II. Rehabilitation...9 Rehabilitation... 9 Commercial Rehabilitation Residential Rehabilitation... 14

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2 TABLE OF CONTENTS I. Introduction...1 Introduction to Standards... 1 Creation of District... 3 Preservation in General... 4 Secretary of the Interior s Standards for Rehabilitation... 4 Goals for Rehabilitation... 5 The Historic Preservation Committee... 6 Project Review... 6 Other Regulations... 7 Map of Historic District... 8 II. Rehabilitation...9 Rehabilitation... 9 Commercial Rehabilitation Residential Rehabilitation III. New Construction...18 New Construction New Commercial Construction New Residential Construction IV. Maintenance...24 Maintenance V. Demolition...26 Demolition VI. Appendices...27 Funding Sources Glossary Bibliography

3 I. INTRODUCTION TO STANDARDS Purpose These standards are designed to help property owners identify the key features of their historic sites that should be addressed when planning repairs, alterations, or rehabilitation. They also outline the criteria with which the Historic Preservation Committee will evaluate proposals for Certificates of Appropriateness, which is required for most exterior construction, demolition or restoration projects. Finally, these standards provide general criteria to be considered when new construction is planned in the District to ensure that new construction does not detract from the character and integrity of the surrounding properties or the District as a whole. This document outlines the procedure required for projects to be approved in the Historic District and attempts to give property owners helpful information regarding possible funding sources, design options, and individuals and organizations to contact for technical assistance. About the Standards The City of Logan recognizes the Center Street National Historic District as a unique asset to the community and Cache Valley at large. The District demonstrates the development styles and unique historical attributes of Logan and provides commercial and residential areas that are attractive to residents and visitors alike. The designation of the District at the federal, state, and local levels provides benefits including potential sources of financial assistance to property owners who maintain the historical integrity of their property. Without this assistance it would be increasingly difficult to maintain the historic homes and traditional commercial storefronts within the District. The Historic District Design Standards are created to assist decision-making in achieving the goal of preserving the integrity of each building, property, and the overall district. Maintaining and enhancing the integrity of the properties within the District is important to preserve the rich cultural assets and provide benefits to property owners associated with recognition of the area as a historic district. General Plan The Municipal Council adopted a rewrite of the Logan General Plan in June of This plan represents the vision of the community and involved an extensive process of public workshops and hearings capturing the community goals of Logan Residents. Within this plan there are numerous goals and policies regarding the importance of preservation of the Historic District and the character that the District brings to Logan. The creation of standards for review of exterior remodeling and new construction was initiated within the General Plan process and specifically discussed with reference to the Center Street Historic District. The following text box outlines some of the associated discussion and recommendations within the General Plan regarding the Historic District. 1

4 PRESERVATION AND THE GENERAL PLAN Section discusses the goal of residents to maintain the character of existing neighborhoods in order to preserve what originally attracted people to that specific neighborhood. Improvement and enhancement of neighborhood character was a primary theme throughout the General Plan process and is easily identified within the residential neighborhoods in the District. Land Use section specifically discusses the importance of visual character within the downtown and along Main Street. This section also discusses the establishment of Design Review to preserve and enhance the character of the built environment. Goal LU-3: Protect and enhance the character of the Center Street Historic District. Land Use section provides further discussion of the sense of place within Logan s downtown and the importance in preserving the positive characteristics that makes the downtown enjoyable. Goal LU-22: Improve and enhance the appearance of downtown Logan. Goal LU 23: Preserve and enhance neighborhood character. Goal LU-25: Preserve the character and architecture of Logan s neighborhoods. The Future of Downtown Logan plan Since the update to the General Plan, downtown Logan has been the subject of a focused planning effort involving the City, downtown business and property owners, and residents of the City at large. This effort resulted in a summary document describing the general vision for downtown in the coming decades, the Future for Downtown Logan. Although this planning process did not focus exclusively on the historic aspects of the downtown area, the Future for Downtown Logan plan does talk about the importance of ensuring that new development in downtown Logan be compatible with the historic elements of the area. The Future for Downtown Logan plan principles shall be considered when a project comes before the Historic Preservation Committee for a Certificate of Appropriateness. 2

