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1 <Insert Institution Name> National Construction Code Training Program MODULE 5 Understanding the Disability Access Provisions Welcome and introduction Welcome to this training course on the access provisions for people with disability contained in the National Construction Code. My name is and I ll be presenting this program. My training and experience mainly relate to Before we start the presentation, there are a few house keeping matters that I need to advise you about. As most of you will be aware, the Building Code of Australia (or BCA) forms Volumes One and Two of the National Construction Code and is adopted by all States and Territories as a mandatory code governing the design and construction of new buildings, as well as additions and alterations to existing buildings. This presentation has been developed to provide you with the basic information you will need to understand the scope of the access requirements of the BCA. Application of the requirements for access will require careful consideration of the BCA, State and Territory building law and regulations and in many instances referenced Australian Standards. As we move through the presentation there may issues you would like further clarification on - so please ask questions at any time. 1

2 Content of Module 5 Part 1 - Introduction to Module 5 Part 2 - Background to Access Provisions Part 3 - Performance Requirements Part 5 - Administrative Matters Summarise the areas that will be covered in this Module This module contains 5 parts: First, we will look at the background to Module 5 and recap a little on some other Modules in this series Then we will look at the background to the development of the access requirements that were included in the BCA in 2011 We will also look at the mandatory requirements of the BCA; that is the Performance Requirements Next, we will look in more detail at one method of meeting the Performance Requirements by using what are called the Deemed-to-Satisfy Provisions Finally, we will briefly look at a few State and Territory administrative matters 2

3 PART 1 Introduction to Module 5 3

4 Introduction to Module 5 This Module is one of a series produced by the Australian Building Codes Board (ABCB); the organisation responsible for the development and maintenance of the Building Code of Australia (BCA) For the purposes of this presentation it is assumed that participants have a general understanding of how the BCA works Part 1 - Introduction to Module 5 This presentation forms part of a training program that has been developed as an initiative of the Australian Building Codes Board - which we ll now refer to as the ABCB. The ABCB is the organisation responsible for the development and ongoing maintenance of the Building Code of Australia. The ABCB s training program is made up of a series of modules. This module is number 5. This presentation has been developed on the assumption that even if you have not attended presentations on Module 1, which provided an introduction to the BCA and Module 2, which dealt with the BCA s Performance Requirements you have some basic knowledge of how the BCA works. Having said that it would be good to briefly touch on a couple of fundamental issues from those modules. 4

5 Module 1 - recap Module 1 was titled An Introduction to the Building Code of Australia The objective of Module 1 was to provide information on: the background to the development of the BCA the operation of the BCA, and the application of the BCA Part 1 - Introduction to Module 5 In order to understand the material in Module 5 it is important to recap a few basic issues from Modules 1 and 2 Module 1 essentially introduced people to the development, operation and application of the BCA 5

6 Module 1 - recap BCA applies to all new building work. This includes: new buildings renovations or upgrades to existing buildings Part 1 - Introduction to Module 5 The requirements of the BCA are triggered when someone makes an application for building or construction approval for either a new building or to undertake new building work on an existing building such as an upgrade, extension or renovation. For existing buildings, the BCA will apply to the work that is covered by the building approval application Example, if level 6 of an 8 storey building is being fully upgraded only the work on the level subject to the building approval application will be required to comply with the new BCA requirements. 6

7 Module 1 - recap The BCA establishes minimum acceptable standards for new building work The BCA: is referenced in State/Territory law is amended annually requirements are intended to be cost effective is intended to eliminate poor practice does not address best practice Part 1 - Introduction to Module 5 The BCA seeks to establish a nationally consistent level of minimum acceptable standards Nothing in the BCA stops a developer from going beyond the minimum requirements to achieve best practice 7

8 Module 1 - recap Volume One contains requirements for the design and construction of commercial buildings, i.e. Class 2 to 9 buildings, plus some Class 10 building matters Volume Two contains requirements for the design and construction of domestic buildings, i.e. Class 1 and 10 buildings Part 1 - Introduction to Module 5 While some larger companies work in both the housing and commercial sector, in general, industry tends to work in either the housing sector or the commercial sector. The BCA endeavours to follow this division 8

9 Module 2 - recap Module 2 was titled Understanding the BCA s Performance Requirements The objective of Module 2 was to provide information on how to comply with the BCA without using Deemed-to-Satisfy Provisions, i.e. by developing an Alternative Solution Part 1 - Introduction to Module 5 While most times those responsible for new building work follow a deemed-tosatisfy path for achieving compliance, Module 2 focused on how to achieve compliance by developing an Alternative Solution It is important to just recap one aspect of Module 2 which covered the structure and hierarchy of the BCA to ensure a clearer understanding of the content of Module 5 9

10 Objective Functional Statement Performance Requirement Building Solutions DTS Provisions Alternative Solutions Documentary Evidence Verification Methods Comparative Analysis Guidance Mandatory Methods of achieving compliance Assessment Methods Expert Judgement Part 1 - Introduction to Module 5 The BCA is split into sections covering various building elements, for example, Part F2 deals with Sanitary facilities. Each section is structured in a hierarchy. At the top are broad Objectives and Functional Statements which provide overall guidance. Below that are a set of Performance Requirements which are the mandatory parts of the BCA. A person responsible for a building must be able to show a building complies with these requirements. Under that sit two methods for achieving compliance with each Performance Requirement using the Deemed-to-Satisfy Provisions which provide technical building solutions or by developing Alternative Solutions A building does not have to comply with the Deemed-to-Satisfy Provisions if it can be demonstrated to the relevant Building Control Authority that a proposed Alternative Solution complies with the relevant Performance Requirement. Module 2 then went on to look at Assessment Methods but this Module will not be revisiting those issues. 10

11 MODULE 5 Understanding the Disability Access Provisions Now back to Module 5. 11

12 Objective of Module 5 The objective of Module 5 is to provide basic information on BCA provisions for people with disability relating to Class 1b, Class 2 to 9 buildings, as well as Class 10 buildings Information is also available from the ABCB website: Part 1 - Introduction to Module 5 The module provides a basic overview of the BCA access provisions. As building professionals you will need to give careful consideration to the BCA, State and Territory building laws and regulations and referenced technical standards to ensure buildings comply with relevant laws. Proceed to next slide 12

13 People with disability Broad definition of disability includes people who- are blind or have low vision; have learning or intellectual disabilities; are deaf or hearing-impaired; have a physical disability; experience mental health or psychological difficulties; and people with an acquired brain injury. Part 1 - Introduction to Module 5 The definition of disability used in anti-discrimination law is very broad and covers about 20% of Australians People protected from discrimination by those laws may experience difficulties using buildings, so buildings need to be designed and constructed in ways to ensure they are accessible. It is not just people with a mobility disability who experience barriers to accessing and using buildings. Example: a person with low vision might experience difficulty using poorly designed stairs. Example: a person with a hearing impairment might experience difficulty hearing a teller behind a fully screened counter. Good access has benefits for a much wider group of people than those who currently have a disability. For example, those of us who will have a disability in the future, families with small children, older Australians and anyone delivering or picking up goods. 13

14 Principle of access Provide safe, equitable and dignified access to buildings, and facilities and services within buildings Part 1 - Introduction to Module 5 The BCA sets out how to provide safe, equitable and dignified access to buildings. Good design is not just about providing some access. It is about ensuring, as far as possible, that people with disability can use buildings independently and with dignity. Example, accessible entry to a new building must be the principle pedestrian entrance and not one around the back of the building. Example, gaining access to a swimming pool should not rely on someone having to be carried into it. 14

