HealthStream Regulatory Script

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1 HealthStream Regulatory Script Control of Hazardous Energy: Lockout/Tagout Release Date: August 2009 HLC Version: 602 Lesson 1: Introduction Lesson 2: Energy Control Basics Lesson 2: Lockout and Tagout Devices Lesson 3: Training and Inspections

2 Lesson 1: Introduction 1001 Introduction Welcome to the introductory lesson on control of hazardous energy. IMAGE: 1001.JPG. As your partner, HealthStream strives to provide its customers with excellence in regulatory learning solutions. As new guidelines are continually issued by regulatory agencies, we work to update courses, as needed, in a timely manner. Since responsibility for complying with new guidelines remains with your organization, HealthStream encourages you to routinely check all relevant regulatory agencies directly for the latest updates for clinical/organizational guidelines. If you have concerns about any aspect of the safety or quality of patient care in your organization, be aware that you may report these concerns directly to the Joint Commission. Page 1 of 4 2

3 1002 Course Rationale Use of energy comes with having and using equipment. Unfortunately, energy can be hazardous if not controlled. For example, uncontrolled electrical energy can cause shock or electrocution. IMAGE: 1002.JPG OSHA [glossary] has regulations that help protect workers from the risk of uncontrolled energy. This course will provide you with information to: Be compliant with OSHA s rules on hazardous energy Keep yourself and your co-workers safe when work is being performed on equipment that has hazardous energy You will learn about: Energy-control procedures Lockout / tagout devices How these procedures and devices are used Page 2 of 4

4 1003 Course Goals After completing this course, you should be able to: List the steps of an energy-control procedure Define lockout and tagout, including when each is used List the required features of lockout and tagout devices Recall the training requirements for authorized, affected, and other employees NO IMAGE Page 3 of 4

5 1004 Course Outline This introductory lesson gave the course rationale and goals. FLASH ANIMATION: 1004.SWF/FLA Lesson 2 discusses the basics of energy control. Lesson 3 describes lockout and tagout devices and how they are used. Lesson 4 briefly explains the requirements for energy program training and inspections. Page 4 of 4

6 Lesson 2: Energy Control Basics 2001 Introduction & Objectives Welcome to the lesson on energy control basics. FLASH ANIMATION: 2001.SWF/FLA After completing this lesson, you should be able to: List the features of an energy-control procedure Identify sources of hazardous energy Recall the importance of energy-isolating devices and lockout / tagout devices Page 1 of 14

7 2002 Energy-Control Procedures: Definition OSHA requires that employers have energy-control procedures. IMAGE: 2002.SWF/FLA These procedures are used to remove hazardous energy from equipment or machinery before the equipment or machinery is: Serviced Maintenanced Different energy-control procedures are required for different types of equipment, depending on: The type of energy the equipment uses How much energy the equipment uses Similar types of equipment may have similar procedures. Page 2 of 14

8 2003 Energy-Control Procedures: Overview An energy-control procedure must have specific instructions for: Getting the equipment ready for shutdown Shutting down the equipment Disconnecting or isolating the equipment from its energy source Using devices to 1) lock energy away from the equipment ( lockout ) or 2) provide a tag to warn against reconnecting the equipment to its energy source ( tagout ) Getting rid of any stored or leftover energy in the equipment Checking that energy does not re-accumulate in the equipment, if there is a possibility that this could occur Verifying that energy has been removed from the equipment, and that the equipment has been removed from its energy source IMAGE: 2003.SWF/FLA These features of an energy-control procedure will be explained further, as we continue on in the lesson. Page 3 of 14

9 2004 Maintenance and Service Activities Let s first take a closer look at when energy-control procedures must be used. IMAGE: 2004.SWF/FLA Remember: Energy-control procedures must be used when equipment is maintenanced or serviced. Maintenance and service activities include: Construction Installation Setup Adjustment Inspection Modification Maintenance or service work All of these activities require the use of an energy-control procedure. Page 4 of 14

