The relationship between competence and performance: implications for assessing practice performance

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "The relationship between competence and performance: implications for assessing practice performance"

Transcription

1 Papers from the 10 th Cambridge Conference The relationship between competence and performance: implications for assessing practice performance J-J Rethans, 1 J J Norcini, 2 M Barón-Maldonado, 3 D Blackmore, 4 B C Jolly, 5 T LaDuca, 6 S Lew, 7 G G Page 8 & L H Southgate 9 Objective This paper aims to describe current views of the relationship between competence and performance and to delineate some of the implications of the distinctions between the two areas for the purpose of assessing doctors in practice. Methods During a 2-day closed session, the authors, using their wide experiences in this domain, defined the problem and the context, discussed the content and set up a new model. This was developed further by correspondence over a 6-month period. Results Competency-based assessments were defined as measures of what doctors do in testing situations, while performance-based assessments were defined as measures of what doctors do in practice. The distinction between competency-based and performance-based methods leads to a three-stage model for assessing doctors in practice. The first component of the model proposed is a screening test that would identify doctors at risk. Practitioners who pass the screen would move on to a continuous quality improvement process aimed at raising the general level of performance. Practitioners deemed to be at risk would undergo a more detailed assessment process focused on rigorous testing, with poor performers targeted for remediation or removal from practice. Conclusion We propose a new model, designated the Cambridge Model, which extends and refines Miller s pyramid. It inverts his pyramid, focuses exclusively on the top two tiers, and identifies performance as a product of competence, the influences of the individual (e.g. health, relationships), and the influences of the system (e.g. facilities, practice time). The model provides a basis for understanding and designing assessments of practice performance. Keywords clinical competence *standards; physicians, family *standards; education, medical, continuing *standards; quality of health care standards. Medical Education 2002;36: Introduction Most medical students start their careers as qualified doctors after successfully completing the final high stakes examinations. Traditionally, doctors have been 1 Skillslab, Maastricht University, The Netherlands, 2 Psychometrics and Research, American Board of Internal Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, 3 Faculty of Medicine, University of Alcalá, Madrid, Spain, 4 Evaluation Bureau, Medical Council of Canada, Ottawa, Canada, 5 Centre for Medical and Health Sciences Education, Monash University, Victoria, Australia, 6 National Board of Medical Examiners, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, 7 Royal Australian College of General Practitioners, Melbourne, Australia, 8 Faculty of Medicine, Division of Educational Support and Development, College of Health Disciplines, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada, 9 Centre for Health Informatics and Multi- Professional Education, Medical School, University College London, UK Correspondence: Jan-Joost Rethans, MD PhD, Skillslab, Maastricht University, PO Box 616, 6200 MD Maastricht, The Netherlands. Tel.: 00 31Æ43Æ388Æ1790; Fax: 00 31Æ43Æ ; sk.unimaas.nl regarded as competent enough to start working with patients immediately. Furthermore, it has been assumed that they would remain competent throughout their professional careers by taking postgraduate courses and that this, together with working in actual practice, would provide sufficient opportunities and evidence to ensure that they remained fit to practise. However, there are or at least two reasons why this view does not reflect the reality for medical practitioners today. Firstly, several studies have shown that there are differences between what doctors can do in controlled high stakes situations and what they really do in actual practice. 1 5 Moreover, the relationship between demonstrating competency in examinations and behaviour in actual practice appears at the least to be problematic. Studies have shown both high and moderate as well as very low () 0Æ04) correlations between results of doctors performing examinations during tests and in actual practice. 1 5 One of the problems with these 901

2 902 Assessing practice performance J-J Rethans et al. Key learning points Competency-based assessment measures what doctors can do in controlled representations of professional practice. Performance-based assessment measures what doctors do in their professional practice. Assessing doctors in practice should best be done using a three-stage model. The staged model consists of: a screening phase for all doctors, focusing on real practice; a continuous quality improvement phase for those who pass the screen, and a detailed assessment process for those at risk. conflicting results is that authors do not make use of the same implicit or explicit definitions of both test conditions and methods used. The situations under which candidates are investigated and the descriptions of these situations are not uniform: competence (behaviour), competency, test behaviour, professional behaviour (actual) performance and test performance are only some of them. In addition, some studies refer to direct observations of doctors while others use opinions of peers and compare these. Yet these studies claim to describe the same results. We urgently need to establish a common terminology before we can make it possible to determine the implications which these results have for quality assurance or licensure programmes for medical professionals. Secondly, it is now known that merely undertaking postgraduate courses throughout a professional career, even if done from personal initiative, is not enough to remain working as a competent doctor. 6 This is not only because of the rapid changes in medical information technology. In addition, the growth of government and patient influences (satisfaction rates, legal rights, etc.) reflected in the quality improvement literature shows that additional factors direct the behaviour of a medical professional. This is reflected in the content of different national and international medical standards or guidelines programmes. The requirements of patients, society and peers make a professional career, and its assessment, much more complex now than it has been in the past. In this paper we propose a model for the assessment of performance and competence in actual practice with the following characteristics. It will: contain clear definitions; take into account current knowledge about assessment; be an international model, more or less independent of any national setting, and promote the assessment of an individual medical professional. The approach to the model, how to use it for screening, the issue of poor performers, the implications of this model and its strengths and weaknesses form the basis for the rest of the paper. Implementation is not part of this paper. Definitions In this paper we will use the following definitions: competency-based assessment measures what doctors can do in controlled representations of professional practice; performance-based assessment measures what doctors do in actual professional practice. Although at first glance these definitions may seem wide open, their implications are not. Many research papers on assessment refer to performance-based assessment and then describe candidates taking objective structured clinical examinations (OSCEs) and clinical physical examinations (CPXs). We propose that all assessments under examination-like settings should now be referred to as competence-based assessments, whereas assessments in actual practice should be referred to as performance-based assessments. Each setting has its own dynamics. Current knowledge about the test practice in both settings is shown in Table 1. In general, competence assessment is easier to administer. However, the perspectives of patients and society demand that doctors should meet the assessment standards in their working conditions in any given situation. In future, the emphasis should lie on the assessment of performance. A model for assessing practising doctors Figure 1 depicts a model for assessing practising doctors. The model is founded upon an up-to-date understanding of what is known about assessing both clinical competence and clinical performance. The model is intended to be applicable across medical specialties and across international boundaries. It is sensitive to the need to be fair to the profession and its members, yet

3 Assessing practice performance J-J Rethans et al. 903 Table 1 Current knowledge of practices for competence and performance assessment Competence Performance Available technology Reasonable costs Traditional methods Measurement qualities (theory) known Experimental context Logistically feasible Quantitative Professionally-based What can we assess? Technology evolving High costs Traditional methods rejected Subjectivity versus objectivity Naturalistic context Logistically difficult Descriptive qualitative Involves patients What else should we assess that we can t learn from competency assessment? Figure 1 Outline of the authors approach to performance assessment. responsive to the public s need to be assured that doctors performances are effective. We propose to apply it in a 5-year cycle, preferably dovetailing it with current national standards and using contemporary knowledge on psychometrics. The model for assessing practising doctors has three components. These are: 1 a general screening component in which all practitioners will participate, followed by either

