Arrests in Wisconsin 2010

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1 Wisconsin Office of Justice Assistance 1 S. Pinckney Street, Suite 615 Madison, WI Scott Walker Governor Arrests in Wisconsin 2010 July 2011 Arrests in Wisconsin 2010 i 07/2011

2 Wisconsin Statistical Analysis Center Office of Justice Assistance 1 S. Pinckney Street, Suite 615 Madison, WI This project was supported by Grant No DJ-BX-0985 awarded by the Bureau of Justice Assistance, Office of Justice Programs, U.S. Department of Justice.

3 State of Wisconsin SCOTT WALKER Governor 1 S Pinckney Street Suite 615 Madison WI Phone: (608) Fax: (608) July 2011 Dear Colleague, I am pleased to present Arrests in Wisconsin This report, prepared by the Office of Justice Assistance s Statistical Analysis Center (SAC), is a collection of arrest data reported by Wisconsin law enforcement agencies in the previous year. It is based on monthly reports submitted to OJA through the Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) Program. We greatly appreciate the continued efforts of personnel from the 398 contributing agencies in the collection and reporting of this important information. This report contains detailed information on arrest volume, rates, and trends for law enforcement agencies throughout the State of Wisconsin. In addition, it provides information on arrestee characteristics such as age, race, and sex for five separate crime categories: Violent, Property, Drug, Society, and. It is separated into three main sections: all arrests, adult arrests, and juvenile arrests. Within each of these sections, data are further broken down by crime types. For each crime type, a series of figures and tables are provided to show volume, rates, and trends. Following the lead of the FBI and their annual report, Crime in the United States, OJA discontinued printed versions of this publication in 2007 and relies exclusively on internet technology for widespread distribution. This allows OJA to maximize its limited resources, while continuing to provide useful and valuable data to a broad audience. Some of the more important findings are summarized at the beginning of the report (pg. 4), as well as at the beginning of the adult and juvenile sections (pg. 15 and 26). Major findings include a 10% decrease in overall arrests, with a 1% increase in violent and a 10% decrease in property arrests. In addition, drug arrests increased by 2%, while society arrests decreased by 12% and other uncategorized offenses decreased by 9%. I hope this report meets your needs and trust that you will find it useful. OJA continues to improve its statistical reporting procedures, as well as develop new and innovative ways to make this information available to the public. Should you have any comments or suggestions regarding this report, I encourage you to contact our office with feedback. Sincerely, Darcey Varese Acting Deputy Director Arrests in Wisconsin 2010 i 07/2011

4 ARRESTS IN WISCONSIN 2010 Uniform Crime Reporting Program Wisconsin Office of Justice Assistance Statistical Analysis Center 1 S. Pinckney Street, Suite 615 Madison, WI (608) Arrests in Wisconsin 2010 ii 07/2011

5 DEDICATION This publication is dedicated to all law enforcement officers, and in particular, to the memory of the one Wisconsin law enforcement officer who lost his life while performing his duty in Korey E. Dahlvig Vilas County Sheriff s Office Arrests in Wisconsin 2010 iii 07/2011

6 Table of Contents I. Introduction... 1 A. Background... 1 B. Format & Structure... 2 C. Limitations... 3 II. Arrests in Wisconsin... 4 A. Violent... 5 B. Property... 7 A. Drug... 9 B. Society B III. Adult Arrests in Wisconsin A. Violent B. Property A. Drug B. Society B IV. Juvenile Arrests in Wisconsin A. Violent B. Property A. Drug B. Society B V. Appendix A. Arrests by Agency Table 1 Two-Year Comparison Table 2 Violent Table 3 Property Table 4 Drug Table 5 Society Table Arrests in Wisconsin 2010 iv 07/2011

7 Table of Contents B. Adult Arrests by Agency Table 7 Two-Year Comparison Table 8 Violent Table 9 Property Table 10 Drug Table 11 Society Table C. Juvenile Arrests by Agency Table 13 Two-Year Comparison Table 14 Violent Table 15 Property Table 16 Drug Table 17 Society Table D. Arrests by Offense and Sex & Race Table 19 All Table 20 Adult Table 21 Juvenile E. Definitions UCR Crimes Arrests in Wisconsin 2010 v 07/2011

8 Introduction Overview As mandated by the Wisconsin Legislature (Wis. Stat (1)(g)), the Wisconsin Office of Justice Assistance (OJA) is responsible for reporting information concerning the number and nature of criminal offenses known to have been committed in the state. This includes collecting crime and arrest data from 399 separate law enforcement agencies for the FBI s Uniform Crime Reporting Program (a nationwide cooperative statistical effort of more than 17,000 law enforcement agencies voluntarily reporting data on crime). The primary objective of UCR is to generate reliable information for use in law enforcement administration, operation, and management. Today, the American public looks to the Uniform Crime Reports for information on fluctuations in the level of crime, while criminologists, sociologist, legislators, municipal planners, the media, and other students of criminal justice use the statistics for varied research and planning purposes. This report, prepared by the OJA Statistical Analysis Center (SAC), is a collection of arrest data reported by Wisconsin law enforcement agencies in It contains detailed information on arrest volume, rates, and trends for law enforcement agencies throughout the State of Wisconsin. In addition, it provides information on arrestee characteristics such as age, race, and sex for five separate crime categories: Violent, Property, Drug, Society, and. The report also includes a breakdown of arrests by adults and juveniles. A. Background The Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) Program was first initiated in 1930 by the International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP). Recognizing a need for national crime statistics, IACP formed the Committee on Uniform Crime Records. The committee evaluated various crimes on the basis of their seriousness, frequency of occurrence, pervasiveness in all geographic areas of the country, and likelihood of being reported to law enforcement. After studying state criminal codes and making an evaluation of the recordkeeping practices in use, the Committee identified seven main classifications known as Part I crimes. The seven offense classifications include the violent crimes of murder and non negligent manslaughter, forcible rape, robbery, aggravated assault, and the property crimes of burglary, larceny theft, and motor vehicle theft. By congressional mandate, arson was added as the eighth Part I offense category in Agencies classify and score these offenses according to a hierarchy rule in which, in cases with more than one offense, only the most severe offense is counted. During the early planning of the program, it was recognized that the differences among criminal codes precluded a mere aggregation of state statistics to arrive at a national total. Further, because of the variances in punishment for the same offenses in different state codes, no distinction between felony and misdemeanor crimes was possible. To avoid these problems and provide nationwide uniformity in crime reporting, standardized offense definitions were formulated by which law enforcement agencies were to submit data without regard for local statutes. Arrests in Wisconsin /2011