5 CREATION OF DISTRICT The Logan Municipal Council adopted Logan s Center Street Historic District in In 1979 the district was listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The creation of the district was initiated by the completion of a historic reconnaissance survey of the area now designated. The original survey was completed in 1978 and provides information defining Logan s contributory and non-contributory structures. Contributory structures are structures that were built more than 50 years ago that maintain their original historic fabric and significance. Non-contributory structures are those built either less than fifty years ago or built within the historic period, but their historic make-up no longer maintains its integrity. Another survey was completed in 1999 and redefined the contributory and non-contributory structures in the Historic District. The results of these surveys are available in the Department of Community Development office. The District is made up of a wealth of historically significant structures that represent the history and settlement of Logan. These buildings have unique architectural styles that represent the history of Logan and are irreplaceable historical and cultural resources. The majority of the structures in Logan s Historic District were constructed in the early 1900s and have significance to the City of Logan, Cache Valley, and the State of Utah. A variety of structures make up the district, including commercial, residential, and institutional buildings. There are approximately 500 buildings within the boundaries of the district, 350 of which are considered contributory structures. View of Center Street Historic District 3

6 PRESERVATION IN GENERAL The intent of preservation is to maintain the original character of a historic structure to the greatest extent possible. A structure s character is composed of various components, ranging from materials to unique architectural features. Preservation can succeed simply through regular maintenance of a structure. With routine maintenance a building and its materials and features will continue to last into the future. Regular maintenance helps the property owner avoid expensive replacement costs. A basic principle of preservation is consequently to repair before replace. This allows the original, unique features of the building to be preserved with the strongest integrity. When replacement is unavoidable it is important that replacement is similar to the original in material, form, size, and color. Removing original decorative details from a building and adding decorative details where there were none originally are both practices that should be avoided. Both of these practices can give a false sense of the original building and the style or era that it was built in. The Secretary of the Interior s Standards for Rehabilitation are a valuable resource for basic guidance when beginning rehabilitation of a historic structure. The ten principle elements of the Standards reinforce general preservation theory. These ten elements are included below, and a complete copy of the Secretary of the Interior s Standards for Rehabilitation is available in the Department of Community Development office. SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR S STANDARDS FOR REHABILITATION 1. A property shall be used for its historic purpose or be placed in a new use that requires minimal change to the defining characteristics of the building and its site and environment. 2. The historic character of a property shall be retained and preserved. The removal of historic materials or alteration of features and spaces that characterize a property shall be avoided. 3. Each property shall be recognized as a physical record of its time, place, and use. Changes that create a false sense of historical development, such as adding conjectural features or architectural elements from other buildings, shall not be undertaken. 4. Most properties change over time; those changes that have acquired historic significance in their own right shall be retained and preserved. 5. Distinctive features, finishes, and construction techniques or examples of craftsmanship that characterize a historic property shall be preserved. 4

7 6. Deteriorated historic features shall be repaired or restored rather than replaced. Where the severity of deterioration requires replacement of a distinctive feature, the new feature shall match the old in design, color, texture, and other visual qualities and, where possible, materials. Replacement of missing features shall be substantiated by documentary, physical, or pictorial evidence. 7. Chemical or physical treatments, such as sandblasting, that cause damage to historic materials shall not be used. The surface cleaning of structures, if appropriate, shall be undertaken using the gentlest means possible. 8. Significant archeological resources affected by a project shall be protected and preserved. If such resources must be disturbed, mitigation measures shall be undertaken. 9. New additions, exterior alterations, or related new construction shall not destroy historic materials that characterize the property. The new work shall be differentiated from the old and shall be compatible with the massing, size, scale, and architectural features to protect the historic integrity of the property and its environment. 10. New additions and adjacent or related new construction shall be undertaken in such a manner that if removed in the future, the essential form and integrity of the historic property and its environment would be unimpaired. GOALS FOR REHABILITATION Rehabilitation of historic structures is important in Logan for a number of reasons. First, preservation of a historic downtown is a main goal of The Future for Downtown Logan and is directly related to maintaining vitality of the commercial area by maintaining a shopping environment that attracts residents and visitors. As described in The Future for Downtown Logan Logan s downtown remains a vibrant shopping district within the City and the goal is to improve on the existing success. Rehabilitation and preservation of the elements that make downtown unique is important to the continued vitality of this area. Second, historical and cultural resources are invaluable elements of community and create our sense of place. Often the importance of these resources is not identified on a daily basis, but is quickly realized after they are destroyed. Logan s historical resources in the District currently maintain a high level of integrity. Rehabilitation is important to maintain these resources in those cases where it is apparent that preservation alone is insufficient. 5