15 PART 2 Background to NCC Access Provisions 15

16 General background Disability access requirements have been in the BCA since 1990 Focus was on access to commercial and public buildings (Classes 3, 5-9) Part 2 - Background to Access Provisions Access requirements are not new to the BCA Indeed many of the issues covered in the current BCA remain very similar to previous requirements Historically private housing has not been covered by any BCA access requirements 16

17 BCA access provisions BCA has historically required access for people with disability to be provided: to a building within a building (including lifts, signage and hearing augmentation) to certain carparking spaces to suitable sanitary facilities Part 2 - Background to Access Provisions There has been a progressive increase in access requirements in the BCA covering a range of building elements such as ramps, stairs, accessible toilets and signage. While these requirements remain within the new BCA there are a number of new elements that will be covered in this module. Note: some people may not know what a hearing augmentation system is. It can be described as a device to assist people with hearing impairment to access audible information in places such as a theatre, lecture hall, conference centre or bank where tellers are behind a glass screen for example. Typical devices use an induction (hearing) loop, radio frequency or infrared technology. A hearing augmentation system is required in buildings that have built-in sound amplification systems.. 17

18 BCA scope The BCA only addresses the physical fabric and layout of a building, it does not: address the fixtures and fittings such as furniture or reception desks used in a building address some wayfinding information such as room numbers or general signs address management policies or staff behavior Part 2 - Background to Access Provisions The BCA is mainly concerned with the physical construction of the building. Generally speaking what happens after construction in terms of fitout and ongoing use and management are not covered by the BCA, but continue to be covered by discrimination law. Example, if a building complies with the new BCA when it is constructed but a new fitout limits access, those responsible for the fitout may be subject to complaints. Example, if the staff at a nightclub refuse to allow a blind person entry. 18

19 The challenge of inconsistent laws The Disability Discrimination Act (DDA) has applied to buildings since 1993 Complaints could be made about the level and quality of access a building provided Buildings could comply with the BCA, but still be subject to a successful DDA complaint Uncertainty for building industry Part 2 - Background to Access Provisions Even though a building could comply with the BCA at the time it was built, under discrimination law, complaints could still be made about access problems individuals faced. Building law and discrimination law was not consistent leading to uncertainty for the building industry including developers, designers, builders and certifiers. There have been many successful DDA complaints about buildings which were BCA compliant. For example, Cox v the State of Queensland 1994 made against the Brisbane Convention Centre. The cost of rectification was in the order of $

20 Achieving consistency In 2001, Federal Gov t asked ABCB to develop proposals to address inconsistency Resulted in the development of Premises Standards and BCA amendments to align the two Part 2 - Background to Access Provisions Following approaches from industry, building professionals and community groups, the Federal Government resolved to address the inconsistency by developing a disability standard covering buildings, which would form part of a new BCA when completed. The disability standard was to set out details of what was required, in terms of building design and construction, to comply with the DDA. Complying with building law and the BCA would then also achieve compliance with the disability standard (formal title; Disability (Access to Premises buildings) Standards 2010, known as the Premises Standards). 20

21 Development of Premises Standards Developed through stakeholder committees, specialist working groups and specialist consultants Proposals were refined through extensive industry and community consultation Draft provisions subjected to formal regulatory impact analysis process Part 2 - Background to Access Provisions As with the development of any new regulations, the ABCB consulted widely with the community and the building industry to ensure that the new provisions would be effective and generally acceptable. 21

22 Regulation Impact Statement (RIS) All proposals for new regulation, including the Premises Standards and changes to the BCA, are subjected to a rigorous regulation impact assessment process that includes cost benefit analysis The Premises Standards RIS is available from the ABCB website Part 2 - Background to Access Provisions The activities of the ABCB are governed by an Inter-government Agreement (IGA) that requires it to comply with the Council of Australian Government (COAG) general principles for the development of regulations. In essence, these principles only allow new regulations to be introduced if other means of achieving compliance with government policy, e.g. market forces, consumer education or development of "guideline" documents, can be demonstrated to have failed or give lower net benefit. 22

23 Benefits for industry In addition to improving access, RIS process sought to ensure new requirements: are cost-effective can be reasonably achieved provide the greatest certainty possible Part 2 - Background to Access Provisions The RIS showed the proposed Premises Standards and new BCA were a costeffective way of regulating for better access and in most instances could be reasonably achieved. The RIS also showed that, by changing the BCA so it required the same as the Premises Standards, industry could be confident that compliance with the new BCA would also achieve compliance with the Premises Standards. 23

24 Background to new requirements 1995: Building Access Policy Committee (BAPC), established by ABCB, begins its work on progressive changes to the BCA 2001: Gov t asks ABCB to develop proposals for Premises Standards and changes to BCA Part 2 - Background to Access Provisions The Building Access Policy Committee that developed the draft included representatives from designers and architects, developers, the construction industry, building certifiers, regulators and people with disability. Between 1995 and 2000 the ABCB introduced a number of improvements for access, but in 2001 started work on the development of the Premises Standards at the request of the then Government. 24

25 Background to new requirements 2005: Draft Premises Standards and a Regulation Impact Statement released for public comment 2006: ABCB develops revised proposals and a revised Regulation Impact Statement following consideration of public comment Part 2 - Background to Access Provisions After the ABCB released the draft Premises Standards and Consultation RIS for public comment in 2005, both the Premises Standards and the RIS were revised in 2006 to take into consideration the comments received. 25

26 Background to new requirements 2008: Draft Disability (Access to Premises Buildings) Standards (Premises Standards) tabled in Parliament and referred to a House of Representatives Committee to conduct a public inquiry 2009: Parliamentary Committee makes recommendations in its report Access All Areas Part 2 - Background to Access Provisions A Parliamentary Committee undertook the third and final round of consultation on the draft and made a number of recommendations for change. 26

27 Background to new requirements February 2010: Government responds to report and finalises Premises Standards 2010: ABCB aligns BCA to reflect content of Premises Standards 1 May 2011: Premises Standards and BCA 2011 adopted Part 2 - Background to Access Provisions Once the Premises Standards was finalised, the ABCB was able to proceed with aligning the BCA to reflect the requirements of the Premises Standards. 27

28 Premises Standards structure Premises Standards comprise: Parts 1 6 including trigger dates and objectives, scope, exceptions and concessions and review information Access Code for Buildings which provides the Performance Requirements and Deemed-to- Satisfy Provisions Part 2 - Background to Access Provisions While this module is about the BCA we need to look briefly at the structure of the Premises Standards to understand how they fit together The Premises Standards is in two sections. The first consists of 6 parts which cover legal and administrative issues including some general concessions and exemptions. The second part is the Access Code for Buildings. This is the part that includes Performance Requirements and Deemed-to-Satisfy Provisions which give the technical detail on how to comply. Those familiar with the BCA will recognise that the Access Code is written in the same style as the BCA. 28

29 Achieving consistency Relevant provisions in Parts 1 6 are to be reflected in State and Territory building control systems Access Code is reflected in BCA Compliance with the BCA will ensure compliance with the Access Code Part 2 - Background to Access Provisions As was the case before BCA 2011, a full understanding of building requirements can only be achieved by looking at the BCA and relevant State and Territory building laws and regulations. Changes have been made to State and Territory building control systems to reflect the relevant content of Parts 1 6 of the Premises Standards. The BCA changes reflect the content of the Access Code. Taken together, building professionals can be confident that if they apply the BCA and relevant State and Territory building laws and regulations they are also ensuring a building complies with the Premises Standards. 29