9 Introduction The UCR program, as originally designed, remained virtually unchanged in terms of the amount and type of data collected and disseminated for nearly 60 years. Yet by the 1980s, it had become clear that the nature of law enforcement investigations and reporting had changed dramatically since the inception of the program. As a result, the FBI initiated a thorough evaluation of the existing system with the purpose of formulating a phased in redesign effort to enable the program to meet the needs of law enforcement into the 21 st century. Based upon the recommendations of the evaluation, the FBI developed a new system known as the National Incident Based Reporting System (NIBRS). Unlike the aggregate summary based system, NIBRS is designed to collect all components of a crime, including characteristics of the offense and its associated victims, offenders, property, and arrestees. In 1998, the FBI released the final data elements and offense specifications of the new system. At that time, Wisconsin and other state programs began their efforts to implement this enhanced reporting system. Today, the state has 319 law enforcement agencies participating in Summary Based Reporting (commonly referred to as UCR) and 80 agencies participating in Incident Based Reporting (IBR) including the Milwaukee Police Department. Nationally, 45 states participate, or plan to participate, in the IBR program. Of those states, 13 have 100% participation rate from their local law enforcement agencies. Due to the increased reporting requirements of the new program, OJA is implementing it in phases to allow law enforcement agencies the time and resources needed to acquire the necessary technological capabilities. As the State of Wisconsin moves forward with the implementation of this data collection program, a number of additional agencies will be submitting IBR data in For a list of current certified and testing IBR agencies, please visit the OJA website. B. Format & Structure Due to the changing landscape of statistical information dissemination and available resources, in 2010 the Statistical Analysis Center followed the lead of the FBI and their annual report, Crime in the United States, by discontinuing all printed versions of this publication to focus exclusively on internet technology for future distributions. This allows the agency to maximize its limited resources, while continuing to provide useful and valuable data to a broad audience. With regard to structure, the report is separated into three main sections: all arrests, adult arrests, and juvenile arrests. Within each of these sections, data are further broken down by crime types (for definitions, see Appendix E). For each crime type, a series of figures and tables are provided to show statistical information such as volume, rates, and trends. Arrests in Wisconsin /2011

10 Introduction C. Limitations As presented by the FBI in their annual report, Crime in the United States, adequate assessment of criminality and law enforcement s response from jurisdiction to jurisdiction requires the consideration of many different variables, some of which are not readily measurable or applicable among all locales. Geographic and demographic factors specific to each jurisdiction must be considered and applied if one is going to make an accurate and complete assessment of crime in that jurisdiction. Understanding a jurisdiction s industrial/economic base; its dependence upon neighboring jurisdictions; its transportation system; and its economic dependence on nonresidents such as tourists all contribute to accurately gauging and interpreting the crime known to and reported by law enforcement. It is incumbent upon all data users to become as well educated as possible about how to understand and quantify the nature and extent of crime as reported by law enforcement agencies through the UCR program. Valid assessments are possible only with careful study and analysis of the various unique conditions affecting each local law enforcement jurisdiction. Specific to this report, caution should be taken when comparing the results to other previous annual reports. First, shifting of a law enforcement agency from one population category to another based on annual re estimation of the jurisdiction s population may have an affect on rates. Second, this report reflects offenses that were reported to law enforcement agencies in 2010 but may have occurred during previous years. Finally, changes to law enforcement policies and procedures and their effect on crime rates must also be taken into consideration. Arrests in Wisconsin /2011

