Course Packet for Interpersonal Communication

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "Course Packet for Interpersonal Communication"

Transcription

1 Course Packet for Interpersonal Communication (with Pablo Martin) This packet contains all of the assignment descriptions and rubrics that you will need for our course this semester. All assignments are listed in chronological order. For individual assignment point values, please see the syllabus. If you lose this packet, please download a replacement from the Course Resources Page. Extra Credit For nearly every chapter, students have two extra credit options (worth 5 points each): 1. complete the Miscellaneous Reading Activity (found online on the CRP) 2. research any of the chapter s concepts further on their own, sharing the source citation and a brief discussion of their findings with the class Note: students cannot exceed the maximum number of extra credit points allowed for the course. Interpersonal Communication: Contain Your Enthusiasm The Contain Your Enthusiasm assignment is intended to be a creative and fun exercise. Not only will we all get to know each other better, we ll also begin to explore a major theme of the course: the power of perception in how we know the world. Basically, I wish to demonstrate that we see the world as our filters allow us to see it, not as it really is. The assignment involves two parts: a presentation that involves your sharing a series of objects that you ve gathered together in order to teach us more about you; a paper discussing what you learned about your colleagues presentations and about perception in general. Contain Your Enthusiasm Presentation You will need to think of a container that you believe represents how OTHERS see you (NOT how you see yourself; several students have made this mistake in the past). You might need to start by asking your friends and acquaintances how they see you. You might choose to focus on a first impression or on the impressions you ve given these people over time. Then, you need to identify three objects that you will put inside the container, items that represent three of your true or inner qualities. These qualities should be things your friends or family know about you know, but that others wouldn t know or suspect just by looking at or speaking with you briefly. You will then gather all four of these items, hiding the three objects that symbolize your true self inside the container that represents how others see you. Please avoid being obvious or literal in choosing your three objects. For example, don t include a CD to show you like music, or a pen to show you like to write. The more metaphorical the item, i.e. the more symbolic it is, the more you will have to say to explain how it represents you and thus, the more we ll learn about you. We don t just want to hear, Here s a CD. I like music. Stories and examples from your life are great ways to talk about yourself. Allow yourself to find creative ways to represent the characteristics that make you who you are the more creative, the more insight we will gain into who you are. If you are having difficulty finding objects, write down several of your qualities and brainstorm a list of possible objects representing each of them. Then, go back to your lists a day or two later and brainstorm some more this should help you think outside of the box as well as focus on the qualities that really matter to you. Lastly, you definitely don t want to forget about this assignment backpacks, pencils, and other everyday objects are will earn only half-credit, unless cleared with me beforehand. Each student will have a window of time to share their items with the class roughly 3-10 minutes. Your presentation will be graded on: 1) How well the object/container represents your sense of identity or how others perceive you, either on their own or with your discussion. 2) The thoughtfulness and/or creativity that went into the object/container. 3) How thoroughly and clearly you discuss what each object/container represents (do we get a clear idea of who you are or are perceived to be?). 4) The overall understanding we have of your personality or identity. Let s look at an example. A person whose identity is tied to the ocean and her free spirit might put a feather in her bag rather than a bar of surf wax. In explaining why she chose that object, she might share how lighthearted a person she is, a free spirit who blows where the wind takes her. She might also tell a brief story to illustrate her 1

2 point. But if she only used a bar of wax, she might be tempted to simply say, I love the ocean and I m a surfer so I use surf wax. That won t really help us get to know her any better, and getting to know each other is a critical component of this activity. Each category will be evaluated on the following criteria: Contain Your Enthusiasm Presentation Rubric 1. How well the object/container represents your sense of identity or how others perceive you, either on their own or with your discussion. (Unless you contact me well before class, using backpacks, pencils, and other everyday objects in your presentation will only be worth half credit.) 2. How thoroughly and clearly you discuss what each object/container represents (do we get a clear idea of who you are or are perceived to be?). 3. The thoughtfulness and/or creativity that went into the object/container. The Container: 4 points Object 1: 4 points Object 2: 4 points Object 3: 4 points Holistic Presentation (the overall understanding we have of your personality or identity): 4 points Overall Score (20 points possible): Contain Your Enthusiasm Paper As each student presents their objects, the rest of you will need to take notes on three areas: 1) what their four items are, 2) what you learn about each student as he shares, and 3) your mental reactions to his presentation. Strive to be both honest and open-minded as you listen and take notes, allow yourself to experience your own preconceived notions of each student and write down your reactions. Don t be hard on yourself or worry if you re relying on stereotypes, it is normal and natural to have these. In fact, exploring stereotypes is one of the reasons we do this assignment! As you jot these reactions down, note how your stereotypes conflict with what you learned about the speaker in their presentation. Afterwards, you will use these notes to help you produce a confidential, 2-3 page paper in which you discuss your reactions to three of your colleagues presentations. (Tip: this works best when you write about people who surprised you.) In your paper, you must discuss: 1) the presenter and her container, 2) the perception/stereotype you had of her prior to the exercise, 3) at least one of the presenter s three objects and what it taught you about her, and 4) discusses your current perception of the presenter and/or how it s changed. For each of the people you write about, be sure to reflect on the differences between the containers people chose and the objects they placed within them. In other words, focus on the difference between each person s objects and his or her container, not the differences between the three people you are discussing. Be sure to provide depth and detail in your discussions. In the introduction and/or conclusion, you might also write about why people are often so different from the impressions give. Make sure to proof read your paper so that it is both clear and free of errors. Below is the layout you should follow in your paper (if you re a strong writer, your paper might look different). 1. Introduction: preparing your reader with a preview of what they can expect to read about (I suggest you write this last). This paragraph should be roughly three to five sentences long. 2. Colleague #1: 1) identify the presenter and his container, 2) describe the perceptions/stereotypes you had of him prior to the exercise, 3) discuss at least one of the presenter s three objects and what it taught you about him, and 4) your current perception of the presenter after what you ve learned 3. Colleague #2: same as for Colleague 1 4. Colleague #3: same as for Colleague 1 5. Conclusion: a summary of what you wrote about, closing with a general statement that shares your final 2