10 2005 Maintenance and Service Activities: Exceptions Energy-control procedures may NOT be required during certain minor servicing activities. Examples of such activities are: Lubrication Cleaning Un-jamming Minor adjustments Minor tool changes IMAGE: 2005.SWF/FLA Energy-control is not required during these activities if: The activity is routine, repetitive, and a basic part of the work of the equipment. The activity occurs during normal production operation (link to glossary) of the equipment. The employer provides another way to protect against worker injury during the activity. Page 5 of 14

11 2006 Hazardous Energy Now let s take a look at what is considered to be hazardous energy. Energy-control procedures are required for the following types of energy: Electrical energy Kinetic energy Thermal energy Click on each type of energy for more information. CLICK TO REVEAL Electrical energy This type of energy comes from sources such as generators, batteries, and capacitors. Energy-control procedures are required for any equipment powered by electrical energy, except if both of the following are true: Exposure to hazardous electrical energy can be completely controlled by unplugging the equipment from an electric outlet. Service workers have sole control of the equipment plug during service activities. Kinetic energy Kinetic energy may also be called mechanical energy. This type of energy is in the moving parts of a mechanical system. For example, a machine that uses motion or rotation has kinetic energy. Hazardous kinetic energy also may be released from potential energy stored in: Pressure vessels Gas cylinders and tanks Hydraulic or pneumatic systems Springs Thermal energy Thermal energy is energy in the form of heat. Thermal energy is produced from: Mechanical work Radiation Chemical reactions Electrical resistance Page 6 of 14

12 2007 Energy Isolation Remember: The first two steps in an energy-control procedure are: Getting the equipment ready for shutdown Shutting down the equipment. IMAGE: 2007.SWF/FLA However, it is not enough just to shut the equipment down. The equipment could re-energize if: There is a short-circuit. Someone accidentally turns the equipment back on. This could injure or kill the worker doing the maintenance. Therefore, the third step in energy control is to disconnect or isolate the equipment from its energy source. Page 7 of 14

13 2008 Energy Isolation Energy is considered to be isolated or blocked when it cannot flow or be used. IMAGE: 2008.SWF/FLA In general, equipment is isolated from its energy source by using a mechanical device that physically blocks the flow or release of energy. Examples of this sort of device are: Manual circuit breakers Disconnect switches Line valves Safety blocks Page 8 of 14

14 2009 Lockout / Tagout Devices The next step in an energy-control procedure is to use a lockout or tagout device. IMAGE: 2009.JPG Remember: An energy-isolating device blocks the flow or release of energy to equipment. A lockout device locks the energy-isolating device in an off/safe position. The device cannot be operated until the lockout device is removed. A tagout device is a notice that warns that the energy-isolating device should NOT be turned to the on/unsafe position. Tagout devices are used for energy-isolating devices that cannot be locked. Lockout and tagout devices and their use will be described in greater detail in the next lesson. Page 9 of 14

15 2010 Releasing Stored Energy The next step in an energy-control procedure is to get rid of any stored or leftover energy in the equipment. IMAGE: 2010.JPG Getting rid of stored energy may include: Discharging capacitors by grounding Releasing or blocking springs that are under tension Venting fluids from pressure vessels or tanks until the internal pressure is equal to atmospheric pressure Allowing all equipment to come to a full stop after it has been shut down and isolated from its energy source Page 10 of 14

16 2011 Energy-Control Procedures: Last Two Steps The last two steps in an energy-control procedure are: Checking to see whether hazardous energy builds back up in the equipment, if there is a possibility that this could occur Verifying that energy has been removed from the equipment, and that the equipment has been removed from its energy source IMAGE: 2011.SWF/FLA These final steps ensure that the equipment is safe to work on. Page 11 of 14