11 Arrests Overview in Wisconsin Between 2009 and 2010, the State of Wisconsin experienced a 10 % decrease in the number of overall arrests. The number of violent arrests, however, increased by 1%, while the number of property arrests decreased by 10%. In addition, drug arrests increased by 2%, while society arrests decreased by 12%, and other uncategorized offenses decreased by 9%. Below are the major findings from each of the five individual crime categories: Violent In 2010, Wisconsin law enforcement made 8,066 arrests for violent crime, up 1% from Adults were arrested for violent crimes at a higher volume and higher rate than juveniles in Male arrest rates have been relatively stable during the past three years, while female rates have remained moderately consistent since Black arrest rates have been dramatically higher than all other race categories for the past five years. Property In 2010, Wisconsin law enforcement made 54,072 arrests for property crime, down 10% from Adults were arrested for property crimes at a higher volume than juveniles, yet juveniles were arrested at a higher rate per 100,000 population. Overall, both male and female arrest rates have experienced a general downward trend since For the past five years, Black and American Indian/Alaskan Native arrest rates have been consistently higher than those for White and Asian/Pacific Islander. Drug In 2010, Wisconsin law enforcement made 25,750 drug arrests, up 2% from Adults were arrested for drug crimes at a higher volume and higher rate than juveniles in With the exception of 2006, both male and female drug arrest rates have been relatively stable during the past five years. Drug arrest rates among the different racial categories have remained moderately consistent since Arrest rates in all but one racial category are lower than their respective rates in Society In 2010, Wisconsin law enforcement made 140,299 arrests for society crime, down 12% from Adults were arrested for crimes against society at a higher volume and higher rate than juveniles in Both male and female arrest rates have been on a general downward trend over the past five years. During the past five years, Black and American Indian/Alaskan Native arrest rates have been consistently higher than those for White and Asian/Pacific Islander. In 2010, Wisconsin law enforcement made 127,276 arrests for crimes classified as other, down 9% from Adults were arrested at a higher volume and higher rate than juveniles in Overall, both male and female arrest rates have experienced a general downward trend since For the past five years, Black and American Indian/Alaskan Native arrest rates have been consistently higher than those for White and Asian/Pacific Islander. Arrests in Wisconsin /2011

12 Arrests: Violent For this report, violent crimes include: Murder, Forcible Rape, Robbery, and Aggravated Assault. Overview In 2010, Wisconsin law enforcement made 8,066 arrests for violent crime, down 1% from last year (Table 1). Of the violent crime arrests, Aggravated Assaults accounted for 66%; Robbery, 23%; Forcible Rape, 9%; and Murder, 2%. The rate of arrests for these offenses was 143 per 100,000 Wisconsin residents (Table 2). Age, Sex, Race Adult arrests accounted for the majority of violent crime arrests in 2010, but when looking at the arrest rate per 100,000 residents, adults and juveniles had somewhat comparable figures. For example, adults were arrested at a rate of 154 per 100,000 adults (Table 8), while juveniles were arrested at a rate of 108 per 100,000 juveniles (Table 14). Figure 1: Violent Arrests by Age, % Adult 82% Juvenile Figure 2: Violent Arrest Rates* by Sex, Male Female Over the past five years, male arrest rates have remained relatively stable, experiencing minor riseand fall fluctuations. Female arrest rates on the other hand have remained fairly consistent over all five years Comparing by race, notable differences were found in the arrest rates between the four race classifications. Black arrest rates have been substantially higher than all other classifications for the past five years. American Indian/Alaskan Native rates have also been consistently high. White and Asian/Pacific Islander arrest rates have remained relative similar and stable over this same time period. For the past few years, arrest rates have steadily been decreasing for all race categories except Black, which instead has shown a steady increase. *It should be noted that beginning in 2005, and continuing through 2010, a number of agencies in the state began submitting crime data via the Wisconsin Incident Based Reporting System (WIBRS). The transition into this new reporting system may account for some of the change in numbers seen * Per 100,000 Wisconsin Residents per Sex Figure 3: Violent Arrest Rates* by Race, White Black Am. Ind. 381 Asian * Per 100,000 Wisconsin Residents per Race Arrests in Wisconsin /2011

13 Arrests: Violent Sex by Violent Offense Type In 2010, males were arrested at a greater rate than females for all violent crimes. As in previous years, Murder accounted for the least number of violent crime arrests with five arrests per 100,000 males and less than one arrest per 100,000 females. Both males and females were arrested for Aggravated Assault at a higher rate than any other violent crime, with males accounting for 84% of the total arrests. The arrest rate for Robbery followed the same pattern as the other violent crime categories, with males being arrested at a notably higher rate than females. Figure 4: Violent Arrest Rates* by Sex and Offense, 2010 Male Female Murder 5 0 Forcible Rape 25 1 Robbery 60 6 Aggravated Assault * Per 100,000 Wisconsin Residents per Sex Race by Violent Offense Type White arrests accounted for 54% (4,362) of the total violent crime arrests in 2010, followed by Black arrests at 42% (3,359) American Indian/Alaskan Native arrests at 1% (256), and Asian/Pacific Islander arrests at 1% (89). For further details, see Appendix D. In comparing the arrest rates of violent crime by race, sizeable differences were found between the four race classifications. Black arrest rates were higher than the other three race classifications for all four violent crime offenses. Most notably, the Black arrest rate for Murder was 22 per 100,000 black residents followed next by American Indian/Alaskan Native at 5 per 100,000 Asian residents. Similarly, the Black rate for Robbery was 357 followed next by American Indian/Alaskan Native at 25. Arrest rates for Asian/Pacific Islander were generally the lowest among the four race categories, followed by White and American Indian/Alaskan Native. Consistent with previous years, Aggravated Assaults accounted for the highest rates of arrests for all four race categories, while Murder rates were the lowest. Generally, arrests rates for Robbery and Forcible Rape are somewhat comparable. The only exception to this is found in the Black category, where the Robbery arrest rate was higher than the Forcible Rape arrest rate. Figure 5: Violent Arrest Rates* by Race and Offense, 2010 White Black Am. Indian Asian Murder Forcible Rape Robbery Aggravated Assault * Per 100,000 Wisconsin Residents per Race Arrests in Wisconsin /2011

