Knowledge Management in Theory and Practice

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "Knowledge Management in Theory and Practice"

Transcription

1 Knowledge Management in Theory and Practice Kimiz Dalkir Elsevier

2 KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT IN THEORY AND PRACTICE

3

4 KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT IN THEORY AND PRACTICE Kimiz Dalkir McGill University AMSTERDAM BOSTON HEIDELBERG LONDON NEW YORK OXFORD PARIS SAN DIEGO SAN FRANCISCO SINGAPORE SYDNEY TOKYO

5 Elsevier Butterworth Heinemann 30 Corporate Drive, Suite 400, Burlington, MA 01803, USA Linacre House, Jordan Hill, Oxford OX2 8DP, UK Copyright 2005, Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise, without the prior written permission of the publisher. Permissions may be sought directly from Elsevier s Science & Technology Rights Department in Oxford, UK: phone: (+44) , fax: (+44) , You may also complete your request on-line via the Elsevier homepage (http://elsevier.com), by selecting Customer Support and then Obtaining Permissions. Recognizing the importance of preserving what has been written, Elsevier prints its books on acid-free paper whenever possible. Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data Application submitted British Library Cataloguing-in-Publication Data A catalogue record for this book is available from the British Library. ISBN: X For information on all Elsevier Butterworth Heinemann publications visit our Web site at Printed in the United States of America Working together to grow libraries in developing countries

6 This book is dedicated to my sons, Kemal and Kazmir, who are beginning their journey of discovery.

7

8 CONTENTS Foreword Acknowledgements xiii xv 1 INTRODUCTION TO KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT IN THEORY AND PRACTICE Learning Objectives 1 Introduction 2 What Is Knowledge Management? 4 Multidisciplinary Nature of KM 6 The Two Major Types of Knowledge 8 The Concept Analysis Technique 9 History of Knowledge Management 12 From Physical Assets to Knowledge Assets 16 Organizational Perspectives on Knowledge Management 17 Why Is KM Important Today? 18 KM for Individuals, Communities, and Organizations 20 Key Points 21 Discussion Points 21 References 22 2 THE KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT CYCLE Learning Objectives 25 Introduction 26 Major Approaches to the KM Cycle 26 The Zack KM Cycle 26 The Bukowitz and Williams KM Cycle 32 The McElroy KM Cycle 35 The Wiig KM Cycle 38 An Integrated KM Cycle 43 Strategic Implications of the KM Cycle 45 Practical Considerations for Managing Knowledge 45 vii

9 Key Points 46 Discussion Points 46 References 46 3 KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT MODELS Learning Objectives 47 Introduction 48 Major Theoretical KM Models 49 The von Krogh and Roos Model of Organizational Epistemology 50 The Nonaka and Takeuchi Knowledge Spiral Model 52 The Knowledge Creation Process 52 Knowledge Conversion 53 Knowledge Spiral 56 The Choo Sense-making KM Model 58 The Wiig Model for Building and Using Knowledge 61 The Boisot I-Space KM Model 66 Complex Adaptive System Models of KM 67 Strategic Implications of KM Models 72 Practical Implications of KM Models 72 Key Points 73 Discussion Points 73 References 74 4 KNOWLEDGE CAPTURE AND CODIFICATION Learning Objectives 77 Introduction 78 Tacit Knowledge Capture 80 Tacit Knowledge Capture at Individual and Group Levels 82 Interviewing Experts 83 Structured Interviewing 84 Stories 86 Learning by Being Told 89 Learning by Observation 90 Other Methods of Tacit Knowledge Capture 90 Tacit Knowledge Capture at the Organizational Level 94 Explicit Knowledge Codification 96 Cognitive Maps 97 Decision Trees 98 Knowledge Taxonomics 99 Strategic Implications of Knowledge Capture and Codification 102 Practical Implications of Knowledge Capture and Codification 103 Key Points 104 Discussion Points 105 Note 105 References 105 viii KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT IN THEORY AND PRACTICE

10 5 KNOWLEDGE SHARING AND COMMUNITIES OF PRACTICE Learning Objectives 109 Introduction 110 The Social Nature of Knowledge 114 Sociograms and Social Network Analysis 116 Community Yellow Pages 119 Knowledge-Sharing Communities 122 Types of Communities 123 Roles and Responsibilities in CoPs 126 Knowledge Sharing in Virtual CoPs 129 Obstacles to Knowledge Sharing 132 The Undernet 133 Organizational Learning and Social Capital 134 Measuring the Value of Social Capital 135 Strategic Implications of Knowledge Sharing 137 Practical Implications of Knowledge Sharing 138 Key Points 139 Discussion Points 140 Notes 140 References KNOWLEDGE APPLICATION Learning Objectives 145 Introduction 146 Knowledge Application at the Individual Level 148 Characteristics of Individual Knowledge Workers 148 Bloom s Taxonomy of Learning Objectives 152 Task Analysis and Modeling 159 EPSS 160 Knowledge Application at Group and Organizational Levels 166 Knowledge Reuse 169 Knowledge Repositories 172 Strategic Implications of Knowledge Application 172 Practical Implications of Knowledge Application 173 Key Points 174 Discussion Points 174 Notes 175 References THE ROLE OF ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE Learning Objectives 177 Introduction 178 Different Types of Cultures 181 Organizational Culture Analysis 182 CONTENTS ix

11 Culture at the Foundation of KM 185 The Effects of Culture on Individuals 187 Cultural Transformation to a Knowledge-Sharing Culture 190 Organizational Maturity Models 201 KM Maturity Models 204 CoP Maturity Models 207 Strategic Implications of Organizational Culture 209 Practical Implications of Organizational Culture 209 Key Points 213 Discussion Points 213 Notes 214 References KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT TOOLS Learning Objectives 217 Introduction 218 Knowledge Capture and Creation Tools 218 Content Creation Tools 218 Data Mining and Knowledge Discovery 219 Blogs 222 Content Management Tools 224 Knowledge Sharing and Dissemination Tools 225 Groupware and Collaboration Tools 225 Wikis 231 Networking Technologies 232 Knowledge Acquisition and Application Tools 236 Intelligent Filtering Tools 237 Adaptive Technologies 241 Strategic Implications of KM Tools and Techniques 241 Practical Implications of KM Tools and Techniques 242 Key Points 243 Discussion Points 243 Notes 244 References KM STRATEGY AND METRICS Learning Objectives 247 Introduction 248 Knowledge Management Strategy 251 Knowledge Audit 253 Gap Analysis 256 The KM Strategy Road Map 257 The Management of Organizational Memory 260 Balancing Innovation and Organizational Structure 263 Historical Overview of Metrics in KM 266 KM Metrics 268 The Benchmarking Method 272 x KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT IN THEORY AND PRACTICE

12 The Balanced Scorecard Method 275 The House of Quality Method 277 Key Points 279 Discussion Points 279 Notes 280 References THE KM TEAM Learning Objectives 283 Introduction 284 Major Categories of KM Roles 287 Senior Management Roles 290 KM Roles and Responsibilities within Organizations 294 The KM Profession 296 The Ethics of KM 297 Key Points 300 Discussion Points 301 Note 301 References FUTURE CHALLENGES FOR KM Learning Objectives 303 Introduction 304 Political Issues Regarding Access 305 The Politics of Organizational Context and Culture 307 How to Provide Incentives for Knowledge Sharing 309 Shift to Knowledge-Based Assets 313 Future Challenges for KM 318 KM Research Issues 319 A Postmodern KM? 322 Concluding Thoughts 323 Key Points 324 Discussion Points 325 References 326 Glossary 329 Index 345 CONTENTS xi