4 904 Assessing practice performance J-J Rethans et al. 2 a continuous quality improvement component for practitioners who perform well on the screening component, or 3 a rigorous diagnostic investigation and follow-up component for practitioners who perform poorly on the general screen. The context of the model Most existing arrangements for the monitoring of individual practitioners involve either or both of two contrasting approaches. 7 In each case, formal mechanisms are created for inspection of the practice performance of doctors. But there are numerous and significant differences. For example, the approach favoured in the US, arising from its tradition of entrepreneurial medicine, focuses on identification of the (allegedly few) poor performers and seeks to apply sanctions in the form of restrictions to the license to practice, including revocation. 8 Elsewhere, notably in Canada, equally formal mechanisms are imposed, but the intention is described as continuous promotion of quality among all practitioners. 9 In the UK, mainly because of recent health care alarms and public concern over the quality of practising doctors, both systems will be in operation from Whatever the context, there are indications of increasing support for implementation of systems of monitoring doctors practice performance. 11 Such systems are now operational. 12 Accordingly, this present climate affords an opportunity to consider the most desirable features of any system of practice performance assessment. The screening component The arguments made here reflect several guiding principles. In a complex social and professional environment, efficient use of resources is imperative. This must translate into a mechanism that meets the real challenge of balancing cost with effective measurement of performance. Hence the adoption of a screening philosophy that rigorously meets these constraints. An appropriate approach is to consider the task as a screening plus further investigation strategy. If relatively quick and efficient screening procedures can be developed, then only a limited number of potentially at risk doctors need be subject to further, more detailed scrutiny. One way of achieving this might be by screening and scrutinising routinely collected data on items such as those outlined in Table 2 (e.g. patient reviews for communication skills, health checks for fitness to practise, prescribing behaviour and referral letters for appropriate management). 13 These screens could be spread over 3 5 years so that a snapshot of each area is taken, thereby reducing the need for large scale screens every 5 years. Some of this might even be managed on a self-assessment or local peer assessment basis, with appropriate quality assurance devices (sampling) included. Data on the predictive validity of these screens could then be collected. Of course, it may be that quick and effective screening for behaviour as complex as practice performance just does not exist. Hence, screening should assess broadly, but with priority on practice performance. In epidemiological terms, the sensitivity of the first phase must be high. It would be more acceptable to have doctors wrongly classified as being at risk in the first phase, and then reclassified, after the next assessment stages, as good performing colleagues, than to have them classified as good performers who, in the end, are found to be deficient. Finally, the screening assessment must be consistent with, and possess sufficient rigour to correctly classify doctors for, components 2 and 3 described above. Table 2 Potential screening methods and elements of performance assessment Methods Elements Peer review Patient review Performance appraisal Professional development continuing medical education (CME) Compulsory health checks Chart audits or competence assessments Aggregate measures (e.g. patient immunisation rates) Prescribing behaviour Referral information Technical skills; team relationships professional behaviour; ethics; cognitive skills; patient management Communications; professional behaviour; impairment; satisfaction Technical competence; resource use; status of privileges Active participation in CME; professional behaviour Physical fitness; cognitive function; psychological impairment Use of computerized records; decision-making; prescribing patterns; insight Standing in context of practice standards Knowledge currency; clinical decisions; patient management; impairment Patient management; decision-making

5 Assessing practice performance J-J Rethans et al. 905 Assumptions of screening assessment Before we describe the specific components of an effective screening assessment, we should also define four complementary resources that we believe must be made available. These include: 1 a doctors health programme; 2 definitions of scope or standards of practice; 3 guidelines and standards for the profession, and 4 baseline information. Potential screening methods While the premise of any screening is proactive in orientation, the process must be acceptable to the medical community and credible to the public. We acknowledge the importance of conventional indications of possible practice problems, such as patient complaints and actions following hospital review. Reactive measures In most countries, patient complaints constitute a very large volume of information and they characterise much of the communication between ordinary citizens and licensing bodies. A small fraction of these complaints are deemed worthy of intensive investigation. Although they have risen in number in recent years, it remains true that only a very small number of patient complaints (including malpractice suits) result in adverse judgements or disciplinary action. 14 Performance reviews by hospital oversight committees may result in modification of privileges, or (less often) their termination. In US jurisdictions such actions are reportable to the licensing authority, which may undertake independent investigation as well. However, the credibility of a complaints system must remain low because it is neither truly peerreferenced nor self-regulating. Proactive measures A portfolio of proactive methods should represent the centrepiece of any proposed performance screening assessment. This is because of the professional value that imposes the obligation on doctors to be knowledgeable and proficient throughout their careers. There is a large array of possible screening methods and they vary in feasibility, utility and cost. In the interests of completeness we have included all of them here, irrespective of their potential for contributing meaningfully to the screening process. Care should be taken, however, that statements of competence are applicable to real practice. The major elements of the initial screening process should become a routine part of a doctor s professional life, consisting of regular monitoring of performance (e.g. via patient satisfaction reviews, referral rate comparison groups) and more formal periodic assessments (e.g. via chart reviews, peer reviews). While the screening component is intended to focus on the assessment of performance, it could also include some low cost, easily administered competency assessments (e.g. written examinations). Similarly, while Table 2 includes important, possibly generic elements of professional performance, other elements of performance should not be excluded. For example, the important domain of clinical judgement may not be assessed adequately by those methods listed. Given the greater challenge of obtaining reliable performance assessments, competency assessments would add reliability to the assessment process. However, this screening phase should ultimately emphasize performance assessments. To ensure rigour, competency assessments should be administered under controlled conditions. The screening component assumes that programmes to assess doctors health are already in place. If they are not, they should be encompassed in the screening process prior to periodic performance or competency assessments so as to rule out health-related causes of poor performance. Continuous quality improvement The second component of the model focuses on learning, as its thrust is one of continuous quality improvement (CQI) for practitioners who perform well on the screening component. It is expected that over 90% of all practitioners would be directed to this component of the model from the screening component. This CQI component would build upon the results of the assessment strategies comprising the screening component of the model, and would be largely self-guided by the practitioner. This adds another argument in support of the proposal that the first screening phase should primarily be based in and on real practice: doctors will view the results of their performance data as of their own. This sense of personal identification with the subject can make an important contribution towards stimulating change. In this second component, practitioners could employ a reflective learning model to construct their learning around their screening assessment results and their individual practices. Any assessment activity built into this component need only be of minimal rigour, its purpose being to guide the practitioners to areas of strength and weakness in their own performances. Although CQI depends largely on the doctor s selfguidance, it will be apparent if doctors remain in this

