Annual report Victorian Department of Human Services

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1 Annual report Victorian Department of Human Services

2 Annual report Victorian Department of Human Services

3 If you would like to receive this publication in another format, please phone , using the National Relay Service if required, or This document is also available on the Internet at Unless indicated otherwise, this work is made available under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Australia licence. The licence DOES NOT apply to any software, artistic works, images, photographs or branding, including the Victorian Coat of Arms, the Victorian Government logo and any Victorian Government departmental logos. To view a copy of this licence, visit creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/au It is a condition of this Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Licence that you must give credit to the original author who is the State of Victoria. Authorised and published by the Victorian Government, 1 Treasury Place, Melbourne. ISSN Printed on Australian made, per cent recycled, FSC (Forestry Stewardship Council) certified, carbon neutral paper by Snap West Melbourne, 77 McClure Road, Kensington, Victoria, September 2014 ( ) The cover photographs of this report show some recipients of services or program participants. All images have been used with permission.

4 iii Accountable officer s declaration Hon. Mary Wooldridge MP Minister for Community Services Minister for Disability Services and Reform Hon. Wendy Lovell MLC Minister for Housing Hon. Ryan Smith MP Minister for Youth Affairs Hon. Heidi Victoria MP Minister for Women s Affairs Dear ministers In accordance with the Financial Management Act 1994, I am pleased to present the Victorian Department of Human Services annual report for the year ending 30 June Gill Callister Secretary Department of Human Services 8 September 2014

5 iv Annual report Victorian Department of Human Services Contents Accountable officer s declaration iii Year in review 1 Organisational and governance structure 55 Workforce data 76 Other disclosures 83 Appendices 199

6 1 Year in review Our strategic intent The Department of Human Services supports Victorians in need to build better lives and achieve their potential. We do this by providing housing and community services and programs so that individuals and families are supported and can participate in their community, the economy and life. Our client services charter We work to provide the highest quality of services that we can. Our Client services charter sets out our commitment to respect, safety, privacy, fair process and participation for our clients. The charter is available at: Our values The Department of Human Services values are central to the way we work with clients, members of the community, colleagues and suppliers. They include: Client focus We listen to our clients, respond to their needs and work with them to help them improve their wellbeing. Professional integrity and respect We act impartially, treating all people with dignity and respect. Quality We always strive to do our best and improve the way we do things. Collaborative relationships We work together to achieve better results. Responsibility We commit to the actions we take to achieve the best possible outcomes for our clients.

7 2 Annual report Victorian Department of Human Services Message from the Secretary After a period of significant change, the department s transformation in the way we deliver human services is really coming to life. We have implemented our new organisational structure and are focused on working in a way that is founded on integrated services and more effective, targeted support for our clients. It has taken a great deal of focus and there is still more to do, but we now have a much better structure, including 17 local areas to support people and work with the community and our community services sector partners to achieve our vision over the next decade. Despite Victoria s leadership and innovation in human services, there is still pressure on the system. We are seeing increasing complexity and levels of disadvantage, and at the same time as demand is rising across the board, people rarely come to us with a single problem that is easily solved. Making a lasting change in people s lives requires the coordination and delivery of a range of interrelated responses. This year we have continued to focus on providing this kind of response by working across the department in a more coordinated and sophisticated way to help move more people out of disadvantage permanently. We are delivering on the Government s reform agenda and are starting to see increasingly positive results for individuals and families, which are demonstrated in some of the stories contained in this year s annual report. We continue to test and refine Services Connect, the new integrated approach to delivering human services, which has been tested in nine sites across the state and is now being expanded to include testing in the community services sector. The ultimate vision of Services Connect is an integrated human services system that connects people to the level of support that they need, with one key worker working with them in a way that builds their capabilities and helps them set goals for the future. This means addressing a person or family s full range of needs, to give them a better chance of moving out of disadvantage over time. We are working closely with our community services sector partners to do all we can to improve the outcomes for vulnerable Victorians. The department spent more than $1.6 billion this year and funded around 1,600 community service providers to deliver client services and community programs. Work under the Service Sector Reform project continued during the year, with consultation across the sector and the release of Professor Peter Shergold s final report, Service sector reform: a roadmap for community and human services reform. The report outlined a number of recommendations for how government and the community sector can improve the way they work together to support people in need. One of these was the establishment of the Community Sector Reform Council, which was set up in November 2013 to advise on the implementation of community and human services reform. We are taking a whole-of-government approach to promoting the social and economic participation of all Victorians. We are strengthening our services for young people, women and people with a disability so that they can achieve their aspirations, participate in work and be involved in the community. The National Disability Insurance Agency headquarters is now established in Geelong and the transition of people with a disability in the Barwon Area to the National Disability Insurance Scheme is almost complete. The feedback we have received from people with a disability, their families and carers about their