13

14 FOREWORD Knowledge management as an organizational innovation has been with us for more than a decade. As a discipline, it has reached a state of maturity where we can now discern the principles, practices, and tools that make it unique. As a discourse, it has engendered new concepts and categories for us to make sense of the many important ways that organizations use knowledge to create value. Given the richness of ideas and innovations that have emerged under the rubric of knowledge management, and given the tremendous interest in schools and organizations to learn about the subject, it is something of a mystery that there are so few textbooks available. Perhaps it is because the field draws upon a wide range of subject areas, or perhaps it is because many different perspectives complicate the discussion of issues that engage knowledge management. Despite these difficulties, or perhaps because of them, there is a pressing need for a textbook that presents a thoughtful, systematic view of knowledge management as a coherent body of management theory and practice. The book in our hands answers this call. What then is knowledge management? The first chapter of the book gives a well-argued answer, but for our purposes here, we may define knowledge management as a framework for designing an organization s goals, structures, and processes so that the organization can use what it knows to learn and to create value for its customers and community. Thus, there is no single, universal recipe for managing knowledge each organization has to think through and design its own approach. This design process will have to encompass four sets of organizational enablers posed by these questions: What is the organizational vision or strategy driving the need to manage knowledge? What roles and structures ought to be in place? How to develop processes and practices that promote knowledge sharing and use? Which tools and platforms can support these efforts? For each of these enablers, research and practice in knowledge management has identified principles, exemplars, and lessons that can help to plan and execute an effective strategy. Considering these enablers also highlights the special strengths of this textbook. First and foremost there is the question of vision and strategy why try to manage knowledge? The book makes clear in its early pages how the creation and application of knowledge can be the engine of organizational performance and growth. In their attempts to pursue this vision, many organizations quickly xiii

15 discover that their most daunting task is to cultivate the norms of trust, cooperation, and mutual respect that nourish the creation and sharing of knowledge. The book recognizes this challenge, and devotes an entire chapter to examining in detail the impact of organizational culture. Consider next the issue of roles and structures. Departments in organizations are naturally territorial and guarded about losing control of where their information goes to, and how it might be used. The book highlights the importance of leaders such as the Chief Knowledge Officer or the Chief Information Officer who champion the collective benefit of sharing information, and who remove the barriers that prevent cooperation between departments. At the same time, knowledge sharing cannot simply be mandated through formal authority. Some of the most valuable knowledge sharing occurs in communities of practice that are self-organized around informal roles and relationships. A fine chapter in the book discusses communities of practice in the context of knowledge sharing. The process and practice of knowledge management is a central focus of the book. After a survey of major theoretical approaches in the literature, the book develops a new synthesis that views knowledge management as a continuous cycle of three processes: (1) knowledge creation and capture, (2) knowledge sharing and dissemination, (3) knowledge acquisition and application. This KM Cycle model forms the organizational principle of much of the book, and is carefully considered in the first six chapters. The balance between process and practice is a delicate one. A process that is regulated strictly by rules and policies can stifle creativity and experimentation. On the other hand, relying only on informal practices may mean that new learning is dispersed and unavailable to others in the organization. An alluring aspect of knowledge management is the range of tools and platforms that hold out the promise of transforming the ways we work with information and knowledge. Thus, there are tools that capture and represent content so that it can be accessed efficiently; tools that discover and extract knowledge; tools that facilitate social networking and community building; and tools that support communication and collaboration in groups. While the discussion of tools and techniques takes place throughout the book, a systematic analysis is presented in a well-structured chapter that covers many recent technological developments. A textbook is a pedagogical apparatus, and this book has incorporated a number of features that will enhance student learning and student-teacher interaction. Each chapter contains learning objectives, side-boxes of short cases, summaries of main messages, and questions for discussion. Beyond these features, the most engaging quality of the book is the combination of experience and enthusiasm that the author brings to the subject: the insights, the resonant examples, the lively language, and the occasional touch of humor. The book is an invitation to students to embark on an exciting and rewarding learning adventure. Chun Wei Choo Faculty of Information Studies University of Toronto xiv KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT IN THEORY AND PRACTICE

16 1 INTRODUCTION TO KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT IN THEORY AND PRACTICE A light bulb in the socket is worth two in the pocket. Bill Wolf ( ) This chapter provides an introduction to the study of knowledge management (KM). A brief history of knowledge management concepts is outlined, noting that much of KM existed before the actual term came into popular use. The lack of consensus over what constitutes a good definition of KM is addressed, and the concept analysis technique is described as a means of clarifying the conceptual confusion that persists over precisely what KM is. The multidisciplinary roots of KM are enumerated, together with their contributions to the discipline. The two major forms of knowledge, tacit and explicit, are compared and contrasted. The importance of KM today for individuals, for communities of practice, and for organizations are described, together with the emerging KM roles and responsibilities needed to ensure successful KM implementations. LEARNING OBJECTIVES 1. Use a framework and a clear language for knowledge management concepts. 2. Define key knowledge management concepts such as intellectual capital, organizational learning and memory, knowledge taxonomy, and communities of practice using concept analysis. 3. Provide an overview of the history of knowledge management and identify key milestones. 4. Describe the key roles and responsibilities required for knowledge management applications. 1

17 INTRODUCTION The ability to manage knowledge is becoming increasingly more crucial in today s knowledge economy. The creation and diffusion of knowledge have become ever more important factors in competitiveness. More and more, knowledge is being regarded as a valuable commodity that is embedded in products (especially high-technology products) and in the tacit knowledge of highly mobile employees. Although knowledge is increasingly being viewed as a commodity or an intellectual asset, it possesses some paradoxical characteristics that are radically different from those of other valuable commodities. These knowledge characteristics include the following: Use of knowledge does not consume it. Transferral of knowledge does not result in losing it. Knowledge is abundant, but the ability to use it is scarce. Much of an organization s valuable knowledge walks out the door at the end of the day. The advent of the Internet and the World Wide Web have made unlimited sources of knowledge available to us all. Pundits are heralding the dawn of the Knowledge Age supplanting the Industrial Era. Forty years ago, nearly half of all workers in industrialized countries were making or helping to make things; today that proportion is down to 20% (Drucker, 1994; Bart, 2000). Laborintensive manufacturing with a large pool of relatively cheap, relatively homogeneous labor and hierarchical management has given way to knowledge-based organizations. There are fewer people doing more work. Organizational hierarchies are being put aside as knowledge work calls for more collaboration. The only sustainable advance a firm has comes from what it collectively knows, how efficiently it uses what it knows, and how quickly it acquires and uses new knowledge (Davenport and Prusak, 1998). An organization in the Knowledge Age is one that learns, remembers, and acts based on the best available information, knowledge, and know-how. All of these developments have created a strong need for a deliberate and systematic approach to cultivating and sharing a company s knowledge base one populated with valid and valuable lessons learned and best practices. In other words, in order to be successful in today s challenging organizational environment, companies need to learn from their past errors and not reinvent the wheel again and again. Organizational knowledge is not intended to replace individual knowledge but to complement it by making it stronger, more coherent, and more broadly applicative. Knowledge management represents a deliberate and systematic approach to ensure the full utilization of the organization s knowledge base, coupled with the potential of individual skills, competencies, thoughts, innovations, and ideas to create a more efficient and effective organization. The Iaccoca Institute found that CEOs, when asked how much of the knowledge that is available to the organization is actually used, responded only about 20%. Yet if this figure represented average utilization of production capacity, it would only be acceptable to the most foolhardy CEOs 2 KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT IN THEORY AND PRACTICE