6 906 Assessing practice performance J-J Rethans et al. component or transfer to other components because the initial screening phase is to be repeated periodically. Rigorous performance assessment The purpose of the third component of the model is to obtain a detailed assessment of a practitioner who performed poorly on the screening as a basis for decisions on remediation, rehabilitation or exit from the profession. It is expected that less than 10% of practitioners will be directed to this component. Given the high stakes involved for both the practitioner and society, the assessment process in this component must be of the highest rigour. The standards applied in this component should preferably be at least national ones and be approved by bodies and or boards of the profession(s) involved. This third component also involves the major task of seeking out doctors who are still remediable. Once again, the focus here is on assessing performance. However, this will be complemented by an equally rigorous assessment of competence, which will serve as a mechanism for understanding poor performance, and for developing remedial strategies for correcting poor performance. Whereas component 2 of the model was largely self-directed by the practitioner, component 3 will be directed by a professional or government body responsible for the quality of practitioners performance. We propose a staged assessment also in this phase, to be first performance-based and then competencybased. In order to understand why doctors perform poorly, we need to ask why and how come questions so that we can identify factors or reasons behind poor performance such as impairment, behavioural and health-related issues. These questions should be based on the outcomes of the first screening phase. The answers should direct the examiners firstly to explanations for poor performance (such as current temporary difficult personal circumstances) and secondly to specific assessment areas where candidates show inadequate results. At the end of this phase, more traditional competency-based assessment strategies may be used, such as detailed knowledge tests, standardised patient examinations of clinical and practical skills, structured oral tests, tests of cognitive abilities, direct observation of doctor patient contacts and so on. This approach has been adopted by the UK General Medical Council (GMC) and has been implemented for the entire profession. 10 The introduction of the GMC s Performance Procedures in July 1997 has enabled the identification of doctors whose performance is seriously deficient, calling their registration into question. This completes the GMC s facilities for dealing with dysfunctional doctors, which were previously limited to conduct or health-related matters. The performance of doctors who enter the procedures is assessed in two parts, comprising peer review of practice to assess performance in the workplace and tests of competence to assess knowledge and skills basic to that performance. Equivalent assessments for peer review for all registered doctors have been devised and piloted. The competence assessment always includes a written examination and at least one practical examination, but the written examination may be an objective (multiple-choice) test, a short-answer test, or some form of essay test. The practical examination(s) may involve interactions with standardised patients, clinical models, or other forms of simulations. Trained nonmedical assessors recruited by open advertisement in the national press take part in both phases alongside the medical assessors. By spring 2001, 230 doctors had entered the programme. General practitioners are represented in proportion to their numbers in the profession, and other disciplines that have been assessed include surgeons, emergency doctors, anaesthetists, psychiatrists, paediatricians and radiologists. The Cambridge Model for Performance and Competence Miller proposed an assessment model with four stages or levels, designated knows, knows how, shows how and does, as shown in Fig Miller refers to shows how as being an assessment of performance. However, as argued earlier in this paper shows how nowadays should be referred to as competency-based assessment rather than as performancebased assessment. Miller s triangle implicitly assumes that competence predicts performance. However, the exact relationship between competence and performance is complicated. 1 5,10 Factors such as time pressure, day of the week, mood of the patient and doctor and impact of the fore-going examination influence clinical performance just as individual deficient competence on specific domain-related knowledge areas does. Miller s figure is very useful in educational settings, especially for setting up medical curricula or courses for students. The four stages can easily be used to build an educational programme that begins with the assimilation of pure knowledge (reading books and articles) and progresses through the acquiral of clinical skills to development of real performance in practice. However, the model is no longer very helpful in terms of assessment in real practice.

7 Assessing practice performance J-J Rethans et al. 907 Figure 2 Miller s Triangle 15. Another drawback of Miller s figure is that it fails to account for the influences of other factors on clinical performance. While these influences are numerous, they may be arbitrarily classified as either systemrelated or individual-related. System-related influences include government programmes and initiatives, patient expectations, guidelines or policies developed by the practice facility, time, and accessibility to other health professionals. Individual-related influences include the physical and mental health of the doctor, their state of mind at the time of the performance assessment, and their relationships with others, including patients, peers (including other health professionals) and their own family. Miller s triangle is a static figure, whereas contemporary assessment demands a more flexible figure. It is vitally important that our staged assessment programme allows us to view the performance of an individual doctor from different angles. These different angles will allow, for example, fuller answering of the why questions submitted to the assessee. To illustrate this and the interaction between these systemic and individual influences and competence and performance, we propose a modification to Miller s triangle (Fig. 3). This effectively inverts Miller s model. Clearly, competence is an important prerequisite for performance and is therefore represented in the main triangle in the centre. Alternatively, this may be conceptualised as the beam of light which competence sheds on performance, but which does not of itself illuminate the whole picture. We propose at least two further triangles, or shafts of light, to illuminate the influences of the system-related and individual-related factors that should also considered when assessing the performance of a doctor. In fact, it is very likely that more shafts of light are necessary to wholly illumine the performance of an individual doctor. The corollary is that not all the problems related to doctor performance will be explained by competence alone. Because of this, it may be more cost-effective in the first instance to examine other systemic or individual influences before conducting rigorous assessment of doctor competence. Figure 3 The Cambridge Model for delineating performance and competence.

8 908 Assessing practice performance J-J Rethans et al. Conclusion The purpose of this paper was to describe current views of the relationship between competence and performance and to delineate some of the implications of this relationship for assessing doctors in practice. Competency-based assessments were defined as measures of what doctors do in testing situations, while performance-based assessments were defined as measures of what doctors do in practice. We argued that tests of competence are feasible and efficient, and produce results with known, valid properties. In contrast, methods of assessing performance are just evolving but hold greater promise of meeting the needs of patients and society by describing the actual quality of care delivered by doctors. The distinction between competency-based and performance-based methods leads naturally to a model for assessing doctors in practice. The first component of the model we propose is a screening test, a relatively quick and efficient procedure that would identify doctors at risk. Practitioners who pass the screen would move on to a continuous quality improvement process aimed at raising general levels of performance. Practitioners at risk of poor performance would undergo a more detailed assessment process focused on rigorous testing, with poor performers targeted for remediation or removal from practice. Finally, the competence performance distinction traces at least part of its heritage to Miller s model, which divided methods according to whether the examinee is required to know, know how, show how or do. We propose the Cambridge Model, which extends and refines Miller s work. It inverts his pyramid, focuses exclusively on the top two tiers, and identifies performance as a product of competence combined with the influences of factors related to the individual (e.g. health, relationships) and factors related to the system (e.g. facilities, practice time). The model provides a basis for understanding and designing assessments of practice performance. Contributors All authors contributed equally to the discussions leading to this paper, which were undertaken during the 10th Cambridge Conference. J-JR and JJN undertook main responsibility for preparing the draft, co-ordinating input from the other authors and writing the final version of the paper. Acknowledgements Grateful acknowledgement is made to the sponsors of the 10th Cambridge Conference, the Medical Council of Canada, the Smith & Nephew Foundation, the American Board of Internal Medicine, the National Board of Medical Examiners and the Royal College of Physicians. Funding There was no external funding for this study. References 1 Rethans JJ, Sturmans F, Drop R, van der Vleuten C, Hobus P. Does competence of general practitioners predict their performance? Comparison between examination setting and actual practice. BMJ 1991;303: Ramsey PG, Wenrich M, Carline JD, Inui TS, Larson EB, Logerto JP. Use of peer ratings to evaluate physician performance. JAMA 1993;269: Ram P, van der Vleuten C, Rethans JJ, Schouten B, Hobma S, Grol R. Assessment in general practice: the predictive value of written-knowledge tests and a multiple-station examination for actual medical performance in daily practice. Med Educ 1999;33: Southgate L, Campbell M, Cox J, Foulkes J, Jolly B, McCrorie P et al. The General Medical Council s performance procedures: the development and implementation of tests of competence with examples from general practice. Med Educ 2001;35: Page GG, Fielding DW. Performance on PMPs and performance in practice: are they related? J Med Educ 1980;55: Davis DA, Thompson MA, Oxman AD, Haynes RB. Changing physician performance. A systematic review of the effects of continuing medical education strategies. JAMA 1995;274: Dauphinee D, Fabb W, Jolly B, Lansley D, Wealthall S, Procopis P. Determining the content of certifying examinations. In. Newble DI, Jolly BC, Wakeford RE, eds. Certification and Recertification in Medicine: Issues in the Assessment of Clinical Competence. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press; Norcini JJ. Recertification in the United States. BMJ 1999;319: Dauphinee WD. Revalidation of doctors in Canada. BMJ 1999;319: Southgate LH, Pringle M. Revalidation in the United Kingdom: general principles based on experience in general practice. BMJ 1999;319: Southgate LH, Cox J, David T, Hatch D, Howes A, Johnson N et al. The assessment of poorly performing doctors: the development of the assessment programmes for the General

