Laborer/Hostler Kansas City, Mo. Craig Mayfield Mark Mayfield Locomotive Engineer Fort Madison, Iowa Crystal McKee Christian McKee Manager, Equipment Operation, Texas Katie McKeon Kourtney Cooksley Conductor Alliance, Neb. Haley Mirts Glenn Mirts Road Foreman of Engines Quincy, Calif. Megan Moore Donald Moore Conductor/Locomotive Engineer Chaffee, Mo. Arianna Morgart Dennis Morgart Director, Technology, Research & Development Topeka, Kan. Jeri Murphy Daniel Murphy Signal Technician Galesburg, Ill. Alexa Piggott Julie Piggott Vice President-Finance & Treasurer, Texas Blake Riffel Thomas Riffel Conductor Fort Madison, Wis. Stephanie Schilz John Eggen Locomotive Engineer Minneapolis Kathryn Sherfey Larry Sherfey CTC Maintainer Sidney, Neb. Steven Silverberg Kal Silverberg Manager, Service Design & Performance, Texas Sharissa Stewart Paul Stewart Clerk Lincoln, Neb. Landon Wallace John Wallace Locomotive Engineer Chaffee, Mo. Jeffrey Western Russell Western Locomotive Engineer Commerce, Calif. Erika Wheeler Kenneth Wheeler Locomotive Engineer Kansas City, Kan. Please note: Names, titles and family members are written as listed on application. Information about applying for the BNSF College Scholarship Program for will be in the Winter issue of Railway. 8 RAILWAY I SUMMER 2009

9 Fight the Spike: Summer initiative under way Although BNSF s injury-frequency and severity ratios are improving overall, an effort is under way to address seasonal injury spikes in certain divisions. Called Fight the Spike, the program will focus attention on safe work practices to prevent the peaks in injuries that can occur at some locations. While the program s emphasis is for Transportation employees, Engineering and Mechanical teams may also hear about this program throughout the year. Safety statistics show that some divisions tend to have a summer spike, while others have a spike in the winter months, says Greg Fox, vice president, Transportation. To help focus attention on and eliminate these spikes, we are implementing an aggressive plan that includes system teams traveling to division locations that have exhibited the highest seasonal injury spike over the last few years. Fox and other leaders from Safety, Crew Dispatching, Locomotive Utilization and other teams are visiting these field locations to talk with employees about safety and gather feedback. This is a great opportunity for train crews and other field employees to get answers to any safety questions, Fox says. The following divisions are part of BNSF s summer spike program: California, Northwest and Southwest. When cooler temperatures return, the Powder River and Kansas divisions will be targeted for winter preparedness. What is Fight the Spike? During the Fight the Spike initiative, the teams will spend three days at each of the targeted divisions, focusing on crew-change points, where they will review key safety information and briefing materials. During these meetings, employees will have an opportunity to ask questions and raise any safety-related concerns. After the visits, local Transportation leaders have follow-up discussions with employees, responding to questions and issues and explaining the division s action plan. The summer spike period generally runs from May to August; the winter spike discussions will begin in September. What can you do? If your location is visited by a system team, participate in the discussion and feel free to ask questions. As always, work to eliminate all at-risk behaviors. Remember the importance of thorough job safety briefings. As a team, review in your job safety briefings any of the Eight Deadly Decisions, the Seven Safety Absolutes and the Critical Decisions that apply to the task at hand. Also, be sure to review any seasonal risks that might affect the task at hand. For instance, in hot weather, remember the importance of staying hydrated and watch for signs of heat stress. To ensure compliance, each of us must take into account our own safety and speak up to our co-workers whenever we see unsafe behavior. Watch for updates on the campaign and division visits in BNSF News, the division newsletters and BNSF-TV. RAILWAY I SUMMER

10 BNSF s 2008 Safety Employees of the Year; Johnson wins Hammond At the same time Employees of the Year are selected, the BNSF Operations leaders name six employees as Safety Employees of the Year. Out of those, one is selected to be BNSF s Hammond Award nominee. The Hammond Award is a national award recognizing railroad employees efforts to improve safety within the industry and communities. The award is named for the late Harold F. Hammond, former president of the Transportation Association of America. All U.S. railroads are eligible to nominate an employee for the prestigious honor. After careful review and consideration of the 2008 Safety Employees of the Year, BNSF selected Bob Johnson, safety assistant at the Northtown Diesel Shop, as BNSF s nominee. Then on May 20, Johnson was named the winner of the national award, making him the fifth BNSF employee to receive the award since I am humbled and honored to receive this award, Johnson said following the ceremony. He graciously acknowledged that the individual award he received would not have been possible without the support, involvement and commitment of my co-workers at Northtown and across BNSF. Johnson attended the national awards ceremony in Washington, D.C., with his wife, Patricia, along with Mark Schulze, vice president, Safety, Training and Operations Support, and Ron Hennessey, director, Safety, Mechanical. 08 Hammond Award Winner Robert Johnson Machinist Minneapolis (Northtown) Diesel Shop Bob Johnson has been a machinist for BNSF for 37 years, and he has been consistently committed to safety throughout his career. He currently serves as the safety assistant at the Northtown Diesel Shop, where his passion for safety is always manifested. The following are among Johnson s many safety contributions: Developed and implemented risk-assessment tools for system Mechanical Improved leadership management strategies for supervisors Implemented peer-to-peer communication networks Improved safety education Enacted proactive safety processes, such as work practice observations Johnson was also instrumental in helping the Northtown Diesel Shop receive the Governor s Award for Meritorious Achievement in Occupational Safety and Injury Prevention in the Workplace. He oversees many other safety and training programs for his location, including hearing conservation, hazard communication, fall protection, and safety footwear and eyewear. Johnson has also made a unique contribution to Northtown employees in helping the R.F. Johnson