18 (Agile People Enterprise Development Group Newsletter, Iacocca Institute, Pennsylvania, November 1996). Knowledge management (KM) was initially defined as the process of applying a systematic approach to the capture, structure, management, and dissemination of knowledge throughout an organization in order to work faster, reuse best practices, and reduce costly rework from project to project (Nonaka and Takeuchi, 1995; Pasternack and Viscio, 1998; Pfeiffer and Sutton, 1999; Ruggles and Holtshouse, 1999). KM is often characterized by a pack rat approach to content: save it, it may prove useful sometime in the future. Many documents tend to be warehoused, sophisticated search engines are then used to try to retrieve some of this content, and fairly large-scale and costly KM systems are built. Knowledge management solutions have proven to be most successful in the capture, storage, and subsequent dissemination of knowledge that has been rendered explicit particularly lessons learned and best practices. The focus of intellectual capital management (ICM), on the other hand, is on those pieces of knowledge that are of business value to the organization referred to as intellectual capital or assets (Bontis and Nikitopoulos, 2001). Although some of these are more visible (e.g., patents, intellectual property), the majority consist of know-how, know-why, experience, and expertise that tend to reside within the head of one or a few employees (Klein, 1998; Stewart, 1997). ICM is characterized by less content because content is filtered and judged, and only the best are inventoried (the top ten, for example). ICM content tends to be more representative of a person s real thinking (contextual information, opinions, stories) owing to its emphasis on actionable knowledge and know-how. As a result, endeavors are less costly and the focus shifts to learning (at the individual, community, and organizational level) rather than to the building of systems. A good definition of knowledge management incorporates both the capturing and storing of the knowledge perspective, together with the valuing of intellectual assets. For example: Knowledge management is the deliberate and systematic coordination of an organization s people, technology, processes, and organizational structure in order to add value through reuse and innovation. This coordination is achieved through creating, sharing, and applying knowledge as well as through feeding the valuable lessons learned and best practices into corporate memory in order to foster continued organizational learning. When asked, most executives often state that their greatest asset is the knowledge held by their employees. They also invariably add that they have no idea how to manage this knowledge! It is essential to identify that knowledge that is of value and is also at risk of being lost to the organization, through retirement, turnover, and competition using the intellectual capital or asset approach. In addition, the selective or value-based knowledge management approach should be a three-tiered one. That is, it should also be applied to three organizational levels: the individual, the group or community, and the organization itself. The best way to retain valuable knowledge is to identify INTRODUCTION TO KM IN THEORY AND PRACTICE 3

19 intellectual assets and then to ensure that legacy materials are produced and subsequently stored in such a way as to make their future retrieval and reuse as easy as possible (Stewart, 2000). These tangible by-products need to flow from individual to individual, between members of a community of practice, and, of course, back to the organization itself, in the form of lessons learned, best practices, and corporate memory. Many knowledge management (KM) efforts have been largely concerned with capturing, codifying, and sharing the knowledge held by people in organizations. Although there is still a lack of consensus over what constitutes a good definition of KM (see the next section), there is widespread agreement as to the goals of an organization that undertakes KM. Nickols (2000) summarizes these goals as follows: the basic aim of knowledge management is to leverage knowledge to the organization s advantage. Some of management s motives are obvious: the loss of skilled people through turnover, pressures to avoid reinventing the wheel, pressures for organization-wide innovations in processes as well as products, management of risk, and the accelerating rate at which new knowledge is being created. Some typical knowledge management objectives are to: Facilitate a smooth transition from those retiring to their successors who are recruited to fill their positions. Minimize loss of corporate memory due to attrition and retirement. Identify critical resources and critical areas of knowledge so that the corporation knows what it knows and does it well and why. Build up a toolkit of methods that can be used with individuals, with groups, and with the organization to stem the potential loss of intellectual capital. WHAT IS KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT? An informal survey conducted by the author identified over 100 published definitions of knowledge management, and of these, at least 72 could be considered very good! Clearly, KM is a multidisciplinary field of study that covers a lot of ground. This finding should not be surprising, for applying knowledge to work is integral to most business activities. However, the field of KM does suffer from the Three Blind Men and an Elephant syndrome. In fact, there are likely more than three distinct perspectives on KM, and each leads to a different extrapolation and a different definition. From the business perspective: Knowledge management is a business activity with two primary aspects: [T]reating the knowledge component of business activities as an explicit concern of business reflected in strategy, policy, and practice at all levels of the organization; and, making a direct connection between an organization s intellectual assets both explicit (recorded) and tacit (personal know-how) and positive business results. (Barclay and Murray, 1997) 4 KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT IN THEORY AND PRACTICE

20 Knowledge management is a collaborative and integrated approach to the creation, capture, organization, access and use of an enterprise s intellectual assets. (Grey, 1996) From the cognitive science or knowledge science perspective: Knowledge the insights, understandings, and practical know-how that we all possess is the fundamental resource that allows us to function intelligently. Over time, considerable knowledge is also transformed to other manifestations such as books, technology, practices, and traditions within organizations of all kinds and in society in general. These transformations result in cumulated [sic] expertise and, when used appropriately, increased effectiveness. Knowledge is one, if not THE, principal factor that makes personal, organizational, and societal intelligent behavior possible. (Wiig, 1993, pp ) And, from the process/technology perspective: Knowledge management is the concept under which information is turned into actionable knowledge and made available effortlessly in a usable form to the people who can apply it. (Information Week, Sept. 1, 2003) Leveraging collective wisdom to increase responsiveness and innovation. (Carl Frappaolo, Delphi Group, Boston, posted at articles/default.asp?articleid=949) A systematic approach to manage the use of information in order to provide a continuous flow of Knowledge to the right people at the right time enabling efficient and effective decision making in their everyday business. (Steve Ward, Northrop Grumman, posted at asp?articleid=949) A knowledge management system is a virtual repository for relevant information which is critical to tasks performed daily by organizational knowledge workers. (What Is KM?, posted at Wiig (1993) also emphasizes that given the importance of knowledge in virtually all areas of daily and commercial life, two knowledge-related aspects are crucial for viability and success at any level. These are knowledge assets that must be applied, nurtured, preserved, and used to the largest extent possible by both individuals and organizations; and knowledge-related processes to create, build, compile, organize, transform, transfer, pool, apply, and safeguard knowledge that must be carefully and explicitly managed in all affected areas. Historically, knowledge has always been managed, at least implicitly. However, effective and active knowledge management requires new perspectives and techniques and touches on almost all facets of an organization. We need to develop a new discipline and prepare a cadre of knowledge professionals with a blend of expertise that we have not previously seen. This is our challenge! (Wiig, in Grey, 1996) INTRODUCTION TO KM IN THEORY AND PRACTICE 5

