Literacy Education. Master of Science in Education: Program Overview. Program Highlights

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "Literacy Education. Master of Science in Education: Program Overview. Program Highlights"

Transcription

1 Master of Science in Education: Literacy Education Program Overview The Ralph C. Wilson, Jr., School of Education offers a Master of Science in Literacy Education. The Literacy Education programs lead to the Literacy certification and are designed for teachers who hold initial or provisional classroom certification. Program Highlights Integrated coursework and practicum Faculty collaboration with colleagues in the higher education community and P-12 schools to ensure a well-rounded program of study Experiential and applied learning with relevant and meaningful assignments and assessments Engaging classroom interaction and discussions Flexible schedule with evening classes

2 Mission The mission of the Master of Science in Literacy Education program is to prepare highly capable and ethically responsible literacy professionals who thoroughly understand and can implement the theory and practice of literacy acquisition and instruction. Consistent with the missions of St. John Fisher College and the Ralph C. Wilson, Jr. School of Education, as well as the standards set forth by the International Reading Association and the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards, the literacy program develops the knowledge, skills, and dispositions literacy educators need in order to effectively teach all students ways of using multiple forms of text that will provide them with opportunities for success in a global community. Contact Information For information regarding application and admission to the Master of Science in Literacy Education program, please contact the Office of Graduate Admissions at (585) or The program embraces the belief that all children learn and that learning occurs when students are actively engaged in constructing meaning within a collaborative and supportive community of learners. As such, our candidates learn how to create learning environments that address the diverse learning needs of students, are informed by best practices, use ongoing meaningful assessment of student learning, and are continuously informed by self-reflection and a commitment to professional development. Finally, our candidates learn how to disseminate information about literacy development to the family and community so that literacy learning becomes meaningful in all aspects of a child s life. For specific information regarding the Master of Science in Literacy Education program, please contact Dr. Kathleen Broikou, Program Director, at (585) or Office of Graduate Admissions 690 East Avenue Rochester, NY P: (585) F: (585)

3 Program Goals This program is designed to develop literacy professionals who: Demonstrate an understanding of the theory and practice of teaching literacy. Understand literacy acquisition as something that occurs across the life span, out of school, as well as in school. Create positive connections with families and communities in order to support both in- and out-of-school literacy learning. Demonstrate an understanding and respect for cultural, linguistic, and ethnic diversity. Have the ability to create programs to address the strengths and needs of individual learners. Have advanced knowledge of the learner and learning environment, as well as practical skills in design, implementation, teaching strategies, assessment, and evaluation of literacy programs. Encourage all teachers, regardless of discipline or special areas, to understand language and literacy as tools for thinking and learning that integrate reading, writing, listening, speaking, and visual representation. Have the expertise and habits of mind that lead to equitable pedagogy in order to address the needs of all students, including those with diverse perspectives and special needs. Practice continuous reflection and professional development. Faculty The faculty in the School of Education is committed to providing high-quality programs of study, including relevant field experiences, that stimulate critical thinking and promote reflective practice. The faculty are highly qualified and model best professional practices in teaching, scholarship, advisement and service, including the assessment of their own effectiveness as related to candidate performance. The faculty collaborate with colleagues in the higher education community and P-12 schools to ensure a well-rounded program of study for all candidates. Program Format The format of the program is designed to accommodate the schedules of working teachers. Classes are offered in the late afternoon and evening during the school year. Classes are offered during the day and evening in the summer. Admission Requirements Candidates are required to have initial or provisional teacher certification and present satisfactory evidence of the ability to perform at the graduate level to be eligible for admission to the graduate program in Literacy Education at St. John Fisher College. The School of Education Admissions Committee and the program director assess applicant qualifications. Please refer to the Graduate Application for more specific application requirements.