Fitness Center become a reality. This building is a tangible example of his determination to improve the health and safety of BNSF employees. For more than two years, Johnson worked tirelessly to develop this onsite fitness center. Today, more than 400 employees from all work groups have 24-hour access to this center and to a healthier lifestyle. Bob Johnson has always had a passion and commitment for safety, on and off the job. He is a leader who works tirelessly to identify solutions for safety concerns and issues. Bob is very deserving of the highly prestigious Hammond Award, says Hennessey, noting that Johnson serves on a local committee to help improve transportation safety, volunteers for Operation Lifesaver and is a liaison to emergency responders in several communities. issues. Guided by his leadership, this group overcame mistrust and blame, asking, and then answering, some very hard questions. Carlson facilitated meetings that were extremely difficult. What emerged from these meetings, however, was an attitude of respect, honesty and cooperation, and that has spread to all employees. The processes that this group ultimately implemented have succeeded; these include an open-door policy, work practice observations and employee empowerment. As a result, the subdivision s injuries dropped from 11 in 2007 to two in The team ended the year with a 1.04 frequency ratio a true safety turnaround. Kip Lytle Structures Safety Facilitator Nebraska and Colorado divisions If you took a measure of commitment, and added in preventive analysis, strong communication and the desire to mentor, you d be looking squarely at Kip Lytle, a Structures safety facilitator for the Nebraska and Colorado divisions, and a 36-year BNSF veteran. Lytle s peers say he is a real safety leader who has a special ability to motivate others. Whether he is researching a new safety idea or facilitating a dialogue on safety, co-workers and new employees respond well to his hands-on approach. But Lytle also makes a difference on a system level. Over the past nine years, he has been a key contributor to Engineering s core safety programs and, in fact, has taken the initiative to design several training modules. One is Hazard Recognition, which is part of the annual Engineering and Telecommunications safety certification program, and another is Trenching & Shoring. Lytle has taken on some other complex and challenging assignments. He has addressed confined space issues in Lincoln and Omaha, Neb., as well as Denver, and investigated fallprotection issues at various locations throughout his territory. He is a proponent of communication, and for the past four years he has put together a Weekly Safety Reminder, which is a safety advisory on topics like winter weather driving, confined spaces, overhead power lines and fall protection, to name a few. These documents are used by Structures safety facilitators in his region and also at the system level. Terrance Ed Carlson Conductor Northwest Division BNSF has experienced many safety successes, but few are as compelling as the safety improvements orchestrated by Terrance Ed Carlson. Carlson has been a road conductor for five years, assigned to the Lakeside Subdivision on the Northwest Division. He also chairs the local site-safety committee and co-chairs the division safety committee, so for Carlson, safety is truly a 24/7 proposition. Two years ago, the Lakeside Sub had the ignominious reputation of having the highest number of injuries of any subdivision across the BNSF system, with an injury-frequency ratio of Carlson realized that safety and morale needed to be improved, and was concerned that a severe injury or fatality was likely given the high injury rate. He gathered a core group of senior managers and labor leaders to address safety Vincent Rogers Crane Director and Operator Cicero, Ill. Serving as a crane director and operator for 12 years, Vincent Rogers has quietly demonstrated his commitment to safety by working injury-free. As an Intermodal safety trainer, based in Cicero, Ill., Rogers is a valuable member of the local safety team. One of Rogers responsibilities is to ensure 10 RAILWAY I SUMMER 2009

11 that a crane operator trainee clearly understands normal crane operations, including proper start-up and shut-down, in addition to steps that should be taken for any abnormal operation or situation. Last year, he worked with a senior hub manager on an intermodal project, called the Personnel Qualification Standard (PQS). PQS essentially is a qualification and certification program that relies on standardized training and testing for crane operators and directors. Rogers identified requirements for on-the-job training and incorporated these items into PQS. He was also instrumental in helping co-workers accept this proactive safety program. Additionally, Rogers demonstrates safety leadership through mentoring. Last year, 114 new employees came to Cicero; he tirelessly helped with new-hire orientation and was always available to answer questions. Rogers is considered to be a key reason why Cicero s Intermodal safety processes are effective. Because he was dedicated to identifying root causes, the facility experienced a 29-percent decline in third-party accidents last year. Sharon Robinson Safety Assistant Chicago Sharon Robinson, a Chicago-based safety assistant with responsibilities for four Mechanical shops, is known to walk the walk and talk the talk especially when it comes to safety. Robinson has impacted the safety process not only in her work area but also in other departments. As a safety certification trainer who is also certified in rules training, she helped train more than 125 Mechanical and Intermodal employees last year. In addition, she mentored new employees on her own initiative, volunteering to teach new-hire classes at four different locations. As a result of her leadership, none of these new-hire employees experienced a single injury last year. Locally, Robinson also revived the work practice observations program. Thanks to Robinson s involvement, participation has increased dramatically; about 90 percent of carmen at the shop now participate compared with fewer than 20 percent before. As a certified defensive driving instructor, Robinson also developed a defensive driving class for ramp workers who drive around and near shop employees. Additionally, she is well-versed in hazardous materials, forklift safety, lockout/tagout and CPR, and often provides rules interpretation for peers. In fact, it is not uncommon for Robinson to come in before 4 a.m. to make sure that night-shift employees receive safety training and to answer their questions. Steven