17 2012 Review If you push the power button on your TV, you have. If you throw the circuit breaker in your breaker box so that you remove power from the electrical circuit that includes your TV, you have. a. Locked out the TV / Tagged out the TV b. Tagged out the TV / Locked out the TV c. Shut down the TV / Isolated the TV from its energy source d. Isolated the TV from its energy source / Locked out the TV MULTIPLE CHOICE INTERACTION Correct: C A: Incorrect. The correct answer is C. Pushing a power button on a piece of equipment shuts the equipment down. Shutting down the flow of electricity by using a manual circuit breaker isolates equipment from its energy source. B: Incorrect. The correct answer is C. Pushing a power button on a piece of equipment shuts the equipment down. Shutting down the flow of electricity by using a manual circuit breaker isolates equipment from its energy source. C: Correct. Pushing a power button on a piece of equipment shuts the equipment down. Shutting down the flow of electricity by using a manual circuit breaker isolates equipment from its energy source. D: Incorrect. The correct answer is C. Pushing a power button on a piece of equipment shuts the equipment down. Shutting down the flow of electricity by using a manual circuit breaker isolates equipment from its energy source. Page 12 of 14

18 2013 Review Energy-control procedures are required during: a. Transport of equipment b. Routine use of equipment c. Normal production operation of equipment d. Maintenance or service activities on equipment MULTIPLE CHOICE INTERACTION Correct: D A: Incorrect. The correct answer is D. Energy-control procedures are required during maintenance or service activities on equipment. B: Incorrect. The correct answer is D. Energy-control procedures are required during maintenance or service activities on equipment. C: Incorrect. The correct answer is C. Energy-control procedures are required during maintenance or service activities on equipment. D: Correct. Energy-control procedures are required during maintenance or service activities on equipment. Page 13 of 14

19 2014 Summary You have completed the lesson on energy control basics. NO IMAGE Remember: OSHA requires employers to have energy-control procedures. These procedures must achieve the following: 1) Prepare equipment for shutdown. 2) Shut down equipment. 3) Isolate equipment from its energy source. 4) Lockout or tagout energy-isolation devices. 5) Release or remove any stored or leftover energy. 6) Check for re-accumulation of hazardous energy. 7) Verify that equipment has been deenergized and isolated from its energy source. Devices used to isolate equipment from energy sources include manual circuit breakers, disconnect switches, line valves, and safety blocks. Energy-isolation devices must be turned to the safe/off position during service work. They also must be locked or tagged out, to make sure they will not accidentally be turned to the on position. Page 14 of 14

20 Lesson 3: Lockout and Tagout Devices 3001 Introduction & Objections Welcome to the lesson on lockout and tagout devices. FLASH ANIMATION: 3001.SWF/FLA After completing this lesson, you should be able to: Define lockout and tagout Recall when lockout is required and when tagout may be used instead List the required features of lockout and tagout devices Page 1 of 15

21 3002 Lockout Remember: Lockout uses a physical mechanism to hold a line valve, safety block, or other energy-isolating device in the safe/off position. IMAGE: 3002.JPG Lockout is required if all of the following are true: An employee is performing service or maintenance activities on a piece of equipment. Unexpected startup of the equipment could expose the employee to hazardous energy and risk of injury or death. The equipment can be locked out. Page 2 of 15

22 3003 Equipment That Can Be Locked Out A piece of equipment can be locked out if any of the following is true: The equipment is designed with a hasp or other part that makes it possible to attach a lockable energy-isolating device, for example, a lockable electronic disconnect switch. The equipment has a built-in locking mechanism. The equipment has a valve cover, circuit breaker blockout, or other energy-isolating device that can reasonably be locked. IMAGE: 3003.JPG Page 3 of 15

23 3004 Equipment That Cannot Be Locked Out If a piece of equipment cannot be locked out, tagout may be used instead. This is discussed in more detail later in the lesson. IMAGE: 1001.JPG When equipment that cannot be locked out is repaired, renovated, or replaced, a lockable energy-isolating device must be installed. The equipment then must be locked out during service work. Note: Even when equipment can be locked out, tagging out may be okay under certain circumstances. This is described later in the lesson. Page 4 of 15