14 Arrests: Property For this report, property crimes include: Burglary, Theft, Motor Vehicle Theft, Arson, Forgery, Fraud, Embezzlement, Stolen Property, and Vandalism. Overview In 2010, Wisconsin law enforcement made 54,072 arrests for property crime, down 10% from last year (Table 1). Of these property crime arrests, Theft accounted for 59%; Vandalism, 17%; Fraud, 8%; and Burglary, 8%. Motor Vehicle Theft, Embezzlement, Forgery, Stolen Property, and Arson, accounted for the remaining 8% of arrests. The rate of arrests for these offenses was 1,070 per 100,000 Wisconsin residents. (Table 3) Figure 6: Property Arrests by Age, % Adult 72% Juvenile Age, Sex, Race Although adults accounted for the majority of property crime arrests in 2010, juveniles were arrested at a greater rate per 100,000 residents. For example, adults were arrested at a rate of 968 per 100,000 adults (Table 9), while juveniles were arrested at a rate of 956 per 100,000 juveniles. (Table 15) Overall, both male and female arrest rates have been on a general downward trend over the past five years. As with previous years, males were arrested at a noticeably higher rate than females, accounting for 64% of total property crime arrests in Comparing by race, notable differences were found in the arrest rates between the four race classifications. Black and American Indian/Alaskan Native arrest rates have consistently been higher than White and Asian/Pacific Islander arrest rates over the past five years. Arrest rates for all four race classifications are down from five years ago. *It should be noted that beginning in 2005, and continuing through 2010, a number of agencies in the state began submitting crime data via the Wisconsin Incident Based Reporting System (WIBRS). The transition into this new reporting system may account for some of the change in numbers seen. Figure 7: 7: Property Arrest Rates* by by Sex, Male Female * Per 100,000 Wisconsin Residents per Sex Figure 8: Property Arrest Rates* by Race, White Black 3,782 3,930 3,976 4,033 3,605 Am. Ind. 1,834 1,903 2,008 1,731 1,752 Asian * Per 100,000 Wisconsin Residents per Race Arrests in Wisconsin /2011

15 Arrests: Property Sex by Property Offense Type In 2010, males and females had similar arrest rates for Fraud, Forgery and Embezzlement crimes. Theft accounted for the greatest number of property crime arrests for both males and females, while Embezzlement and Arson accounted for the least. Both males and females were arrested for Theft at a higher rate than any other property crime, with males accounting for 56% of the total Theft arrests. Burglary and Vandalism arrest rates for males were markedly higher than the arrest rate for females. Figure 9: Property Arrest Rates* by Sex and Offense, 2010 Male Female Burglary Theft Motor Vehicle Theft 32 7 Arson 5 1 Forgery Fraud Embezzlement 4 4 Stolen Property Vandalism * Per 100,000 Wisconsin Residents per Sex Race by Property Offense Type White arrests accounted for 71% (38,506) of the total property crime arrests in 2010, followed by Black arrests at 25% (13,544), American Indian/Alaskan Native arrests at 3% (1,424), and Asian/Pacific Islander arrests at 1% (598). For further details, see Appendix D. In comparing the arrest rates of property crime by race, sizeable differences were found between the four race classifications. Black and American Indian/Alaskan Native rates were higher for nearly all property crime offenses. Most notably, there were 2,143 arrests per 100,000 Black residents for Theft and 939 arrests per 100,000 American Indian/Alaskan Native residents for Theft. Arrests rates for Arson and Embezzlement were relatively similar among all four race classifications. Figure 10: Property Arrest Rates* by Race and Offense, 2010 White Black Am. Indian Asian Burglary Theft 451 2, Motor Vehicle Theft Arson Forgery Fraud Embezzlement Stolen Property Vandalism * Per 100,000 Wisconsin Residents per Race Arrests in Wisconsin /2011

16 Arrests: Drug For this report, drug crimes include: Sale-Opium/Narcotic, Sale-Marijuana, Sale-Synthetic Narcotic, Sale-, Possession-Opium/Narcotic, Possession-Marijuana, Possession-Synthetic Narcotic, and Possession-. Overview In 2010, Wisconsin law enforcement made 25,750 drug arrests, up 2% from last year (Table 1). Of the total drug arrests, 81% were for Possession and 19% were for Sale/Manufacturing. The most common drug associated with both drug sale and possession arrests was marijuana. Drug arrests were made at a rate of 455 per 100,000 Wisconsin residents (Table 4). Figure 11: Drug Arrests by Age, % Adult 84% Juvenile Age, Sex, Race Adults accounted for the majority of drug arrests in 2010, and also had the highest arrest rate per 100,000 residents when compared to the juvenile arrest rate. For example, adults were arrested at a rate of 501 per 100,000 adults (Table 10), while juveniles were arrested at a rate of 307 per 100,000 juveniles (Table 16). With the exception of 2006, male drug arrest rates have been generally consistent for the past five years. During this same period, female drug arrest rates have remained relatively stable since Comparing by race, notable differences were found in the arrest rates between the four race classifications. Black and American Indian/Alaskan Native arrest rates have consistently been higher than White and Asian/Pacific Islander over the past five years. The arrest rates of all four race categories have experience a rise and fall pattern since 2006, with the exception of American Indian/ Alaskan Native which has been on a steady decline. Figure 12: Drug Arrest Rates* by Sex, Male Female * Per 100,000 Wisconsin Residents per Sex Figure 13: Drug Arrest Rates* by Race, White *It should be noted that beginning in 2005, and continuing through 2010, a number of agencies in the state began submitting crime data via the Wisconsin Incident Based Reporting System (WIBRS). The transition into this new reporting system may account for some of the change in numbers seen. Black 1,961 2,027 2,028 Am. Ind Asian ,974 2, * Per 100,000 Wisconsin Residents per Race Arrests in Wisconsin /2011