Waller Safety Coordinator Powder River Division Words that describe Steve Waller, a 33- year BNSF employee, include forthright, knowledgeable, passionate and, above all, solutiondriven. Waller serves as both the United Transportation Union safety coordinator for the Powder River Division and as a local chairman. Waller has worked his entire career without a reportable or non-reportable injury, and without any incident requiring first aid. Notably, Waller embarked on an ambitious program to educate employees about high-level safety concepts, such as human factors and risk assessment. He conceived and organized two safety seminars, advocating for an employeedriven safety process. He also implemented a three-phase safety training program, covering quality job safety briefings, the Safety Issue Resolution Process, empowerment, conflict resolution and more. In part due to his efforts, the Powder River Transportation frequency ratio in 2007 was 1.75, besting the system Transportation ratio. At the end of 2008, the division s Transportation frequency ratio reduced further to 1.22, again besting the system rate. For its 2008 performance, the division received the Safety Bell for the Best Derailment Prevention, an award in which Waller most certainly played a major part. Employee safety tips The people I work with every day look out for each other. We don t rush. We pay attention and are alert and attentive. Roberta Taylor, conductor, Cicero, Ill. We have a program where we walk up to our peers, approaching them if we see any unsafe behaviors. It keeps us all aware. Mike Villa, Structures foreman, Chicago I think before I act. I always have to be aware of where I am and what s around me. David Rapp, surfacing gang machine operator, mobile gang Focus on Safety VP, Safety, Training and Operations Support: Mark Schulze, Contributing Photographers: Jeff Buehner and Newslink Got a story idea? Send story ideas, safety tips, suggestions and comments to or call Gene Welander at (817) Safety Vision We believe every accident or injury is preventable. Our vision is that BNSF will operate free of accidents and injuries. Warm Weather Checklist Symptoms & Treatment Heat stress occurs when hot weather, humidity or exertion add heat faster than the body can get rid of it. Even if you feel you are used to summer temperatures, take precautions! Heat cramps: Muscle spasms can develop after considerable loss of fluid through perspiration. To treat, massage cramping muscles, rest and drink fluids. Heat rash: Tiny red bumps appear on the skin from blocked sweat glands. To treat, cool your body, get plenty of rest, and clean and dry affected areas. Heat exhaustion: Caused by dehydration, symptoms include excessive sweating, weakness, dizziness, dry mouth and headache. Victims may be pale or shaky, feel cool and clammy, have little urine output, and have a rapid, weak pulse. Have victim rest in a cool location and drink fluids until urine output is restored. Seek medical attention if symptoms persist. Heat stroke: Treat this serious condition as a medical emergency. Victim will have a body temperature near 105 degrees F and will be sluggish. Symptoms may progress from a state of confusion to loss of consciousness. Victim s heat regulatory system may fail, resulting in hot, dry skin and rapid, weak, irregular pulse. Seek medical attention immediately. Remove victim from direct sunlight, undress victim and cool the skin by wetting and fanning him/her. Prevention Eat well-balanced meals, watch sodium intake and get adequate sleep. Minimize alcohol consumption before working in hot, humid weather as alcohol contributes to dehydration. Wear loose-fitting, light-colored clothing. Drink 7 to 8 ounces of water every 30 minutes; avoid soda and other caffeinated drinks. Ask your physician if you need to take special precautions because of medication or other medical conditions. Wear sunscreen with an SPF of at least 30. RAILWAY I SUMMER

12 Best of the Best Safety Leaders TRANSPORTATION: Frank Bennett, superintendent operations, Alliance, Neb. Matt Boyd, superintendent operations, Trinidad, Colo. Matthew Burkart, terminal superintendent, Minneapolis Richard Danielson, terminal superintendent, Galesburg, Ill. David Davenport, terminal superintendent, Chicago/Corwith Chris Engel, superintendent operations, Lincoln, Neb. Steven Nettleton, terminal superintendent, Kansas City, Kan. Danny Ray, terminal superintendent, Kansas City, Mo. (retired) Ryan Shoener, terminal superintendent, Memphis, Tenn. MECHANICAL: David Bertholf, general foreman, Seattle Richard Castanon, shop superintendent, Commerce, Calif. Roman Cisneros, general foreman, Amarillo, Texas Donald Kaplan, general foreman, Haslet, Texas Harold Lederer, general foreman, Richmond, Calif. Paul Lorenzen, general foreman, Springfield, Mo. Aaron Marshall, general foreman, Houston Vernon Peterson, general foreman, Vancouver, Wash. Mark Riley, general foreman, Newton, Kan. Carlos Rueda, general foreman, Los Angeles Larry Stover, suburban shop superintendent, Chicago ENGINEERING: John Crisler, division engineer, Stockton, Calif. Dwight Golder, manager, Signal, Galesburg, Ill. Mike Herzog, manager, Structures, Kansas City, Kan. J. Lee Hostler, manager, Structures, Albuquerque, N.M. Jeffrey Jarman, manager, Signal, Spokane, Wash. Cory Knutson, manager, Structures, Billings, Mont. Adam Richardson, division engineer, San Bernardino, Calif. Jeffrey Schmidt, manager, Track Maintenance Rail, Springfield, Mo. Jeffrey Schurman, shop superintendent, Roadway Equipment, Brainerd, Minn. Dennis Skeels, manager, Signal, San Bernardino, Calif. Steven Talbot, manager, Structures, Kansas City, Kan. John Upward, general director, Roadway Equipment, A s BNSF works toward its vision of an injury-free and accident-free workplace, a number of leaders and work groups stand out each year with exceptional safety performance. They are setting the standard for us all and are considered the Best of the Best. The individuals listed in the column to the left were recognized at the Employees of the Year program as leaders of the Best of the Best work teams. These individuals met demanding safety criteria and placed at the top of their department for their safety performance. Congratulations to all of these leaders for modeling the way in safety. Transportation Front row, left to right: Ryan Shoener, Chris Engel, Nicole Herbst (accepting on behalf of Danny Ray, who retired), Matthew Burkart and Frank Bennett; Back row, left to right: Matt Boyd, Richard Danielson, Steve Nettleton and David Davenport Mechanical Front row, left to right: Harold Lederer, Richard Castanon, Vernon Peterson, Larry Stover