8 The Historic Preservation Committee With the designation of the Center Street National Historic District in 1978, the Municipal Council also established the Historic Preservation Committee (HPC). The duties of the Committee are outlined in City Ordinance and include working to protect and preserve the District, processing nominations to the National Register of Historic Places, and ensuring the completion of a historic survey at least once a decade. In 1996 it became apparent that the Historic Preservation Committee needed revitalization. City staff began working with the Committee to increase involvement and update out-of-date and missing regulations regarding the review of projects in Logan s Historic District. With the appointment of two new Committee members in the beginning of 1997 the board was once again a full five members representing a variety of preservation interests. These Design Standards are a final step in the original goal of retrofitting the City s preservation policies. However, this is by no means the final step in the overall goal of preservation in Logan. The Committee will work with these standards in reviewing applications for Certificates of Appropriateness. Through this review process, it is the intent of the Committee to aid in educating and promoting sound preservation practices within the District. PROJECT REVIEW With the formal adoption of the Historic District in 1998 as a zoning element, the City initiated a formal process for reviewing all projects undertaken in the District. The process requires that a Certificate of Appropriateness be issued prior to the issuance of a building permit for any exterior project including demolition in the District. The Certificate of Appropriateness needs approval by either the Director of Community Development or by the Historic Preservation Committee, depending on the type of project. Items that may be reviewed and approved or denied by Staff include: Fences and retaining walls; Demolition of non-contributory structures; Demolition of accessory structures; and General maintenance and upkeep. These items may change as the review process evolves and if it is determined Staff can objectively review other items using the Historic District Design Standards. Projects not on this list are required to obtain a Certificate of Appropriateness from the Historic Preservation Committee. One of the most important things any applicant can do to streamline the review process in applying for a Certificate of Appropriateness is to work with the Planning Staff to review the standards. A detailed guide of the process, required application materials, and applicable timeline is available from the Department of Community Development office. 6

9 OTHER REGULATIONS Beyond the Historic District Design Standards additional regulations may apply to a project proposal. Information is available in the Department of Community Development office and Planners are available to discuss project options and explain any items that may be confusing. Examples of these additional regulations include: Land Development Code The Future for Downtown Logan Plan Sign Regulations Logan General Plan International Building Code Building Conservation Development Code Public Works Standards and Specifications Planning Staff will assist a project applicant in gathering information on regulations and process. For more information call

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11 II. Rehabilitation Introduction The following sections include standards for general rehabilitation of commercial or residential structures. This section describes the general philosophy of rehabilitation and should be used in conjunction with more detailed standards for structure type in the following pages. Logan s Land Development Code regulates use of property. The Historic Preservation Commission does not regulate use, however, it is important to choose a use that is suitable for the structure. The design and era of the building are elements that make the structure historic. It is imperative that these characteristics are maintained throughout the rehabilitation process. The most important aspect of rehabilitation is to protect and maintain the character of the building. Most often this is done by protecting and maintaining the architectural style, details, and overall design of the building through maintenance and rehabilitation. A fundamental principle of preservation is that architectural elements must be repaired before replaced. There are times when replacement of an element is unavoidable due to the lack of maintenance in the past. Replacement is also necessary when architectural features are missing from the building. When replacement is required, it is important to substitute features that are similar to existing features. Therefore, it is important to use documented history of the structure when undergoing rehabilitation efforts. Documented history such as photos or survey information can be helpful in preservation efforts by identifying original architectural features. If documented history is not available use simplified style and elements Doors are an important aspect of a building and add to the overall appearance of the structure. Doors symbolize the center of the structure because they are where people enter and exit a building. The design of doors is often characterized by the type of use and can range from large ornate to simple and understated. As with doors, windows are an architectural detail that adds to the overall appearance of the structure. Windows often provide a human scale to a structure. The term window can include many different aspects of the overall feature, including frames, openings, and configuration of panes. Building materials are a dominating visual characteristic of a building representing the time and craftsmanship of the era of construction. Materials can also offer a look at the social aspects of the era in which the building was constructed. Color is similarly a dominating visual characteristic; although color is not regulated through these standards or any other City review process, it is recommended that color schemes be simple. Building Codes change with time and upgrades are often required to bring historic buildings to current code. This is typically true with electrical and plumbing systems within historic structures. It is important that such changes are done with sensitivity to the character of the structure. 9

12 Additions are often needed to increase either residential or commercial space within historic structures. It is important to make these additions without jeopardizing the historic integrity of the structure or the property. COMMERCIAL REHABILITATION Certain features are characteristic of historic commercial structures in downtown Logan. Many of these features were originally designed to help draw the attention of customers and thus are often pedestrian friendly. These features are important to address in commercial rehabilitation efforts in order to preserve the integrity of the historic structure. The following standards explain and illustrate the features that the Historic Preservation Committee will examine during its review of a project proposal. A photo of typical commercial facade elements will be inserted and will show: Storefront Bulkheads Cornice Transom windows Upper windows Sign band 10