21 Knowledge management is a surprising mix of strategies, tools, and techniques some of which are nothing new under the sun. Storytelling, peer-topeer mentoring, and learning from mistakes, for example, all have precedents in education, training, and artificial intelligence practices. Knowledge management makes use of a mixture of techniques from knowledge-based system design, such as structured knowledge acquisition strategies from subject matter experts (McGraw and Harrison-Briggs, 1989) and educational technology (e.g., task and job analysis to design and develop task support systems; see Gery, 1991). This makes it both easy and difficult to define what KM is. At one extreme, KM encompasses everything to do with knowledge. At the other extreme, it is narrowly defined as an information technology system that dispenses organizational know-how. KM is in fact both of these and many more. One of the few areas of consensus in the field is that KM is a highly multidisciplinary field. Multidisciplinary Nature of KM Knowledge management draws upon a vast number of diverse fields such as: Organizational science. Cognitive science. Linguistics and computational linguistics. Information technologies such as knowledge-based systems, document and information management, electronic performance support systems, and database technologies. Information and library science. Technical writing and journalism. Anthropology and sociology. Education and training. Storytelling and communication studies. Collaborative technologies such as Computer Supported Collaborative Work and groupware, as well as intranets, extranets, portals, and other web technologies. This list is by no means exhaustive, but it serves to show the extremely varied roots that gave life to KM and continues to be its basis today. Figure 1-1 illustrates some of the diverse disciplines that have contributed to KM. The multidisciplinary nature of KM represents a double-edged sword. On the one hand, it is an advantage because almost anyone can find a familiar foundation on which to base their understanding and even practice of KM. Someone with a background in journalism, for example, can quickly adapt his or her skill set to the capture of knowledge from experts and reformulate them as organizational stories to be stored in corporate memory. Someone coming from a more technical database background can easily extrapolate his or her skill set to design and implement knowledge repositories that will serve as the 6 KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT IN THEORY AND PRACTICE

22 FIGURE 1-1 THE INTERDISCIPLINARY NATURE OF KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT Help Desk Systems Cognitive Science Technical Writing Database Technologies KM Disciplines Collaborative Technologies Organizational Science Electronic Performance Support Systems Artificial Intelligence Document and Information Management Web Technologies Decision Support Systems Library and Information Sciences corporate memory for that organization. However, the diversity of KM also presents some challenges with respect to boundaries. Skeptics argue that KM is not and cannot be said to be a separate discipline with a unique body of knowledge. This attitude is typically represented by phrases such as KM is just IM (Information Management) or KM is nonsensical it is just good business practices. It becomes very important to be able to list and describe what set of attributes are necessary and are in themselves sufficient to constitute knowledge management both as a discipline and as a field of practice that can be distinguished from others. One of the major attributes of KM relates to the fact that it deals with knowledge as well as information. Knowledge is a more subjective way of knowing and is typically based on experiential or individual values, perceptions, and experience. Popular examples to distinguish data from information and from knowledge include the following: Data: Content that is directly observable or verifiable; a fact for example, listings of the times and locations of all movies being shown today I download the listings. Information: Content that represents analyzed data for example, I can t leave before 5 so I will go to the 7:00 P.M. show at the cinema near my office. Knowledge: At that time of day, it will be impossible to find parking. I remember the last time I took the car I was so frustrated and stressed because I thought I would miss the opening credits. I ll therefore take the commuter train. But first I ll check with Al. I usually love all the movies he hates so I want to make sure it s worth seeing! Another distinguishing characteristic of KM as opposed to other information management fields is the ability of KM to address knowledge in all of its forms, notably, tacit knowledge and explicit knowledge. INTRODUCTION TO KM IN THEORY AND PRACTICE 7

1 Introduction to Knowledge Management

1 Introduction to Knowledge Management 1 Introduction to Knowledge Management A light bulb in the socket is worth two in the pocket. Bill Wolf (1950 2001) This chapter provides an introduction to the study of knowledge management (KM). A brief

More information

Chapter 13: Knowledge Management In Nutshell. Information Technology For Management Turban, McLean, Wetherbe John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

Chapter 13: Knowledge Management In Nutshell. Information Technology For Management Turban, McLean, Wetherbe John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Chapter 13: Knowledge Management In Nutshell Information Technology For Management Turban, McLean, Wetherbe John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Objectives Define knowledge and describe the different types of knowledge.

More information

Knowledge Management in Public Health. Nancy Dubois, NCCMT Consultant dubfit@rogers.com 519.446.3636

Knowledge Management in Public Health. Nancy Dubois, NCCMT Consultant dubfit@rogers.com 519.446.3636 Knowledge Management in Public Health Nancy Dubois, NCCMT Consultant dubfit@rogers.com 519.446.3636 CPHA Conference, June 2009 Overview The four essential elements of Knowledge Management: Culture, Content,

More information

3. What is Knowledge Management

3. What is Knowledge Management 3. What is Knowledge Management ETL525 Knowledge Management Tutorial One 5 December 2008 K.T. Lam lblkt@ust.hk Last updated: 4 December 2008 KM History The subject of KM was originally arisen in the field

More information

Knowledge Management

Knowledge Management Knowledge Management Management Information Code: 164292-02 Course: Management Information Period: Autumn 2013 Professor: Sync Sangwon Lee, Ph. D D. of Information & Electronic Commerce 1 00. Contents

More information

Envisioning a Future for Public Health Knowledge Management

Envisioning a Future for Public Health Knowledge Management Envisioning a Future for Public Health Knowledge Management By Cadence Group Public health today faces challenges and opportunities of a degree that it has never seen before. Never before have methods

More information

superseries FIFTH EDITION

superseries FIFTH EDITION Prelims-I046413.qxd 3/19/07 1:04 PM Page i Institute of Leadership & Management superseries Motivating to Perform in the Workplace FIFTH EDITION Published for the Institute of Leadership & Management AMSTERDAM

More information

THE ROLE OF KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM IN SCHOOL: PERCEPTION OF APPLICATIONS AND BENEFITS

THE ROLE OF KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM IN SCHOOL: PERCEPTION OF APPLICATIONS AND BENEFITS THE ROLE OF KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM IN SCHOOL: PERCEPTION OF APPLICATIONS AND BENEFITS YOHANNES KURNIAWAN Bina Nusantara University, Department of Information Systems, Jakarta 11480, Indonesia E-mail:

More information

THE e-knowledge BASED INNOVATION SEMINAR

THE e-knowledge BASED INNOVATION SEMINAR The Kaieteur Institute For Knowledge Management THE e-knowledge BASED INNOVATION SEMINAR OVERVIEW! Introduction Knowledge is a new form of renewable and intangible energy that is transforming many organizations.

More information

CHALLENGES AND APPROACHES FOR KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT. Jean-Louis ERMINE CEA/UTT

CHALLENGES AND APPROACHES FOR KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT. Jean-Louis ERMINE CEA/UTT CHALLENGES AND APPROACHES FOR KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT Jean-Louis ERMINE CEA/UTT Abstract: Knowledge Management is now a crucial issue in companies: Knowledge is a major economic challenge for the future.

More information

KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT

KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT G. AMIRTHRAJ MBA-II YEAR MANAKULA VINAYAGAR INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY amirthrajbba@gmail.com Mobile no 9629321360 ABSTRACT This paper contains topics of interest for those in the Knowledge

More information

Knowledge Management (KM) Knowledge Continuity Management (KCM)

Knowledge Management (KM) Knowledge Continuity Management (KCM) Knowledge Management (KM) Knowledge Continuity Management (KCM) Dr Kimiz Dalkir School of Information Studies McGill University 25 October 2011 Presentation is subject to the Creative Commons Agreement

More information

3 rd GENERATION KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT and Beyond!