and Aaron Marshall; Back row, left to right: David Bertholf, Mark Riley, Roman Cisneros, Paul Lorenzen and Carlos Rueda; not pictured: Don Kaplan Engineering Front row, left to right: David Burks (accepting on Jeffrey Schmidt s behalf), Dwight Golder, J. Lee Hostler, Dennis Skeels, Jeffrey Jarman and Jeffrey Schurman; Back row, left to right: Steven Talbot, Mike Herzog, Cory Knutson, John Crisler, Adam Richardson and John Upward Securing Cars and equipment UNDESIRED MOVEMENT BEFORE DETACHMENT UNATTENDED LOCOMOTIVES ON, UNDER and AROUND ABTH 102.1, , , GCOR 7.6, System Special Instructions Secure standing equipment with hand brakes to prevent undesired movement. Do not depend on the air brake system to prevent undesired movement. Consider slack; apply hand brakes on the correct end of the cut of cars on grade: For bunched slack, low end For stretched slack, high end When determining the number of hand brakes to apply, consider grade, adhesion, weather conditions, and number of loaded and empty cars. Release air brakes to verify securement. In addition, for unattended train or portion of train with locomotive: Apply hand brakes on all locomotives on the lead consist. Count locomotive hand brakes toward total hand brakes required. Secure consist as outlined in ABTH ABTH 102.1, , , GCOR 7.6, System Special Instructions Do not depend on the air brake system to secure equipment. Secure equipment against undesired movement. Release all air brakes to ensure hand brakes prevent movement. Make a 20-PSI brake pipe reduction. Close angle cock on the rear locomotive or the last car to be detached. Leave angle cock open on portion of cars left standing. Allow brakes on standing portion to apply in emergency. If available, use end-of-train telemetry device to ensure brake pipe pressure drops to 0. ABTH 102.3, 106.2, 106.6, GCOR 7.6, System Special Instructions (excluding DP remote locomotives on secured unattended trains) Place the throttle in Idle, except when protecting engine from freezing. Move transition handle (if equipped) and generator field switch or circuit breaker on control stand (if equipped) to Off. Remove reverser handle from slot. Apply all hand brakes; verify securement by releasing air brakes. After brakes charge, make a 20-PSI brake pipe reduction. Leave automatic brake valve cut in; fully apply the independent brake. Move engine control switch to Isolate on all locomotives, except during winter protection. S-10.2, S , S , S , S-10.15, S , S-10.16, GCOR 7.6 Always apply sufficient hand brakes to prevent movement. Before spotting locomotives in a shop facility, review proper procedures. Before working on air brake rigging, review procedures. Always establish blue signal protection prior to working on locomotives or railcars that have been set out. Properly chock wheels. When securing equipment, ensure it is not fouling an adjacent track. 12 RAILWAY I SUMMER 2009

13 Planning for Tomorrow by Changing Today Envision is here! A s you begin using and becoming familiar with SAP software for Finance, HR and Payroll functions, a support team is ready to assist you with both technical and business process questions. Simply call 593-HELP on a company phone or and follow the voice prompt, or select option 3, then option 6 from the main menu, which will connect you to a SAP Support Center specialist. The support staff will be ready to answer questions relating to all aspects of the new solution, including: Invoice processing and approval (FastTrack Replacement) New Employee Online (EOL) (scheduled leave request forms, exempt vacation and sick time entry, personal information management, direct deposit, etc.) Procard transactions Paycheck information Use of the new screens and online processes Note: Simulations of the new Employee Online as well as other helpful information can be found on the Envision Project Wiki: bnsf.com/display/env/home. Running the railroad for our customers With the implementation of Envision, BNSF joins more than 12 million users and 85,000 different companies worldwide that use SAP computer software. (Envision is BNSF s Enterprise Resource Planning Program utilizing SAP as a platform. HR, Payroll and Finance are a small step into the larger fully integrated offering of SAP.) SAP is a proven, reliable product that integrates HR, Payroll and accounting functions so that all components work together, bridging the technological gaps of the old Financial, Human Resources and Payroll computer systems. Envision will reduce the distractions of administrative work and allow BNSF employees to spend more time doing what they do best running the railroad for our customers. Reminder to exempt employees only: If you re planning a vacation, don t forget that exempt employees now enter their own vacation and sick time through the new Employee Online portal beginning July 1, This does not apply to scheduled employees, who will continue to report time through their current process. RAILWAY I SUMMER

14 knee deep in almost everything railroad Their jobs are to be curious, nosy and doubting. In the course of a day, they will look, probe, question, scrape and file always digging, asking why, what, when, where, how and sometimes who. Microscopes and test tubes are among the many tools they use to make critical analysis and, hopefully, find answers to their questions. Corey Wills equips locomotives with onboard computer systems and fuel meters to monitor and log power output and fuel consumption. S ound like another new CSI television drama? Nope. Welcome to BNSF Railway s Technical Research & Development Department (TR&D), based not in Miami, New York City or Las Vegas, but in Topeka, Kan. While the TR&D group is a small one, their work touches nearly every aspect of the railroad. For example, members of TR&D routinely test the diesel fuel to make sure it is up to company standards. Soap for washing hands has to meet their approval to pass quality, environmental and industrial hygiene concerns. And when unfortunate incidents such as derailments occur, members of the team are often at the scene or have components shipped to the lab to determine what went wrong and, if possible, how to prevent them from happening again. Tasked with a variety of responsibilities, the team, led by Glenn Bowen, Larry Milhon and Dennis Morgart, working under Assistant Vice President Mark Stehly, gets knee-deep with almost everything on the railroad. Among the functions we provide is assisting the Mechanical, Engineering and Strategic Sourcing & Supply departments to ensure the railroad buys and uses the best materials available, and that we get the best bang for the buck, says Bowen. From locomotives and ties