9 Assessing practice performance J-J Rethans et al. 909 Medical Council s Performance Procedures. Med Educ 2001;35 (Suppl.): Cunningham JPW, Hanna E, Turnbull J, Kaigas T, Norman GR. Defensible assessment of the competency of the practising physician. Acad Med 1997;72: Davies HA, Crossley J, Howe A, Jolly BC, Newble DI. Performance assessment using outpatient letters: the Sheffield assessment instrument for letters. Med Educ 2001;35: Page GG, Bates J, Dyer SM et al. Physician-assessment and physician enhancement programmes in Canada. J Can Med Assoc 1995;153: Miller GE. The assessment of clinical skills competence performance. Acad Med 1990;65 (Suppl.):S63 S67. Received 20 March 2002; editorial comments to authors 13 June 2002; accepted for publication 17 June 2002

Assessment-Driven Continuing Professional Development

Assessment-Driven Continuing Professional Development Assessment-Driven Continuing Professional Development Implications for Physicians, Assessors, Regulators and Certifying Colleges Author: Dr. Kevin Imrie Date: April 7, 2014 Conflict of Interest Declaration

More information

Supporting information for appraisal and revalidation

Supporting information for appraisal and revalidation Supporting information for appraisal and revalidation During their annual appraisals, doctors will use supporting information to demonstrate that they are continuing to meet the principles and values set

More information

Draft proposal Standards for assessment in RACP training programs

Draft proposal Standards for assessment in RACP training programs Draft proposal Standards for assessment in RACP training programs February 2014 Page 1 Contents Introduction... 3 Quick guide to the proposed RACP standards for assessment... 4 Standards for assessment

More information

FEDERATION OF STATE MEDICAL BOARDS OF THE UNITED STATES, INC. SPECIAL COMMITTEE ON MAINTENANCE OF LICENSURE

FEDERATION OF STATE MEDICAL BOARDS OF THE UNITED STATES, INC. SPECIAL COMMITTEE ON MAINTENANCE OF LICENSURE FEDERATION OF STATE MEDICAL BOARDS OF THE UNITED STATES, INC. SPECIAL COMMITTEE ON MAINTENANCE OF LICENSURE INTERIM REPORT TO THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS FEBRUARY 2005 Section I: Introduction The was established

More information

Comparison table showing 2015 accreditation standards for specialist medical programs and professional development programs against the 2010 standards

Comparison table showing 2015 accreditation standards for specialist medical programs and professional development programs against the 2010 standards Comparison table showing 2015 accreditation standards for specialist medical programs and professional development programs against the 2010 standards Medical Programs and Professional Development Programs

More information

FACULTY OF PHARMACEUTICAL MEDICINE

FACULTY OF PHARMACEUTICAL MEDICINE FACULTY OF PHARMACEUTICAL MEDICINE OF THE ROYAL COLLEGES OF PHYSICIANS OF THE UNITED KINGDOM DIPLOMA IN PHARMACEUTICAL MEDICINE GUIDANCE NOTES FOR CANDIDATES AND SUPERVISORS FOR THE DIPLOMA IN PHARMACEUTICAL

More information

Supporting information for appraisal and revalidation: guidance for General Practitioners

Supporting information for appraisal and revalidation: guidance for General Practitioners Supporting information for appraisal and revalidation: guidance for General Practitioners Based on the Academy of Medical Royal Colleges and Faculties Core for all doctors 2 Supporting information for

More information

Faculty of Public Health

Faculty of Public Health Faculty of Public Health Of the Royal Colleges of Physicians of the United Kingdom Working to improve the public s health The UK Faculty of Public Health (FPH) is the leading professional body for public

More information

Quality Assurance of Medical Appraisers

Quality Assurance of Medical Appraisers Quality Assurance of Medical Appraisers Recruitment, training, support and review of medical appraisers in England www.revalidationsupport.nhs.uk Contents 1. Introduction 3 2. Purpose and overview 4 3.

More information

Teaching institution: Institute of Education, University of London

Teaching institution: Institute of Education, University of London PROGRAMME SPECIFICATION Doctor in Education Awarding body: Institute of Education, University of London Teaching institution: Institute of Education, University of London Name of the final award: Doctor

More information

University of Cambridge: Programme Specifications MASTER OF STUDIES IN INTERDISCIPLINARY DESIGN FOR THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT

University of Cambridge: Programme Specifications MASTER OF STUDIES IN INTERDISCIPLINARY DESIGN FOR THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT University of Cambridge: Programme Specifications Every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the information in this programme specification. Programme specifications are produced and then reviewed

More information

Supporting information for appraisal and revalidation

Supporting information for appraisal and revalidation Supporting information for appraisal and revalidation During their annual appraisals, doctors will use supporting information to demonstrate that they are continuing to meet the principles and values

More information

A Regulatory Framework for Nurse Practitioners in British Columbia

A Regulatory Framework for Nurse Practitioners in British Columbia 2855 Arbutus Street Vancouver, BC V6J 3Y8 Tel 604.736.7331 1.800.565.6505 www.crnbc.ca A Regulatory Framework for Nurse Practitioners in British Columbia In December 2000, the Ministry of Health announced

More information

Guide to the National Safety and Quality Health Service Standards for health service organisation boards

Guide to the National Safety and Quality Health Service Standards for health service organisation boards Guide to the National Safety and Quality Health Service Standards for health service organisation boards April 2015 ISBN Print: 978-1-925224-10-8 Electronic: 978-1-925224-11-5 Suggested citation: Australian

More information

Good Practice Guidelines for Appraisal

Good Practice Guidelines for Appraisal Good Practice Guidelines for Appraisal Dr Laurence Mynors Wallis Dr David Fearnley February 2010 1 Contents Page Introduction 3 Link between appraisal and revalidation 4 Preparation for the appraisal meeting

More information

PROGRAMME SPECIFICATION MA/MSc Psychology of Education and the MA Education (Psychology)

PROGRAMME SPECIFICATION MA/MSc Psychology of Education and the MA Education (Psychology) PROGRAMME SPECIFICATION MA/MSc Psychology of Education and the MA Education (Psychology) Awarding Institution: Institute of Education, University of London Teaching Institution: Institute of Education,

More information

Teaching and Learning Methods

Teaching and Learning Methods Programme Specification (Postgraduate) Date amended: 1. Programme Title (EdD) 2. Awarding body or institution University of Leicester 3. a) Mode of Study part time b) Type of Study postgraduate research

More information

What is expected of Candidates for a Research Degree?