4 Learning Outcomes Upon completion of this program candidates will be able to: Choose literacy practices that demonstrate knowledge of psychological, social, cultural, and linguistic foundations of reading and writing processes and instruction. Demonstrate knowledge of the major components of reading (phonemic awareness, word identification and phonics, vocabulary and background knowledge, fluency, comprehension strategies, and motivation) and how they are integrated into fluent reading. Use their knowledge of the writing processes, language development, writing development, and ongoing assessment to provide instruction in the components of writing, assist students in constructing meaning in their written work, and provide genuine opportunities for students to write for a variety of purposes and audiences. Demonstrate knowledge of language development and literacy acquisition and the variations related to culture and linguistic diversity. Select and use a wide range of instructional practices, approaches, methods, and curriculum materials, including technology-based practices, to support reading and writing instruction for learners at different stages of reading and writing development and from diverse cultural and linguistic backgrounds. Select and use a variety of assessment tools and practices to plan and evaluate effective reading and writing instruction that meet the needs of all students, including those at differing developmental stages and those from differing cultural and linguistic backgrounds. Create a caring, supportive, inclusive, challenging, democratic, and safe learning environment that fosters literacy development, independently and collaboratively, by integrating foundational knowledge, use of instructional practices, approaches and methods, curriculum materials, and the appropriate use of assessments. Demonstrate valuing of the role of student language, particularly student talk, in student learning, and establish an appreciation of student culture/language background as a foundation for future learning and engagement in learning. Demonstrate knowledge of the new literacies (i.e., digital, visual and media literacy) and their impact on literacy acquisition and instruction. Demonstrate an understanding and respect for the role language and literacy play within various disciplines (social studies, science, mathematics, languages other than English, etc.). Demonstrate multiple comprehension strategies appropriate within particular disciplines for development of active literacy users within the subject area. Create ways to engage students, teachers, parents, and other adults from the community to enrich instruction. Participate in, initiate, implement, and evaluate professional development programs. Contribute actively to the improvement of teaching, learning, and the advancement of knowledge and professional practice.

5 M.S. Literacy Birth Grade 6 Degree Requirements* Course # Course Name Credits GRDG 620 Nature and Acquisition of Literacy GRDG 626 Language, Literacy, and Diversity in American Schools GRDG 65 Assessment-Based Literacy Instruction GRDG 67 Practicum in Literacy: Birth Grade 6 GRDG 69 Emergent Literacy GRDG 640 Administration and Supervision of Reading and Writing Programs GRDG 650 Literacy Methods and Materials GRDG 658 Literacy Coaching Practicum GRDG 670 Theory and Practice of Integrating Literature into the Classroom GRDG 690 Capstone Project: Action Research in Literacy Total 0 M.S. Literacy Grades 5 12 Degree Requirements* Course # Course Name Credits GRDG 620 Nature and Acquisition of Literacy GRDG 626 Language, Literacy, and Diversity in American Schools GRDG 64 Literacy Instruction in the Content Areas GRDG 65 Assessment-Based Literacy Instruction GRDG 68 Practicum in Literacy: Grades 5 12 GRDG 640 Administration and Supervision of Reading and Writing Programs GRDG 652 Developing Critical Literacy Skills through Literature: Grades 5 12 GRDG 658 Literacy Coaching Practicum GRDG 670 Theory and Practice of Integrating Literature into the Classroom GRDG 690 Capstone Project: Action Research in Literacy M.S. Literacy Birth 6 and Grades 5-12 Certification Course # Course Name Credits GRDG 620 Nature and Acquisition of Literacy GRDG 626 Language, Literacy, and Diversity in American Schools GRDG 64 Literacy Instruction in the Content Areas GRDG 65 Assessment-Based Literacy Instruction Choose one of: GRDG 67 Practicum in Literacy (Birth Grade 6) GRDG 68 OR Practicum in Literacy (Grades 5 12) GRDG 69 Emergent Literacy GRDG 640 Choose one of: GRDG 650 GRDG 652 Administration and Supervision of Reading and Writing Programs Literacy Methods and Materials (Birth Grade 6) OR Developing Critical Literacy Skills through Literature (Grades 5 12) GRDG 658 Literacy Coaching Program GRDG 670 Theory and Practice of Integrating Literature into the Classroom GRDG 690 Capstone Project: Action Research in Literacy GRDG Elective One elective chosen in consultation with advisor Total 6 Please note that candidates in this program will register for one Birth Grade 6 practicum AND one Grades 5 12 practicum. *Please note that programs are subject to change. Total 0