3 thoughts regarding the experiences you wrote about in this paper. This paragraph should be roughly three to five sentences long. Contain Your Enthusiasm Paper Rubric Items in bold are more important than items in standard font and are thus worth more points. Flow of the Paper: 5 points 1. Includes an effective introduction 2. Includes an effective conclusion 3. The paper is well organized 4. The paper flows well, both within and between paragraphs Colleague #1: 10 points 1. Identifies the presenter and their container 2. Describes your perception/stereotype of her/him prior to the exercise 3. Discusses at least one of the presenter s three objects and what you it taught you about the presenter 4. Discusses your current perception of the presenter and/or how it s changed Colleague #2 (same as for Colleague #1): 10 points Colleague #3 (same as for Colleague #1): 10 points Formatting: Deduction of up to 5 points Your paper should be formatted as described here and in the syllabus, be 2-3 pages in length, identify and follow a particular style format (MLA, APA, Chicago, etc.), and be free of organizational, spelling, grammar, and punctuation errors. Overall Score (35 points possible): Interpersonal Communication: Critical Exercises Research shows that one of the best ways to master a new concept is by performing it. Even more success can be had by reflecting on the experience afterwards. These are the functions of the Critical Exercises. Each report asks you to engage in a particular interpersonal communication event in your life, reflect on your actions, and think critically about their results. The best conversations for the Critical Exercises tend to be those that are emotionally intense or impactful to your life in some way and even conversations that go badly. As you produce each critical exercise, your ability to observe, analyze, reflect, and critique communication behavior will improve. Ideally, you will become a more sensitive, sophisticated, and effective communicator. Each Critical Exercise (CE) is comprised of two sections: 1) Observation and 2) Analysis & Reflection. The observation section is like a field report: you will be asked to describe the events that took place in detail, not to judge them. The analysis & reflection section is where you describe your personal reactions as well as your reflections on the events by answering the questions provided. In both sections, be sure to use relevant communication terminology. Please separate and label each section (as well as the numbers within sections) in your paper so that it is easier for me to grade (and thus for you to earn credit!). A detailed Observation might read, Steven looked down and shrugged his shoulders. He played with the buttons on his collar, and then he looked up. He looked over my shoulder and did not make eye contact with me for several seconds, then he glanced at me for a moment. A vague Observation might read Steven didn t say anything when I was done talking. A judgmental or evaluative Observation would read, Steven became shy all of the sudden. He didn t want to look at me anymore. Notice how the detailed Observation focuses on specific, observable events. In the vague Observation, the writer provides very little detail and in the evaluative Observation, she gives meaning to Steven s actions rather than describing them. It can be very difficult to separate our opinions from our observations, but learning to do so will sharpen your ability to think more clearly 3

4 and critically about the interaction. The Observation section should be as detailed as possible I encourage you to write notes immediately after the target interaction occurs. In the Analysis & Reflection section, you are asked to evaluate or interpret the meaning of the details you described in the Observation. An effective Analysis& Reflection might read, At the time, I attributed Steven s fidgeting and how he averted his eyes to his being very shy, or worse that he didn t like me. Looking at his fidgety behavior during our interaction and noticing when it started, I realize that telling him about my exboyfriend might have made him uncomfortable. An ineffective and vague Analysis & Reflection might read, I thought Steven didn t like me. Your papers will also be assessed for writing and formatting. This means that they should be formatted as described here and in the syllabus, be 3-5 pages in length, identify and follow a particular style format (MLA, APA, Chicago, etc.), and be free of organizational, spelling, and punctuation errors. Up to ten points will be deducted for errors in these areas. Each Critical Exercise has a due date stated provided the syllabus. Sample CEs will be made available online for your reference. You may revise and rewrite one CE for a better grade making improvements on the paper you already submitted (and only those elements of the original paper that you attempted can be revised). I will accept these throughout the semester, but no later than when we meet for the final exam. All Critical Exercises will be kept confidential. Note: You may revise and resubmit one of the three Critical Exercises you complete for re-evaluation, minus any original deductions for lateness/incompleteness. These can be submitted at any time during the semester, but no later than time of the final. Observation: (102 points) Critical Exercise 1: The Communication Model For this critical exercise, you are being asked to observe and evaluate a very brief snapshot of a communication event that you participated in recently. Based on that interaction, identify and describe the elements from the communication model by making a numbered list (that corresponds to the items below) and filling it in. You might only need to write a few words or a whole paragraph to describe each element from the model, just be sure to be complete in your responses. Again, be sure that you focus on only one message and response from this event this will likely include only one small part of a conversation, so it s best to analyze an interaction between you and someone you know well. Be sure to follow the instructions discussed in class and/or online, where sample papers are also available. Elements of the Communication Model: (6 pts each) 1. A brief summary of the interaction from beginning to end, including the channel(s) used (face-to-face, visual chat/skype, telephone, cellular phone, etc.; this is so I can better understand your paper as I read through it. Try to focus on what happened, not the communicators interpretations of what happened.) 2. A brief description of the overall situation or emotional climate in the days or weeks prior to the interaction between the two parties (you ve been fighting a lot, you ve just gotten back from a wonderful vacation, you ve been avoiding the other person, etc.) 3. Communicator A s name (this is either you or the other person) 4. Communicator A s field of experience and how it might have affected the exchange (in particular, their background as it pertains to the conversation at hand, including their gender, culture(s), upbringing, significant life experiences, filters for perceiving/understanding reality, etc.) 5. Communicator B s name (this is either you or the other person) 6. Communicator B s field of experience and how it might have affected the exchange (see above for more information) 7. Context, both recent and immediate, for communicator A (how was their day? what recent experiences or emotions may be influencing the way she/he experienced the event, and what happened immediately before the interaction that may have colored her/his state of mind, such as did he/she have a bad day, just get promoted, etc. You may not discover this until after the conversation takes place, so think about it.) 4

5 8. Context, both recent and immediate, for communicator B (see above for more information) 9. Situational context and external noise during the exchange (where are you talking? what s happening around you?) 10. Focusing on just one of the exchanges in the conversation, provide the words and nonverbal cues used by A to communicate his/her message (include the actual phrase, the tone, their facial affect, etc.) 11. The intended message from A (not the actual words they used, but what they wanted to communicate; you may have to guess what their intent was or you may have learned it later in the conversation) 12. How B interpreted A s message (word for word, write out the message that B decoded in his/her head) 13. Focusing on the exchange from 10 above, provide the words and nonverbal cues used by B to respond to A s message B s response to the original message (include the actual phrase, the tone, their facial affect, etc.) 14. How A interpreted B s message (word for word, write out the message that A decoded in his/her head) 15. Internal noise for communicator A (their actual thoughts; if this is not you, you may have to guess what perceptions or distractions were in his/her head; share why you think that) 16. Internal noise for communicator B (their actual thoughts; if this is not you, see above for tips) 17. Final shared meaning arrived at from the exchange (in regards to the primary message; if there wasn t a shared meaning, describe the meaning that each of the different communicators arrived at) Analysis & Reflection: (100 points) Using complete sentences, answer each of the following questions thoroughly and in detail. Be sure to go beyond just the what, share the why as well. Your responses should be roughly words each. (20 pts each) 1. Ignore the interaction for a moment and describe what are/were your preconceived notions of the other person before entering this interaction. In other words, describe the filters that were in place as you listened to him/her. (For example, you might have the filter that my brother is a lazy, selfish idiot. ) How did you translate their words and nonverbals when you listened from this filter? Start by writing out what this filter or preconceived notion was, then describe specifically how it affected your understanding or interpretation of what was said. 2. Now consider how your interaction and your understanding would have changed if your preconceived notions or filters were the exact opposite of what they were (while being realistic). For example, rather than thinking my brother is a lazy, selfish idiot, what would you have heard and experienced if you thought my brother is a hard-worker in some ways, he probably cares a lot about certain people, and he s actually really smart at some things. Start by writing out what this new filter or preconceived notion might have been, then describe specifically how it might have changed your understanding or interpretation of what was said. (This may be a tough one for you to do, but answering it well could have a powerful impact in your perspective of and relationship with the other person.) 3. What was the relational information in the interaction? Remember, relational information, or how we feel about one another, is communicated mostly nonverbally, so look at the WAY that each of you interacted with one another more than what was actually said. How did the way that you each communicated to each other reflect your feelings for one another at that time and in overall? 4. In your opinion, which elements of the transactional communication model have the biggest impact on the communication process? Why? 5. Which elements of the transactional communication model had the biggest impact on this interaction? Why? (Did the nature of the relationship allow you to communicate without words? Did the immediate context cause difficulties for either party? Etc.) Writing and Formatting: Deduction of up to 10 points Your critical exercise should be formatted as described here and in the syllabus, be 4-6 pages in length, identify and follow a particular style format (MLA, APA, etc.), and be free of organizational, grammatical, spelling, and punctuation errors. 5