30 Voluntary best practice The Premises Standards and BCA contain the minimum requirements for access Some project briefs may require a higher standard Best practice and innovation is still possible and encouraged Part 2 - Background to Access Provisions As a regulatory document, the BCA contains the minimum acceptable requirements. Individual building project briefs and documentation can stipulate that the project exceeds the minimum requirements. Best practice and innovation is still possible. Example; if an innovative hearing augmentation system is developed, it could be used as an Alternative Solution. Example; a shopping center may choose to increase the number of accessible parking spaces from the required minimum to meet local demand. 30

31 PART 3 Disability Access Performance Requirements Parts D3, E3, and F2 of Volume One 31

32 Key Performance Requirements Key Performance Requirements relating to access: DP1 Access to a building DP2 Access within a building DP6 Travel path to an exit DP8 Accessible carparking DP9 Communication system for hearing impaired EP3.4 Lifts FP2.1 Sanitary facilities Part 3 - Performance Requirements Performance Requirements relating to access sit primarily in Section D of the BCA although there are two others in Section E and F. The Performance Requirements are the mandatory parts of the BCA building control authorities must be convinced that a building solution complies with these requirements via either the Deemed-to-Satisfy Provisions or a suitable Alternative Solution 32

33 Overall access objectives To provide, as far as is reasonable, people with safe, equitable and dignified access to: a building; and the services and facilities within a building Part 3 - Performance Requirements In broad terms the Performance Requirements seek to ensure buildings provide a continuous accessible path of travel. A continuous accessible path of travel is one that does not include a step, stairway, turnstile, revolving door, escalator, moving walkway or other feature that might impede safe, equitable and dignified movement. Access is required: to a building from the allotment boundary between associated buildings that are required to be accessible between levels (via lifts, ramps and stairs) In most buildings, to all areas normally used by the occupants to signage including braille and tactile to required hearing augmentation systems to suitable sanitary facilities 33

34 DP1 - overview Access must be provided to enable people to: approach a building from the road boundary, associated accessible building and associated accessible carparking space get into a building and to all areas normally used by occupants including toilets identify accessible facilities Part 3 - Performance Requirements While there are some exceptions and exemptions within the BCA, access is generally required to all parts of the building used by the occupants - who may be customers, visitors or staff The Deemed-to-Satisfy Provisions in the BCA and referenced Australian Standards describe the minimum requirements to meet these Performance Requirements. Example, while the Performance Requirement requires access to all areas used by the occupants, the Deemed-to-Satisfy Provisions allow for concessions in the number of entrances that need to be accessible Example, while the Performance Requirement requires access to all areas used by the occupants, the Deemed-to-Satisfy Provisions allow for concessions in relation to lift or ramp access to upper floors in some small buildings 34

35 DP2 - overview People must be able to move safely to and within a building Special attention should be paid to: walking surfaces doors ramps stairways landings handrails Part 3 - Performance Requirements DP2 focuses on safe movement to and within a building Example, the need for slip-resistant walking surfaces Example, the need to ensure doors are installed in a way that does not impede access Example, the need for suitable handrails to assist and provide stability for people using stairs or ramps 35

36 DP6 - overview People must be able to safely evacuate the building Building use and the characteristics of the occupants, including their mobility, must be considered Part 3 - Performance Requirements DP6 addresses the issue of safe evacuation of a building and requires that the design of paths of travel to exits must be appropriate considering the use of a building, the number of occupants and issues such as the mobility of occupants. As with other Performance Requirements the Deemed-to-Satisfy Provisions in the BCA and referenced Australian Standards describe the minimum requirements to meet this Performance Requirement. 36

37 DP8 - overview Carparking spaces suitable for use by people with disability must be provided Spaces must be marked and easy to find Part 3 - Performance Requirements DP8 addresses the need for carparking spaces suitable for use by people who use wheelchairs or walking frames or who may have other disabilities that require additional space to be able to get in and out of their vehicle Accessible carparking spaces have minimum dimensions to ensure a person getting out of a car can, for example, get into their wheelchair safely 37

38 DP9 - overview An inbuilt communication system, such as a lecture theatre PA system, must be suitable for people who are deaf or have a hearing impairment Part 3 - Performance Requirements DP9 addresses the need to ensure that where there is an inbuilt communication system, as might be found in a cinema or concert hall, a means of giving access to the information to people with a hearing impairment must be provided. As with other Performance Requirements the Deemed-to-Satisfy Provisions in the BCA and referenced Australian Standards describe the minimum requirements to meet this Performance Requirement. 38

39 EP3.4 - overview When a passenger lift is provided in a building required to be accessible, it must be suitable for use by people with disability. Part 3 - Performance Requirements EP3.4 addresses the need to ensure that when passenger lifts are used to transport people from one level to another in a building that is required to be accessible, they must be designed and constructed in a way that allows people with disability to independently use them. What makes a lift suitable for use by people with disability will be covered in the section on Deemed-to-Satisfy Provisions 39

40 FP2.1 - overview Sanitary facilities suitable for use by people with disability must be provided at convenient locations Part 3 - Performance Requirements FP2.1 addresses the need to ensure people with disability are able to use sanitary facilities in an accessible building Apart from the accessible unisex toilets most people will be familiar with, this Performance Requirement also covers accessible showers and toilets suitable for use by people with ambulant disabilities, which will be covered in the section on Deemed-to-Satisfy Provisions 40

41 PART 4 Disability Access Deemed-to-Satisfy Provisions 41

42 Deemed-to-Satisfy Provisions One method of meeting Performance Requirements Compliance with Deemed-to-Satisfy Provisions of BCA ensures compliance with Deemed-to-Satisfy Provisions of Access Code Reminder: The Performance Requirements are the mandatory requirements of the BCA. The Deemed-to-Satisfy Provisions describe one way to meet those requirements. It is in the Deemed-to-Satisfy Provisions that you will find a number of concessions and exemptions that define some limits to the level of access required in specific buildings or areas of buildings. As described earlier, compliance with the Deemed-to-Satisfy Provisions of the BCA ensures compliance with the Access Code of the Premises Standards. 42

43 Parts D3, E3, F2 and H2 Part D3 covers general building access requirements Part E3 covers lifts Part F2 covers accessible toilets and showers Part H2 covers requirements for public transport buildings The Deemed-to-Satisfy Provisions are contained within 4 Parts 43

44 D3.1 General access requirements 44

45 D3.1 General requirements Table D3.1 sets out which buildings and parts of buildings have to be accessible Different classes of buildings have different access requirements Table D3.1 is the main roadmap for determining which buildings need to be accessible and to what extent. It is based on building classifications, and in some cases, specific uses within classifications. Different classes of buildings may have different access requirements Example, while office blocks generally require access to all areas normally used by the occupants, hotels only require access to common areas of the building and some units but not all. This Table has to be read alongside other parts of the BCA which describe some concessions and exemptions from the general rules in Table D3.1 Example, D3.4 provides some general exemptions for access to specified areas of buildings 45

46 Some useful terms Accessible means having features to enable use by people with disability. Accessway means a continuous, accessible path of travel (as defined in AS ) to, into or within a building. Before looking at the broad requirements for access for different classes of buildings in Table D3.1, considering a couple of definitions will be useful In the BCA, a number of terms are specifically defined and appear in italics to alert users that a special meaning has been ascribed. These definitions are found in A1.3 Under the BCA something is accessible if it has features that ensure people with disability can get into and use a building The BCA also includes a definition of an accessway which is generally a continuous accessible path of travel which does not include any barrier for a person with disability and which meets the technical specifications found in Australian Standard AS This means essentially that, in order to meet the Deemed-to-Satisfy Provisions of the BCA, a building must meet the requirements of Parts D3, E3, F2 and H2 and the technical specifications in referenced Australian Standards 46