24 3005 Lockout Devices Lockout devices must be: Provided by the employer Durable enough for workplace conditions Standard in color, shape, or size IMAGE: 3002.JPG Page 5 of 15

25 3006 Lockout Devices Lockout devices also must be: The only devices used for lockout Used only for lockout Very difficult to remove accidentally Labeled with identification Click on each item above for more information. CLICK TO REVEAL The only devices used for lockout This means that the lockout devices provided by the employer are to be used for lockout whenever lockout is required. Other devices may not be used instead. Used only for lockout This means that lockout devices may not be used for any purpose other than lockout. Very difficult to remove accidentally This means that lockout devices must be strong enough to resist accidental removal. For example, it should take extreme force with tools such as bolt cutters to remove the device without its key. Labeled with identification Each lockout device must be labeled with the identification of the specific employee authorized to apply and remove that device. The authorized employee is usually the worker performing the service activity. Each worker should have his or her own lockout device and the single key to that device. Each worker should apply his or her own lockout device whenever working on equipment that requires lockout. Page 6 of 15

26 3007 Tagout Remember: Tagout uses a written warning against re-energizing a piece of equipment. IMAGE: 3007.JPG As compared to lockout devices, tags: Are easier to remove Provide less protection Therefore, tagout may be used instead of lockout only if either of the following is true: The equipment cannot be locked out. The equipment can be locked out, but the specific tagout procedure provides the employee with at least as much protection as would a lockout procedure. Page 7 of 15

27 3008 Tagout For lockable equipment that uses tagout, tagout must provide at least as much protection as would a lockout. IMAGE: 3007.JPG Therefore, the tagout procedure must have all of the required features of an energy-control procedure. In addition, the procedure must have at least one extra safeguard against re-energizing of the equipment during a service activity. Examples of additional safeguards are: Removing an isolating circuit element Removing a valve handle Blocking a controlling switch Opening an extra disconnecting device Page 8 of 15

28 3009 Tagout Devices Tagout devices must: Be provided by the employer Have a standard color, shape, or size Have a standard print and format Be legible and understandable Be attachable by hand NO IMAGE Page 9 of 15

29 3010 Tagout In addition, tagout devices must: Be the only devices used for tagout Be used only for tagout Be durable Warn and give clear instructions Be very difficult to remove accidentally Be labeled with identification Click on each item to learn more. CLICK TO REVEAL Be the only devices for tagout This means that the tagout devices provided by the employer must be used for tagout whenever tagout is required. No other device may be used instead. Be used only for tagout This means that tagout devices may not be used for any other purpose. Be durable Tags must not deteriorate or become illegible even when used in wet environments or near corrosive chemicals. Warn and give clear instructions This means that tagout devices must warn employees of the danger of reenergizing tagged out equipment. They must give clear instructions, such as: Do Not Start! Do Not Open! Do Not Close! Do Not Energize! Do Not Operate! Be very difficult to remove accidentally The tag attachment must be a one-piece nylon cable tie or equivalent. It must: Remain intact in all environments and conditions. Be non-reusable. Be self-locking and non-releasable. Have a minimum unlocking strength of 50 pounds. Be labeled with identification Each tagout device must be labeled with the identification of the specific employee authorized to apply and remove that device This is usually the worker performing the service activity. Page 10 of 15

30 3011 Limitations of Tagout Devices Lockout is preferable to tagout whenever possible. IMAGE: 3011.JPG Tagout devices may create a false sense of security. Remember: Tags are warning devices only. They do not provide the physical protection of a lock. Page 11 of 15