6 Media Example This exercise is designed to help you and your peers better comprehend the various interpersonal communication concepts that we will be discussing this semester, and have some fun doing it. The goals of this assignment are: To help you become an expert in an interpersonal communication concept To let you learn how you learn best and share your unique approach with us To help you study for the exams (strong test questions are likely to be used on the exams) To allow you to engage in scholarly discussion with you colleagues To show you that your voice and unique insights are valuable to the community Once during the semester, each of you will be asked to teach a section from the textbook to the class. Within this section, you will need to choose one concept to teach in greater detail using a media artifact to illustrate your point. A media artifact is a song, film clip, advertisement, work of art, or anything that has been captured to a medium to be shared with others. You can create your own artifact if you like, or use an artifact to teach the opposite of the concept you re focusing on just be sure to explain that in your presentation! Your presentation should last roughly minutes, give or take, so please avoid summarizing everything discussed in your section. Instead, highlight and focus on the most important information for us. You can present your information in any manner you choose. Past students have used PowerPoint and included their media artifact within it, while others have taken us to a website to show us the artifact or used the DVD player to show a film clip. Whichever approach you use, make sure that your materials are loaded on the computer, if necessary, and ready to go before class starts. In addition to teaching us about your section and showing us an artifact to illustrate it, you will also need to write a test question and share it with all of us. It s easiest to do this electronically (either with PowerPoint or a document that you project in the front of the room). Excellent questions will likely be used on course exams. You will present your Media Example at the beginning of the class meeting when your section comes up in the reading (chapter due dates are listed on the syllabus). To help you with your presentation, I recommend that you print up your notes (or your slides) so that you can rely on them, rather than on the projection or computer screen. Delivery accounts for a small part of your score. To pick a section to focus on, I suggest that you start by identifying some media artifacts that appeal to you for one reason or another, and then determine if there s any interpersonal communication (IC) going on within them. Because IC is everywhere, if you keep an open mind, I am sure you ll find something interesting to work with. Once you do, you can reserve that particular section to teach the week that we are reading about it. You will need to reserve your section by editing the sign-up sheet in Blackboard (the sign-up sheet is an editable wiki) by the date state on the syllabus. Requirements of the Media Example Presentation A. An Explanation of the Chapter Section 1. Identify the section 2. Thoroughly explain your section and use your own words as much as possible (if you are using PowerPoint, don t put too much text on each slide 6 lines should be the maximum) 3. Provide your own examples to help explain the section and/or do a little extra research (basically, your explanation needs to go beyond restating what s in the textbook) B. A Media Artifact or Text (I suggest you do this in the following order) 4. Introduce the media artifact itself and briefly explain how it demonstrates at least one concept from your section 5. Share the media artifact. If you wish to use a song, it s helpful if you include the lyrics as well as playing the song. 6. Provide a slide (if using PowerPoint) to help you explain, in detail, how the media artifact speaks to or demonstrates the concept(s) by referring to specific instances in the artifact itself (exact moments/lyrics/parts of the artifact). 6

7 The media example should clearly and effectively illustrate the concept don t assume we see the connections, make them for us. Many students overlook this! C. A Multiple-Choice Test Question 7. Provide a test question that is both challenging and well planned out. 8. Provide five answer choices, A-E 9. Provide the correct answer 10. Explain why this answer is correct or better than the others D. Delivery 11. Your delivery is effective and engaging don t worry, this is a minor part of your overall grade E. Optional: Post Media Example Document/File to Blackboard (5 points XC) Attach your document/file as an attachment to a new thread in Blackboard in Media Example Forum. The title of your thread should include your chapter first, then the name of the section you are covering. NOTE: Some of this presentation may seem redundant to you or that you are restating the obvious. While sometimes this may be the case, it is better to err on the side of being clear and giving us too much information than not enough. When it comes to explaining your media artifact, you should briefly tell your audience about what we are going to see or hear, share the artifact with us, and then explain it to us clearly, using references to the concept and the artifact itself. It may sound ridiculous to do this, but it works. With time, you ll get to where you can do this in a way that does not feel so obvious or repetitive. 7

8 Important Notes and Tips: Students who produced a Media Example before Chapter 9 may also produce and present a second Media Example in Round 2. Round 2 is for those who either wish to produce a second media example to replace their original scores OR for those who earned a 90 or higher in Round 1, they can earn up to 25 points extra credit. Be sure to make a note of what section and what chapter you are going to be covering so you have your work completed by the due date. If you miss your presentation, you may not be able to do a make-up (and if you are, your score will be penalized by 50%). Before selecting the one section you will produce a Media Example presentation for, begin by identifying a few concepts that appeal to you and skim the title of each section of the textbook. Once you ve identified a section you wish to focus on, please log into Blackboard and write your name next to the section that you will be covering. In your presentation, remember that you do not need to go into detail about every aspect discussed in your section, but you should demonstrate a clear understanding of the most important elements of your section. A student describes it this way: The point of the media example is to choose a song or clip from a movie/show/commercial etc., that shows an example of what it is you are teaching the class about. For example, if your section talks about the different kinds of listening styles, a good media example is in a scene where three people are having a conversation and one of them is thinking about something else and only tuning in when they hear their name. It shows that they are being a selective listener and a psuedo-listener. That shows the class the types of listening styles in an acted out clip. Instead of the students trying to visualize what you are saying, they can actually see it happening in your example. It s like having to write a song or act out a movie using what you learned in your section, although you can use what someone else created instead. Past students have committed these two common mistakes, so watch out for them: o o They don't provide a detailed breakdown of how the media artifact they chose speaks to the concept OR they don't introduce it so that we know what to look for. Make sure that you do both of these things (as in writing, tell us what you're going to tell us, tell us/show us, then tell us what you told us). They don't label the new thread as the name of the section they are covering. This is important so that if you want to review a section or have a question about one from a particular chapter, it's much easier to find. Media Example Concepts Please sign up for the concept of your choice using the wiki on Blackboard. Round 1 Chapter 4: Experiencing and Expressing Emotions 1. The Nature of Emotion: 2. Forces Shaping Emotion: 3. Managing Your Emotional Experience and Expression: 4. Emotional Challenges: Chapter 5: Listening Actively 1. Listening: A Five Step Process: 2. The Five Functions of Listening: 3. Understanding Listening Styles: 4. Preventing Ineffective Listening: Chapter 6: Communicating Verbally 8