13 CR-1 Storefronts The traditional storefront is a distinctive element of commercial buildings in Logan. Generally the storefront consists of large display windows with a primary recessed entry. a. Maintain the original storefront. b. If the original storefront has been covered, remove covering material and restore original storefront windows. c. Utilize storefront display areas as an asset to the commercial establishment. d. Empty storefronts should be utilized for window display and lit into the evening (as also described in The Future for Downtown Logan). CR-2 Kickplates Kickplates are located at the base of the building underneath the bottom of display windows. Bulkhead is another term used to refer to the area beneath the display windows. a. Repair existing kickplates whenever possible. b. If bulkheads have been covered with a foreign material, uncover and restore the original feature. c. If repair is not possible, reconstruct the kickplates using historical documentation. CR-3 Transom windows Transom windows are the row of small windows above the main storefront windows. Transom windows have often been covered if a lower interior ceiling was constructed. a. Uncover and restore transom windows when possible. b. If rebuilding the storefront, include transom windows using historical documents/photos to guide their design. CR-4 Upper windows Windows on the second and upper stories are distinctly characteristic of commercial storefronts. These windows often were part of the residential units above commercial establishments. Upper windows are a distinct aspect of the commercial façade and are important elements of a rehabilitation project. a. Uncover boarded up upper windows. b. Repair damaged window frames. c. If replacement is unavoidable, match new frames to the original historic frames d. Windows should fill the entire window opening. e. If using aluminum replacement frames make sure they are painted and not metallic in appearance. f. Install storm windows on the inside only. This will have less of a visual impact, be easier to maintain, and will provide better ventilation. 11

14 CR-5 Rear Facades Many commercial buildings in Logan have rear facades providing access from inner block parking lots. The Future for Downtown Plan emphasizes the importance of inner block pedestrian walkways; therefore rear facades create an opportunity to have greater customer exposure. a. Design rear storefronts to complement the main façade. b. Use materials and colors similar to those on the front façade so customers are able to associate the rear façade with the business. c. Identify the rear entrance with a window panel or small sign that conforms to the City sign code. d. Locate and screen utility and trash areas to make the rear entrance more inviting for clientele. CR-6 Doors The door is the primary focus of the front facade of a commercial structure because it provides a first impression of the building and its uses. The design of doors for commercial structures is usually less ornate than for residential structures. a. Repair original door. b. If replacing is unavoidable, choose a replacement that is of the same design, proportion, and material. c. Do not use a door with inappropriate details or moldings. d. Elaborate or detailed doors are often characteristic of residential structures and should not be used on a commercial rehabilitation project. e. Repair original kickplates. f. Do not change the location, size, or proportion of doorways. g. If an inappropriate replacement has been installed in the past, replace it with a more compatible door. CR-7 Cornice The cornice is the architectural detail along the top of the structure. The style of cornices range from specialized ornamentation to very simple architectural detail. a. Repair the original cornice. b. Reconstruct the cornice if repair is not feasible. c. Ensure that the reconstructed cornice is architecturally compatible with the character of the structure. d. Use appropriate materials for reconstruction of the cornice. e. Reintroduce a cornice if the original cornice has been removed. 12

15 CR-8 Signage Commercial signs help identify the business within a building and, when used properly, can be assets to the downtown district. Signage is primarily regulated by the sign ordinance within the Land Development Code, which has special standards for the District. Additional consideration should be given to signs within the District to complement the historic character of the area. For example, The Future for Downtown Logan recommends developing a unique sign scheme for the Downtown area. Signs should be chosen with the following principles in mind. a. Use simple signage that advertises use of the structure but does not overshadow or dominate the historic character of the structure. b. Place signs on the sign band of the storefront. c. Perpendicular or blade signs are recommended. d. Choose a sign that is compatible in size and scale to the building façade. e. Limit the number of signs on a building (one wall sign is permitted on each façade that faces a street or other public area). f. Use indirect lighting for surface mounted signs on the structure. g. Keep signs simple. h. Use signage characteristic of the history of the structure, such as individual lettering and simple, painted signs. i. Signage shall not be backlit. j. Individual letters are preferred over cabinet signs. The Great Harvest Bread Company (left) and Everton s Hardware (below) signs are examples of desirable signage within the Historic 13