47 References to Australian Standards AS contains technical information on the construction of accessways, for example: dimensions and clearances at doorways design of handrails layout of accessible toilets As was the case with previous editions of the BCA, not all of the technical detail is contained in the BCA itself. Some of it is in other documents referred to in the BCA, such as Australian Standards. During this presentation, won t be going into detail on the content of all these documents, but will refer to relevant significant changes AS (Design for access and mobility, Part 1 General requirements for access New building work) is a key reference when dealing with disability access. It contains most of the technical information necessary to ensure Deemed-to- Satisfy Provisions of the BCA are met Other Australian Standards cover issues such as lift requirements (the AS 1735 suite) and specifications for tactile ground surface indicators (AS ). In order to fully understand the application of the Deemed-to-Satisfy Provisions of the BCA, practitioners need to refer to these Australian Standards. 47

48 Class 1b small hostels, B&B Specifies number of dwellings required to be accessible Specifies number of bedrooms and sanitary facilities required to be accessible Specifies common areas required to be accessible in B&Bs, guest houses etc Table D3.1 sets out access requirements for Class 1b buildings which include guest houses, small hostels, B&Bs, farmstay, cabins and retreats used for holiday accommodation If the accommodation consists of cabins or cottages or similar as stand alone dwellings, the requirement is for at least 1 dwelling to be accessible and have accessible washing and toileting facilities. However, this requirement is only triggered if there are 4 or more cabins or cottages used for holiday accommodation on the allotment. If the accommodation is a boarding house, guest house, B&B, hostel or similar, access is required to at least one bedroom and associated washing and toileting facilities and to common areas such as dining rooms, games rooms, lounge rooms or similar The Premises Standards has different requirements for B&B type accommodation depending on whether the facility is newly built or an existing building. State and Territory building control systems need to be looked at to see how they reflect these different requirements. 48

49 Class 2 apartment blocks Access required from a pedestrian entrance to the front doors of sole-occupancy units (SOU) on at least one level Common areas required to be accessible including BBQ area, gym, pool If other levels are served by a lift or ramp, similar access must be provided on those levels Access requirements for Class 2 buildings are new to the BCA Access must be provided through at least one pedestrian entrance to at least 1 floor containing SOUs but only to the front door of those SOU. The BCA does not require accessible design inside the SOU The BCA also requires access to at least 1 of each type of room or facility used in common by all the residents of the apartment block Example, a small apartment block has two floors and no common facilities used by all residents. In this case access would only be required through the building entrance and along the public corridors on one floor (most likely the ground floor) Example, if a larger apartment block has 3 floors and includes a laundry and a BBQ area for use by all residents on the ground floor, access would be required to the laundry, BBQ area and the front doors of SOU on the ground floor. The Premises Standards does not require any Class 2 building built before 1 May 2011 to provide access when renovating or upgrading. State and territory building laws and regulations need to be looked at to see if they reflect these different requirements. 49

50 Class 3 hotels and motels Access required from a pedestrian entrance to the front doors of sole-occupancy units (SOU) on at least one level Specifies common areas required to be accessible including BBQ area, gym, pool If other levels are served by a lift or ramp, similar access must be provided on those levels For hotels and motels, there are requirements for both common areas and accommodation units to be accessible. For the common areas, access is required to the front door of all units on at least 1 level and to at least 1 of each type of common room or space. These requirements also apply to all levels served by a lift or accessible ramp. Example, a small hotel has two floors and no common facilities other than reception. In this case access would only be required through the building entrance and along the public corridors on one floor (most likely the ground floor) and to the reception area Example, if a larger hotel has 3 floors and includes a reception area, restaurant and a BBQ area for use by all residents on the ground floor. Access would be required to the reception area, restaurant, BBQ area and the front doors of SOU on the one level. 50

51 Class 3 hotels and motels Specifies the number of accessible SOUs required depending on size of hotel/motel Specifies location and groupings of accessible SOUs to ensure choice In addition to certain common areas, Table D3.1 requires a specified number of accessible SOUs be provided depending on the size of the hotel or motel Example, a hotel with 15 SOUs must have 2 accessible SOU with associated washing and toilet facilities Table D3.1 also specifies that no more than 2 accessible SOUs can be located next to each other and that, if more than 2 accessible SOU are required, they must be representative of the range of rooms available Example, if a hotel has 100 SOUs, half of which are superior quality, some of the five required accessible SOUs should also be of superior quality in order to provide occupants a choice of accommodation options representative of the range of rooms available. 51

52 Classes 5, 6, 7, 8 and 9a To and within: all areas normally used by the occupants Class 7a (carparking) to and within any level containing accessible carparking spaces Class 5 buildings are office buildings Class 6 buildings are service or retail outlets including cafes, libraries, showrooms, grocery shops and banks Class 7b buildings are generally storage buildings such as warehouses and wholesale retail buildings Class 8 buildings are generally laboratories, factories or buildings in which goods or produce are made or assembled Class 9a buildings are generally health care facilities For these Classes of buildings, access is to be provided to and within all areas normally used by the occupants An occupant is anyone who can reasonably be expected to be in a building. This includes staff, the general public or visitors. Example, this would include public reception and retail areas, offices, secure areas for staff only, staff amenity rooms and the like This general requirement for access to all areas needs to be read alongside any exemptions and limitations found in other parts of D3 Example, in some situations lift or ramp access to the upper floor of a small 2 storey building is not required under D3.2 Class 7a buildings are carparks, and for this Class of building, access is required to and within any level containing accessible carparking spaces 52

53 Class 9b educational/assembly For schools, early childhood centres and universities etc. to all areas normally used by the occupants For assembly buildings such as cinemas or concert halls to all areas normally used by the occupants, but not every tier or level if no wheelchair seating spaces are provided on that level Class 9b buildings include schools, colleges, universities and early childhood centres as well as cinemas, theatres, sports stadiums and concert halls. For Class 9b buildings such as cinemas, theatres, stadiums etc. there are requirements in another section of D3 for accessible spaces for wheelchair users. If any particular seating platform or tier in a building does not have accessible seating spaces, access does not need to be provided to that level. Example, if a new cinema has two levels but all the required wheelchair accessible spaces can be provided on level 1, there is no requirement for access to be provided to level 2 53

54 Class 9c aged care Requirements for aged care facilities are essentially the same as for Class 3 buildings, including access to specified common areas and numbers of accessible SOUs Aged care buildings are those that provide residential accommodation for aged persons where personal care services are provided Requirements for access are similar to those required for a hotel/motel Not every SOU in an aged care facility need be an accessible SOU 54

55 Class 10a toilet block/shelter If located in an accessible area access is required to and within an accessible toilet, change room or shelter Class 10a buildings would generally be non-habitable buildings or facilities like a toilet block, public shelter or change room at a sports field The requirement for access is limited to those Class 10a buildings that are located in an accessible area. Example, a toilet block next to a car park for a sports field would be considered to be in an accessible area whereas a shelter built 5 kilometers into a walking track in a National Park would not be considered to be in an accessible area. 55

56 Class 10c swimming pool Swimming pools, other than private pools, with a perimeter greater than 40 m are required to provide some means of access into the pool The requirement for access into pools is limited to public pools such as hotel pools, council pools, pools in sports or health centres and the like Private back yard pools and those available exclusively for use by, for example, residents in the penthouse unit in an apartment block or hotel are not required to provide access The 40 m perimeter limit generally excludes access requirements for small pools such as plunge pools or hot-tubs. 56