9 1. Characteristics of Verbal Communication: 2. Functions of Verbal Communication: 3. Cooperative Verbal Communication: 4. Barriers to Cooperative Verbal Communication: Chapter 7: Communicating Nonverbally 1. Principles of Nonverbal Communication: 2. Nonverbal Communication Codes, Part 1 (Body Movements, Voice, Touch, and Personal Space): 3. Nonverbal Communication Codes, Part 2 (Time, Physical Appearance, Objects, the Environment): 4. Functions of Nonverbal Communication: Chapter 8: Developing Interpersonal Competence 1. What is Interpersonal Communication Competence?: 2. Improving Interpersonal Competence: 3. Improving Your Competence Online: 4. Improving Your Intercultural Competence: 5. Preventing Interpersonal Incompetence: Chapter 9: Managing Conflict and Power 1. Conflict and Interpersonal Communication: 2. Power and Conflict: 3. Handling Conflict: 4. Conflict Resolutions and Outcomes: Chapter 10: Relationships with Romantic Partners 1. Defining Romantic Relationships: 2. Romantic Attraction: 3. Relationship Development and Deterioration: 4. Maintaining Romantic Relationships: 5. The Dark Side of Romantic Relationships: Round 2 (Round 2 is for those who wish to produce a second media example to replace their original scores OR for those who earned a 90 or higher in Round 1, who wish to earn up to 25 points extra credit.) Chapter 11: Relationships with Family and Friends 1. Defining Family: 2. Maintaining Family Relationships: 3. Defining Friendship: 4. Maintaining Friendship Relationships: Chapter 12: Relationships in the Workplace 1. Defining Workplace Relationships: 9

Communication Skills for Healthy Relationships

Communication Skills for Healthy Relationships A WorkLife4You Guide Communication Skills for Healthy Relationships Communication is vital in creating and maintaining a relationship, whether it be an intimate relationship such as with a partner, child,

More information

LaGuardia Community College Department of Human Resources CUSTOMER SERVICE COMMUNICATION SKILLS INTERPERSONAL SKILLS E-MAIL & TELEPHONE TECHNIQUES

LaGuardia Community College Department of Human Resources CUSTOMER SERVICE COMMUNICATION SKILLS INTERPERSONAL SKILLS E-MAIL & TELEPHONE TECHNIQUES LaGuardia Community College Department of Human Resources CUSTOMER SERVICE COMMUNICATION SKILLS INTERPERSONAL SKILLS E-MAIL & TELEPHONE TECHNIQUES 1 This Workshop Provides Strategies to: Deliver quality

More information

County of Yuba Customer Service Examination Study Guide

County of Yuba Customer Service Examination Study Guide County of Yuba Customer Service Examination Study Guide The following study guide will familiarize and assist you with preparing for a written examination containing multiple-choice customer service items.

More information

OTTAWA ONLINE COM 30163 Interpersonal Communication

OTTAWA ONLINE COM 30163 Interpersonal Communication Course Description OTTAWA ONLINE COM 30163 Interpersonal Communication Examines models of relational interaction, verbal and nonverbal messages, language use, critical listening, relational dynamics, self-concept,

More information

Basics of Reflective Essay Writing

Basics of Reflective Essay Writing Basics of Reflective Essay Writing Writing the Reflective Essays The three parts of this document reviews a year s worth of writing skills. Read everything very carefully and make sure to email me with

More information

DESCRIBING OUR COMPETENCIES. new thinking at work

DESCRIBING OUR COMPETENCIES. new thinking at work DESCRIBING OUR COMPETENCIES new thinking at work OUR COMPETENCIES - AT A GLANCE 2 PERSONAL EFFECTIVENESS Influencing Communicating Self-development Decision-making PROVIDING EXCELLENT CUSTOMER SERVICE

More information

Steps for Planning and Preparing an Effective Presentation

Steps for Planning and Preparing an Effective Presentation Steps for Planning and Preparing an Effective Presentation According to speaking consultant Lilyan Wilder (1999), two of the greatest myths about delivering oral presentations are that you re better off

More information

The Good Roommate Guide

The Good Roommate Guide The Good Roommate Guide Contents: p. 2 COMMUNICATING WITH YOUR ROOMMATE 101 p. 3 IDENTIFYING COMMUNICATION STYLES p. 4 TOP 10 TIPS FOR HEALTHY RELATIONSHIP p. 5 10 EFFECTIVE WAYS TO HANDLE CONFLICT p.

More information

Tips for Effective Online Composition and Communication with Dr. Gary Burkholder

Tips for Effective Online Composition and Communication with Dr. Gary Burkholder Transcript Tips for Effective Online Composition and Communication with Dr. Gary Burkholder [ MUSIC ] HI, I WANT TO DISCUSS FOR YOU TODAY TIPS FOR EFFECTIVE ONLINE COMPOSITION AND COMMUNICATION. AS WALDEN

More information

Speech 120: Human Communication Spring 2015 Tentative Course Syllabus and Schedule

Speech 120: Human Communication Spring 2015 Tentative Course Syllabus and Schedule Speech 120: Human Communication Spring 2015 Tentative Course Syllabus and Schedule Instructor: Dewi Hokett Email: dhokett@palomar.edu Phone: 760-744-1150 x2794 Office: H 201 P Office Hours: Tue / Thurs.:

More information

Guidelines on Seminar Presentations

Guidelines on Seminar Presentations Guidelines on Seminar Presentations Your main goal in presenting this seminar is to communicate your topic to an audience of mixed backgrounds and interests. This should not be a technical paper such as

More information

EMPLOYEE JOB IMPROVEMENT PLANS. This Employee Job Improvement Plan designed by Kielley Management Consultants achieves results because:

EMPLOYEE JOB IMPROVEMENT PLANS. This Employee Job Improvement Plan designed by Kielley Management Consultants achieves results because: EMPLOYEE JOB IMPROVEMENT PLANS This Employee Job Improvement Plan designed by Kielley Management Consultants achieves results because: it is simple and understandable it keeps supervisors and employees

More information

Chapter Four: How to Collaborate and Write With Others

Chapter Four: How to Collaborate and Write With Others Chapter Four: How to Collaborate and Write With Others Why Collaborate on Writing? Considering (and Balancing) the Two Extremes of Collaboration Peer Review as Collaboration * A sample recipe for how peer

More information

PREPARATION GUIDE FOR WRITTEN TESTS

PREPARATION GUIDE FOR WRITTEN TESTS PREPARATION GUIDE FOR WRITTEN TESTS Prepared by: The Department of Administrative Services Human Resources Management August 2004 GENERAL INFORMATION ON WRITTEN TESTS Two types of questions are often used

More information

Keep Your Focus on the Meaning

Keep Your Focus on the Meaning Active Reading Before you can write well, you must read well. 1. strategies for active reading 2. stages of active reading 3. writing a critique Passive Reading: reading done without an active, critical

More information

How to Study Mathematics Written by Paul Dawkins

How to Study Mathematics Written by Paul Dawkins How to Study Mathematics Written by Paul Dawkins Before I get into the tips for how to study math let me first say that everyone studies differently and there is no one right way to study for a math class.