16 CR-9 Awnings Awnings are an attractive feature of historic storefronts. An awning should be chosen not only as an advertising tool but also as a method of providing customer shelter from rain and sun. Awnings should also promote an all-season friendly downtown. a. Fit awnings within the frame of the window, door, or storefront. b. Do not obscure architectural details with an awning. c. Use colors and sizes that compliment the building, neighborhood, and streetscape of the area. d. Use fabric or traditional metal awnings. e. Plastic or vinyl awnings are prohibited. f. Do not use backlit awnings. g. Approximate the shape and style of the awning to the original. h. Crank style awnings are preferred. RESIDENTIAL REHABILITATION As with commercial structures, there are certain features of a historic residential building that are important to preserve in rehabilitation efforts. The following sections identify components of a residential structure that the Historic Preservation Commission will consider while reviewing a rehabilitation plan. RR-1 Porches One of the unique aspects of historic homes in Logan is the front porch or entryway. With few exceptions, the homes within the District each have a distinct entrance into the home. a. Repair entryways and porches by reinforcing the historic features. b. Don t replace an entire porch if only a portion needs to be replaced. c. Maintain the open-air nature of porches; do not enclose porches with solid materials. d. Reconstruct missing elements to match the original if form and detailing are evident; do not build a porch based on speculation of what was there historically. e. Do not build elaborate replacements more ornate than the original. f. Do not build a porch that is incompatible in size, scale, or materials with the rest of the structure. Porches are a characteristic feature of homes in the District 14

17 RR-2 Roof The roof pitch, style, and materials play an important role in the overall character of the house. Specific roof types and materials characterize many types of residential construction. Therefore, it is important to maintain general roof characteristics in order to retain the character of the structure. a. Preserve original roof type. b. Do not add visible roof features such as dormers and skylights to the street side(s) of the house. c. Maintain or closely match the historic roof materials. d. Do not use roof materials such as clay tiles, aluminum shingles, or metal roof materials that are not compatible with the architectural style of the home. e. Use shingles that closely replicate the original shingles. RR-3 Windows Windows serve different functions - such as lighting, ventilation, and decoration - and are placed on many different levels of a structure. a. Repair historic window frames. b. Do not allow windows to deteriorate to the extent that repairs are costly or replacement is necessary. c. Avoid creating an inaccurate historic appearance. d. Maintain window size and proportion. Don t enlarge or close window openings for cosmetic purposes. e. If replacement is unavoidable, select replacements that most closely match the original windows. f. If using aluminum replacement frames, make sure they are painted and not metallic in appearance. g. Do not change window type. h. Preserve unique window types such as leaded or stained glass. i. Maintain original mullion/muntin configuration. An example of a window opening that has been closed. 15

18 RR-4 Doors The front door of a historic home is an important aspect of the structure because it is a focal point from the street and often provides a first impression. Residential doors are often more ornate in detail than commercial doors. a. Repair the original door. b. Only replace door if repair is not feasible. c. Replace with doors similar to original doors in style, size, and materials. d. Do not use doors with an inaccurate level of detail or ornamentation. RR-5 Exterior Materials Residential structures within the District range from brick to wood siding. The exterior building material is generally a distinct feature of the home and represents the time and craftsmanship of the era of construction. a. Preserve original wall materials. b. Do not cover original walls with a foreign material such as aluminum/vinyl siding or stucco. c. Use appropriate maintenance techniques to ensure lasting preservation of the materials and structure as a whole. RR-6 Additions Additions are a common element of historic homes. Often a historic home does not have adequate room for the activities of a modern family; for example, a historic home usually does not have a garage. When planning additions on a structure it is important to ensure that the addition does not detract from the historic character or threaten the integrity of the structure. a. Minimize the structural and visual impact of the addition to the historic home. b. Locate additions to the rear of the main structure. Use complementary materials, roof pitch, windows, etc., but do not build the addition to appear as part of the original structure. Some differences between the addition and the primary structure are desirable to illustrate the different times of construction. c. Design the addition in a manner that makes it clear what is historic and what is new. d. Construct additions so that they can be removed without threatening the integrity of the historic building. e. If a side addition is unavoidable, set the addition back as far as possible so that from the front the shape of the original home is discernable. f. Do not attach a garage to a historic home. A detached garage is always preferable. 16

19 RR-7 Architectural details Architectural details are often the small things that may go unnoticed but have a strong cumulative impact on the aesthetics of the structure. Architectural details range from arches and windows to finials and brickwork. The glossary contains pictures and definitions of most of these details. a. Repair original architectural details. b. If repair is not feasible, replace details with similar elements in terms of size, material, and detail. c. Do not use details that are historically inaccurate with the character or era of the structure. d. If unsure of original details always error on the side of simplicity. Finial Dentil Cornice 17