57 D3.2 Access to buildings 57

58 Access to buildings D3.2 covers the requirements for access: to a building from the allotment boundary; between associated accessible buildings; to a building from accessible carparking spaces on the allotment Accessways must be provided from the main points of entry at the allotment boundary. This might require more than one accessway from the allotment boundary depending on the location of the building and the number of pedestrian entry points. An associated accessible building connected by a pedestrian link might include two buildings operated by the same company where a specific pedestrian link has been created other than the public footpath outside of the buildings allotment. Where an accessible carparking space is required within an allotment, the space must be linked to the building it serves. A council public carpark outside the building allotment would not be required to have an accessway to any particular building. 58

59 Access to buildings D3.2 also specifies: number of accessible entrances required number of accessible doorways required when there are multiple doorways at an entrance where a required accessible doorway has multiple leaves, one of the leaves must have a clear opening width of at least 850 mm The principal pedestrian entrance to a building must always be accessible If there is more than one pedestrian entrance, 50% of entrances including the principle entrance, must be accessible unless the entrance serves an area exempted by D3.4 If a building has a floor area greater than 500 m 2 in total, no inaccessible entrance can be more than 50 m from an accessible entrance D3.2 provides details of how to determine how many doorways must be accessible at an entrance and specifies that when a required accessible doorway has multiple leaves (other than if it is an automatically opening doorway) one of the leaves must have a clear opening of at least 850 mm so that a person with a disability using a wheelchair, for example, does not have to open both leaves to enter 59

60 D3.3 Parts of a building to be accessible 60

61 Parts of buildings to be accessible D3.3 covers: ramps and stairways passenger lifts passing and turning spaces on corridors small building concession carpet pile height D3.3 covers a number of accessible features [Read the content of D3.3 from the slide] 61

62 D3.3 - Ramps Ramps are a way of providing a continuous accessible path of travel between levels Ramps must comply with AS Concessions for fire-isolated ramps AS provides detailed specifications for 4 types or ramps. General access ramps, threshold ramps, kerb ramps and step ramps Example, a general access ramp is required when raising more than 190 mm in height between levels. It must have handrails, landings every 9 m, a gradient between 1 in 14 and 1 in 20 and tactile ground surface indicators (TGSI) at the top and bottom Example, a step ramp can be used when raising no more than 190 mm in height between levels. It does not have to have handrails or TGSI and can have a gradient up to 1 in 10 The BCA does not require these features on a ramp used as a fire-isolated ramp Note that D3.11 limits the use of connected access ramps to a combined vertical rise of 3.6 m this limitation recognises that ramps going higher than 3.6 m are likely to be difficult to use due to fatigue 62

63 D3.3 - Stairways Stairways cannot form part of a continuous accessible path of travel but where provided, must meet certain requirements Stairways must comply with AS Concessions for fire-isolated stairways AS provides detailed specifications for stairways which apply to all stairways except fire-isolated stairways Example, stairways must include features such as continuous handrails on both sides, opaque risers, luminance contrast nosings on treads and TGSI at the top and bottom of the stairs Fire-isolated stairways are only required to have luminance contrast nosings and handrails on one side Note: luminance contrast refers to the amount of light reflected from one surface or component, compared to the amount of light reflected from the background or surrounding surfaces. High luminance contrast between the two surfaces ensures good visibility. The BCA and AS require 30% luminance contrast in various situations including at the nosings of steps. 63

64 D3.3 - Lifts D3.3 requires every passenger lift to comply with E3.6, which provides the detailed requirements for passenger lifts E3.6 will be covered later in the presentation 64

65 D3.3 - Passing and turning spaces Passing spaces are required every 20 m along an accessway where a clear line of sight is not possible Turning spaces are required every 20 m along an accessway and within 2m of a dead-end Specifications for passing and turning spaces are in AS Passing and turning spaces are required to ensure a person using a wheelchair does not have to back up significant distances along a narrow passageway A passing space can also serve as a turning space and the circulation space required at an intersection of two passageways is also sufficient to serve as a passing/turning space The dimensions for passing and turning spaces can be found in AS

66 D3.3 - Small building concession While generally access is required to all levels of buildings, there is a concession for certain small buildings In some 2 and 3 storey buildings where the storeys, other than the entrance storeys, are each under 200 m 2, an accessible ramp or lift does not have to be provided to those storeys The small building concession takes account of the relative costs and loss of net lettable space of installing a lift or ramp into a small building compared to the total cost of the building The concession only applies to 2 and 3 storey buildings; a building of 4 or more stories must have access to all levels This concession is only available for Class 5, 6, 7b or 8 buildings Example, if a three storey building is 600 square metres on the ground floor and has two upper floors each of 300 square metres, all levels must be accessible Example, if a three storey building is 600 square metres on the ground floor and has two upper floors each of 190 square metres, an accessible ramp or lift need not be provided to serve those upper floors. However, note that all other accessible features still need to be provided on those upper levels Example, if a three storey building is 600 square metres on the ground floor and has a second floor of 300 and a third floor of only 150 square metres, because at least one of the upper floors is over 200 square metres all levels must be accessible 66

67 D3.3 - Carpet pile height While the use of carpets on an accessway is allowed, if the carpet pile is too high it would make movement in a wheelchair difficult A combined pile carpet height and backing thickness of up to 15 mm is allowed Traversing carpet can be very difficult for people using wheelchairs because of the rolling resistance. This requirement for carpet pile height over-rides the technical specifications found in AS

68 Additional features While D3.3 specifically refers to design features such as ramps and stairways, the general requirement to comply with AS applies to other accessible features such as: doors and doorways switches and controls While the BCA does not specifically refer to some of the features that form part of a continuous accessible path of travel or make a building accessible such as doors, doorways and switches, they are nonetheless important aspects of access and usability As a general rule of thumb, unless specifically excluded, all the design specifications in AS should be applied to building elements in areas required to be accessible 68

69 Doorways for doorways, AS provides specifications for: clear opening dimensions force for opening circulation space around doorway luminance contrast door controls AS provides details for the design and construction of doors and doorways Example, doorways must have a clear minimum opening of 850 mm Example, circulation space at doorways must be sufficient to allow a person using a wheelchair to get access to the handle and turn into or out of a narrow passage. AS contains detailed requirements for circulation depending on the width of the passageway, size of the door and direction of travel as these all affect accessibility. Example, AS specifies luminance contrast requirements between the door leaf and surrounding wall, for example, in order to assist with identification of the doorway for people with low vision. Example, door handles must be located at specified heights and meet certain specifications for ease of use 69

70 Door controls 1. Round knob 2. Lever type 3. D type Doorknobs can be difficult for people who have a disability which affects hand and arm function. Opening doors can require a combination of gripping, twisting, pushing or pulling. Photo 1 is a round knob. This is difficult for people with limited arm mobility and dexterity to operate. Successful operation requires grip, a twist and a push. Photo 2 is a lever type handle. While this is an improvement, it is still possible for a hand to slip off. Photo 3 is a D type handle and the type required by AS The shape provides support and prevents hands from slipping off. It provides support for closing the door. 70

71 D3.4 Exemptions 71

72 Exemptions D3.4 allows exemptions from general rule of access to all areas Exemptions need to be assessed on a case-by-case basis This is no different to other parts of the BCA where professional judgement is required While access is generally required to all areas normally used by building occupants there are some areas that are exempt In these situations a continuous accessible path of travel is not required This has always been the case in the BCA and professional judgements will have to be made on a case by case basis 72