More information

CLASS PARTICIPATION: MORE THAN JUST RAISING YOUR HAND

CLASS PARTICIPATION: MORE THAN JUST RAISING YOUR HAND STUDENT LEARNING SUPPORT TUTORIAL PRODUCED BY THE CENTER FOR TEACHING AND FACULTY DEVELOPMENT CLASS PARTICIPATION: MORE THAN JUST RAISING YOUR HAND CHAPTER 1: LEARNING THROUGH CLASS PARTICIPATION CLASS

More information

Providing Quality Customer Service

Providing Quality Customer Service Providing Quality Customer Service What is Customer Service? For all school district employees to provide the best customer service possible, we must first understand customer service. There are many acceptable

More information

Learning From Lectures:

Learning From Lectures: Learning From Lectures: A Guide to University Learning Learning Services University of Guelph Table of Contents Student Guide:... 3 University Lectures... 3 Preparing for Lectures... 4 Laptop Pros & Cons...

More information

Overexposed: Sexting and Relationships & Private Today, Public Tomorrow Grades 9-12

Overexposed: Sexting and Relationships & Private Today, Public Tomorrow Grades 9-12 Overexposed: Sexting and Relationships & Private Today, Public Tomorrow Grades 9-12 Essential Question: What are the risks and responsibilities when you share online in a relationship? How can you respect

More information

BUSINESS WRITING: LETTERS, E-MAILS, REPORTS, CASES, AND PRESENTATIONS

BUSINESS WRITING: LETTERS, E-MAILS, REPORTS, CASES, AND PRESENTATIONS BUSINESS WRITING: LETTERS, E-MAILS, REPORTS, CASES, AND PRESENTATIONS WHY IS EXCELLENT PROFESSIONAL WRITING SO IMPORTANT TO YOU? Hiring a new employee is expensive, and companies often evaluate their recruiters

More information

The College Experience COL 101 3 Hours Credit

The College Experience COL 101 3 Hours Credit The College Experience COL 101 3 Hours Credit Course Information Course Description: In this course, we will study the best practices for success in college and learning on line by using technology smartly,

More information

Table of Contents Page Introduction... 3 Key Feedback Principles... 4 Types of Feedback... 5

Table of Contents Page Introduction... 3 Key Feedback Principles... 4 Types of Feedback... 5 P r o v i d i n g q u a l i t y f e e d b a c k a g o o d p r a c t i c e g u i d e Table of Contents Page Introduction... 3 Key Feedback Principles... 4 Types of Feedback... 5 Positive Feedback... 5 Developmental

More information

ONTARIO NURSES ASSOCIATION. The Mentor Toolkit. Updated March 2013

ONTARIO NURSES ASSOCIATION. The Mentor Toolkit. Updated March 2013 ONTARIO NURSES ASSOCIATION The Mentor Toolkit Updated ONA is the union representing 60,000 registered nurses and allied health professionals and more than 14,000 nursing students providing care in hospitals,

More information

FACULTY PEER ONLINE CLASSROOM OBSERVATIONS AA

FACULTY PEER ONLINE CLASSROOM OBSERVATIONS AA Philosophy Online class observations are meant to facilitate an instructor s professional growth. They will be used to create an opportunity for reflection and stimulate ideas for improvement in the online

More information

Performance Management

Performance Management Performance Management WORKSHOP HANDOUTS Facilitated by: Tara Kemes, Vantage Point Knowledge Philanthropist June 2013 Page 1 of 16 Handout 1 Performance Management System Overview What is performance management?

More information

HUMAN RESOURSES COLLEGE OF EDUCATION AND HUMAN ECOLOGY. Manager's Guide to Mid-Year Performance Management

HUMAN RESOURSES COLLEGE OF EDUCATION AND HUMAN ECOLOGY. Manager's Guide to Mid-Year Performance Management HUMAN RESOURSES COLLEGE OF EDUCATION AND HUMAN ECOLOGY Manager's Guide to Mid-Year Performance Management Table of Contents Mid-year Performance Reviews... 3 Plan the performance appraisal meeting... 3

More information

Prepared Public Speaking

Prepared Public Speaking Prepared Public Speaking Purpose: The purpose of the Prepared Public Speaking CDE is to allow students to develop a speech pertaining to a topic in agriculture. It aims to provide the opportunity for personal

More information

Advice for Recommenders: How to write an effective Letter of Recommendation for applicants to the Stanford MBA Program

Advice for Recommenders: How to write an effective Letter of Recommendation for applicants to the Stanford MBA Program Advice for Recommenders: How to write an effective Letter of Recommendation for applicants to the Stanford MBA Program -- Edited Transcript of Interview updated 27 July 2011 What are some of your responsibilities

More information

GUIDE TO PATIENT COUNSELLING

GUIDE TO PATIENT COUNSELLING Guide To Patient Counselling page - 1 - GUIDE TO PATIENT COUNSELLING Communication is the transfer of information meaningful to those involved. It is the process in which messages are generated and sent

More information

University of Toronto TEFL Online

University of Toronto TEFL Online University of Toronto TEFL Online 403 (v41) Reflection Journal Submission - Unit 4 Name: RAHEEL KHAN Score: 100% Passmark: 100% Attempted: Tuesday, February 11, 2014 Attempt Number: 3 Time Taken: 00:09:51

More information

Shoreline Community College elearning Best Practice Guidelines

Shoreline Community College elearning Best Practice Guidelines Shoreline Community College elearning Best Practice Guidelines This document provides recommended guidelines to help improve user experience for any elearning course. Recommendations are based on usability

More information

Learning to Delegate

Learning to Delegate Learning to Delegate Overview Tips for managers on how to delegate Why is delegation necessary? Why do many managers have a hard time delegating? What to delegate What not to delegate How to delegate Give

More information

Verbal Communication II

Verbal Communication II Verbal Communication II Course Health Science Unit II Communication Essential Question How does the communication process affect health care delivery? TEKS 130.204 (c) 2A, 2B, 3B, 3C Prior Student Learning

More information

Course Syllabus for MUSI 1306 Section 047 Music Appreciation 2010 Fall Standard Semester

Course Syllabus for MUSI 1306 Section 047 Music Appreciation 2010 Fall Standard Semester ADMINISTRATIVE MENU HOME LOG IN Course Syllabus for MUSI 1306 Section 047 Music Appreciation 2010 Fall Standard Semester Note to Students: Syllabi are the most recent available at the time they were posted

More information

Quick Guide. Oral presentations. Four-step guide to preparing oral presentations. What is in this guide. Step 1: Plan

Quick Guide. Oral presentations. Four-step guide to preparing oral presentations. What is in this guide. Step 1: Plan Oral presentations What is in this guide Four-step guide to preparing oral presentations Step 1: Plan Step 2: Prepare Step 3: Practise Step 4: Present Reflecting on the presentation Oral presentations

More information

PE TIP SHEET NO. 11: Tips for Effective Public Speaking

PE TIP SHEET NO. 11: Tips for Effective Public Speaking Last month s Tip Sheet No. 10 provided information on forming and utilizing a speakers bureau. Now somebody s got to get out there and deliver an insightful, stimulating and captivating speech. Yikes --

More information

Unleashing your power through effective 360 feedback 1

Unleashing your power through effective 360 feedback 1 Consulting with organizations that are committed to being an employer of choice. Unleashing your power through effective 360 feedback 1 What is feedback? Feedback is input from others. It reflects the