20 III. New Construction In General New construction can range from a small addition on a single family home to a new three story infill development in the commercial core. These changes can be detrimental to a historic district if allowed to occur without consideration of the character in the surrounding neighborhood. The purpose of these guidelines is to ensure that new construction complements the Historic District. New development should be developed to be compatible with surrounding historic structures and the character of the district as a whole. It is not necessary to excessively copy historic details to make a new building compatible with surrounding structures. New construction should not attempt to imitate existing historic structures. A new structure should instead share general features with surrounding historic structures. The general size and scale of new construction should be similar to other buildings in the area. When designing the structure also look at the ratio of wall surface to openings and width to height of features such as windows and doors. The overall proportion of these ratios should be similar to other buildings in the District. Similarly, heights and setbacks (particularly front and side setbacks) can be overpowering design elements if not consistent with existing development. New construction should approximate the heights and setbacks of surrounding structures. Buildings in a neighborhood often are comprised of similar materials, due to development and design standards and practices at the time of construction. Although it is important that new construction does not replicate historic structures, compatibility of building materials and architectural details is important. Architectural details do not necessarily need to be copied, but the general architectural elements identified in the neighboring structures should be integrated into new construction. Although color is not regulated through these standards or any other City review process, it is recommended that color schemes be simple and compatible with surrounding buildings. For example, a dominant color with one or two accent colors to draw attention to architectural details can be very attractive and historically complementary. It is also important to consider the natural features of the property while designing plans for construction. Consideration should be given to natural features of a site, such as the topography of the land, canals, mature vegetation, and streams or other unique features on the property. These natural features can often be an asset to development is these considerations are part of the design process. NEW COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION The specific characteristics of the District s commercial downtown should be carefully considered when designing new construction within this area. One of the assets of the historic downtown is the unique atmosphere and scale of the built environment; shopping downtown is much different than shopping at a big box retailer. New construction should maintain and protect the overall environment of the downtown. To help accomplish these goals, the following sections describe the elements of new construction that the Historic Preservation Committee considers when reviewing a development proposal. 18

21 CC-1 Setbacks A dominant characteristic of Logan s historic downtown is the siting of buildings at a zero lot line. New commercial construction constructed in this area should conform to the zero lot line siting to maintain this streetscape orientation. Exceptions to this guideline exist for commercial areas on 100 East and 100 West, where structures are commonly setback from the front property line. a. Build new construction at a zero front lot line. b. New construction along 100 East and 100 West should be designed with similar front setbacks to neighboring structures. CC-2 Architectural elements Although new construction should not replicate surrounding buildings, the general architectural elements of the typical historic commercial building should be used. a. Design new construction to incorporate the architectural elements (cornices, kickplates, window and door styles, etc.) of Logan s typical historic commercial structure as displayed in graphic on page 10 in the commercial rehabilitation section. b. Do not replicate ornate architectural elements of historical buildings. CC-3 Orientation Downtown Logan storefronts open directly onto the front sidewalk and are pedestrian friendly. New construction should not detract from the orientation and unity of commercial structures in the downtown. a. Site new construction to orient primarily to the street. b. The front door of all new commercial construction shall open directly onto sidewalk. CC-4 Rear Facades Many of the commercial structures in the downtown have usable rear facades located on the interior of the block. Many of these block interiors are public parking areas, and the rear facades provide unique opportunities for access to commercial establishments from parking areas. There is great potential to use the rear entryways to create a pedestrian atmosphere area within these underutilized block interiors, and it is important that new construction not obstruct this potential. The Future for Downtown Logan plan recognizes this consideration in its conceptual design of downtown blocks with interior pedestrian pathways. a. New commercial structures with a façade facing an inner block area shall provide a rear entry onto the parking areas. b. New construction in the downtown shall not obstruct existing or potential future pedestrian access from rear facades. c. Unless infeasible, new construction in the downtown shall include a rear entrance to facilitate pedestrian access to buildings from interior pedestrian pathways. 19

22 CC-5 Parking As discussed in preceding sections, the majority of structures in the downtown area are oriented to the street and are generally placed at the front lot line. Parking does not generally exist between the street and the building, except for a couple of locations along 100 East. Presently, most parking in downtown is accommodated on the street, within public parking lots, or behind the buildings. The Future for Downtown Logan plan recognizes the critical importance of providing sufficient parking for downtown patrons, and describes future parking both on street and in the interior of downtown blocks. a. Parking shall not be placed between the street and the building. b. New construction in the commercial downtown shall accommodate parking in conformance with the regulations of the Land Development Code for the Commercial Central (CC) zoning district and the Future for Downtown Logan plan. c. Locate parking to the rear of buildings and in inner block parking areas to protect the pedestrian scale of the downtown historic neighborhood. Mixed-Use Parking Terraces Line illustration from the Future for Downtown Plan illustrating parking options 20