73 Exemptions Areas which pose a health or safety risk or are otherwise inappropriate for people with disability (such as a foundry floor or rigging loft) are exempt Under D3.4, accessways are not required to certain areas within buildings where providing access would be inappropriate because of the nature of the area or the tasks undertaken in that area. These areas could include rigging lofts, waste-containment areas, foundry floors, loading docks, fire lookouts, plant and equipment rooms and other similar areas. Assessment of these areas will need to be made on a case-by-case basis. Care needs be taken, however, to ensure that any assessment of the need to utilise this exemption is not based on assumptions about the ability of people with disability or people with a particular type of disability to undertake work in those settings. 73

74 D3.5 Accessible Carparking 74

75 Carparking If a carpark is provided in a building or in a carparking area on the same allotment, accessible carparking spaces must be provided Accessible carparking spaces must be designated with signage if more than 5 spaces in total Accessible carparking spaces must be provided in a Class 7a building (carpark) and in a carparking area on the same allotment as a building required to be accessible. In other words if a building is required to be accessible by Table D3.1, accessible carparking spaces must be provided in any carpark building or carparking area associated with the building if on the same allotment. Accessible carparking spaces need not be provided where a carparking service is provided, such as a valet service, where direct access to the carpark is not available to the public. If the carpark has a total of more than 5 spaces, the accessible spaces must be designated and signed as accessible spaces. Where there are 5 spaces or less, the accessible space need not be designated or signed so as to restrict its use only for people with disability. 75

76 Carparking Proportion of accessible carparking spaces determined by Table D3.5 Accessible carparking spaces must comply with AS/NZS The proportion of accessible carparking spaces required is calculated using Table D3.5. Example, a Class 6 building such as a shopping centre with up to 1000 carparking spaces must have 1 accessible carparking space for every 50 spaces provided Example, an office building (Class 5) or a school (Class 9b) must have 1 accessible carparking space for every 100 spaces provided An accessible carparking space must be connected to an accessible entry to a building via a continuous accessible path of travel The specifications for accessible carparking spaces are found in AS/NZS Parking facilities Off-street parking for people with disabilities 76

77 Carparking Accessible space Accessible space Bollard 5400 Shared areas 2400 Parking aisle or roadway The slide shows an arrangement for an accessible carparking space as required by AS/NZS Two adjacent accessible spaces may share a single unloading area, which must be protected by a bollard to prevent the space from being occupied by a vehicle. 77

78 D3.6 Signage 78

79 Signage BCA contains requirements for certain signage related directly to building matters, including: identification of all sanitary facilities location and type of hearing augmentation directional information in some situations The BCA requires accessible signage to identify toilets and showers, rooms with hearing augmentation systems, directions to an accessible entrance from an inaccessible entrance and directions to an accessible unisex toilet from a bank of toilets that does not include an accessible unisex toilet. Some of this signage must include International symbols for access and some must be provided in tactile and braille form to assist blind people and people with low vision Note: Other signage that might be found in a building such as tenants board information, room numbers or directions to particular spaces are not covered by the BCA. 79

80 Signage - toilets All toilets must be identified using tactile and braille signage in addition to male/female signage All accessible unisex toilets must incorporate the international symbol of access All accessible unisex toilets must identify if the toilet is left or right hand transfer If there is no accessible unisex toilet at a bank of toilets, directional signage must be provided indicating the closest accessible toilet All toilets, not just accessible unisex toilets, must have accessible signage in the form of tactile and braille signage In addition, an accessible unisex toilet must be identified by the international symbol of access (the wheelchair symbol) People using wheelchairs transfer from their chair to the toilet pan in different ways. For some people transferring to the left is easier than to the right and visa versa. When a building has more than one accessible unisex toilet they must be designed in a way that alternates between left and right hand transfer and the signage for the toilet must provide that information in the form of a L or R In some situations a standard block of toilets must also have a cubicle designed for use by people with ambulant disabilities such as people with arthritis who may find it very difficult to lower and raise from the pan. Where the ambulant accessible cubicles are required they must have tactile and braille signage on the door of the cubicle to indicate that they are suitable for use by an ambulant person with a mobility disability. In some situations, there is no requirement for an accessible unisex toilet at each bank of male and female toilets. When this is allowed, directional signage, incorporating the international symbol of access must be provided at the inaccessible toilets directing people to the nearest accessible toilet. 80

81 Non-compliant signage Required signage should not be seen as an opportunity to be creative It is specifically designed to be legible to a wide range of people, including those with cognitive or learning disabilities and must be presented in a consistent form to be easily interpreted. Discussion points: Ask audience what parts do not comply. Some suggestions are below: Sharp corners All uppercase letters Symbol is not white on blue (Internationally standardised) Serif font is used (Picture 1) Symbol is abstracted (Picture 3) 81

82 Signage - hearing augmentation Identify a room with hearing augmentation using the international symbol for deafness Within the room, indicate: type of system area covered if receivers are being used, where a receiver can be obtained Braille and tactile signage required Any space required to have a hearing-augmentation system must be identified by braille and tactile signage as well as the international symbol of deafness which is white on blue similar the international symbol of access. This signage would generally be outside the room in which the hearingaugmentation system is available. Signage within the room must indicate the type of hearing-augmentation, and the area of the room covered. Signage must also indicate if the system being used in the room requires personal receivers, and where they may be obtained if this is the case. More information on hearing augmentation will be presented later this slide only covers signage for hearing augmentation. 82

83 Signage - entrances Directional information including the international symbol of access is required at an inaccessible entrance to identify the location of the nearest accessible entrance In some situations an entrance to a building might not need to be accessible (covered under D3.2) and when this is the case, directional signage including the international symbol of access must be provided at the inaccessible entrance identifying where the closest accessible entrance is This signage is directional and does not need to be provided with braille or tactile signage 83

84 Specification D3.6 Braille and tactile signage 84

85 Specification D3.6 Provides details in relation to the: design; location; and luminance contrast required for braille and tactile signs Specification D3.6 covers issues such as: Location of signs to ensure they can be read by a braille reader Size and spacing of braille dots Fonts Luminance contrast The need for rounded edges to ensure a braille reader does not injure themselves 85

86 Braille and tactile sign location Signs should be at an accessible height - between 1200 mm and 1600 mm from the floor Braille is designed to be read with the fingers and as such, needs to be at an appropriate height. 86

87 Braille and tactile sign location A person reading braille should not be at risk of injury from opening doors or pedestrian traffic This sign including braille and tactile information warned people to not stand in front of the door but the sign is placed on the door meaning that a braille reader would have to do exactly what it is warning against 87

88 D3.7 Hearing augmentation Note: Remind participants about what a hearing augmentation system is. It can be described as a device to assist people with hearing impairment to access audible information in places such as a theatre, lecture hall, conference center or bank where tellers are behind a glass screen for example. Typical devices use induction (hearing) loop, Radio Frequency or InfraRed technology. 88

89 Hearing augmentation A hearing augmentation system is required: in a room in a Class 9b building, eg cinema in an auditorium, conference room, meeting room or room used for judiciary purposes at any ticket office, teller booth or reception area where the public is screened from service provider. but only if the room has an in-built amplification system The trigger for a requirement to have a hearing augmentation system is the provision of a built-in amplification system Example, a room in a convention centre has a built-in PA system. This room will be required to have a hearing augmentation system as well Example, a small meeting room in a law firm office does not have a built-in PA system so does not need to have a hearing augmentation system Example, a ticket booth at a railway station is screened off from the public and has a speaker system in place. This booth would be required to have a hearing augmentation system as well 89