6 Course Descriptions GRDG 620 Nature and Acquisition of Literacy () This course is an overview of theories of language and literacy acquisition, including but not limited to autonomous and ideological models of reading, socio-cultural-historical views of literacy, critical literacy, language variation, and literacy in a post-typographic world. Candidates will create an electronic portfolio. GRDG 626 Language, Literacy and Diversity in American Schools () In this course, students will examine theory and research around the concept of diversity and its relation to literacy learning. We will draw on Critical Race Theory, sociocultural theory and the concept of discourse communities to help candidates understand the educational challenges and opportunities to literacy learning in diverse communities. Questions about the unique challenges of teaching literacy in a complex classroom will be raised and consideration given to different ways of investigating those questions. Also, questions in regards to how research has contributed to our thinking and methods of teaching literacy to diverse student populations will be examined. Prerequisite or co-requisite: GRDG 620. GRDG 64 Literacy Instruction in the Content Areas () This course is designed to highlight the role of literacy acquisition and application within the content areas. Literacy and writing strategies will be presented in conjunction with New York State Learning Standards. An additional focus of the course will be to help literacy and subject area teachers address the needs of diverse learners through culturally relevant pedagogy and curriculum, the use of multicultural materials, alternative and adaptive methods, including the use of technology. GRDG 65 Assessment-Based Literacy Instruction () This course will examine the nature and function of formal and informal assessment processes in literacy instruction for students in grades -12. An examination of best practices for students in diverse school settings and a review of assessment strategies designed to enhance literacy instruction through the use of technology is addressed. A field experience component in a local school or clinic is required. GRDG 67 Practicum in Literacy () Practicum candidates will focus on the skills of a literacy specialist/coach. Candidates are assigned to a child or small group of children who need specialized instruction. Candidates will be responsible for administering various informal and formal assessments, and using and reporting the results to plan and implement specialized literacy instruction. Candidates will demonstrate their professional and pedagogical knowledge necessary for the interactive and dynamic relationships that Literacy Specialists are required to develop with educators in schools and use differentiated instruction and apply individualized and contextualized teaching and learning techniques that draw upon each student s experience and knowledge base. GRDG 68 Practicum in Literacy () Practicum candidates will focus on the skills of a literacy specialist/coach. Candidates are assigned to a child or small group of children who need specialized instruction. Candidates will be responsible for administering various informal and formal assessments, and using and reporting the results to plan and implement specialized literacy instruction. Candidates will demonstrate their professional and pedagogical knowledge necessary for the interactive and dynamic relationships that Literacy Specialists are required to develop with educators in schools and use differentiated instruction and apply individualized and contextualized teaching and learning techniques that draw upon each student s experience and knowledge base. Prerequisite: GRDG 65. GRDG 69 Emergent Literacy () This course will focus on literacy development, knowledge, and assessment for children from birth to grade two. The impact of culture and language on literacy development and the use of technology to support literacy will be explored. A field experience component in a local school or clinic is required. GRDG 640 Administration and Supervision of Reading and Writing Programs () This course is designed to aid future literacy specialists in developing proficiency in organizing and enhancing school-wide literacy programs. In addition, candidates will explore techniques, including the use of technology, for analyzing and improving curriculum and instruction, and ensuring alignment with New York State Learning Standards. Effective leadership skills, including the ability to work with individuals from diverse backgrounds, will be examined. GRDG 650 Literacy Methods and Materials () The focus is on current research-supported methods and materials used in developing the listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills of children and adolescents. An additional focus of the course will be to help literacy and subject area teachers address the needs of diverse learners through the use of multicultural materials, and alternative and adaptive methods, including the use of technology. Candidates will examine models of literacy instruction, as well as commercially published materials and programs. GRDG 652 Developing Critical Literacy through Middle Childhood and Adolescent Literature () The emphasis of this course is on critical examination of literature from multiple perspectives (e.g., linguistic, political, social, multicultural, and psychological). Candidates will use information technology and other resources to help identify and analyze literary elements of diverse texts and illustrations in relation to varying perspectives and discuss implications of these analyses for the teaching of all students. Prerequisite: GRDG 65.

7 Course Descriptions (continued) GRDG 658 Literacy Coaching Practicum () This course will focus on the application of the skills of a literacy coach. The candidate will be responsible for observing instructional practice and giving feedback, modeling research-based strategies and instruction, engaging in collaborative analysis of student assessment data and how the data informs instruction, planning and participating in a professional book study group, and providing overall leadership in literacy learning and teaching. Prerequisites: GRDG 67 OR 68. GRDG 670 Theory and Practice of Integrating Literature into the Classroom () This course focuses on literature and the theoretical considerations and practices teachers use to integrate literature into the school curriculum. Candidates are introduced to different reading theories that inform the interpretation of literature (i.e. new criticism, reader response, critical literacy, etc.). Candidates will also have opportunities to enrich and expand their pedagogical knowledge through the introduction of instructional strategies focused on the teaching of literature (i.e. discussion, writing, and technology integration). GRDG 690 Capstone Project: Action Research in Literacy () A guided experience that addresses a significant issue in literacy of intellectual interest to each candidate. Candidates will complete an action research project that provides an opportunity to practice methods and means of collecting data, engage in the process of analyzing and writing up research, and formally present research to colleagues. The project will reflect the standards in the candidate s program of study and demonstrate that the candidate has a clear understanding of the SoE s conceptual framework of social justice and the five interlocking tenets of diversity, compassion, knowledge, service, and achievement. Where possible, the candidate will demonstrate or provide evidence that he or she has acquired facility in the use of technology and information literacy to support instruction and learning. Note: A minimum of 21 hours of the program must be completed for candidates in a 0-hour program. 27 credits must be completed for candidates in the 6-hour program. Prerequisite: GRDG 67.