17 Arrests: Drugs Sex by Drug Offense Type In 2010, males were arrested at a higher rate than females for all drug offenses. As in previous years, Marijuana Possession accounted for the greatest number of drug arrests with 481 arrests occurring per 100,000 males and 91 arrests occurring per 100,000 females. For both males and females, the highest drug sale arrest rate was for marijuana offenses. Figure 14: Drug Arrest Rates* by Sex and Offense, 2010 Male Female Opium/Cocaine Sales 41 9 Marijuana Sales Synthetic Narcotic Sales 9 5 Drug Sales 16 7 Opium/Cocaine Possession Marijuana Possession Synthetic Narcotic Possession 22 9 Drug Possession * Per 100,000 Wisconsin Residents per Sex Race by Drug Offense Type White arrests accounted for 67% (17,276) of the total drug arrests in 2010, followed by Black arrests with 30% (7,755), American Indian/Alaskan Native arrests 2% (538), and Asian/Pacific Islander arrests 1% (181). For further details, see Appendix D. In comparing the arrest rates of drug offenses by race, sizeable differences were found between the four race categories. Most notably, Black and American Indian/Alaskan Native residents were consistently arrested at a greater rate than White and Asian/Pacific Islander residents. Arrest rates in the Asian/Pacific Islander category were the lowest among the four race categories. Consistent with previous years, Marijuana Possession accounted for the highest rate of arrests for all four race categories. Black residents were arrested at a noticeably higher rate for Marijuana Possession than any other race category, with 1,255 arrests per 100,000 Black residents. The sale or possession of synthetic narcotics generally had the lowest arrest rate among the drug offenses for all race categories. Figure 15: Drug Arrest Rates* by Race and Offense, 2010 White Black Am. Indian Asian Sale: Opium/Cocaine Sale: Marijuana Sale: Synthetic Narcotic Sale: Possess: Opium/Cocaine Possess: Marijuana 217 1, Possess: Synthetic Narcotic Possess: * Per 100,000 Wisconsin Residents per Race Arrests in Wisconsin /2011

18 Arrests: Society For this report, society crimes include: Weapon Law Violations, Prostitution, Sex Offenses, Gambling Violations, Driving While Intoxicated, Liquor Law Violations, Disorderly Conduct, Vagrancy, Curfew & Loitering, and Runaways. Overview In 2010, Wisconsin law enforcement made 140,299 arrests for society crime, down 12% from last year (Table 1). Of these society crime arrests, Disorderly Conduct accounted for 40%; Operating While Intoxicated, 25%; Liquor Law Violations, 23%; and the remaining seven society crimes, 12%. The rate of arrests for these offenses was 2,481 per 100,000 Wisconsin residents (Table 5). Age, Sex, Race Adults accounted for the majority of property crime arrests in 2010 and were also arrested at a greater rate per 100,000 residents. For example, adults were arrested at a rate of 2,520 per 100,000 adults (Table 11), while juveniles were arrested at a rate of 2,355 per 100,000 juveniles (Table 17). Figure 16: Society Arrests by Age, % Adult 78% Juvenile Figure 17: Society Arrest Rates* by Sex, Male Female Overall, male arrest rates have been on a steady downward trend the past five years. Female arrest rates have also experienced a steady downward trend during the same time period. As with previous years, males were arrested at a noticeably higher rate than females; accounting for 71% of total society crime arrests in Comparing by race, notable differences were found in the arrest rates between the four race classifications. Black and American Indian/Alaskan Native arrest rates have consistently been higher than White and Asian/Pacific Islander arrest rates over the past five years. Arrest rates for all four race classifications have declined from their respective rates five years ago * Per 100,000 Wisconsin Residents per Sex Figure 18: Society Arrest Rates* by Race, *It should be noted that beginning in 2005, and continuing through 2010, a number of agencies in the state began submitting crime data via the Wisconsin Incident Based Reporting System (WIBRS). The transition into this new reporting system may account for some of the change in numbers seen. White 2,916 2,850 2,705 Black 8,070 7,874 8,135 Am. Ind. 5,292 4,908 5,039 Asian 1,789 1,630 1,498 2,489 2,184 7,473 6,523 5,063 4,327 1,443 1,326 * Per 100,000 Wisconsin Residents per Race Arrests in Wisconsin /2011

19 Arrests: Society Sex by Society Offense Type In 2010, males were arrested at a greater rate than females for all society crimes with the exception of Runways. As in previous years, Disorderly Conduct accounted for the greatest number of society crime arrests with 1,403 arrests occurring per 100,000 males and 563 arrests occurring per 100,000 females. Among both males and females, Gambling Violations had the lowest arrest rate for all society crimes. Figure 19: Society Arrest Rates* by Sex and Offense, 2010 Male Female Weapons Prostitution 7 6 Sex Offenses Gambling Violations 6 0 Driving While Intoxicated Liquor Laws Disorderly Conduct 1, Vagrancy Curfew and Loitering Runaways * Per 100,000 Wisconsin Residents per Sex Race by Society Offense Type White arrests accounted for 79% (110,364) of the total society crime arrests in 2010, followed by Black arrests at 17% (24,351), American Indian/Alaskan Native arrests at 3% (3,517), and Asian/Pacific Islander arrests at 1% (1,913). For further details, see Appendix D. In comparing the arrest rates of society crime by race, variations were found between the different crime classifications and the four race categories. On average, Black and American Indian/Alaskan Native residents were arrested at a higher rate than White and Asian/Pacific Islander residents. Generally, Disorderly Conduct had the highest arrest rate among the four race classifications. Most notably, there were 3,680 arrests per 100,000 Black residents for Disorderly Conduct. Arrest rates in the Asian/Pacific Islander category were generally the lowest among the four race categories. Figure 20: Society Arrest Rates* by Race and Offense, 2010 White Black Am. Indian Asian Weapons Prostitution Sex Offenses Gambling Violations Driving While Intoxicated , Liquor Laws Disorderly Conduct 784 3,680 1, Vagrancy Curfew and Loitering Runaways * Per 100,000 Wisconsin Residents per Race Arrests in Wisconsin /2011