What is expected of Candidates for a Research Degree? What is expected of Candidates for a Research Degree? The Quality Assurance Agency s definition of what Masters and Doctorates are is given along with their qualification descriptors (QAA framework for

More information

Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists. Faculty of Sexual and Reproductive Healthcare

Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists. Faculty of Sexual and Reproductive Healthcare Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists Faculty of Sexual and Reproductive Healthcare Supporting Information for Appraisal and Revalidation: Guidance for Obstetrics and Gynaecology and / or Sexual

More information

Guidelines on continuing professional development

Guidelines on continuing professional development Guidelines on continuing professional development Introduction These guidelines 1 have been developed by the Psychology Board of Australia under s. 39 of the Health Practitioner Regulation National Law

More information

PUBLIC RECORD. Record of Determinations Fitness to Practise Panel. Date: 12 January 2015. Medical Practitioner

PUBLIC RECORD. Record of Determinations Fitness to Practise Panel. Date: 12 January 2015. Medical Practitioner PUBLIC RECORD Date: 12 January 2015 Name of Medical Practitioner Dr Andrea HERMANN Primary medical qualification State Exam Med 1994 Rheinisch-Westfälische Technische Hochschule Aachen GMC reference number

More information

Original Scientific Papers Original

Original Scientific Papers Original Do vocationally registered GPs obtain better outcomes than other GPs? A study of Accident Compensation claims data Stephen Buetow MA (Hons) PhD, Senior Research Fellow, Department of General Practice and

More information

ROYAL HOLLOWAY University of London PROGRAMME SPECIFICATION

ROYAL HOLLOWAY University of London PROGRAMME SPECIFICATION ROYAL HOLLOWAY University of London PROGRAMME SPECIFICATION This document describes the Doctorate in Clinical Psychology. This specification is valid for new entrants and current students from September

More information

Regulations for Research Programmes of Study (including new route PhD programmes)

Regulations for Research Programmes of Study (including new route PhD programmes) (including new route PhD programmes) Note: these Regulations should be read in conjunction with the University Code of Practice for the Quality Assurance for Research Programmes of Study. 1. Scope and

More information

APPENDIX 13.1 WORLD FEDERATION OF OCCUPATIONAL THERAPISTS ENTRY LEVEL COMPETENCIES FOR OCCUPATIONAL THERAPISTS

APPENDIX 13.1 WORLD FEDERATION OF OCCUPATIONAL THERAPISTS ENTRY LEVEL COMPETENCIES FOR OCCUPATIONAL THERAPISTS APPENDIX 13.1 WORLD FEDERATION OF OCCUPATIONAL THERAPISTS ENTRY LEVEL COMPETENCIES FOR OCCUPATIONAL THERAPISTS APPENDIX 13.1 FORMS PART OF THE APPENDICES FOR THE 28 TH COUNCIL MEETING MINUTES CM2008: Appendix

More information

AMA Position Statement. Competency-based training in medical education

AMA Position Statement. Competency-based training in medical education Competency-based training in medical education 2010 1. Scope The AMA has developed this position statement in response to growing debate in the medical profession about the potential impact of competency-based

More information

T he performance procedures of the General Medical Council

T he performance procedures of the General Medical Council 43 ORIGINAL ARTICLE Corridor consultations and the medical microbiological record: is patient safety at risk? S R Heard, C Roberts, S J Furrows, M Kelsey, L Southgate, on behalf of the Specialty Assessment

More information

1. Progress in developing the GMC s Revalidation Quality Assurance (QA) model.

1. Progress in developing the GMC s Revalidation Quality Assurance (QA) model. 4 May 2011 Continued Practice, Revalidation and Registration Board 9 To consider Quality Assurance Sampling and Audit Issue 1. Progress in developing the GMC s Revalidation Quality Assurance (QA) model.

More information

Criteria for the Accreditation of. MBM Programmes

Criteria for the Accreditation of. MBM Programmes Criteria for the Accreditation of MBM Programmes 1 2 1 INTRODUCTION Framework & Eligibility 1.1 This document sets out the criteria for MBM (Masters in Business & Management) programme accreditation. While

More information

Contact: Dr. Judy Hyde. 1 P a g e. President ACPA. judy.hyde@acpa.org.au

Contact: Dr. Judy Hyde. 1 P a g e. President ACPA. judy.hyde@acpa.org.au Response of the Australian Clinical Psychology Association (ACPA) to the Psychology Board of Australia s Consultation Paper 25: On ending the higher degree exemption from sitting the National Psychology

More information

INTERNAL AUDIT MANUAL

INTERNAL AUDIT MANUAL དང ལ ར ས ལ ན ཁག Internal Audit Manual INTERNAL AUDIT MANUAL Royal Government of Bhutan 2014 i i ii ii Internal Audit Manual དང ལ ར ས ལ ན ཁག ROYAL GOVERNMNET OF BHUTAN MINISTRY OF FINANCE TASHICHHO DZONG

More information

BMJcareers. Informing Choices

BMJcareers. Informing Choices : The Need for Career Advice in Medical Training How should the support provided to doctors and medical students to help them make career decisions during their training be improved? Experience elsewhere

More information

ENGINEERING COUNCIL OF SOUTH AFRICA

ENGINEERING COUNCIL OF SOUTH AFRICA ENGINEERING COUNCIL OF SOUTH AFRICA Standards and Procedures System Policy on Registration of Persons in Professional Categories Status: Approved by Council Document : R-01-P Rev-1.4 9 April 2013 Background:

More information

A Programmatic View on Assessment

A Programmatic View on Assessment A Programmatic View on Assessment Marvin R Dunn Keynote at the 2015 ACGME Annual Educational Conference San Diego, 28 March 2015 Cees van der Vleuten Maastricht University The Netherlands www.maastrichtuniversity.nl/she

More information

The Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education 2007 ISBN 978 1 84482 672 1. All QAA's publications are available on our website www.qaa.ac.

The Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education 2007 ISBN 978 1 84482 672 1. All QAA's publications are available on our website www.qaa.ac. Accounting 2007 The Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education 2007 ISBN 978 1 84482 672 1 All QAA's publications are available on our website www.qaa.ac.uk Printed copies of current publications are

More information

Standards of Physical Therapy Practice

Standards of Physical Therapy Practice Standards of Physical Therapy Practice The World Confederation for Physical Therapy (WCPT) aims to improve the quality of global healthcare by encouraging high standards of physical therapy education and

More information

School of Social Work

School of Social Work Social Work 282 School of Social Work St. Patrick s Building 469 Telephone: 788-5601 Fax: 788-7496 The School Director of the School: Gillian Walker Supervisor of Graduate Studies: Allan Moscovitch The

More information

THE COLLEGE OF EMERGENCY MEDICINE

THE COLLEGE OF EMERGENCY MEDICINE THE COLLEGE OF EMERGENCY MEDICINE on Supporting Information for Revalidation General Introduction The purpose of revalidation is to assure patients and the public, employers and other healthcare professionals

More information

Improving quality, protecting patients

Improving quality, protecting patients Improving quality, protecting patients Standards of proficiency for Healthcare Science Practitioners 31 July 2014 Version 1.0 Review date: 31 July 2015 Foreword I am pleased to present the Academy for

More information

Procedures for Assessment and Accreditation of Medical Schools by the Australian Medical Council 2011

Procedures for Assessment and Accreditation of Medical Schools by the Australian Medical Council 2011 Australian Medical Council Limited Procedures for Assessment and Accreditation of Medical Schools by the Australian Medical Council 2011 Medical School Accreditation Committee These procedures were approved

More information

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences. Postgraduate Degrees. School of Nursing and Midwifery. www.med.monash.edu/nursing

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences. Postgraduate Degrees. School of Nursing and Midwifery. www.med.monash.edu/nursing Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences Postgraduate Degrees School of Nursing and Midwifery Monash University is ranked in the top 100 of World universities and is the only Australian member of the prestigious

More information

Better Skills Better Jobs Better Health. National occupational standards for the practice of public health guide

Better Skills Better Jobs Better Health. National occupational standards for the practice of public health guide Better Skills Better Jobs Better Health National occupational standards for the practice of public health guide March 2004 Acknowledgements These national occupational standards describe good practice

More information

A. Knowledge and Understanding of:... 3 B. Cognitive (Intellectual or Thinking) Skills, able to:... 4

A. Knowledge and Understanding of:... 3 B. Cognitive (Intellectual or Thinking) Skills, able to:... 4 [BA (Hons) Human Resource Management (Informatics) Programme Specification Primary Purpose: Course management, monitoring and quality assurance. Secondary Purpose: Detailed information for students, staff

More information

General Standards Applicable to All Residency Programs. B Standards

General Standards Applicable to All Residency Programs. B Standards General Standards Applicable to All Residency Programs B Standards January 2011 Editorial Revision June 2013 The information in this booklet is also available on the following websites: Royal College CFPC

More information

Mode of Study The MPH course will be delivered full-time and part-time on campus at the Kedleston Road site

Mode of Study The MPH course will be delivered full-time and part-time on campus at the Kedleston Road site PROGRAMME SPECIFICATION DOCUMENT SECTION ONE: GENERAL INFORMATION Programme Title/ Subject Title: Master of Public Health Award title and Interim awards: Postgraduate Certificate in Public Health Postgraduate

More information

A Guide to Learning Outcomes, Degree Level Expectations and the Quality Assurance Process in Ontario

A Guide to Learning Outcomes, Degree Level Expectations and the Quality Assurance Process in Ontario A Guide to Learning Outcomes, Degree Level Expectations and the Quality Assurance Process in Ontario A Guide to Learning Outcomes, Degree Level Expectations and the Quality Assurance Process in Ontario

More information

Clarence D. Kreiter, PhD *, George R. Bergus, MD, MA(Ed)

Clarence D. Kreiter, PhD *, George R. Bergus, MD, MA(Ed) A study of Two Clinical Performance Scores: Assessing the Psychometric Characteristics of a Combined Score Derived from Clinical Evaluation Forms and OSCEs Clarence D. Kreiter, PhD *, George R. Bergus,

More information

Programme name Advanced Practice in Health and Social Care (Advanced Nurse Practitioner- Neonatal/Child/Adult)

Programme name Advanced Practice in Health and Social Care (Advanced Nurse Practitioner- Neonatal/Child/Adult) PROGRAMME SPECIFICATION KEY FACTS Programme name Advanced Practice in Health and Social Care (Advanced Nurse Practitioner- Neonatal/Child/Adult) Award MSc School School of Health Sciences Department Division

More information

An exploration of quality assurance programmes in professional regulators in Ontario, Canada

An exploration of quality assurance programmes in professional regulators in Ontario, Canada An exploration of quality assurance programmes in professional regulators in Ontario, Canada 1. Executive Summary... 3 2. Introduction... 5 Approach to study 5 Background to the HPC s revalidation research

More information

Programme Specification

Programme Specification Programme Specification Title: Marketing Final Award: Master of Science (MSc) With Exit Awards at: Postgraduate Certificate (PG Cert) Postgraduate Diploma (PG Dip) Master of Science (MSc) To be delivered

More information

Understanding Professional Self-Regulation

Understanding Professional Self-Regulation Understanding Professional Self-Regulation Glen E. Randall BA, MA, MBA, PhD candidate, Founding Registrar of the College of Respiratory Therapists of Ontario (CRTO) 1993 - Nov 2000 In the course of daily

More information

Medical Appraisal Guide

Medical Appraisal Guide A guide to medical appraisal for revalidation in England March 2013 (reissued with updated hyperlinks September 2014) www.england.nhs.uk/revalidation/ Contents Introduction 3 Purpose and context 4 Primary

More information

Volunteer Managers National Occupational Standards

Volunteer Managers National Occupational Standards Volunteer Managers National Occupational Standards Contents 00 Forward 00 Section 1 Introduction 00 Who are these standards for? 00 Why should you use them? 00 How can you use them? 00 What s in a Standard?

More information

Proposal for Communication Ph.D. at UC Davis 8

Proposal for Communication Ph.D. at UC Davis 8 Proposal for Communication Ph.D. at UC Davis 8 6. Administration of the Program The program will be administered by the Department of Communication, which is currently administering the Communication M.A.

More information

PROGRAMME SPECIFICATION

PROGRAMME SPECIFICATION Programme Specification Section 1: Basic Data Awarding institution/body Teaching institution Faculty responsible for programme University of the West of England University of the West of England Faculty

More information

Guidance on UK medical education delivered outside the UK. Introduction. Purpose of guidance

Guidance on UK medical education delivered outside the UK. Introduction. Purpose of guidance Guidance on UK medical education delivered outside the UK Introduction Purpose of guidance 1. The purpose of the General Medical Council (GMC) is to protect, promote and maintain the health and safety

More information

SAQA LOGO: QUALIFICATION TITLE Bachelors Degree in Quantity Surveying (NQF level 7) based on Unit Standards. LEVEL: NQF level 7 CREDITS: 360 FIELD:

SAQA LOGO: QUALIFICATION TITLE Bachelors Degree in Quantity Surveying (NQF level 7) based on Unit Standards. LEVEL: NQF level 7 CREDITS: 360 FIELD: QUALIFICATION TITLE Bachelors Degree in Quantity Surveying (NQF level ) based on Unit Standards SAQA LOGO: LEVEL: NQF level CREDITS: 360 FIELD: NSB 12: Physical Planning and Construction SUB-FIELD: Physical

More information

PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT PLAN (PDP)

PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT PLAN (PDP) Date of PDP: Review Date of PDP: PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT PLAN (PDP) PERSONAL DETAILS Name.. Current Address.. Telephone Numbers Work.... Mobile E-mail Address... Qualifications (with dates)... Dental School/University.