to cleaners, paints and chemicals, we re involved in the decision-making process. It s a responsibility that more often than not finds team members doing their job trackside. Corey Wills, assistant director, Laboratory and Testing Services, for example, equips locomotives with onboard computer systems and fuel meters to monitor and log power output and fuel consumption as the engines move across the system. The locomotives will be in the field a couple of months, automatically reporting their fuel efficiency performance back to Topeka, Wills says. The Mechanical Department asked that we compare the fuel efficiency on the newest GE and EMD locomotives one factor in future purchasing decisions. Wills is also responsible for TR&D s two research and test cars. The test cars let us give our customers, both internal and external, a unique look at how rail transportation can meet their shipping needs. We can run overthe-road tests, monitoring vibration, force and acceleration, all while recording video to help ensure that our customers freight is delivered damage-free. Dollars and sense While Wills works around a locomotive, Environmental Chemist Georgianna Gideon peers into a microscope, evaluating new products to ensure that the company is purchasing products that meet quality specifications at the right price. I work closely with the Strategic Sourcing & Supply Department, Gideon says. When they are considering buying a new product, they will send it to me to determine how good it really is. I ll compare it with current approved materials. When I find one product better than another, I ll let them know. But TR&D is not just focused on the myriad components that make up railroading. The team is also thinking about the employees doing the jobs. For example, Corey Ruch, engineer II, often works on preventing injuries. Somebody is working with a tool and gets hurt perhaps using a wrench and it breaks. The tool gets sent to us and we determine if the wrench was being misused, if it was the wrong wrench for the application or if the tool failed due to bad construction, explains Ruch, wanting to make sure that no one else gets hurt. He also reviews fuel additives pitched to the company by vendors claiming their products will improve fuel economy. If they make a persuasive case, we ll bring in a locomotive, instrument it to monitor power output and fuel consumption, and then test their product out. Timm Twaddle, on the other hand, is not so much concerned about fuel economy as he is fuel quality control. A fuel chemist, every month he receives samples of vendor-supplied fuel to ensure that they meet crucial BNSF quality-control standards. Very little gets past him, having worked with fuels for more than three decades. One by one, he pours samples into test tubes. The first exam he makes before submitting the fuels to complex lab equipment is to hold the samples up to the light to make sure they have the right clarity and brightness initial indicators of quality. Before Twaddle is done with each sample, he s cooked it in an oil bath for 90 minutes, checking for water droplets and the right amount of stabilizing additives that prevent fuel line filters 14 RAILWAY I SUMMER 2009

15 from clogging and injectors from sticking. Using an array of sophisticated tools, he is confident that by the time he s finished, he ll know whether the sample meets BNSF quality standards. The GO Team TR&D s function extends well beyond the capital city of Kansas. Sometimes, especially during derailment investigations, it s necessary to get to the scene quickly, which is why most of the team are members of the BNSF derailment GO Team. Larry Milhon, director, Train Dynamics Research and Derailment Prevention, and his group work on research projects aimed at derailment prevention. If they [the first responders] can t determine what caused the derailment, we go out, Milhon says, adding that decision is made only after long-distance telephone calls and conferences can t solve the puzzle. Once onsite, the group looks at train dynamics, locomotive event recorder data, the train manifest, and mechanical and engineering measurements. A key to the investigation is finding the point of the derailment, he adds. We look at the car types, how they re positioned in the train, and how heavily they re loaded, explains Milhon. We ask, Where did the cars initially go on the ground? and What were the marks at the point of derailment? If the rail rolled over, that leads the investigation down one path. If a car s wheels climbed the rail, then that leads the investigation down another path. Back in Topeka, Alicia Bitner, engineer I, is using a wire brush on the end of a broken piece of rail to remove rust. Among her responsibilities is getting bits and pieces of broken equipment, wheels and rails that have been involved in derailments to talk to her. The piece of rail in question was part of the puzzle in a recent derailment. Did this piece of rail break as a result of the derailment, or was it the cause of the derailment? Bitner asks rhetorically. If the rail caused the derailment, we try and determine why it failed. The results of a TR&D investigation can define train handling and train makeup rules. If loaded cars can be positioned toward the front of the train, undesirable in-train forces such as stringlining/jackknifing and slack action can be minimized. The result is an improved ride quality with lowered derailment risk and lessened damage to our customers products, Milhon says. Dennis Morgart, director, Maintenance of Way & Mechanical Research, and his team become involved if there is an issue regarding a track component, such as ties, ballast, rail, fasteners, etc. Recently, research emphasis for us has been rail-wheel friction management. We ve found that improved friction control leads to lower lateral forces during curving, reduced rail wear and less tie damage, says Morgart, adding that by reducing the energy input into the track structure, less fuel is needed to move trains. If field personnel or members of the GO Team are not 100 percent certain what caused the problem, pieces of the puzzle are tagged and sent from the site to Topeka for further investigation and testing, says Morgart, adding, We re charged with the responsibility of solving problems. Timm Twaddle, a fuel chemist, checks samples of fuel to ensure that they meet BNSF s quality-control standards. And while the TR&D group has certain constants, new challenges are always on the horizon. It s different every day, says Gideon. We never know from one day to the next what we re going to be working on. Contributed by David Lustig Environmental Chemist Georgianna Gideon evaluates new products to ensure that BNSF is purchasing products that meet quality specifications at the right price. RAILWAY I SUMMER