20 Arrests: For this report, other crimes include: Negligent Manslaughter, Assaults, Family Offenses, and All (except Traffic). Overview In 2010, Wisconsin law enforcement made 127,276 arrests for crimes classified as other, down 9% from last year (Table 1). Of these other crime arrests, All accounted for 84%; Simple Assaults, 14%; Family Offenses, 2%; and Negligent Manslaughter, less than 1%. The rate of arrests for these offenses was 2,251 per 100,000 Wisconsin residents (Table 6). Age, Sex, Race Adult arrests accounted for the majority of other crime arrests in 2010, and also had the highest arrest rate per 100,000 residents when compared to the juvenile arrest rate. For example, adults were arrested at a rate of 2,415 per 100,000 adults (Table 12), while juveniles were arrested at a rate of 1,718 per 100,000 juveniles (Table 18). Overall, both male and female arrest rates have followed a steadily declining trend over the past five years. As with previous years, males were arrested at a noticeably higher rate than females, accounting for 73% of total other crime arrests in Comparing by race, notable differences were found in the arrest rates between the four race classifications. Black and American Indian/Alaskan Native arrest rates have consistently been higher than White and Asian/Pacific Islander arrest rates over the past five years. Rates for all race categories decreased this year. Figure 21: Arrests by Age, % Adult 82% Juvenile Figure 22: Arrest Rates* by Sex, Male Female * Per 100,000 Wisconsin Residents per Sex Figure 23: Arrest Rates* by Race, *It should be noted that beginning in 2005, and continuing through 2010, a number of agencies in the state began submitting crime data via the Wisconsin Incident Based Reporting System (WIBRS). The transition into this new reporting system may account for some of the change in numbers seen. White 2,339 2,204 2,143 Black 8,954 8,976 8,691 Am. Ind. 6,459 5,732 5,975 Asian 1,622 1,491 1,371 2,043 1,818 8,393 7,877 5,800 5,234 1,297 1,064 * Per 100,000 Wisconsin Residents per Race Arrests in Wisconsin /2011

21 Arrests: Sex by Offense Type In 2010, males were arrested at a greater rate than females for all crimes classified as other. As in previous years, Negligent Manslaughter accounted for the least number of these arrests with one arrest occurring per 100,000 males and less than one arrest occurring per 100,000 females. Both males and females were arrested for All crime at a higher rate than any other crime in this category with males being arrested at almost three times the rate of females. The arrest rate for Assaults and Family Offenses followed the same pattern, with males being arrested at a notably higher rate than females. Figure 24: Arrest Rates* by Sex and Offense, 2010 Male Female Negligent Manslaughter 1 0 Assaults Family Offenses All (Except Traffic) 2,778 1,010 * Per 100,000 Wisconsin Residents per Sex Race by Offense Type White arrests accounted for 72% (91,892) of the total arrests classified as other in 2010, followed by Black arrests with 23% (29,594), American Indian/Alaskan Native arrests 3% (4,254), and Asian/Pacific Islander arrests 1% (1,536). For further details, see Appendix D. In comparing the arrest rates of these other crimes by race, sizeable differences were found between the four race categories with Black and American Indian/Alaskan Native residents being arrested at a higher rate for all four crime offenses. Most notably, there were 5,993 arrests per 100,000 Black residents for All offenses and 4,319 arrests per 100,000 American Indian/Alaskan Native residents. Arrest rates in the Asian/Pacific Islander category were generally the lowest among the four race categories. Consistent with previous years, All arrests accounted for the highest rate of arrests among the four race categories, while Negligent Manslaughter arrest rates were the lowest. Figure 25: Arrest Rates* by Race and Offense, 2010 White Black Am. Indian Asian Negligent Manslaughter Assaults 209 1, Family Offenses All (Except Traffic) 1,572 5,993 4, * Per 100,000 Wisconsin Residents per Race Arrests in Wisconsin /2011