More information

Programme Specification

Programme Specification Programme Specification Title: Accounting Final Award: Master of Science (MSc) With Exit Awards at: Postgraduate Certificate (PG Cert) Postgraduate Diploma (PG Dip) Master of Science (MSc) To be delivered

More information

The Royal New Zealand College of General Practitioners, New Zealand; 2013

The Royal New Zealand College of General Practitioners, New Zealand; 2013 RNZCGP Continuing Professional Development Programme 2014 2017 The Royal New Zealand College of General Practitioners, New Zealand; 2013 The Royal New Zealand College of General Practitioners owns the

More information

GEN2. Consultant report form. Request. This is a request for a consultant report on behalf of: Applicant s name. Applicant s GMC reference number

GEN2. Consultant report form. Request. This is a request for a consultant report on behalf of: Applicant s name. Applicant s GMC reference number Consultant report form This is a request for a consultant report on behalf of: Applicant s name Applicant s GMC reference number Request Dear the applicant s supervising consultant/consultant colleague

More information

STANDARDS FOR ACCREDITATION

STANDARDS FOR ACCREDITATION STANDARDS FOR ACCREDITATION OF POST-GRADUATE CRNA FELLOWSHIPS January 2014 Copyright 2014 by the Council on Accreditation of Nurse Anesthesia Educational Programs 222 S. Prospect Avenue, Park Ridge, Illinois,

More information

Competency-Based Approach. Leanne Worsfold September 5, 2012

Competency-Based Approach. Leanne Worsfold September 5, 2012 Competency-Based Approach Leanne Worsfold September 5, 2012 Agenda Introduction to the Canadian model Define competence and competencies Review evidence-based literature Competence-based Assessments Canadian

More information

Programme Specification

Programme Specification Programme Specification MSc in Forensic Psychology Entry Requirements: Applicants for this course must have a good Honours degree (2:1 or better) in Psychology that confers Graduate Basis for Registration

More information

Deploying Professionally Qualified Faculty: An Interpretation of AACSB Standards An AACSB White Paper issued by:

Deploying Professionally Qualified Faculty: An Interpretation of AACSB Standards An AACSB White Paper issued by: Deploying Professionally Qualified Faculty: An Interpretation of AACSB Standards An AACSB White Paper issued by: AACSB Accreditation Coordinating Committee AACSB Accreditation Quality Committee January

More information

GRADUATE CERTIFICATE IN ORGANISATIONAL DEVELOPMENT

GRADUATE CERTIFICATE IN ORGANISATIONAL DEVELOPMENT GRADUATE CERTIFICATE IN ORGANISATIONAL DEVELOPMENT Innovative, practical and relevant SIMON GOTT Graduate Certificate In Organisational Development Programme Director Organisations cannot truly thrive

More information

Doctor of Education - Higher Education

Doctor of Education - Higher Education 1 Doctor of Education - Higher Education The University of Liverpool s Doctor of Education - Higher Education (EdD) is a professional doctoral programme focused on the latest practice, research, and leadership

More information

Note that the following document is copyright, details of which are provided on the next page.

Note that the following document is copyright, details of which are provided on the next page. Please note that the following document was created by the former Australian Council for Safety and Quality in Health Care. The former Council ceased its activities on 31 December 2005 and the Australian

More information

Code of Conduct. Property of UKAPA 20/11/2009 1

Code of Conduct. Property of UKAPA 20/11/2009 1 Code of Conduct A Physician Assistant (now associate) (PA) is defined as someone who is: a new healthcare professional who, while not a doctor, works to the medical model, with the attitudes, skills and

More information

STUDY AT ONE OF THE WORLD S BEST UNIVERSITIES

STUDY AT ONE OF THE WORLD S BEST UNIVERSITIES STUDY AT ONE OF THE WORLD S BEST UNIVERSITIES WHY AT UOW Psychology at UOW connects you with people, programs and technology to enhance your learning experience. 1. RECOGNISED AUSTRALIA-WIDE When peak

More information

TOP. Masters in Psychology. Acquire a deep understanding of human behaviour to drive performance in people and organisations

TOP. Masters in Psychology. Acquire a deep understanding of human behaviour to drive performance in people and organisations Masters in University of Liverpool, Online Programmes Acquire a deep understanding of human behaviour to drive performance in people and organisations Learn to bring out the best in yourself and others

More information

PUBLIC RECORD. Record of Determinations Fitness to Practise Panel. Dates 07 May 2015-08 May 2015. Medical Practitioner. Dr John Stanley Partington

PUBLIC RECORD. Record of Determinations Fitness to Practise Panel. Dates 07 May 2015-08 May 2015. Medical Practitioner. Dr John Stanley Partington PUBLIC RECORD Dates 07 May 2015-08 May 2015 Name of Medical Practitioner Dr John Stanley Partington Primary medical qualification MB BS 1987 University of Newcastle upon Tyne GMC reference number 3184336

More information

Programme Specification. MSc Children s Nursing (Pre-Registration) Valid from: September 2014 Faculty of Health and Life Sciences

Programme Specification. MSc Children s Nursing (Pre-Registration) Valid from: September 2014 Faculty of Health and Life Sciences Programme Specification MSc Children s (Pre-Registration) Valid from: September 2014 Faculty of Health and Life Sciences SECTION 1: GENERAL INFORMATION Awarding body: Teaching institution and location:

More information

MSc Financial Risk and Investment Analysis

MSc Financial Risk and Investment Analysis School of Business, Management and Economics Department of Business and Management MSc Financial Risk and Investment Analysis Course Handbook 2013/14 2013 Entry Table of Contents School of Business, Management

More information

Guidelines for Competence Assessment

Guidelines for Competence Assessment Guidelines for Competence Assessment Contents Introduction..........3 Purpose of the guidelines......... 3 Nursing Council documents which support competence assessment..3 Continuing competence requirements.4

More information

A developmental framework for pharmacists progressing to advanced levels of practice

A developmental framework for pharmacists progressing to advanced levels of practice ACLF Advanced to Consultant level Framework A developmental framework for pharmacists progressing to advanced levels of practice Version 2009(a) CoDEG www.codeg.org ADVANCED AND CONSULTANT LEVEL COMPETENCY

More information

Australian Medical Council Limited. Standards for Assessment and Accreditation of Primary Medical Programs by the Australian Medical Council 2012

Australian Medical Council Limited. Standards for Assessment and Accreditation of Primary Medical Programs by the Australian Medical Council 2012 Australian Medical Council Limited Standards for Assessment and Accreditation of Primary Medical Programs by the Australian Medical Council 2012 Medical School Accreditation Committee December 2012 December

More information

Research at Henley Business School

Research at Henley Business School The DBA at Henley We attract experienced and motivated individuals to undertake significant research that shapes organisational thinking and provides an increasingly complex business environment. We are

More information

A competency framework for all prescribers updated draft for consultation

A competency framework for all prescribers updated draft for consultation A competency framework for all prescribers updated draft for consultation Consultation closes 15 April 2016 Contents 1 Introduction... 3 2 Uses of the framework... 4 3 Scope of the competency framework...