More information

Social Security Disability Resources For Self Advocacy

Social Security Disability Resources For Self Advocacy Social Security Disability Resources For Self Advocacy Introduction This guide is intended to help people with multiple sclerosis (MS) advocate effectively to obtain the Social Security Disability Insurance

More information

MINNESOTA STATE UNIVERSITY, MANKATO Department of Speech Communication Mankato, MN 56001

MINNESOTA STATE UNIVERSITY, MANKATO Department of Speech Communication Mankato, MN 56001 MINNESOTA STATE UNIVERSITY, MANKATO Department of Speech Communication Mankato, MN 56001 1 COURSE SYLLABUS SPEE 101: Interpersonal Communication Course ID: 005064 Section: 03 Instructor: Rachel Anderson

More information

SI Coordinator Handbook. Information, Resources and Forms

SI Coordinator Handbook. Information, Resources and Forms SI Coordinator Handbook Information, Resources and Forms Updated November 2010 1 2 Table of Contents SI Coordinator Job Description... 5 Observations and Evaluations... 9 Initial Contacts... 10 Informal

More information

Customer Service: Creating a Solid Foundation

Customer Service: Creating a Solid Foundation Customer Service: Creating a Solid Foundation Brought to you by: Comprehensive Public Training Program (CPTP) As administered by Louisiana State Civil Service 1 Table of Contents Why is Customer Service

More information

Guide to Effective Staff Performance Evaluations

Guide to Effective Staff Performance Evaluations Guide to Effective Staff Performance Evaluations Compiled by Human Resources Siemens Hall, Room 211 The research is clear. The outcome is consistent. We know with certainty that the most powerful leadership

More information

COM 2733 Introduction to Communication Technologies. Course Materials Handbook. (Summer 2005) Prepared by. H. Paul LeBlanc III.

COM 2733 Introduction to Communication Technologies. Course Materials Handbook. (Summer 2005) Prepared by. H. Paul LeBlanc III. COM 2733 Introduction to Communication Technologies Course Materials Handbook (Summer 2005) Prepared by H. Paul III for The University of Texas at San Antonio Department of Communication Copyright 2005,

More information

Speech Communications Online SPC 2608

Speech Communications Online SPC 2608 Speech Communications Online SPC 2608 Instructor: Terri Moore Telephone: 321-433-5536 E-mail: mooret@brevardcc.edu Office: 1/220 - O This is a 3 credit hour online course in the Fundamentals of Speech

More information

ASSERTIVENESS TRAINING: HOW TO BECOME MORE ASSERTIVE IN ORDER TO MAXIMIZE THE CHANCE OF GETTING WHAT YOU WANT

ASSERTIVENESS TRAINING: HOW TO BECOME MORE ASSERTIVE IN ORDER TO MAXIMIZE THE CHANCE OF GETTING WHAT YOU WANT ASSERTIVENESS TRAINING: HOW TO BECOME MORE ASSERTIVE IN ORDER TO MAXIMIZE THE CHANCE OF GETTING WHAT YOU WANT WHAT IS ASSERTIVENESS? There are three basic interpersonal styles that we can use when interacting

More information

SHARPEN YOUR NOTE -TAKING

SHARPEN YOUR NOTE -TAKING SHARPEN YOUR NOTE -TAKING SKILLS Mayland Community College SOAR Program 1996 Note-taking is a three part process of OBSERVING, RECORDING, AND REVIEWING. First you observe an event (teacher lecturing or

More information

Reflective Writing. How do you write reflectively? Stages of reflective thinking

Reflective Writing. How do you write reflectively? Stages of reflective thinking Reflective Writing Reflective Writing There are a variety of reasons you might need to write reflectively. When you apply for jobs, undertake self-evaluation at work or whilst studying, or when writing

More information

Giving Good Presentations. Goals of a Presentation. Importance of the Skill

Giving Good Presentations. Goals of a Presentation. Importance of the Skill Giving Good Presentations Jonathan I Maletic, Ph.D. Department of Computer Science Kent State University Goals of a Presentation Why are you presenting? To communicate some idea, concept, or method to

More information

GUIDE TO EFFECTIVE STAFF PERFORMANCE EVALUATIONS

GUIDE TO EFFECTIVE STAFF PERFORMANCE EVALUATIONS GUIDE TO EFFECTIVE STAFF PERFORMANCE EVALUATIONS The research is clear. The outcome is consistent. We know with certainty that the most powerful leadership tool for improving productivity and increasing

More information

Oral Communication in Workplace

Oral Communication in Workplace UNITAR Fellowship Program for Afghanistan 2011 Cycle Orientation Workshop Oral Communication in Workplace Ahmad Fawad Akbari & Yama Shams UNITAR Afghan Resource Persons 15 May 2011 Kabul Introduction to

More information

National Health Education Standards and Performance Indicators. Interpersonal Communication [4.12.1; 4.12.2; 4.12.3] Self Management [7.12.2; 7.12.

National Health Education Standards and Performance Indicators. Interpersonal Communication [4.12.1; 4.12.2; 4.12.3] Self Management [7.12.2; 7.12. LESSON 8 Interpersonal Communication and Self Management Student Learning Objectives Identify how interpersonal communication and self management are needed for healthy living. Expand on the definition

More information

EFFECTIVE ARMY BRIEFING

EFFECTIVE ARMY BRIEFING Personal Development Track Section 1 EFFECTIVE ARMY BRIEFING Key Points 1 The Four Types of Army Briefings 2 The Information Briefing 3 Four Steps to Effective Briefings e Men who can command words to

More information

Making the Most of Your Performance Appraisal. Say the words performance appraisal and you get any number of reactions. For some,

Making the Most of Your Performance Appraisal. Say the words performance appraisal and you get any number of reactions. For some, Making the Most of Your Performance Appraisal Say the words performance appraisal and you get any number of reactions. For some, the performance management process, which includes completion of the annual

More information

Onboarding and Engaging New Employees

Onboarding and Engaging New Employees Onboarding and Engaging New Employees Onboarding is the process of helping new employees become full contributors to the institution. During onboarding, new employees evolve from institutional outsiders

More information

Communication 170: Semester Interpersonal Communication Classroom: meeting day and time Stephen F. Austin State University

Communication 170: Semester Interpersonal Communication Classroom: meeting day and time Stephen F. Austin State University Communication 170: Semester Interpersonal Communication Classroom: meeting day and time Stephen F. Austin State University Instructor: Office: Phone: Office Hours: Department: Appointments: Languages,

More information

Virginia English Standards of Learning Grade 8

Virginia English Standards of Learning Grade 8 A Correlation of Prentice Hall Writing Coach 2012 To the Virginia English Standards of Learning A Correlation of, 2012, Introduction This document demonstrates how, 2012, meets the objectives of the. Correlation

More information

Introduction to Intercultural Communication 1.1. The Scope of Intercultural Communication

Introduction to Intercultural Communication 1.1. The Scope of Intercultural Communication 1 An Introduction to Intercultural Communication 1.1 The Scope of Intercultural Communication Sometimes intercultural conversations go very smoothly and are extremely intriguing; think of a walk at sunset

More information

Presented by: Heather J. Donnelly HDI Certified Instructor. Telephone Skills

Presented by: Heather J. Donnelly HDI Certified Instructor. Telephone Skills Presented by: Heather J. Donnelly HDI Certified Instructor Telephone Skills Objectives Recall the key principles for dealing with an irate caller Apply specific techniques effective in providing excellent

More information

Shared Solutions: An Overview Special Education Policy and Programs Branch Ministry of Education

Shared Solutions: An Overview Special Education Policy and Programs Branch Ministry of Education Shared Solutions: An Overview Special Education Policy and Programs Branch Ministry of Education Table of Contents 1. Shared Solutions: Overview 2. Understanding Conflict 3. Preventing Conflicts 4. Video:

More information

Dates count as one word. For example, December 2, 1935 would all count as one word.