16 Time for change: Countdown to RSIA For more than 150 years, accurate information on hours of service has been as fundamental to railroading as crossties, locomotives and spike mauls. Timetables, wall clocks and heirloom pocket watches reflect the historic importance of time to the rail industry, while a new generation of digital tools helps modern railroaders accurately measure time and hours of service. Beginning July 16, 2009, accurate hours of service reporting will take on added importance for BNSF train, yard & engine (TY&E) employees. That s the day the Railway Safety Improvement Act of 2008 (RSIA) goes into effect, implementing new rules governing several aspects of hours of service. The Rail Safety Improvement Act includes a number of provisions that affect railroad operations and employees, says Greg Fox, vice president, Transportation. The most impactful portion for our TY&E employees is the hours of service aspect. To prepare for RSIA, all TY&E employees must contact their supervisors by July 14, 2009, for an instructional briefing on new hours-ofservice requirements and a new TSS tie-up process. New caps on hours of service per month, consecutive starts and limbo time make it even more important that TY&E employees accurately report their hours of service at tie-up. Inaccurate information could affect an employee s ability to be called to work. BNSF has several new tools to help TY&E employees maximize their hours of service and keep track of their consecutive starts and hours against the new caps. We ll tell them how many hours they have against the monthly cap, Fox says. And they ll be able to see the number of consecutive starts they have, their limbo time accumulation, and other pertinent, cap-sensitive data. In Topeka, Kan., George Wong, director of TY&E Compensation Systems, and his group worked closely with affected departments at BNSF and with feedback from labor organizations and the Federal Railroad Administration (FRA) simplified the tie-up process in TSS. Dubbed Express Tie-Up, this new interface includes a single tie-up screen that works for all types of Transportation service and expedites the tie-up process for TY&E employees. With RSIA, we need to ensure accuracy, speed and consistency in the tie-up process, Wong explains. Express Tie-Up automatically records all applicable Constructive Allowance (CA) codes for each job, which helps employees complete their tie-up faster. While automatically recording applicable CA codes helps employees save time, BNSF recognizes that each tour of duty comes with its own unique circumstances. We understand that sometimes an employee will need to enter additional CA codes at the end of a tour, Wong says. Employees need to know that they control the reporting on actual hours worked, meal penalties and other applicable codes. We simply give them the option to add those codes after they ve completed their hours of service reporting so that time doesn t count against their caps. Beginning July 16, 2009, accurate hours of service reporting will take on added importance for BNSF train, yard & engine employees. That s the day the new hours of service rules under the Railway Safety Improvement Act of 2008 go into effect. 16 RAILWAY I SUMMER 2009

17 TY&E employees are ultimately responsible for accurate reporting of time under RSIA Inaccurately reporting hours of service could not only diminish an employee s opportunities to work, it could also result in a fine by the FRA. TY&E employees are providing official FRA documentation when they tie up, Wong notes. The hours of service information they provide drives many different things, including reports of their total time on duty, required under RSIA. The hours reported on their time tickets will be used to calculate whether they re getting close to any of the monthly caps outlined in the law. Wong explains the importance of accuracy in FRA reporting: Ultimately, those time tickets generated by employee input are accessible by the FRA and could result in a possible fine if information is inaccurate. TY&E employees must be sure they understand the difference between relieved time and released time. Confusing relieved time and released time at tie-up can inaccurately inflate an employee s monthly hours-of-service and limbo time against the caps. That s why TY&E employees must be sure they understand the difference between these terms and use that knowledge to accurately enter the times at tie-up. Relieved time is the time when an employee is relieved of duties covered under hours of service. This includes duties surrounding the movement of a train and the securing of a train by application of hand brakes, air brakes and derails. Time spent waiting for or in deadhead transportation is not considered part of the duties covered by hours of service. This time is defined as limbo time. Under RSIA, all limbo time after the 12th hour of duty is counted toward the monthly cap on limbo time. An employee s released time is the time when he or she ties up at the terminal at the end of his or her tour of duty. BNSF has mailed letters, distributed briefings and published articles to explain RSIA and the new caps on hours of service per month, rest time, limbo time and consecutive starts and to help TY&E employees understand their rights and responsibilities. An informational DVD has also been sent to Transportation managers at BNSF terminals. Each BNSF TY&E employee must contact his or her supervisor prior to July 14, 2009, to receive a mandatory briefing on RSIA and Express Tie-Up. As the RSIA implementation date approaches, Fox wants to keep the focus squarely on the purpose of the law s new caps and employee responsibilities. At its core, RSIA is all about safety, Fox emphasizes. We want to do everything we can to help our TY&E employees work safely and report accurately under RSIA. Contributed by David Vickers About Express Tie-Up: BNSF has modified the TSS screens to make it easier for employees to tie up at the end of each tour of duty and to more accurately track their status against new monthly caps for total hours of service and limbo time under RSIA. A single tie-up process applies for all types of TY&E service, including road, local, yard and switch service. General provisions for TY&E employees Employees must have at least 10 consecutive hours of undisturbed rest immediately after going off duty. This applies at both the home terminal and the away-from-home terminal. If the time on duty, plus the time spent waiting for or in deadhead transportation