22 Adult Arrests Overview in Wisconsin Between 2009 and 2010, the State of Wisconsin experienced an 8% decrease in the number of total adult arrests. The number of adult violent arrests increased by 2%, while the number of property arrests decreased by 7%. In addition, drug arrests increased by 3%, while society arrests decreased by 11%, and other uncategorized offenses by 8%. Below are the major findings from each of the five individual crime categories: Violent Adult Wisconsin law enforcement made 6,633 adult arrests for violent crime, up 2% from Adults age 18 to 24 accounted for 40% of the total adult arrests for violent crimes. Male arrest rates have been relatively stable since 2008 after experiencing a rise and fall pattern in prior years, while female arrests have remained relatively consistent. For the past five years, Black arrest rates for adults have been substantially higher than those for all other race categories. Property Adult Wisconsin law enforcement made 38,987 adult arrests for property crime, down 7% from Adults age 18 to 24 accounted for 42% of the total adult arrests for property crimes. Male arrest rates have been on a general downward trend for the past few years, while female arrest rates have experienced a somewhat rise and fall pattern. Over the past five years, Black and American Indian/Alaskan Native arrest rates for adults have been substantially higher than those for the other two race categories. Drug Adult Wisconsin law enforcement made 21,655 adult arrests for drug crime, up 3% from Adults age 18 to 24 accounted for 52% of the total adult arrests for drug crimes. Both male and female drug arrest rates have been on an increasing trend since Black arrest rates for adults have been substantially higher than those for all other race categories over the past five years. Society Adult Wisconsin law enforcement made 108,921 adult arrests for society crime, down 11% from Adults age 18 to 24 accounted for 45% of the total adult arrests for society crimes. Male society arrest rates have generally been on a steady decline, while female arrest rates have experienced a rise and fall pattern during the past five years. Black and American Indian/Alaskan Native arrest rates for adults have been substantially higher than those for the other two race categories over the past five years. Adult Wisconsin law enforcement made 104,391 arrests for crimes classified as other, down 8% from Adults age 18 to 24 accounted for 33% of the total adult arrests for other crimes. While male arrest rates have decreased since 2006, female adult arrest rates have been fairly inconsistent. Over the past five years, Black and American Indian/Alaskan Native arrest rates for adults have been substantially higher than those for the other two race categories. Arrests in Wisconsin /2011

23 Adult Arrests: Violent For this report, adult violent crimes include: Murder, Forcible Rape, Robbery, and Aggravated Assault. Overview In 2010, Wisconsin law enforcement arrested 6,633 adults for violent crime, up 2% from last year (Table 7). Of these violent crime arrests, Aggravated Assaults accounted for 70%; Robbery, 19%; Forcible Rape, 9%; and Murder, 2%. The rate of arrests for these offenses was 154 per 100,000 adult residents (Table 8). Age, Sex, Race Forty percent of adults arrested for violent crime were between the ages of 18 and 24. Generally, as the groups increased in age, the number of arrests decreased. Adults age 18 to 34 accounted for approximately 71% of the total adults arrested for violent crime, while adults age 35 and over accounted for a little less than 30%. Male arrest rates have been relatively stable since 2008 after experiencing a rise and fall pattern in prior years, while female arrests have remained relatively consistent. As with previous years, adult males were arrested at a noticeably higher rate than adult females, accounting for 84% of total adult violent crime arrests in Comparing by race, notable differences were found in the arrest rates between the four race classifications. White and Asian/Pacific Islander arrests rates have remained relatively stable during the past five years, while Black and American Indian/Alaskan Native arrest rates have varied. *It should be noted that beginning in 2005, and continuing through 2010, a number of agencies in the state began submitting crime data via the Wisconsin Incident Based Reporting System (WIBRS). The transition into this new reporting system may account for some of the change in numbers seen. Figure 26: Adult Violent Arrests by Age, 2010 Figure 27: Adult Violent Arrest Rates* by Sex, % 10% 16% 40% 31% Male * Per 100,000 Wisconsin Residents per Sex Female Figure 28: Adult Violent Arrest Rates* by Race, White Black Am. Ind ,006 1,090 1,025 1, Asian * Per 100,000 Wisconsin Residents per Race Arrests in Wisconsin /2011

24 Adult Arrests: Violent Sex by Violent Offense Type In 2010, adult males were arrested at a greater rate than adult females for all violent crimes. As in previous years, murder accounted for the least number of violent crime arrests with six arrests occurring per 100,000 males and one arrest occurring per 100,000 females. Both males and females were arrested for Aggravated Assault at a higher rate than any other violent crime with males accounting for 81% of the total arrests. The arrest rate for Robbery followed the same pattern of the other violent crime categories, with males being arrested at a notably higher rate than females. Figure 29: Adult Violent Arrest Rates* by Sex and Offense, 2010 Male Female Murder 6 0 Forcible Rape 26 1 Robbery 53 6 Aggravated Assault * Per 100,000 Wisconsin Residents per Sex Race by Violent Offense Type White adults accounted for 56% (3,728) of the total violent crime arrests in 2010, followed by Black adults with 39% (2,607), American Indian/Alaskan Native adults 3% (229), and Asian/Pacific Islander adults 1% (69). For further details, see Appendix D. In comparing the arrest rates of violent crime by race, sizeable differences were found between the four race categories with black residents being arrested at a higher rate for all four violent crime offenses. Most notably, there were 30 arrests per 100,000 black residents for Murder and 366 arrests per 100,000 Black residents for Robbery. Arrest rates in the Asian/Pacific Islander category were generally the lowest among the four race categories, followed by White, and American Indian/Alaskan Native. Consistent with previous years, Aggravated Assaults accounted for the highest rate of arrests for all four race categories, while Murder arrest rates were the lowest. Figure 30: Adult Violent Arrest Rates* by Race and Offense, 2010 White Black Am. Indian Asian Murder Forcible Rape Robbery Aggravated Assault * Per 100,000 Wisconsin Residents per Race Arrests in Wisconsin /2011