3 rd GENERATION KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT and Beyond! KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT TALKS: 3 rd GENERATION KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT and Beyond! Even given its short life span, Knowledge Management has clearly evolved through three distinct eras, and is already entering

More information

Knowledge in n.e. is the most valuable business resource. Therefore, managing

Knowledge in n.e. is the most valuable business resource. Therefore, managing Part 3 THE KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT Knowledge in n.e. is the most valuable business resource. Therefore, managing knowledge is a key component of modern knowledge management. It is owned by people in much

More information

Chapter 9 Knowledge Management

Chapter 9 Knowledge Management Turban, Aronson, and Liang Decision Support Systems and Intelligent Systems, Seventh Edition Chapter 9 Knowledge Management 9-1 Learning Objectives Define knowledge. Learn the characteristics of knowledge

More information

c. Capturing and preservation of the knowledge

c. Capturing and preservation of the knowledge 9 9.1 Importance of Knowledge Management in Government 9.1.1 Earlier e-governance was considered as mere application of ICT tools to the governance processes. But, as has been emphasized in this Report,

More information

Overview of Knowledge Management in Organizations

Overview of Knowledge Management in Organizations Overview of Knowledge Management in Organizations 1 Overview of Knowledge Management in Organizations Yu Huang Graduate Student, Training and Human Resource Development Key words: Knowledge Management,

More information

Losing Your Minds: Capturing, Retaining and Leveraging Organizational Knowledge. bill Kaplan

Losing Your Minds: Capturing, Retaining and Leveraging Organizational Knowledge. bill Kaplan Losing Your Minds: Capturing, Retaining and Leveraging Organizational Knowledge bill Kaplan Published by In association with Losing Your Minds: Capturing, Retaining and Leveraging Organizational Knowledge

More information

Knowledge Management Process: The Care and Feeding of Knowledge Workers

Knowledge Management Process: The Care and Feeding of Knowledge Workers Knowledge Management Process: The Care and Feeding of Knowledge Workers Anna E. Flynn, Ph.D., C.P.M., Associate Professor and Research Associate ISM and CAPS Research 480-752-6276 Ext 3140; aflynn@ism.ws

More information

Copyright 2011 Gartner, Inc. All rights reserved. Printed in the United States of America 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1

Copyright 2011 Gartner, Inc. All rights reserved. Printed in the United States of America 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 Copyright 2011 Gartner, Inc. All rights reserved Printed in the United States of America 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in or introduced into a retrieval system,

More information

superseries FIFTH EDITION

superseries FIFTH EDITION Prelims-I046416.qxd 3/17/07 11:43 AM Page i Institute of Leadership & Management superseries Managing Conflict in the Workplace FIFTH EDITION Published for the Institute of Leadership & Management AMSTERDAM

More information

THE ROLE OF CULTURE IN KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT. Woo-Soon Park Department of Public Administration, Dong-A University, Pusan 602-714 Korea

THE ROLE OF CULTURE IN KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT. Woo-Soon Park Department of Public Administration, Dong-A University, Pusan 602-714 Korea THE ROLE OF CULTURE IN KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT Woo-Soon Park Department of Public Administration, Dong-A University, Pusan 602-714 Korea Keywords: knowledge, knowledge management, knowledge organization,

More information

STRATEGIC INTELLIGENCE WITH BI COMPETENCY CENTER. Student Rodica Maria BOGZA, Ph.D. The Bucharest Academy of Economic Studies

STRATEGIC INTELLIGENCE WITH BI COMPETENCY CENTER. Student Rodica Maria BOGZA, Ph.D. The Bucharest Academy of Economic Studies STRATEGIC INTELLIGENCE WITH BI COMPETENCY CENTER Student Rodica Maria BOGZA, Ph.D. The Bucharest Academy of Economic Studies ABSTRACT The paper is about the strategic impact of BI, the necessity for BI

More information

Knowledge Asset Management

Knowledge Asset Management SMR International Putting KM to Work Knowledge Asset Management In the Current Economic Crisis, Taking Care of What Your People Know Keeps Survival and Growth on Track Your Company s Knowledge Assets:

More information

Effects of Knowledge Management in Small-Sized Software Organizations

Effects of Knowledge Management in Small-Sized Software Organizations Effects of Knowledge Management in Small-Sized Software Organizations Gajendra Patil 1, Dr. G R Bamnote 2 Research Scholar, Dr K N Modi University, Newai, Rajasthan, India 1 Professor & Head, Prof Ram

More information

Leveraging Knowledge Capital

Leveraging Knowledge Capital Leveraging Capital INTRODUCTION Leveraging knowledge capital in the Federal Government is increasingly critical today because: Reductions in staffing create a need to replace informal methods for sharing

More information

Business Intelligence and Decision Support Systems

Business Intelligence and Decision Support Systems Chapter 12 Business Intelligence and Decision Support Systems Information Technology For Management 7 th Edition Turban & Volonino Based on lecture slides by L. Beaubien, Providence College John Wiley

More information

Enterprise 2.0 Knowledge Management Development Trends

Enterprise 2.0 Knowledge Management Development Trends 2012 International Conference on Economics, Business Innovation IPEDR vol.38 (2012) (2012) IACSIT Press, Singapore Enterprise 2.0 Knowledge Management Development Trends Dimiter Velev 1 + and Plamena Zlateva

More information

Building a Data Quality Scorecard for Operational Data Governance

Building a Data Quality Scorecard for Operational Data Governance Building a Data Quality Scorecard for Operational Data Governance A White Paper by David Loshin WHITE PAPER Table of Contents Introduction.... 1 Establishing Business Objectives.... 1 Business Drivers...

More information

THE MANAGEMENT OF INTELLECTUAL CAPITAL

THE MANAGEMENT OF INTELLECTUAL CAPITAL THE MANAGEMENT OF INTELLECTUAL CAPITAL Many companies have come to realize that market value multiples associated with its intangible assets (patents, trade-marks, trade secrets, brandings, etc.) are often

More information

Knowledge Management. Better Practice Checklist. Practical guides for effective use of new technologies in Government 13 KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT

Knowledge Management. Better Practice Checklist. Practical guides for effective use of new technologies in Government 13 KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT 13 Knowledge Management 13 KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT Better Practice Checklist Practical guides for effective use of new technologies in Government www.agimo.gov.au/checklists version 1, 2004 Introduction Australian

More information

IMPROVEMENT THE PRACTITIONER'S GUIDE TO DATA QUALITY DAVID LOSHIN

IMPROVEMENT THE PRACTITIONER'S GUIDE TO DATA QUALITY DAVID LOSHIN i I I I THE PRACTITIONER'S GUIDE TO DATA QUALITY IMPROVEMENT DAVID LOSHIN ELSEVIER AMSTERDAM BOSTON HEIDELBERG LONDON NEW YORK OXFORD PARIS SAN DIEGO SAN FRANCISCO SINGAPORE SYDNEY TOKYO Morgan Kaufmann

More information

PART I. Chapter 1. Networking in Society, Organisations and Education

PART I. Chapter 1. Networking in Society, Organisations and Education ISBN 92-64-10034-2 Networks of Innovation Towards New Models for Managing Schools and Systems OECD 2003 PART I Chapter 1 Networking in Society, Organisations and Education by Hans F. van Aalst Katholiek

More information

Cover Page. The handle http://hdl.handle.net/1887/33081 holds various files of this Leiden University dissertation.