31 3012 Removal of Lockout and Tagout Devices Lockout / tagout devices should be removed ONLY by the person who put them in place. IMAGE: 3012.JPG All other employees must respect locks and tags. If a person who put a lock or tag in place is unable to remove it, the lock or tag should be removed as directed by the employer. When a lockout / tagout device has been removed, all appropriate employees should be informed that: The locks / tags have been removed. The equipment may be reenergized. Page 12 of 15

32 3013 Review Which of the following is a feature of an appropriate lockout device? Note that a particular employee, Joe, is authorized to apply and remove the device. a. The device is provided by Joe. b. The device is labeled with Joe s identification. c. Without Joe s key, the device can be removed by jerking forcibly. d. Two of Joe s workmates have backup copies of Joe s device key. MULTIPLE CHOICE INTERACTION Correct: B A: Incorrect. Lockout devices should be provided by the employer. The correct answer is B. B: Correct. C: Incorrect. Lockout devices must be strong enough to resist accidental removal. For example, it should take extreme force with tools such as bolt cutters to remove a device without its key. The correct answer is B. D: Incorrect. A lockout device should have a single key. Only the person authorized to apply and remove the device should have a key.. Page 13 of 15

33 3014 Review Tagout devices may be removed by anyone who needs to use the equipment that has been tagged out. a. True b. False MULTIPLE CHOICE INTERACTION CORRECT: B Feedback for A: Incorrect. This statement is false. Lockout / tagout devices should be removed ONLY by the person who put them in place. All other employees must respect locks and tags. Feedback for B: Correct. This statement is false. Lockout / tagout devices should be removed ONLY by the person who put them in place. All other employees must respect locks and tags. Page 14 of 15

34 3015 Summary You have completed the lesson on lockout and tagout devices. NO IMAGE Remember: Lockout physically holds an energy-isolating device in the safe / off position. Lockout is required when an employee works on a piece of equipment that could release hazardous energy and can be locked out. Lockout devices must be durable, standardized, strong, clearly labeled, and used only for lockout. Lockout is preferable to tagout. However, tagout may be used instead for equipment that cannot be locked out. Tagout devices must be durable, standardized, strong, legible, clear and instructive, clearly labeled, and used only for tagout. Locks and tags should be removed only by the person who put them in place. Page 15 of 15

35 Lesson 4: Training and Inspections 4001 Introduction & Objectives Welcome to the lesson on employee training and periodic inspections. FLASH ANIMATION: 4001.SWF/FLA After completing this lesson, you should be able to: Differentiate among authorized, affected, and other employees Recall the training requirements for each type of employee Page 1 of 8

36 4002 Training for Authorized Employees Employees who use energy-control procedures and/or work on equipment with hazardous energy are authorized employees. (link to glossary) IMAGE: 4002.JPG These employees must be trained in: Safely applying, using, and removing energy-isolating devices Recognizing hazardous energy sources The types of hazardous energy sources in their workplace Energy-control procedures Page 2 of 8

37 4003 Training for Affected Employees Equipment users or operators are affected employees. (link to glossary) IMAGE: 4003.JPG These employees use equipment or work in an area where service is performed. However, they do not: Service the equipment Perform lockout / tagout Affected employees must be trained in: The purpose and use of energy-control procedures The ability to recognize when an energy-control procedure is being used The importance of not tampering with locks or tags The importance of not starting or using equipment that has been locked or tagged out Page 3 of 8

38 4004 Training for Other Employees Other employees (link to glossary) are employees whose work operations may take them into areas where energy-control procedures are used. IMAGE: 4004.JPG Other employees do not: Use or service relevant equipment. Perform lockout / tagout. Other employees must be trained in: Energy-control procedures, at a basic level The importance of not tampering with locks or tags The importance of not restarting, reenergizing, or operating equipment that has been locked or tagged out Page 4 of 8

39 4005 When Training Must Occur Employees must be trained before any service or maintenance activities occur. IMAGE: 4005.JPG Employees must be retrained as necessary. For example, authorized and affected employees must be retrained when: Job assignments change. Changes in equipment or processes create new dangers. Energy-control procedures are changed. The employee s knowledge or performance appears inadequate. Training must be documented and certified. Page 5 of 8