25 Adult Arrests: Property For this report, adult property crimes include: Burglary, Theft, Motor Vehicle Theft, Arson, Forgery, Fraud, Embezzlement, Stolen Property, and Vandalism. Overview In 2010, Wisconsin law enforcement arrested 38,987 adults for property crime, down 7% from last year (Table 7). Of these property crime arrests, Theft accounted for 57%; Vandalism, 16%; Fraud, 11%; and Burglary, 8%. Motor Vehicle Theft, Embezzlement, Forgery, Stolen Property, and Arson, accounted for the remaining 8%. The rate of arrests for these offenses was 902 per 100,000 adult residents (Table 9). Age, Sex, Race Forty two percent of adults arrested for property crime were between the ages of 18 and 24. Generally, as the groups increased in age, the number of arrests decreased. Adults age 18 to 34 accounted for 69% of the total adults arrested for property crime, while adults age 35 and over accounted for 30%. Overall, male arrest rates have been on a general downward trend for the past few years, while female arrest rates have experienced a somewhat rise and fall pattern. As with previous years, males were arrested at a noticeably higher rate than females, accounting for 63% of total property crime arrests in Comparing by race, notable differences were found in the arrest rates between the four race classifications. Black and American Indian/Alaskan Native arrest rates have consistently been higher than White and Asian/Pacific Islander arrest rates over the past five years. With the exception of American Indian/Alaskan Native arrest rates, 2010 rates have declined from 2006 levels. *It should be noted that beginning in 2005, and continuing through 2010, a number of agencies in the state began submitting crime data via the Wisconsin Incident Based Reporting System (WIBRS). The transition into this new reporting system may account for some of the change in numbers seen. Figure 31: Adult Property Arrests by Age, % 11% % 42% % Figure 32: Adult Property Arrest Rates* by Sex, Male Female * Per 100,000 Wisconsin Residents per Sex Figure 33: Adult Property Arrest Rates* by Race, White Black 4,008 4,090 4,136 4,404 3,919 Am. Ind. 1,792 1,890 2,062 1,774 1,934 Asian * Per 100,000 Wisconsin Residents per Race Arrests in Wisconsin /2011

26 Adult Arrests: Property Sex by Property Offense Type In 2010, males and females had relatively similar arrest rates for Fraud, Arson and Embezzlement crimes. Theft accounted for the greatest number of property crime arrests for both males and females, while Embezzlement and Arson accounted for the least. Both males and females were arrested for Theft at a higher rate than any other property crime with males accounting for 56% of the total theft arrests. Burglary and Vandalism arrest rates for males were markedly higher than the arrest rate for females. Figure 34: Adult Property Arrest Rates* by Sex and Offense, 2010 Male Female Burglary Theft Motor Vehicle Theft 27 6 Arson 3 1 Forgery Fraud Embezzlement 5 5 Stolen Property Vandalism * Per 100,000 Wisconsin Residents per Sex Race by Property Offense Type White adults accounted for 73% (28,308) of the total property crime arrests in 2010, followed by Black adults with 24% (9,309), American Indian/Alaskan Native adults 3% (1,037), and Asian/Pacific Islander adults 1% (333). For further details, see Appendix D. In comparing the arrest rates of property crime by race, sizeable differences were found between the four race categories with Black and American Indian/Alaskan Native residents being arrested at a higher rate for almost all property crime offenses. Most notably, there were 2,258 arrests per 100,000 Black residents for Theft and 1,045 arrests per 100,000 American Indian/Alaskan Native residents for Theft. Arrests rates for Arson and Embezzlement were relatively similar among the four race categories. Vandalism had the second highest arrest rate behind Theft for all race categories. Figure 35: Adult Property Arrest Rates* by Race and Offense, 2010 White Black Am. Indian Asian Burglary Theft 410 2,258 1, Motor Vehicle Theft Arson Forgery Fraud Embezzlement Stolen Property Vandalism * Per 100,000 Wisconsin Residents per Race Arrests in Wisconsin /2011

27 Adult Arrests: Drug For this report, adult drug crimes include: Sale-Opium/Narcotic, Sale-Marijuana, Sale-Synthetic Narcotic, Sale-, Possession-Opium/Narcotic, Possession-Marijuana, Possession-Synthetic Narcotic, and Possession-. Overview In 2010, Wisconsin law enforcement arrested 21,655 adults for drug offenses, up 3% from last year (Table 7). Of the total drug arrests, 80% were for Possession and 20% were for Sale/Manufacturing. Marijuana was the most common drug associated with both drug sale arrests and possession arrests. Drug arrests were made at a rate of 501 per 100,000 adult residents (Table 10). Age, Sex, Race Fifty two percent of adults arrested for drug offenses were between the ages of 18 and 24. Generally, as the groups increased in age, the number of arrests decreased. Adults age 18 to 34 accounted for 80% of the total adults arrested for violent crime, while adults age 35 and over accounted for 20%. Consistent with previous years, males were arrested at a noticeably higher rate than females, accounting for 82% of total drug arrests in Both male and female drug arrest rates have been on an increasing trend since Comparing by race, notable differences were found in the arrest rates between the four race classifications. Black and American Indian/Alaskan Native arrest rates have consistently been higher than White and Asian/Pacific Islander arrest rates over the past five years. Generally, arrest rates among the four race categories have remained somewhat consistent for the past few years. Figure 36: Adult Drug Arrests by Age, 2010 Figure 37: Adult Drug Arrest Rates* by Sex, % % 2% 7% % * Per 100,000 Wisconsin Residents per Sex Figure 38: Adult Drug Arrest Rates* by Race, Male Female *It should be noted that beginning in 2005, and continuing through 2010, a number of agencies in the state began submitting crime data via the Wisconsin Incident Based Reporting System (WIBRS). The transition into this new reporting system may account for some of the change in numbers seen. White Black 2,649 2,755 2,766 Am. Ind ,733 2, Asian * Per 100,000 Wisconsin Residents per Race Arrests in Wisconsin /2011

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