90 Hearing augmentation Area covered depends on system used Induction loop - 80% of the floor area Receiver based systems such as radio frequency or infrared systems - 95% Ratio of receivers set out in D3.7 Emergency-only systems are exempt Scoreboard or screen announcements There are a number of hearing-augmentation systems available. A decision on which system to use will depend on a number of factors, such as the size and use of the space, external interferences and building materials used. Hearing-augmentation is not required to cover 100% of the floor area of rooms because such coverage could spill over into adjoining rooms and affect the operation of any system installed in those rooms, and because design considerations such as interference and room layout mean that it is difficult to ensure complete coverage in every room. D3.7 also includes information on the number of receivers required if using a system such as radio frequency or InfraRed. Example, in a room accommodating 400 people, 16 receivers would be required to be available. If the built-in amplification system is only used for emergency warnings, that does not trigger a requirement for a hearing augmentation system If a building such as a sports stadium has a screen or scoreboard that is capable of displaying public announcements, it must also be capable of displaying information given to the audience that is given over the public address system Example, if the public address system announces Pele has replaced Beckham in the game, the scoreboard must be capable of displaying that information. 90

91 D3.8 Tactile indicators 91

92 Tactile indicators To assist blind people and people with low vision, tactile ground surface indicators (TGSIs) are used to facilitate safe movement around buildings BCA only requires warning (hazard alert) TGSIs Technical details of TGSIs are in AS/NZS D3.8 sets out the requirements to assist blind people or people with low vision to avoid hazardous situations by the use of tactile ground surface indicators (TGSIs). There are two types of TGSI used in the built environment. Warning TGSIs and directional TGSIs. The BCA only requires the use of warning TGSIs and only for specific hazard identification Technical details for the design and placement of TGSI are found in Australian Standard AS/NZS

93 Examples of warning TGSIs There are very specific design criteria in AS/NZS for TGSIs including luminance contrast requirements The TGSIs are designed so that they may be read either tactually underfoot, through the tip of a long cane, or visually because of their luminance contrast with the surrounding surface. 93

94 Tactile indicators Required at the top and bottom of stairs, escalators, moving walkways and ramps Also required where a person might encounter an overhead obstruction where no barrier exists Not required on fire-isolated stairs and fireisolated ramps or those which lead to areas exempted under D3.4 TGSI warn people that they are approaching some form of potential hazard such as a flight of stairs or a change in level such as a ramp Good design and placement provides information to a blind person or person with low vision to be alert to the hazard If there is a chance that someone walking along a path might bump into an overhead obstruction less than 2 m high, TGSIs should be used to warn of the hazard unless a suitable barrier is in place such as a rail or other suitable fixture or fitting. There is a concession in the BCA which states that fire-isolated stairways and ramps are not required to have TGSIs. If an area is exempt from access requirements under D3.4, TGSI are not required. Buildings specifically provided for aged care services need not use TGSIs on stairs and ramps as long as the handrails on them incorporate a raised dome at the end of the handrail to indicate the end of the stairs or ramp 94

95 Example of when TGSIs might be required because of the danger of the overhead obstruction created by an open stairway This open stairway creates an overhead hazard and a blind person or a person with low vision could walk into the underside of the stairway because there is nothing to warn of the danger 95

96 D3.9 Wheelchair seating spaces in Class 9b assembly buildings 96

97 Wheelchair seating spaces If fixed seating is provided in a Class 9b assembly building, such as a cinema or stadium, wheelchair seating spaces must also be provided Spaces must be available in single and grouped configurations Table D3.9 specifies number of spaces to be provided D3.9 sets out the requirements in relation to the provision of wheelchair seating spaces in Class 9b assembly buildings with fixed seating. This includes the number of wheelchair seating spaces to be provided in theatres, cinemas, auditoriums and the like, their positioning within the general seating area and how they are to be grouped with other seats or wheelchair spaces These grouping requirements ensure that two or more people using wheelchairs can sit next to each other if they wish There is nothing in the BCA to stop building operators putting temporary seating in wheelchair seating spaces when they are not being used The number of spaces and placement depends on the seating capacity of the building Example, a theatre with 140 seats must have 3 wheelchair seating spaces with one single and one group of 2 spaces Example, a 10,000 seat stadium must have 108 wheelchair spaces with at least 5 single spaces, at least 5 groups of 2 spaces and not more than 5 spaces in any other group. The details and dimensions of wheelchair seating spaces are found in AS

98 Wheelchair seating spaces In small cinemas (up to 300 seats), wheelchair seating spaces cannot be placed in the front row In larger cinemas (over 300 seats), 75% of wheelchair seating spaces must be in rows other than the front row Generally people do not rush down to the front of the cinema to take the front row so this requirement is to ensure people with disability are not forced to sit in the front row, which can be a particularly unpleasant experience for people with poor upper body strength being forced to look up at the screen People generally have a wide range of choice of which seats they would like, so this requirement seeks to provide people with disability with a similar choice. 98

99 D3.10 Swimming pools 99

100 Swimming pools A swimming pool required to be accessible by Table D3.1, and with a perimeter of more than 40 m, must be provided with at least one means of access into the pool Latches on swimming pool gates are not required to be at an accessible height Access requirements only apply to public pools such as those in hotels, local government pools and pools associated with facilities such as fitness centres. They do not apply to private household pools or pools only available to single occupancies such as a penthouse in a hotel or apartment block. The trigger is when a pool is greater than 40 m in perimeter. Pools under this size are exempt. Example, a spa with only 10 m perimeter in a hotel is not required to be accessible. Pool safety fences are designed to prevent unsupervised young children gaining entry to swimming pools. For this purpose, latches on swimming pool gates have to be at a height to put them out of reach of children, which also puts them outside the height range for accessibility purposes. On this issue, safety takes precedence over access. Therefore latches on swimming pool gates are not required to be at an accessible height. 100

101 Accessible pool entry Options include: fixed or movable ramp and aquatic wheelchair zero depth entry and aquatic wheelchair platform lift and aquatic wheelchair Sling-style lift If a ramp, zero depth entry or platform lift is used, an aquatic wheelchair (one suitable for immersion in water) must be available. A zero depth entry is typically one used in children s pools to provide a gradual sloping entry A sling-style lift requires someone to transfer from their chair onto a sling which is lowered into the water. This is the least dignified means of providing access but is allowed and may be the most cost effective way of providing access to smaller pools. A pool over 70 m in perimeter can use a sling-style lift as a second means of providing access but must use either a ramp, zero depth entry or platform lift as its primary means of providing access. 101

102 Specification D3.10 Provides detailed specifications for the different forms of access into pools including: dimensions slip resistance weight capacity handrails Specification D3.10 details the design, location and safety features of each of the four systems for providing access into a pool Example, a ramp must have a gradient of no more than 1 in 14 Example, surfaces on a zero depth entry must be slip resistant Example, swimming pool lifts must have a weight capacity of at least 160 kg Example, a sling-style lift must be designed so that it will submerge not less than 500 mm below the water level 102