Dates count as one word. For example, December 2, 1935 would all count as one word. What is an exhibit? An exhibit is a visual representation of your research and interpretation of your topic's significance in history. Your exhibit will look a lot like a small version of an exhibit you

More information

Student Evaluation of Teaching - Form SRT Form - Official End-of-Semester Evaluation of Teaching

Student Evaluation of Teaching - Form SRT Form - Official End-of-Semester Evaluation of Teaching University of Minnesota NSCI 4100 001 Fall 2012 01/10/2013 Number of questionnaires = 17 Page 1 of 2 Dr. McLoon was one of the best instructors I have ever had. He presented difficult material in an interesting

More information

BEST PRACTICE IN ENTREPRISE SOCIAL NETWORKING - 2013

BEST PRACTICE IN ENTREPRISE SOCIAL NETWORKING - 2013 BEST PRACTICE IN ENTREPRISE SOCIAL NETWORKING - 2013 BY WITH 0 ZYNCRO 2013. All right reserved CONTENU - 1/ GUIDELINES FOR USING ENTERPRISE SOCIAL NETWORKS - P.02 2/ HOW AND WHEN TO USE ENTERPRISE SOCIAL

More information

Consultancy Protocol Overview

Consultancy Protocol Overview Harmony Education Center National School Reform Faculty www.nsrfharmony.org Consultancy Protocol Overview The Consultancy Protocol was developed by Gene Thompson-Grove as part of the Coalition of Essential

More information

Effective Study Skills. Dr. Bob Kizlik. How to Study and Make the Most of Your Time

Effective Study Skills. Dr. Bob Kizlik. How to Study and Make the Most of Your Time Effective Study Skills Dr. Bob Kizlik How to Study and Make the Most of Your Time There is little doubt that no two people study the same way, and it is a near certainty that what works for one person

More information

COMPETENT COMMUNICATION MANUAL (NEW)

COMPETENT COMMUNICATION MANUAL (NEW) Project #1: THE ICE BREAKER Executive Summary: For your first speech project, you will introduce yourself to your fellow club members and give them some information about your background, interests and

More information

Sales Coaching Achieves Superior Sales Results

Sales Coaching Achieves Superior Sales Results Sales Coaching Achieves Superior Sales Results By Stu Schlackman Sales Coaching Achieves Superior Sales Results Why Sales Coaching? As a sales leader your days go by quickly. You are constantly multi-tasking,

More information

As tutors, we are responsible for improving the skills of our peers.

As tutors, we are responsible for improving the skills of our peers. Tutor s Creed As tutors, we are responsible for improving the skills of our peers. As tutors, we will consider the body of work presented at the session in the following manner: First, we will impart to

More information

Lesson: Editing Guidelines and Response Writing: Essay Exam (Part 1)

Lesson: Editing Guidelines and Response Writing: Essay Exam (Part 1) Put That In Writing - Level Two 113 UNIT 9 Lesson: Editing Guidelines and Response Writing: Essay Exam (Part 1) 9.1 Learning Objectives A. To know the guidelines for editing an essay. B. To edit and improve

More information

Top 5 best practices for creating effective dashboards. and the 7 mistakes you don t want to make

Top 5 best practices for creating effective dashboards. and the 7 mistakes you don t want to make Top 5 best practices for creating effective dashboards and the 7 mistakes you don t want to make p2 Financial services professionals are buried in data that measure and track: relationships and processes,

More information

A Guide To Understanding Your 360- Degree Feedback Results

A Guide To Understanding Your 360- Degree Feedback Results A Guide To Understanding Your 360- Degree Feedback Results 1 Table of Contents INTRODUCTION CORE BELIEFS... 1 PART ONE: UNDERSTANDING YOUR FEEDBACK... 2 360 Degree Feedback... 2 Evaluate Your Effectiveness...

More information

Middlesex Community College Spring 2015

Middlesex Community College Spring 2015 Middlesex Community College Spring 2015 ENG 101: Composition # 1182 Online Course Semester Begins: 1/21/15 Instructor: Professer Joan Donati Contact Information 3 credit hours Email: Use Blackboard email

More information

COM207: CREATIVE WRITING: FICTION SYLLABUS LECTURE HOURS/CREDITS: 3/3

COM207: CREATIVE WRITING: FICTION SYLLABUS LECTURE HOURS/CREDITS: 3/3 COM207: CREATIVE WRITING: FICTION SYLLABUS LECTURE HOURS/CREDITS: 3/3 CATALOG DESCRIPTION Prerequisite: ENG101 English Composition I Students study a variety of short fiction for story structure and write

More information

HOW TO CHANGE NEGATIVE THINKING

HOW TO CHANGE NEGATIVE THINKING HOW TO CHANGE NEGATIVE THINKING For there is nothing either good or bad, but thinking makes it so. William Shakespeare, Hamlet, Act 2, Scene 2, 239 251. Although you may not be fully aware of it, our minds

More information

Mental Health Role Plays

Mental Health Role Plays Mental Health Role Plays Goals: To discuss various mental health issues and mental illnesses. To discuss stigma, support and treatment options surrounding mental health issues and mental illnesses. Requirements:

More information

Module 9. Building Communication Skills

Module 9. Building Communication Skills Module 9 Building Communication Skills Essential Ideas to Convey To apply a facilitative approach to supervision, supervisors have to approach the people they manage in a different way, by using certain

More information

Section 11. Giving and Receiving Feedback

Section 11. Giving and Receiving Feedback Section 11 Giving and Receiving Feedback Introduction This section is about describing what is meant by feedback and will focus on situations where you will be given, and where you will give, feedback.

More information

Psychic Guide 101 Written by: Jennifer A. Young www.bestonlinepsychics.net

Psychic Guide 101 Written by: Jennifer A. Young www.bestonlinepsychics.net Written by: Jennifer A. Young www.bestonlinepsychics.net Page 1 Table of Contents Chapter Title Page 01 Consulting a Psychic 03 02 Why Should You Consult a Psychic? 04 03 What Is a Psychic? 05 04 Choosing

More information

Create Your Own Business Project

Create Your Own Business Project Create Your Own Business Project Assignment 1: Business Proposal (24 pts.) Write a business proposal in unbound report format. It must be a minimum of one page. It must contain all of the information listed

More information

Negotiation and Refusal Skills Lesson 6

Negotiation and Refusal Skills Lesson 6 Negotiation and Refusal Skills Lesson 6 Synopsis Students reflect on their first volunteer project visit. Negotiation and refusal skills are introduced and demonstrated through role plays. Students then

More information

REPUTATION MANAGEMENT SURVIVAL GUIDE. A BEGINNER S GUIDE for managing your online reputation to promote your local business.