40 4006 Periodic Inspections Lockout / tagout procedures must be reviewed at least once a year. IMAGE: 4006.SWF/FLA The employer must correct any problems found in the review. Page 6 of 8

41 4007 Review Affected employees: a. Use equipment that has hazardous energy. b. Service equipment that has hazardous energy. c. Do not work near equipment that has hazardous energy. d. Perform lockout / tagout on equipment that has hazardous energy. MULTIPLE CHOICE INTERACTION Correct: A A: Correct. Affected employees use equipment that has hazardous energy or work in an area where service is performed. They do not service or perform lockout / tagout on equipment with hazardous energy. B: Incorrect. The correct answer is A. Affected employees use equipment that has hazardous energy or work in an area where service is performed. They do not service or perform lockout / tagout on equipment with hazardous energy. C: Incorrect. The correct answer is A. Affected employees use equipment that has hazardous energy or work in an area where service is performed. They do not service or perform lockout / tagout on equipment with hazardous energy. D: Incorrect. The correct answer is A. Affected employees use equipment that has hazardous energy or work in an area where service is performed. They do not service or perform lockout / tagout on equipment with hazardous energy. Page 7 of 8

42 4008 Summary You have completed the lesson on employee training and periodic inspections. NO IMAGE Remember: OSHA requires employers to provide training on their energy control programs. Training should be specific to the needs of authorized, affected, and other employees. Lockout/tagout procedures must be reviewed at least once a year, to identify and correct any problems. Page 8 of 8

43 Course Glossary # Term Definition 1. affected employees employees who operate locked or tagged out equipment, or work in an area where equipment service is performed 2. authorized employees employees responsible for lockout / tagout and/or those who do service or maintenance work on equipment 3. other employees employees whose work may take them to areas where energy-control procedures are used 4. energy-isolating device mechanical device that physically prevents flow of energy 5. lockout use of a physical mechanism to hold an energy-isolating device in the safe/off position 6. tagout application of a tag to an energy-isolating device, warning employees not to reenergize 7. normal production use of equipment to perform its intended function operations 8. servicing and maintenance workplace activities such as constructing, installing, setting up, adjusting, activities inspecting, modifying, maintaining, and/or servicing equipment

44 Pre-Assessment 1. What is the FIRST step in an energy-control procedure? a. Lockout the energy. b. Tagout the equipment. c. Prepare the equipment for shutdown. d. Verify that equipment is de-energized and isolated from its energy source. Correct: C Feedback: The first step in an energy-control procedure is to prepare the equipment for shutdown. 2. In an energy-control procedure, one of the steps is to release any stored energy. What should be done IMMEDIATELY after this step? a. Lockout or tagout b. Prepare for equipment shutdown c. Check for re-accumulation of energy d. Isolate equipment from its energy source Correct: C Rationale: After releasing residual energy, the next step in an energy-control procedure is to check for re-accumulation of energy. 3. In an energy-control procedure, what is lockout? a. Venting pressure b. Discharging a capacitor c. Locking an energy-isolating device in the off/safe position d. Locking the door to a room where equipment is being serviced Correct: C Rationale: A lockout device locks an energy-isolating device in the off/safe position. 4. During an energy-control procedure, when is it acceptable to use tagout on a piece of equipment? a. When lockout is not possible b. When the equipment has a hasp c. When the equipment has a valve cover d. When the equipment has a circuit breaker blocker Correct: A Rationale: When an equipment can reasonably be locked out (for example, it if has a hasp, valve cover, or circuit breaker blocker that can be locked), lockout must be used. If lockout is not possible, tagout may be used.