to the point of final release, exceeds 12 consecutive hours, then the employee will receive additional undisturbed rest (beyond the standard 10 hours) on a minuteby-minute basis for all time in excess of the 12 consecutive hours. Employees will not spend more than 40 hours per calendar month waiting for or in deadhead transportation from a duty assignment to the place of final release. However, only limbo time beyond the 12 consecutive hours on duty will count toward this cap. The cap is reduced to 30 hours beginning Oct. 16, Employees who initiate an on-duty period each day for A simplified process automatically assigns pay for most categories. A single tie-up screen captures most important information, and the total number of screens to access for tieup is reduced. A few additional screens address other FRA-reporting questions, but the main tie-up occurs on one screen. six consecutive days must be unavailable to work for at least 48 consecutive hours. Employees at an away-from-home terminal on the sixth day who work a seventh consecutive day into the home terminal will be unavailable to work for at least 72 consecutive hours. Employees who have spent a total of 276 hours in any calendar month on duty, waiting for or in deadhead transportation, or in any other mandatory service, will not remain on or go on duty for the remainder of that month. Less than 1 percent of BNSF TY&E employees exceed this limit in a typical month. During a train employee s minimum required period of undisturbed rest, a railroad carrier, and its officers and agents, shall not communicate with the train employee by telephone, by pager, or in any other manner that could reasonably be expected to disrupt the employee s rest. RAILWAY I SUMMER

18 The Across the BNSF System section is about BNSF people who are making a difference, who care enough to better the workplace as well as the communities where we live and where our trains operate. This feature is designed to connect us from one point of pride to another. If you have a story you would like considered, please drop us an , via Communications, Corporate in Outlook, attention Railway Editor. Brightening the lives of others The Southern California Diversity Council brightened the day for many senior citizens when they attended and provided prizes for a bingo outing at the Murrieta Senior Center this spring. Donated prizes for the event included a large Senior citizens at the Murrieta Senior Center enjoy the bingo outing. basket of goodies courtesy of the San Bernardino office. Each time someone scored a bingo, they could choose a prize and everyone was able to walk away with a prize. The Southern California Diversity Council did an awesome job with the seniors, says Jeri Copeland, recreation supervisor at the center. The seniors absolutely love it when they come, and we really appreciate all they do. The William Special BNSF and Ameren Corp., one of BNSF s largest coal customers, granted a wish for a special young boy who has multiple aggressive brain tumors, known as neurofibromatosis. On May 15, 3-year-old William Hunter of East Alton, Ill., who loves trains and the character Thomas the Tank Engine, took a train ride from St. Louis to AmerenUE s Rush Island plant, 40 miles south of downtown St. Louis. John Hack, Ameren general executive coal delivery, and R.B. McCord, St. Louis superintendent operations, worked jointly to make this ride happen. On William s special day, he, along with his parents and grandparents, were greeted by St. Louis employees. Yardmaster Mike Steinberg, dressed in a borrowed Amtrak conductor s uniform, read a few Thomas the Tank Engine stories to William before the train ride and presented the book to the family afterward. Rich Green, yardmaster, called over the radio that the William Special was ready to depart, and William was made an honorary conductor. Operating the train were J.J. Beggs, Chaffee conductor, and Mark Pobst, Chaffee locomotive engineer. They rolled down the windows so William could wave at people along the way, and they let him blow the horn. Once at Rush Island, he sat in the conductor and engineer seats. It was a day that Beggs, a father, will not soon forget. It was for a child, making a memory for him, he says. I know what it would mean to make my daughter s dream come true. That s what we did for him. John Neel, Chaffee division trainmaster, coordinated the landing spot and met everyone on the train at Rush Island. Once stopped, AmerenUE From left, Ameren s John Hack; BNSF s R.B. McCord, J.J. Beggs and Mark Pobst; with William Hunter and his parents, Chris Hunter and Rachel Porter. employees greeted William and his family with a banner, followed by a meal, where a collection was taken up for the family. Others who made the event special were Operation Stop committee members, who donated railroad paraphernalia; Vicki Clayman with Partners in Promotion, who donated BNSF shirts and a conductor s hat; and BNSF local leaders, who donated other items, including gift certificates. McCord thanks all involved. Everyone was so accommodating. They made the trip very special, he says. It made me proud of who I work for. I really felt we made an impact in this child s life. Saving a life It started as an ordinary day. A B&B crew began the morning by removing concrete forms on an arch extension project 10 to 15 miles south of Brookfield, Ill. About an hour into the project, B&B Truck Driver Justin Diehl noticed B&B Mechanic/Carpenter Donnie Lichtenberg bending over near the welding machine, but he did Bill Washam, left, Justin Diehl, Gary Diehl and Mitch Adams. not appear to be in distress. Moments later, B&B Mechanic/Carpenter Keith Thomas saw Lichtenberg lean against the machine and then fall to his back. Thomas immediately called out to him and everyone on the crew, led by foreman Gary Diehl, rushed to Lichtenberg s aid. Lichtenberg declined medical attention, claiming he was just dizzy. The crew cushioned his head and continued to assess the situation. They then noticed Lichtenberg s skin tone, which was very pale. They suggested that if he was OK, he should be able to stand up. He couldn t. Bill Washam, bridge inspector, then called 911. After a brief discussion with the emergency operator, a plan was made to meet the ambulance halfway. Due to everyone s quick actions and emergency preparedness knowledge, the crew brought Lichtenberg to the hospital before the ambulance even left. He is now at home recovering. When you are out on the field and something like this happens to you, you don t really know what s going on, Washam recalls. If faced with this situation again, I m not even going to think twice about