23 CC-6 Materials The majority of structures in the downtown area are masonry. Some historic facades in the District have been covered by metal or aluminum siding, which do not represent the original building materials of structures in the District. New construction should be designed with materials that are compatible to the historic materials of the area. a. Brick is encouraged as a primary building material for new construction. b. Choose exterior building materials that are compatible with and enhance existing historic facades. c. Do not use materials that give a false historical appearance. d. Do not try to replicate building materials of historic structures. CC-7 Signage Signs are an important part of any new commercial establishment. When choosing signs for a new structure in the District, it is important that they complement the character of the area. The Future for Downtown Logan plan discusses the general idea of developing a sign system for the downtown commercial area. Although signage is regulated primarily by the sign ordinance within the Land Development Code, the following principles should be considered for signs in the Historic District. a. Use simple signage that advertises the use of the structure but does not overshadow or dominate the character of the structure. b. Place signs on the sign band of the storefront or perpendicular to the front façade (wall or blade sign). c. Perpendicular or blade signs are recommended. d. Choose a sign that is compatible in size and scale to the building façade. e. Limit the number of signs on a building (one wall sign is permitted on each façade that faces a street or other public area). f. Use indirect lighting for surface mounted signs on the structure. g. Keep signs simple. h. Signage shall not be backlit. i. Individual letters are preferred over cabinet signs. CC-8 Awnings Awnings are a feature commonly incorporated into new construction to complement the historic character of the area and provide customers shelter from the elements. When selecting the design and placement of an awning, the following guidelines should be considered. a. Fit awnings within the frame of the window, door, or storefront. b. Do not obscure architectural details with an awning. c. Use colors that compliment the building, neighborhood, and streetscape of the area. d. Use fabric or traditional metal awnings. e. Plastic or vinyl awnings are prohibited. f. Do not use backlit awnings. g. Crank style awnings are preferred. An example of an awning that meets the Historic Design Review Standards A photo of a desirable awning within the district will be added 21

24 New Residential Construction As with the commercial areas of the district, residential neighborhoods offer a unique look into Logan s history. Many of the homes within the District were owned by important figures in the settlement and growth of the City of Logan. New construction must be sensitive to those historic attributes and enhance the existing character of the area. The Historic Preservation Committee will consider the following issues when reviewing a proposal. RC-1 Setbacks Minimum setbacks are regulated under the Land Development Code and generally take existing setbacks into consideration. Setbacks should conform to existing building setbacks, even if they exceed the minimum setbacks described in the Land Development Code. Although the front setback generally has the greatest visual impact from the street, it is also important to consider side setbacks as well. a. Design the structure with similar setbacks to other structures in the neighborhood. b. The Historic Preservation Committee may require setbacks different than the minimum setbacks outlined in the Land Development Code to maintain neighborhood character. RC-2 Orientation Houses in Logan s Historic District are for the most part oriented to the street. This orientation is important in maintaining the characteristic streetscape within the District and should be followed by new construction. In conjunction with the orientation to the street, houses within the District generally have a distinct front entryway. Whether this is a wrap around porch or simple stoop, a central entryway is identified through the design of the structure. a. Orient new structures to the street. b. Design new homes with a distinct front entryway. c. The dominant visual feature from the street should be the front entrance, not the garage. Photo of new home with distinct front entryway. An example of new residential construction with a distinct front entranceway oriented toward the street. 22

25 RC-3 Parking Parking is a significant aspect of new construction due to the dependence on the automobile. If historic homes in the District have a garage it is generally a small detached garage or carriage house that is pushed to the rear of the primary structure. New construction should conform to the character of existing homes in the neighborhood in terms of the placement and focus of parking and garages. a. Place garages or parking areas to the rear of the home. b. Design garage to face the side yard instead of the front. c. Do not design a building with a garage as a primary focus. d. The garage and house should be designed so parked cars do not protrude streetward of the front plane of the house. e. Design garages as detached accessory structures. RC-4 Size and Scale Most historic homes within the District are multi-storied structures primarily oriented to the street. It is important that new residential construction does not threaten the integrity of the District by creating incompatible infill in terms of size and scale. a. Design new homes to be compatible with existing structures in terms of size and scale b. Use the general building heights of neighboring structures as a guide to designing new construction RC-5 Fences Fence heights and placement are regulated through the Logan Land Development Code, which does not regulate materials other than barbed wire. The following principles are important to consider when designing fencing in the District. a. Chain link fencing is not permitted within the front yard, or side yard when visible from the street. b. Choose fencing material that is compatible with not only the structure but also the overall streetscape. c. Fencing should visually complement and improve the structure and landscaping of a property. 23