103 D3.11 Ramps 103

104 Ramp limitation A series of connected ramps must not have a combined vertical rise of more than 3.6 m A landing for a step ramp must not overlap a landing for another step ramp or ramp Ramps may be used as part of an accessway where there is a change in level and must comply with the requirements specified in AS including a maximum gradient, landings, TGSIs, handrails and kerbing. Clause D3.11 states that a series of ramps cannot be used on an accessway to connect one level to another if the vertical rise is greater than 3.6 metres. This is to ensure that the overall distance required to negotiate a series of ramps does not cause undue fatigue for a user to the point where the ramp becomes unusable. In the case of step ramps, which must have a clear landing area at the top and bottom and may have a gradient of 1 in 10, the landings must not overlap another landing for a step ramp or ramp. This requirement aims to ensure that where two step ramps converge in a high traffic area, sufficient space is provided to enable manoeuvring without requiring people to wait on the ramp. It also aims to limit the likelihood of two step ramps being installed where a 1:14 ramp should have been provided. This is shown in the next slide 104

105 1200 landing 1:14 ramp 1200 landing Step ramp 1200 landing 1200 landing 1:14 ramp 1200 landing 1200 landing Step ramp 1200 landing The need for 2 landings where two ramps overlap 105

106 D3.12 Glazing on an accessway 106

107 Glazing on an accessway Visual indicators must be provided on frameless or fully glazed doors, sidelights and other glazing that might be mistaken for a door or opening if there is no chair rail, handrail or transom Frameless or fully glazed doors, sidelights and other glazing situated on a continuous accessible path of travel are difficult for people with low vision to identify To assist people to safely move into and through buildings, there is a requirement for visual indicators on the glazing if there is no other indicator such as a rail or transom to warn people that the glazed panel is not an unimpeded opening. 107

108 Glazing on an accessway If relying on marking the glass, must comply with AS Details for markings on glass are found in AS and include requirements that the indicator must be a solid band at least 75 mm thick across the whole doorway or sidelight with a 30% luminance contrast. The photo on the left is not marked in any way. The photo on the right is clearly marked in a compliant manner. 108

109 E3.6 Passenger lifts 109

110 Passenger lifts Passenger lifts must be suitable for use by people with disability A variety of lift types can be used. However, Table E3.6a contains limitations on the use of some types of lifts E3.6 identifies the range of lifts that can be used in buildings Design details for each type of lift are found in a suite of Australian Standards Example, AS is a stairway platform lift which follows the flight of stairs on rails fixed at one side Example, AS is a low-rise platform lift While the range is broad and allows for more cost effective approaches to small buildings in particular, there are some limits on when each type of lift can be used Example, while a stairway platform lift (AS ) may be used, the limitations on their use means that they should be a lift of last resort. The limitations on stairway platform lifts are imposed because this type of lift does not offer the most dignified or independent access possible but may, in some situations, be the only option possible. Limitations on use include they must not: Be used in a building accommodating more than 100 people Be used in high traffic areas such as a theatre or shopping centre Connect more than 2 storeys Be used where it is possible to use another type of lift 110

111 Passenger lifts Table E3.6b describes the features required on lifts such as handrails, lighting, control buttons and dimensions If a lift car is fully enclosed, it must not rely on a constant pressure device to operate it Table E3.6b provides some general requirements for the main features of different lift types. Example, all lifts apart from stairway platform lifts and low-rise lifts must have a handrail Example, all lifts that travel more than 12 m must have a minimum lift floor dimension of 1400 mm by 1600 mm Example, all lifts, apart from stairway platform lifts must have lift landing doors at the upper landing Example, all lifts serving more than 2 levels must have automatic audible information within the lift car to identify the level each time the car stops For lift cars that are not fully enclosed, the operating system may be a constant pressure device which requires someone to be constantly pressing a button or lever in order to keep the lift moving. This system of making a lift move can be very difficult for people with some types of disability to operate but the concession exists for safety reasons (for example, in case a child slipped under the lift in a situation where the lift is not enclosed) 111

112 Here are two examples of lifts that may be used in some situations. The left hand side shows an unenclosed lift traveling up one level and the lift on the right is a stairway platform lift 112

113 F2 Sanitary facilities 113

114 F2.4 Accessible sanitary facilities Requires accessible unisex toilets be provided in accordance with Table F2.4(a) Requires accessible unisex showers be provided in accordance with Table F2.4(b) Specifies requirements for ambulant accessible toilet cubicles The general term accessible sanitary facilities refers to: accessible unisex sanitary compartments (referred to generally as accessible unisex toilets, not disabled toilets ) accessible unisex showers toilets suitable for use by people with ambulant disabilities F2.4 refers, throughout, to AS , where all the design specifications and fitout requirements for accessible sanitary facilities can be found Proceed to next slide 114

115 F2.4 Accessible unisex toilets Accessible unisex toilets must be provided: in buildings required to be accessible and containing toilets on every accessible storey where there are toilets However Table F2.4(a) provides details of number and location of accessible unisex toilets that vary depending on the Class of building Example, for a Class 2 building (apartment block) accessible unisex toilets are only required where toilets are provided in a common area Example, for a Class 3 building (hotel) accessible unisex toilets are only required in accessible SOUs and where toilets are provided in a common area Example, for a Class 6 building (shopping centre) accessible unisex toilets are required on every storey containing toilets The general rule is that wherever there is a bank of male and female toilets there should be an accessible unisex toilet However there are some concessions. Proceed to next slide 115

116 Accessible unisex toilets Where male and female banks are at separate locations, an accessible unisex toilet is only required at one of the locations Where there is more than one bank of male and female toilets on a floor an accessible unisex toilet is only required at 50% of banks Example, if female toilets are located on one floor or one side of a building and male toilets are located on another floor or other side of the building, an accessible unisex toilet is only required at one location Example, if a sports stadium has four banks of toilets on the ground floor an accessible unisex toilet is only required at two locations. Proceed to next slide 116

117 Accessible unisex toilets Exceptions and exemptions: toilets on a floor not required to be accessible under the small building concession (D3.3(f)) are not required to have accessible toilets toilets in an area not required to be accessible under D3.4 Exemptions are not required to include accessible unisex toilets Example, if a small two-storey building had a bank of toilets on the ground floor and a bank of toilets on the upper floor, and the upper floor was covered by the small building concession because it was under 200 square metres, only the ground floor would be required to have an accessible unisex toilet. Example, if an area was considered under D3.4 to be exempt from access requirements because of the particular purpose of usage or because of health and safety concerns, and toilets are located in that area, an accessible unisex toilet would not be required in that area. If, however, the toilets were located in another area not covered by the D3.4 exemption, an accessible unisex toilet would be required at that location. Proceed to next slide 117

118 Accessible unisex toilets Must comply with circulation space, fixture and fittings requirements in AS Must contain closet pan, washbasin, shelf or bench top, means of sanitary towel disposal Must not be accessed through an area reserved for one gender The circulation space requirements, location and clearances of fixtures and fittings are critical for ensuring the best possible access for the greatest number of people While the BCA only requires a closet pan, washbasin, shelf or bench top and a sanitary towel disposal bin within a toilet, if other fixtures and fittings are included, such as a soap dispenser, clothes-hanging device, mirror or baby change facility, they must also comply with the requirements of AS An accessible shelf or bench top is particularly important for items to be placed on while, for example, someone is emptying their colostomy bag. Some individuals may require assistance using a toilet. Accessible toilets are therefore required to be unisex to allow for assistance by someone of the opposite gender without having to enter an area reserved for one sex. Proceed to next slide 118

119 Discussion point: Ask participants to identify what might be wrong with this toilet 1.It is being used as a storage area 2.The handrail is upside down and back to front this rail cannot be used to assist with transfer 3.There is no grab rail behind the pan to aid with front-on transfer This is a disabled toilet because it does not work. Proceed to next slide 119

CPPACC8007A Audit built environment and infrastructure for accessibility compliance and propose solutions

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