loading the person up and seeking help. Don t risk it. Also involved in this life-saving effort was B&B Welder Marty Hall. More quick actions The quick thinking and actions of Locomotive Engineer Adam Renfrow and Conductor Keith Mungon saved the life of a trespasser on the Subdivision. The duo was heading northbound when they observed a male trespasser walking south in the middle of the tracks toward From left, Assistant Trainmaster Greg Asher, Adam Renfrow and Senior Special Agent Scott Briggs. their oncoming locomotive. Mungon opened the door of the engine and got the trespasser s attention. He stepped off the tracks before a collision. Renfrow was able to stop the train without going into emergency mode. The two trainmen waited with the trespasser until local law enforcement officers arrived and took custody of him. It From left, Assistant Trainmaster Greg Asher, Keith Mungon and Senior Special Agent Scott Briggs. was later learned the trespasser suffered from mental health issues and was attempting suicide. Proactive employees help those in need Gulf Division train crew Brian Stanley, conductor, and Jason White, locomotive engineer, recently came to the assistance of people involved in a car accident at a local highway crossing. Stanley and White were on their locomotive when they saw a three-car collision take place. The men quickly Jason White, left, and Brian Stanley. went to action. As soon as it happened, we both said, Go, go, go, Stanley recalls. White called the dispatcher for assistance, and Stanley got off the engine and went to one of the cars, which had two small children as passengers. He calmed them down until the paramedics arrived. Glad to help, White says he and Stanley did what they knew was right. We did what anyone else would have done, he says. 18 RAILWAY I SUMMER 2009

19 Track maintenance program in full swing Maintaining BNSF infrastructure allows us to provide customers with efficient and reliable rail service. F or 2009, most of BNSF s $2.6 billion capital investment plan will be spent on maintaining the infrastructure. In past years, spending on capacity expansion has also been substantial, but with lower traffic volumes, the focus has shifted. Track maintenance windows are easier to schedule with lighter volumes, creating opportunities to more efficiently maintain and replace track and structures. That maintenance including undercutting, surfacing, and rail and tie replacement requires that BNSF s 50 production gangs and three shoulder ballast cleaners are hard at work. Major Maintenance of Way projects under way include: Replacing approximately 73 track miles of rail as part of five projects in South Dakota Replacing more than 150,000 ties and almost 35 track miles of rail between Casper, Wyo., and Silesia, Mont. Undercutting six miles of track, replacing more than 75,000 ties and laying approximately 22 track miles of rail between Custer and Glendive, Mont. Undercutting and repairing roadbed beneath a 29-mile stretch of track between Galesburg and Wilbern, Ill., and replacing more than 70,000 railroad ties along the same route This is one of the best starts in our maintenance season that I ve ever seen, says Steve Goodall, chief engineer, South. In just the first couple of months of the year, we re at about 115 percent of plan performance on our rail gangs, and we re at about 110 percent on our tie gangs, so just an excellent start to the year. Of the 23 system rail gangs, 17 are meeting or exceeding plan as of mid-june. RP17, RP14, RP02 and RP10, led by roadmasters Gary Marcellus, Roger Lee, Bob Heintz and Travis Boardman, respectively, are installing more than 85 miles of new rail through the course of the year on the Gallup and Seligman subdivisions on the Southwest Division. They are doing the work significantly ahead of schedule, thanks to favorable windows and the efforts of the employees on the four gangs, according to Goodall. All 11 system tie gangs are working at 93 percent of plan or better, with TP05, led by Roadmaster Donald Jones, among the leaders. Jones says the key to TP05 s success is letting his team do what they do best, while stepping in when necessary. The thing that makes my gang successful is letting the guys do what they know to do, Jones says. They ve been out here for years. I just step in to monitor what everyone s doing. Elsewhere, undercutting gangs and super surfacing crews are meeting or exceeding plan. As the year continues, Engineering s maintenance teams will be hard at work, strengthening the infrastructure to ensure that BNSF is ready when traffic volumes begin to rise. BNSF Performance Measures BNSF Units Handled Year-to-Date through June 21, Coal 1,157,967 1,168,203 Agricultural Products 416, ,057 Industrial Products 548, ,197 Consumer Products 1,836,927 2,288,219 System 3,960,038 4,761, BNSF Velocity Performance Quarter-to-date through June 21, nd Qtr. Goal Actual QTD Locomotives miles per day Agricultural car miles per day Merchandise car miles per day Coal car miles per day Intermodal transit days BNSF Stock Stock: 12-month view through June 19, 2009 S&P 500 Index BNSF BNSF Reportable Injuries Year-to-Date through June 14, Locomotive data is measured as miles per day. Agricultural, Merchandise and Coal active car cycle data is measured as miles per day on the BNSF system. Intermodal average transit days=average time between cutoff and deramp or interchange delivery (transit time starts at cutoff or first train departure if cutoff is after first train departure). The measure weights average trailer and container transit times. With this measure the lower the number the better JUN 08 JUL 08 AUG 08 SEP 08 OCT 08 NOV 08 DEC 08 JAN 09 FEB 09 MAR 09 APR 09 MAY 09 JUN 09 RAILWAY I SUMMER

20 2008 Safety Plate: Along the Old Trail This year s limited-edition safety plate featuring the painting Along the Old Trail by LaVerne Nelson Black will begin shipping in early August to all BNSF employees who worked without a reportable injury in Additionally, employees must have worked at least three consecutive full months of the year of the award year to receive a plate. A painter and sculptor, Black ( ) was commissioned by the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway, and several of his paintings were displayed in their largest ticket offices. His artwork typically depicted Native Americans of the West and horses. Along the Old Trail, painted in 1927, hangs at BNSF s headquarters. $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ The Employee Magazine of Team BNSF SUMMER 2009 P.O. Box , Texas PRSRT STD U.S. POSTAGE PAID FORT WORTH, TX PERMIT NO. 2528

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