Cover Page. The handle http://hdl.handle.net/1887/33081 holds various files of this Leiden University dissertation. Cover Page The handle http://hdl.handle.net/1887/33081 holds various files of this Leiden University dissertation. Author: Stettina, Christoph Johann Title: Governance of innovation project management

More information

Methodological Issues for Interdisciplinary Research

Methodological Issues for Interdisciplinary Research J. T. M. Miller, Department of Philosophy, University of Durham 1 Methodological Issues for Interdisciplinary Research Much of the apparent difficulty of interdisciplinary research stems from the nature

More information

Getting More from SCADA. Using SCADA software to Enhance Asset Management in an Organization. Presented by B-Scada, Inc.

Getting More from SCADA. Using SCADA software to Enhance Asset Management in an Organization. Presented by B-Scada, Inc. Getting More from SCADA Using SCADA software to Enhance Asset Management in an Organization Presented by B-Scada, Inc. Contents What is Asset Management?... 3 Why is Asset Management Important?... 3 Who

More information

Knowledge Management in the Software and Services Group

Knowledge Management in the Software and Services Group UDC 001.8:681.3.06 Knowledge Management in the Software and Services Group VKunio Kurose (Manuscript received August 31, 2000) This paper introduces a practical case of knowledge management in the Software

More information

KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT PROCESS: A SOCIO-TECHNICAL APPROACH (RESEARCH IN PROGRESS)

KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT PROCESS: A SOCIO-TECHNICAL APPROACH (RESEARCH IN PROGRESS) KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT PROCESS: A SOCIO-TECHNICAL APPROACH (RESEARCH IN PROGRESS) David Dulany Aurora University 347 Gladstone Ave. Aurora, Il. 60506-4892 630-844-4894 630-844-7830 (fax) Vincent Pellettiere

More information

Knowledge Management Oxymoron s

Knowledge Management Oxymoron s MSC IN INNOVATION AND TECHNOLOGY MANAGEMENT UNIVERSITY OF BATH Knowledge Management Oxymoron s Introducing Human Factors to Bring Theory to Practice Pedro Parraguez Ruiz 1 st March 2010 Abstract: This

More information

12 A framework for knowledge management

12 A framework for knowledge management 365 12 A framework for knowledge management As those who work in organizations know, organizations are not homogenous entities where grand theoretical systems are easily put in place. Change is difficult.

More information

Analysis and Design of Knowledge Management Systems for School of Information System at XYZ University (A Case Study Approach)

Analysis and Design of Knowledge Management Systems for School of Information System at XYZ University (A Case Study Approach) , pp. 229240 http://dx.doi.org/10.14257/ijmue.2014.9.12.21 Analysis and Design of Management Systems for School of Information System at XYZ University (A Case Study Approach) Yohannes Kurniawan and Siti

More information

Knowledge Management. Clobridge Consulting. An 8-Point Primer. Linking people with information & knowledge www.clobridgeconsulting.com.

Knowledge Management. Clobridge Consulting. An 8-Point Primer. Linking people with information & knowledge www.clobridgeconsulting.com. Knowledge Management An 8-Point Primer January 2014 Clobridge Consulting Linking people with information & knowledge www.clobridgeconsulting.com The Knowledge Management 8-Point Primer What is Knowledge

More information

SPECIFICATION BY EXAMPLE. Gojko Adzic. How successful teams deliver the right software. MANNING Shelter Island

SPECIFICATION BY EXAMPLE. Gojko Adzic. How successful teams deliver the right software. MANNING Shelter Island SPECIFICATION BY EXAMPLE How successful teams deliver the right software Gojko Adzic MANNING Shelter Island Brief Contents 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 Preface xiii Acknowledgments xxii

More information

Managing Data in Motion

Managing Data in Motion Managing Data in Motion Data Integration Best Practice Techniques and Technologies April Reeve ELSEVIER AMSTERDAM BOSTON HEIDELBERG LONDON NEW YORK OXFORD PARIS SAN DIEGO SAN FRANCISCO SINGAPORE SYDNEY

More information

CHANGING DIMENSIONS AND PERSPECTIVES OF KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT

CHANGING DIMENSIONS AND PERSPECTIVES OF KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT CHANGING DIMENSIONS AND PERSPECTIVES OF KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT Kamal Kumar Chaurasia * Abstract Knowledge is the result of learning which provides the only sustainable competitive advantage to the organization.

More information

Preface At the intersection of software engineering and knowledge management

Preface At the intersection of software engineering and knowledge management Preface This is a book for students and practitioners of software engineering. Software engineers carry out knowledge-intensive tasks in software development, project management, or software quality. With

More information

KNOWLEDGE ORGANIZATION

KNOWLEDGE ORGANIZATION KNOWLEDGE ORGANIZATION Gabi Reinmann Germany reinmann.gabi@googlemail.com Synonyms Information organization, information classification, knowledge representation, knowledge structuring Definition The term

More information

The IBM data governance blueprint: Leveraging best practices and proven technologies

The IBM data governance blueprint: Leveraging best practices and proven technologies May 2007 The IBM data governance blueprint: Leveraging best practices and proven technologies Page 2 Introduction In the past few years, dozens of high-profile incidents involving process failures and

More information

CONTRIBUTION OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY IN ENHANCEMENT OF KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT PRACTICES

CONTRIBUTION OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY IN ENHANCEMENT OF KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT PRACTICES International Journal of Information Technology and Knowledge Management July-December 2010, Volume 2, No. 2, pp. 533-537 CONTRIBUTION OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY IN ENHANCEMENT OF KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT PRACTICES

More information

World Health Organization

World Health Organization March 1, 2005 Proposed Networks to Support Health Decision-Making and Health Policy Formulation in Low and Lower Middle Income Countries & Considerations for Implementation World Health Organization A

More information

Strategic Executive Coaching: An Integrated Approach to Executive Development

Strategic Executive Coaching: An Integrated Approach to Executive Development Strategic Executive Coaching: An Integrated Approach to Executive Development A new concept in executive coaching is leading companies to fully utilize the talent they have to drive organizational strategy

More information

KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT

KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT WHAT IS IT? UNITAR Presentation Mike Koenig Long Island University College of Information and Computer Science Brookville, N.Y. michael.koenig@liu.edu 14 June 2006 Classic KM Definitions

More information

Multi-channel Marketing

Multi-channel Marketing RIGHT TIME REVENUE OPTIMIZATION How To Get Started RIGHT TIME REVENUE OPTIMIZATION How To Get Started Summary: The Short List Here s our suggested short list from this paper: Multi-channel marketing is

More information

Holistic Development of Knowledge Management with KMMM

Holistic Development of Knowledge Management with KMMM 1 Karsten Ehms, Dr. Manfred Langen Holistic Development of Knowledge Management with KMMM Siemens AG / Corporate Technology Knowledge Management & Business Transformation If knowledge management is to

More information

Action Plan towards Open Access to Publications

Action Plan towards Open Access to Publications OOAAction Plan Draft Version, 17.01.2013 Action Plan towards Open Access to Publications endorsed during the 2 nd Annual Global Meeting, 27 29 May 2013, Berlin / Germany Assuming that providing research

More information

Supply Chain Strategies

Supply Chain Strategies Supply Chain Strategies Customer-driven and customer-focused Tony Hines ELSEVIER BUTTERWORTH HEINEMANN AMSTERDAM BOSTON HEIDELBERG LONDON NEW YORK OXFORD PARIS SAN DIEGO SAN FRANCISCO SINGAPORE SYDNEY