26 IV. Maintenance Maintenance is a key to preservation. When a historic structure is properly maintained and cared for, that structure can withstand years of use without costly repair or replacement. However, if regular maintenance is ignored elements of the structure often fall into such a state of disrepair that it is impossible to repair the architectural elements and replacement is required. Replacement is not only more costly than maintenance and repair, but replacement can also threaten the integrity of the structure if not undertaken properly. The following section includes basic recommendations for maintenance. M-1 Maintenance of exterior walls The exterior walls of a structure are the main supporting element of the structure and can easily threaten the overall structure if allowed to deteriorate. Regular maintenance and cleaning is important to the longevity of the materials and therefore to the longevity of the structure. a. Maintain original wall materials. b. Use appropriate cleaners and low pressure wash methods to clean masonry walls. c. Do not use abrasive methods to clean or remove paint, such as sandblasting. d. Avoid water pressure over 400 psi. e. Protect walls from water damage by repairing gutters and other drainage systems. M-2 Repair of exterior walls When repair is required on exterior walls, use proper techniques and repair only those parts in need. a. Enlist the assistance of a qualified professional to repair exterior walls. b. Use the same materials for repairs or, if not available, as close in appearance as possible. c. Repair deteriorating walls by repointing mortar joints or replacing damaged masonry units. d. Repair damaged brick when removing siding or other covering materials. e. If the brick is cracked, replace the individual bricks with a brick of a similar size and color so that there is minimal visual impact. f. If the brick has holes or weather damage repoint the brick. M-3 Cleaning brick Cleaning the brick masonry of a building is often undertaken in ways that ultimately weakens the stability of the brick and threatens the integrity of the structure. It is essential that sound cleaning practices be employed to ensure the long term health of the structure. a. If the brick is very dirty, it is best to hire a professional. b. Use the least abrasive method for cleaning brick. c. Do not sandblast brick, since sandblasting destroys the protective outer layer of brick. When this occurs, the brick is left exposed and deterioration is greatly accelerated. 24

27 M-4 Removing paint from brick Many historic brick structures in the District have been painted at some point. Returning the building to natural brick can be an important element of a rehabilitation project. Unpainted brick is often easier and less costly to maintain and is generally better for the brick because it does not allow moisture or other harmful elements to get sealed in the brick material. a. Employ a paint removal professional to do a test strip to determine the feasibility of removing paint from brick. b. Replace brick in areas that have been patched if patches do not match the original brick. c. Use the gentlest method possible to remove the paint. d. Work with a professional who is knowledgeable in working with historic buildings. e. Apply a clear protective covering to unpainted brick. M-5 Painted Brick Bare brick is a characteristic feature of many historic structures in the District. For those structures with unpainted brick, it is vital to retain that design element of the building. Many brick structures have been painted and it is important that maintenance of that paint is undertaken on a regular basis. a. Do not paint unpainted brick. b. When unpainted brick is painted the moisture is sealed in the brick which can cause deterioration of the brick underneath the paint layers. c. When repainting brick that has already been painted, use latex paint because it expands and contracts with weather and it has a natural vapor transmission. d. Use a low pressure wash to remove loose paint before repainting. 25

28 V. Demolition A Certificate of Appropriateness is required for any demolition within the Center Street Historic District. Demolition of non-contributory accessory structures can be approved at the staff level. All other demolition shall be approved, denied, or suspended by the Historic Preservation Committee. Applications for demolition must be accompanied by a plan for proposed new construction on the site. This requirement may be waived by the Department of Community Development in situations where public safety is at risk. After considering the following standards for demolition the HPC may approve, deny, or suspend all or part of the application. D-1 The state of repair of the building or structure. a. The historic resource is in such a condition that it is not feasible to preserve or restore it. b. The cost of restoration or repair. c. The technical feasibility of preservation of the historic resource. d. The feasibility of making modifications to the proposed plans. D-2 The purpose of preserving the historic resource. a. Feasibility of public or private acquisition. b. Feasibility of alternative uses of the historic resource. c. The impact of the demolition to the historic district. D-3 The availability of economic incentives to avoid demolition. If the HPC approves a Certificate of Appropriateness for Demolition the proponent shall obtain a building permit to demolish the structure after a historical record has been submitted and approved by the Department of Community Development. In order to be approved the historical record shall include a written history of the structure, floor plans, and photographs of the inside and outside of the structure including architectural details. If the HPC suspends the application for demolition, no demolition permit shall be issued for the structure. The suspension period cannot exceed one hundred and eighty days (180) from the date of application. During the suspension period the proponent shall work with the HPC to explore all means of preserving the historic resource. If the HPC determines that there is no feasible or timely preservation alternative, the HPC will either approve or deny the application for demolition. If the HPC denies the application for demolition the proponent can appeal the decision to the Planning Commission within 15 days following the committee s decision (Municipal Code E). 26

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