More information

Competency-based training in the Netherlands. Professor Gerrit Glas MD PhD Liesbeth Vleugel MD g.glas@zwolsepoort.nl lvleugel@xs4all.

Competency-based training in the Netherlands. Professor Gerrit Glas MD PhD Liesbeth Vleugel MD g.glas@zwolsepoort.nl lvleugel@xs4all. Competency-based training in the Netherlands Professor Gerrit Glas MD PhD Liesbeth Vleugel MD g.glas@zwolsepoort.nl lvleugel@xs4all.nl Het Competency-based opleidingsplan: training de theorie in the Netherlands

More information

In common with other provincial medical licensing authorities, the College of

In common with other provincial medical licensing authorities, the College of Education Éducation From the *Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alta.; the Physician Performance Advisory Committee, College of Physicians and Surgeons of Alberta, Edmonton, Alta.; the

More information

British School of Commerce

British School of Commerce British School of Commerce Programme Specification for the Cardiff Metropolitan University Master of Business Administration (MBA) Major Project Stage 1 Contents Page 1 Programme Aims and Objectives 3

More information

Teaching institution: Institute of Education, University of London

Teaching institution: Institute of Education, University of London PROGRAMME SPECIFICATION MA Geography in Education Awarding body: Institute of Education, University of London Teaching institution: Institute of Education, University of London Name of the final award:

More information

Feedback: ensuring that it leads to enhanced learning

Feedback: ensuring that it leads to enhanced learning The Clinical Teacher s Toolbox Feedback: ensuring that it leads to enhanced learning David Boud School of Education, University of Technology, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia Editors note: This article

More information

Teaching Institutions: Institute of Education, University of London

Teaching Institutions: Institute of Education, University of London PROGRAMME SPECIFICATION MA Leadership Awarding body: Institute of Education, University of London Teaching Institutions: Institute of Education, University of London Name of final award Master of Arts

More information

Australian Safety and Quality Framework for Health Care

Australian Safety and Quality Framework for Health Care Activities for the HEALTHCARE TEAM Australian Safety and Quality Framework for Health Care Putting the Framework into action: Getting started Contents Principle: Consumer centred Areas for action: 1.2

More information

Admission Checklist Complete this form and enclose it with your application form. Thanks

Admission Checklist Complete this form and enclose it with your application form. Thanks 1 Master of Counselling (MC) Admission Checklist Complete this form and enclose it with your application form. Thanks Applicant s Name: Last First Middle City University of Seattle Application form (completed,

More information

Exhibit 9 ADEA Competencies for Entry into the Allied Dental Professions (As approved by the 2010 ADEA House of Delegates)

Exhibit 9 ADEA Competencies for Entry into the Allied Dental Professions (As approved by the 2010 ADEA House of Delegates) Exhibit 9 ADEA Competencies for Entry into the Allied Dental Professions (As approved by the 2010 ADEA House of Delegates) Introduction In 1998 99, the Section on Dental Hygiene of the American Association

More information

PROGRAMME SPECIFICATION POSTGRADUATE PROGRAMMES

PROGRAMME SPECIFICATION POSTGRADUATE PROGRAMMES PROGRAMME SPECIFICATION POSTGRADUATE PROGRAMMES KEY FACTS Programme name Organisational Psychology Award MSc School School of Arts and Social Sciences Department or equivalent Department of Psychology

More information

State of the art - Evaluating teaching in medical schools: Why, What and How

State of the art - Evaluating teaching in medical schools: Why, What and How State of the art - Evaluating teaching in medical schools: Why, What and How Linda Snell MD MHPE FRCPC FACP Centre for Medical Education & Department of Medicine, McGill University, Montreal, Canada Visiting

More information

Guidelines on endorsement as a nurse practitioner

Guidelines on endorsement as a nurse practitioner Guidelines on endorsement as a nurse practitioner 7160 Introduction The National Registration and Accreditation Scheme (the National Scheme) for health professionals in Australia commenced on 1 July 2010

More information

PROGRAMME SPECIFICATION POSTGRADUATE PROGRAMMES. School of Health Sciences Division of Applied Biological, Diagnostics and Therapeutic Sciences

PROGRAMME SPECIFICATION POSTGRADUATE PROGRAMMES. School of Health Sciences Division of Applied Biological, Diagnostics and Therapeutic Sciences PROGRAMME SPECIFICATION POSTGRADUATE PROGRAMMES KEY FACTS Programme name Award School Department or equivalent Programme code Type of study Full Time Part Time Total UK credits 180 Total ECTS 90 PROGRAMME

More information

Master of Business Administration (MBA)

Master of Business Administration (MBA) BUSINESS SCHOOL Master of Business Administration (MBA) FRAMEWORK SPECIFICATION Version 6.3 June 2015 2015 Bournemouth University Document date: June 2015 Circulation: General Bournemouth University undertakes

More information

ISSUES IN NURSE PRACTITIONER DEVELOPMENTS IN AUSTRALIA

ISSUES IN NURSE PRACTITIONER DEVELOPMENTS IN AUSTRALIA ISSUES IN NURSE PRACTITIONER DEVELOPMENTS IN AUSTRALIA Glenn Gardner Queensland University of Technology & Royal Brisbane and Women s Hospital Email: Ge.gardner@qut.edu.au Gardner, Glenn E. (2004) Issues

More information

Higher National Unit specification: general information. Occupational Therapy: Core Concepts and Processes

Higher National Unit specification: general information. Occupational Therapy: Core Concepts and Processes Higher National Unit specification: general information Unit code: H18H 35 Superclass: PJ Publication date: March 2012 Source: Scottish Qualifications Authority Version: 02 Unit purpose: This Unit is designed

More information

Programme Specification

Programme Specification Programme Specification Title: Logistics Management Final Award: Master of Science (MSc) With Exit Awards at: Postgraduate Certificate (PG Cert) Postgraduate Diploma (PG Dip) Master of Science (MSc) To

More information

Exploring Appropriate Assessment Methods for Postgraduate Sports Management

Exploring Appropriate Assessment Methods for Postgraduate Sports Management Investigations in university teaching and learning vol. 6 (2) spring 2010 ISSN 1740-5106 Exploring Appropriate Assessment Methods for Postgraduate Sports Management Stephen Baines London Metropolitan Business

More information

Nurse practitioner standards for practice

Nurse practitioner standards for practice Orientating statements Nurse practitioners have the capability to provide high levels of clinically focused nursing care in a variety of contexts in Australia. Nurse practitioners care for people and communities

More information

Regulations for Research Programmes of Study (including new route PhD programmes)

Regulations for Research Programmes of Study (including new route PhD programmes) Regulations for Research Programmes of Study (including new route PhD programmes) Note: These Regulations are adapted from the general Regulations for Research Programmes of Study for the University of

More information

Course/programme leader: Tina Cartwright (from Sept 2014)

Course/programme leader: Tina Cartwright (from Sept 2014) PROGRAMME SPECIFICATION Course record information Name and level of final award: Name and level of intermediate awards: Awarding body/institution: Status of awarding body/institution: Location of delivery:

More information