More information

Anatomy of a Decision

Anatomy of a Decision research@bluehillresearch.com @BlueHillBoston 617.624.3600 Anatomy of a Decision BI Platform vs. Tool: Choosing Birst Over Tableau for Enterprise Business Intelligence Needs What You Need To Know The demand

More information

KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT IN DISASTER RISK REDUCTION

KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT IN DISASTER RISK REDUCTION KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT IN DISASTER RISK REDUCTION The Indian Approach Government of India Ministry of Home Affairs National Disaster Management Division The document is prepared by a team comprising of Sujit

More information

Knowledge Management

Knowledge Management Knowledge Management Solving the Nuclear Industry s Brain Drain: How to Capture and Manage Your Company s Institutional Knowledge for Immediate Action A Bentley White Paper Hilmar Retief Product Manager

More information

The Challenges of Effective Program Management

The Challenges of Effective Program Management How to Use Salesforce Dashboards for Project Management Success In large organizations, how do you efficiently manage projects and effectively communicate at scale to achieve desired outcomes? How are

More information

Data Mining for Knowledge Management in Technology Enhanced Learning

Data Mining for Knowledge Management in Technology Enhanced Learning Proceedings of the 6th WSEAS International Conference on Applications of Electrical Engineering, Istanbul, Turkey, May 27-29, 2007 115 Data Mining for Knowledge Management in Technology Enhanced Learning

More information

Integration of E-education and Knowledge Management

Integration of E-education and Knowledge Management Integration of E-education and Knowledge Management Liyong Wan 1, Chengling Zhao 2, and Wei Guo 2 1 College of Humanity and Social Science, Wuhan University of Science and Engineering,Wuhan,China,wanliyongccnu@yahoo.com.cn

More information

Understanding PAYE Delivery Partners

Understanding PAYE Delivery Partners Research report Understanding PAYE Delivery Partners September 2014 Contents Research requirement (background to the project) 3 When the research took place 4 Who did the work (research agency) 4 Methodology:

More information

The Analysis of Knowledge, Knowledge Management and Knowledge Management Cycles: A Broad Review

The Analysis of Knowledge, Knowledge Management and Knowledge Management Cycles: A Broad Review The Analysis of, Management and Management Cycles: A Broad Review Abstract Jawad Kayani Federal Urdu University of Arts, Science and Technology, Islamabad Campus, Pakistan Email: jwdkayani@gmail.com M.

More information

Simplification of work: Knowledge management as a solution

Simplification of work: Knowledge management as a solution Simplification of work: Knowledge management as a solution Second line optional lorem ipsum B Subhead lorem ipsum, date quatueriure 2 Content 4 Simplification of work: Knowledge management as a solution

More information

Achieving Business Analysis Excellence

Achieving Business Analysis Excellence RG Perspective Achieving Business Analysis Excellence Turning Business Analysts into Key Contributors by Building a Center of Excellence 11 Canal Center Plaza Alexandria, VA 22314 HQ 703-548-7006 Fax 703-684-5189

More information

Revisioning Graduate Teacher Education in North Carolina Master of Arts in Elementary Education Appalachian State University

Revisioning Graduate Teacher Education in North Carolina Master of Arts in Elementary Education Appalachian State University Revisioning Graduate Teacher Education in North Carolina Master of Arts in Elementary Education Appalachian State University A. A description of how the proposed program has been revisioned to reflect

More information

This is a sample chapter from A Manager's Guide to Service Management. To read more and buy, visit http://shop.bsigroup.com/bip0005 BSI British

This is a sample chapter from A Manager's Guide to Service Management. To read more and buy, visit http://shop.bsigroup.com/bip0005 BSI British A Manager s Guide to Service Management A Manager s Guide to Service Management Jenny Dugmore Shirley Lacy First published in the UK in 1995 by BSI, 389 Chiswick High Road, London W4 4AL Second edition

More information

Case Study. Using Knowledge: Advances in Expertise Location and Social Networking

Case Study. Using Knowledge: Advances in Expertise Location and Social Networking Case Study Using Knowledge: Advances in Expertise Location and Social Networking Best practices from IBM Global Business Services IBM provides business insight and IT solutions to help its clients become

More information

Research Note: What is a Knowledge Management Project? by David De Long Tom Davenport & Mike Beers

Research Note: What is a Knowledge Management Project? by David De Long Tom Davenport & Mike Beers Research Note: What is a Knowledge Management Project? by David De Long Tom Davenport & Mike Beers The term knowledge management is increasingly finding its way into the management lexicon as concepts

More information

Knowledge Economy. Knowledge Management. Defining the K.M framework. Knowledge Economy. Defining the K.M framework. Defining the K.

Knowledge Economy. Knowledge Management. Defining the K.M framework. Knowledge Economy. Defining the K.M framework. Defining the K. Knowledge Management Knowledge Economy What is it & how should be applied in a business and in an academic context? An empirical study from Greece. Speaker: Nikos Katsiadakis, Thessaloniki Technology Park

More information

Holistic education: An interpretation for teachers in the IB programmes

Holistic education: An interpretation for teachers in the IB programmes IB position paper Holistic education: An interpretation for teachers in the IB programmes John Hare International International Baccalaureate Baccalaureate Organization Organization 2010 2010 1 Language

More information

Managing explicit knowledge using SharePoint in a collaborative environment: ICIMOD s experience

Managing explicit knowledge using SharePoint in a collaborative environment: ICIMOD s experience Managing explicit knowledge using SharePoint in a collaborative environment: ICIMOD s experience I Abstract Sushil Pandey, Deependra Tandukar, Saisab Pradhan Integrated Knowledge Management, ICIMOD {spandey,dtandukar,spradhan}@icimod.org

More information

Data Model ing Essentials

Data Model ing Essentials Data Model ing Essentials Third Edition Graeme C. Simsion and Graham C. Witt MORGAN KAUFMANN PUBLISHERS AN IMPRINT OF ELSEVIER AMSTERDAM BOSTON LONDON NEW YORK OXFORD PARIS SAN DIEGO SAN FRANCISCO SINGAPORE

More information

Five Core Principles of Successful Business Architecture. STA Group, LLC Revised: May 2013

Five Core Principles of Successful Business Architecture. STA Group, LLC Revised: May 2013 Five Core Principles of Successful Business Architecture STA Group, LLC Revised: May 2013 Executive Summary This whitepaper will provide readers with important principles and insights on business architecture

More information

Successful Knowledge Management: Does It Exist?

Successful Knowledge Management: Does It Exist? Successful Knowledge Management: Does It Exist? Karl M. Wiig Manuscript for the August 1999 Issue of the European American Business Journal Knowledge Research Institute, Inc. kmwiig@krii.com Introduction

More information

Ten Steps to Quality Data and Trusted Information

Ten Steps to Quality Data and Trusted Information Ten Steps to Quality Data and Trusted Information ABSTRACT Do these situations sound familiar? Your company is involved in a data integration project such as building a data warehouse or migrating several

More information

Knowledge Management System Architecture For Organizational Learning With Collaborative Environment

Knowledge Management System Architecture For Organizational Learning With Collaborative Environment Proceedings of the Postgraduate Annual Research Seminar 2005 1 Knowledge Management System Architecture For Organizational Learning With Collaborative Environment Rusli Haji Abdullah δ, Shamsul Sahibuddin

More information

CRITICAL AND CREATIVE THINKING RUBRIC GRADUATE PROGRAMS

CRITICAL AND CREATIVE THINKING RUBRIC GRADUATE PROGRAMS CRITICAL AND CREATIVE THINKING RUBRIC GRADUATE PROGRAMS Adapted from the AACU LEAP rubrics, the Bases of Competence skills, Ontario Council of Academic Vice-Presidents Graduate Degree Level Expectations,

More information

IT Financial Management and Cost Recovery

IT Financial Management and Cost Recovery WHITE PAPER November 2010 IT Financial Management and Cost Recovery Patricia Genetin Sr. Principal Consultant/CA Technical Sales David Messineo Sr. Services Architect/CA Services Table of Contents Executive

More information

E-Learning at Kyongju University in Seoul, Korea: the Present and the Future

E-Learning at Kyongju University in Seoul, Korea: the Present and the Future E-Learning at Kyongju University in Seoul, Korea: the Present and the Future Hyunju Jeung, Ph D Full-time lecturer Kyongju University hjeung@kyongju.ac.kr Abstract Internet is spreading fast in our lives.