REPUTATION MANAGEMENT SURVIVAL GUIDE. A BEGINNER S GUIDE for managing your online reputation to promote your local business. REPUTATION MANAGEMENT SURVIVAL GUIDE A BEGINNER S GUIDE for managing your online reputation to promote your local business. About Main Street Hub: Main Street Hub is the voice for more local businesses

More information

Insight Guide. E-Learning Compliance. www.kineo.com

Insight Guide. E-Learning Compliance. www.kineo.com Insight Guide E-Learning Compliance LAST MENU BACK NEXT Insight Guide Overview The challenges of compliance training Questions to ask before you begin your design 20 minutes A new generation of design

More information

Interpersonal Communication Skills Inventory

Interpersonal Communication Skills Inventory Purpose This Interpersonal Communication is designed to provide individuals with some insights into their communication strengths and potential areas for development. By answering each question candidly,

More information

Teaching Public Speaking Online

Teaching Public Speaking Online Teaching Public Speaking Online By Tim Sheldon Bryant & Stratton College January 27, 2009 I teach public speaking Online using PowerPoint audio, and it has proven to be as effective in developing speaking

More information

Difficult Conversations: How to Discuss What Matters Most

Difficult Conversations: How to Discuss What Matters Most Difficult Conversations: How to Discuss What Matters Most A High-Level Summary of the Book by Stone, Patton and Heen Office of Human Resources The Ohio State University 1590 N. High St. Suite 300 Columbus,

More information

The 7 Biggest Mistakes You Can Make in Web Conferences Gihan Perera

The 7 Biggest Mistakes You Can Make in Web Conferences Gihan Perera The 7 Biggest Mistakes You Can Make in Web Conferences Gihan Perera Sponsored by The 7 Biggest Mistakes You Can Make in Web Conferences There s a growing need for organizations to engage in online calls

More information

PROBATION AND PAROLE OFFICER I STUDY GUIDE/SAMPLE TEST

PROBATION AND PAROLE OFFICER I STUDY GUIDE/SAMPLE TEST PROBATION AND PAROLE OFFICER I STUDY GUIDE/SAMPLE TEST Probation and Parole Officer I Meeting the job requirements for Probation and Parole Officer (see job announcement) and passing the examination are

More information

Introduction to General Psychology Spring 2014 PSY 1101-03, 30013 Mon. & Wed.: 6-7:15

Introduction to General Psychology Spring 2014 PSY 1101-03, 30013 Mon. & Wed.: 6-7:15 Introduction to General Psychology Spring 2014 PSY 1101-03, 30013 Mon. & Wed.: 6-7:15 Instructor: Jen Wallin-Ruschman Office Hours in Bowen 216: Mon., Wed., & Fri. 1-2; Mon. & Wed. 3:15-5; Tues. & Thur.

More information

Division of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies Comprehensive Examination Policy and Procedure Statement Ed.D. Program

Division of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies Comprehensive Examination Policy and Procedure Statement Ed.D. Program Division of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies Comprehensive Examination Policy and Procedure Statement Ed.D. Program Purpose The purpose of the comprehensive exam is to provide the doctoral candidate

More information

Writing Guide for Five Paragraph Essays. Grace-St. Luke s Episcopal School

Writing Guide for Five Paragraph Essays. Grace-St. Luke s Episcopal School 1 Writing Guide for Five Paragraph Essays Grace-St. Luke s Episcopal School 2 Five Paragraph Essays Every five paragraph essay has one thing in common five paragraphs. What a revelation! Even writing them

More information

Free: John Tschohl Customer Service Strategic E- mail Newsletter at www.customer- service.com

Free: John Tschohl Customer Service Strategic E- mail Newsletter at www.customer- service.com MMXII by 9201 East Bloomington Freeway Minneapolis, MN 55420 USA (952) 884-3311 (800) 548-0538 (952) 884-8901 Fax quality@servicequality.com www.customer- service.com www.johntschohl.com Free: John Tschohl

More information

Julie Sexeny and Christine Dinkins, Wofford College AAC&U Conference, Portland, 2014. Requirements for reading responses

Julie Sexeny and Christine Dinkins, Wofford College AAC&U Conference, Portland, 2014. Requirements for reading responses Requirements for reading responses Online answers are due by 9:00 a.m. on the assigned class day. In-person answers are due at class time. Requirement: Answer all of the questions briefly but thoroughly.

More information

PERSONAL COMPETENCIES DICTIONARY. Attention to Detail

PERSONAL COMPETENCIES DICTIONARY. Attention to Detail Attention to Detail Achieves thoroughness and accuracy when accomplishing a task through concern for all the areas involved. Provides accurate, consistent numbers on all paperwork Provides information

More information

Units of Study 9th Grade

Units of Study 9th Grade Units of Study 9th Grade First Semester Theme: The Journey Second Semester Theme: Choices The Big Ideas in English Language Arts that drive instruction: Independent thinkers construct meaning through language.

More information

Check in and introductions Reading academic articles - strategies Essay Basics : The assignment fulfilling requirements Three prewriting strategies &

Check in and introductions Reading academic articles - strategies Essay Basics : The assignment fulfilling requirements Three prewriting strategies & Check in and introductions Reading academic articles - strategies Essay Basics : The assignment fulfilling requirements Three prewriting strategies & the dynamic outline Genre types of writing: anecdotal

More information

PREPARING FOR A CIVIL SERVICE EXAM HOW TO PREPARE FOR A CIVIL SERVICE EXAM (IN GENERAL)... DOING YOUR BEST

PREPARING FOR A CIVIL SERVICE EXAM HOW TO PREPARE FOR A CIVIL SERVICE EXAM (IN GENERAL)... DOING YOUR BEST PREPARING FOR A CIVIL SERVICE EXAM HOW TO PREPARE FOR A CIVIL SERVICE EXAM (IN GENERAL)... DOING YOUR BEST BEFORE YOU START TO STUDY: - Read the announcement. Somewhere on it will be the topics or items

More information

Customer Service and Communication. Bringing service to the next level

Customer Service and Communication. Bringing service to the next level Customer Service and Communication Bringing service to the next level 1 Park Authority Philosophy & Goals Before focusing on customer service, it is first important to understand and reinforce the Park

More information

PREPARING RESUMES AND WRITING COVER LETTERS

PREPARING RESUMES AND WRITING COVER LETTERS PREPARING RESUMES AND WRITING COVER LETTERS I. UNDERSTAND THE POSITION The Job Requirements In order to target your resume and cover letters, it is critical that you invest some time in understanding requirements

More information

Onboarding Program. Sponsor s Guide

Onboarding Program. Sponsor s Guide Onboarding Program Sponsor s Guide Sponsor s Guide Introduction This guide has been developed to help sponsors in their roles with new employees. We want to help you be effective and successful in this

More information