45 5. Which of the following is a required feature of a lockout device? a. Lockout devices must be provided by the employee. b. Lockout devices must be easy to remove if the key gets lost. c. Each lockout device used in a particular workplace should have multiple keys. d. All lockout devices used in a particular workplace should be standard in color, shape, or size. Correct: D Rationale: Lockout devices must be standard in color, shape, or size. 6. Which of the following would violate OSHA standards? a. The print on a tagout device is easy to read. b. Pliers are required to attach a tagout device. c. An employer provides a tagout device for an employee. d. The instructions on a tagout device are easy to understand. Correct: B Rationale: Tagout devices must be attachable by hand. 7. Which type of employees must be trained in safely applying energy-isolating devices? a. All employees b. Affected employees c. Authorized employees d. Non-affected, non-authorized employees Correct: C Rationale: "Authorized" employees are those who use energy-control procedures and/or work on equipment with hazardous energy. They must be trained to safely apply energy-isolating devices. 8. Which type of employees must be trained to recognize when an energy-control procedure is being used? a. All employees b. Affected employees c. Authorized employees d. Non-affected, non-authorized employees Correct: B Rationale: "Affected" employees are equipment users or operators. They must be trained to recognize when an energy-control procedure is being used.

46 Final Exam 1. In an energy-control procedure, one of the steps is to isolate the equipment from its energy source. What should be done IMMEDIATELY after this step? a. Lockout or tagout b. Verify de-energization c. Release stored energy d. Shut down the equipment Correct: A Rationale: After isolating equipment from its energy source, the next step in an energy-control procedure is lockout or tagout. 2. What is the LAST step in an energy-control procedure? a. Lockout the energy. b. Tagout the equipment. c. Prepare the equipment for shutdown. d. Verify that equipment is de-energized and isolated from its energy source. Correct: D Rationale: The final step in an energy-control procedure is to verify that equipment is de-energized and isolated from its energy source. 3. When should lockout be performed? a. During routine, minor adjustment of a piece of equipment b. During normal production operation of a piece of equipment c. When a minor tool change is performed, as part of the basic work of a piece of equipment d. When a piece of equipment is being serviced, and unexpected startup could lead to injury or death Correct: D Rationale: Lockout is required when 1) equipment is being serviced or maintained, 2) unexpected startup of the equipment could lead to injury or death, and 3) the equipment is capable of being locked out. 4. In an energy-control procedure, what is tagout? a. Releasing springs that are under tension b. Disconnecting equipment from its energy source c. Tagging a piece of equipment with a written notice that the equipment is a source of hazardous thermal or kinetic energy d. Tagging an energy-isolating device with a written warning that the device should NOT be turned to the on/unsafe position Correct: D Rationale: A tagout device is a written notice that an energy-isolating device should NOT be turned to the on/unsafe position.

47 5. Which of the following violates OSHA standards? a. A lockout device has only a single key. b. A lockout device is labeled for identification. c. A lockout device is used for non-lockout purposes. d. A lockout device is durable enough for workplace conditions. Correct: C Rationale: Lockout devices must be used ONLY for lockout purposes. 6. Which of the following is a requirement for a tagout device? a. The device must be reusable. b. The device must be releasable. c. The device must give clear instructions. d. The device must require tools to be attached. Correct: C Rationale: Tagout devices must give clear instructions, such as, "Do NOT start!" 7. Which type of employees must be trained to recognize hazardous energy sources? a. All employees b. Affected employees c. Authorized employees d. Non-affected, non-authorized employees Correct: C Rationale: "Authorized" employees are those who use energy-control procedures and/or work on equipment with hazardous energy. These employees must be trained to recognize hazardous energy sources. 8. "Other" employees must be trained in which of the following? a. The safe removal of energy-isolating devices b. The types of hazardous energy in their workplace c. The importance of not tampering with locks or tags d. The purpose and use of energy-control procedures Correct: C Rationale: "Other" employees are those whose work duties may take them into areas where energy-control procedures are performed. These employees must be trained in the importance of not tampering with locks or tags.

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