More information

Knowledge Management within the Lebanese Real Estate Bubble: An Exploratory Study

Knowledge Management within the Lebanese Real Estate Bubble: An Exploratory Study Knowledge Management within the Lebanese Real Estate Bubble: An Exploratory Study Dr Leila Halawi Lebanese American University School of Business Dr Raed El Khalil Lebanese American University School of

More information

Talent Management Leadership in Professional Services Firms

Talent Management Leadership in Professional Services Firms Talent Management Leadership in Professional Services Firms Published by KENNEDY KENNEDY Consulting Research Consulting Research & Advisory & Advisory Sponsored by Table of Contents Introduction.... 3

More information

Criteria for the Accreditation of. DBA Programmes

Criteria for the Accreditation of. DBA Programmes Criteria for the Accreditation of DBA Programmes 1 1 INTRODUCTION 1.1 This document sets out the criteria for DBA programme accreditation. While setting the standards that accredited provision is expected

More information

Survey of more than 1,500 Auditors Concludes that Audit Professionals are Not Maximizing Use of Available Audit Technology

Survey of more than 1,500 Auditors Concludes that Audit Professionals are Not Maximizing Use of Available Audit Technology Survey of more than 1,500 Auditors Concludes that Audit Professionals are Not Maximizing Use of Available Audit Technology Key findings from the survey include: while audit software tools have been available

More information

Knowledge Management & Organizational Capacity. Suliman Al-Hawamdeh Professor and Chair College of Information, University of North Texas

Knowledge Management & Organizational Capacity. Suliman Al-Hawamdeh Professor and Chair College of Information, University of North Texas Knowledge Management & Organizational Capacity Suliman Al-Hawamdeh Professor and Chair College of Information, University of North Texas The Need to Manage Knowledge Knowledge is in the mind of people

More information

Knowledge Powers the Service Desk

Knowledge Powers the Service Desk LANDesk White Paper Knowledge Powers the Service Desk The time has come to review knowledge management within service delivery Contents Executive Summary...3 Introduction...3 Service Desks: A Specific

More information

Elearning: Building an Effective and Engaging Solution Online

Elearning: Building an Effective and Engaging Solution Online PERSPECTIVES Elearning: Building an Effective and Engaging Solution Online There s a lot of buzz about elearning, and with good reason. When done effectively, organizations find it can reduce time away

More information

"Professional Programs in/and the Liberal Arts University January 25, 2010

Professional Programs in/and the Liberal Arts University January 25, 2010 Moderator: Michael R. Halleran, Provost "Professional Programs in/and the Liberal Arts University January 25, 2010 Panel: Pamela Eddy, Associate Professor of Education Bill Geary, Associate Professor of

More information

Enhancing University Research through Corporate Engagement and Collaboration

Enhancing University Research through Corporate Engagement and Collaboration Enhancing University Research through Corporate Engagement and Collaboration Jeffrey Scott Vitter, Provost and Executive Vice Chancellor, The University of Kansas Julie S. Nagel, Executive Director of

More information

Abstraction in Computer Science & Software Engineering: A Pedagogical Perspective

Abstraction in Computer Science & Software Engineering: A Pedagogical Perspective Orit Hazzan's Column Abstraction in Computer Science & Software Engineering: A Pedagogical Perspective This column is coauthored with Jeff Kramer, Department of Computing, Imperial College, London ABSTRACT

More information

Knowledge Management: A tool for Improving Government Performance

Knowledge Management: A tool for Improving Government Performance Knowledge Management: A tool for Improving Government Performance Page 1 of 5 Knowledge Management: A tool for Improving Government Performance by Brian D. Murrow and Victoria Adams What is Knowledge Management?

More information

KNOWLEDGE BASED COST ANALYSIS A KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT TOOL TO ARTICULATE THE ROLE OF KNOWLEDGE IN THE COST-BENEFIT ANALYSIS

KNOWLEDGE BASED COST ANALYSIS A KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT TOOL TO ARTICULATE THE ROLE OF KNOWLEDGE IN THE COST-BENEFIT ANALYSIS DARIUS MAHDJOUBI, P.Eng. KNOWLEDGE BASED COST ANALYSIS A KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT TOOL TO ARTICULATE THE ROLE OF KNOWLEDGE IN THE COST-BENEFIT ANALYSIS The paper has been presented at the SECOND WORLD CONGRESS

More information

KM Special Report 2013. Commissioned by ikms

KM Special Report 2013. Commissioned by ikms KM Special Report 2013 Commissioned by ikms PREFACE After more than three decades since the terms knowledge worker and then knowledge management were coined, KM remains serious business, and serious pain,

More information

NIST Cloud Computing Program Activities

NIST Cloud Computing Program Activities NIST Cloud Computing Program Overview The NIST Cloud Computing Program includes Strategic and Tactical efforts which were initiated in parallel, and are integrated as shown below: NIST Cloud Computing

More information

Knowledge Sharing. 1. Introduction. 2. Why Knowledge Sharing? 3. Platforms of KS

Knowledge Sharing. 1. Introduction. 2. Why Knowledge Sharing? 3. Platforms of KS Knowledge Sharing Ramesh G. Paloti Bhavan s College Munshi Nagar Andheri (W) Mumbai 400058 rameshgpaloti@gmail.com 1. Introduction In a growing global economy managing knowledge effectively has become

More information

Teacher Education Comes on Stage

Teacher Education Comes on Stage Assessment and Evaluation in Teacher Education Renewal Calvin M. Frazier A generalist steps lightly in the testing and assessment arena. As a generalist and one specializing in state policymaking, my tread

More information

Center for Effective Organizations

Center for Effective Organizations Center for Effective Organizations WHAT MAKES HR A STRATEGIC PARTNER? CEO PUBLICATION G 09-01 (555) EDWARD E. LAWLER III Center for Effective Organizations Marshall School of Business University of Southern

More information

Software Engineering from an Engineering Perspective: SWEBOK as a Study Object

Software Engineering from an Engineering Perspective: SWEBOK as a Study Object Software Engineering from an Engineering Perspective: SWEBOK as a Study Object Alain Abran a,b, Kenza Meridji b, Javier Dolado a a Universidad del País Vasco/Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea b Ecole de technologie

More information

European University Association Contribution to the Public Consultation: Science 2.0 : Science in Transition 1. September 2014

European University Association Contribution to the Public Consultation: Science 2.0 : Science in Transition 1. September 2014 European University Association Contribution to the Public Consultation: Science 2.0 : Science in Transition 1 September 2014 With 850 members across 47 countries, the European University Association (EUA)

More information