8 3 experiences with the scheme so far will help ensure it is effective in the future. Another area of focus for us is creating a sustainable future for social housing in Victoria. New directions for social housing: a framework for a strong and sustainable future was released during the year, outlining the steps the Victorian Government will take to create a more sustainable social housing system. It makes a commitment to building better communities, providing improved opportunities for tenants and improving social housing residences. the work we are doing and will continue to do over the next year will make a real and lasting difference in people s lives. Gill Callister Secretary Department of Human Services Similarly, Out-of-home care: a five-year plan sets out how the government will reform the out-of-home care system, by better supporting families to provide safe, stable, nurturing homes for children and young people. The plan outlines a commitment to continually improve alternative care arrangements and keep children safe and supported. We know how important it is to intervene early, to help people get their lives back on track so they can reach their goals and aspirations. We are providing a range of family support services, family violence prevention initiatives and programs for young people, to help them connect with their community, study and employment and importantly, with each other. We are placing greater focus on efficiency and improving financial management to ensure our reforms are sustainable and services continue to deliver positive outcomes for our clients. Our transformation program, and the critical reform initiatives that are driving it forward, are in full swing. By testing innovative approaches, implementing what works well, and refining what still needs to be improved, we are realising our vision of placing people at the centre of everything we do. Our reform program is ambitious. There are undoubtedly areas we can improve on, and it requires the sustained commitment of our leaders, staff and sector partners to succeed. With a sharp focus on achieving improved long-term outcomes for Victorians, I believe

9 4 Annual report Victorian Department of Human Services Our objectives Objective 1: Immediate support With our partners we support people in crisis and help individuals and families get their lives back on track. We: deliver responsive client-centred services when and where people need them work with our clients to help them build essential life skills provide services that support the wellbeing and safety of our clients. Objective 2: Capabilities and participation With our partners we work with families, individuals, young people and communities to improve their lives through building capabilities and resilience, supporting participation in work, education and the community. We: work with our clients to build capabilities to get into and stay in work support our clients to participate in training, education and the community enable all young Victorians to experience healthy, active and fulfilling lives and have the opportunity to achieve their full potential, participate in the workforce and be involved in their community intervene early to prevent marginalisation and disadvantage advocate for people and communities at risk of marginalisation, and promote equality and participation in Victoria. Objective 3: Quality of life With our partners we provide services to support people in need to enjoy a positive life. We: deliver responsive, joined up services that meet people s needs give clients choice and control where appropriate provide services that support our clients to achieve their potential. Our challenges Increasing demand Despite Victoria s leadership in human services, pressure on the system still exists. Social and demographic changes are contributing to growing demand for human services, and increasing the complexity of the kind of support people need. Growth in demand is being shaped by intergenerational disadvantage and increased awareness and reporting of child protection and family violence. Victoria has a growing population projected to rise from 5.7 million in 2013 to 7.7 million by 2031 and 10 million by Our population is also ageing the proportion of Australians over 65 years is projected to almost double by As the population ages, we are also likely to experience higher demand for services. 1 Department of Transport, Planning and Local Infrastructure, 2014, 'Victoria in Future 2014: Population and household projections to 2051', Victorian Government, Melbourne. 2 Australian Government, 2010, Australia to 2050: Future Challenges, Commonwealth of Australia, Canberra, p.4.

10 5 Workforce Since 2010, the proportion of frontline human services full time equivalent (FTE) staff in the department has increased from 69 per cent 3 to 73 per cent 4. At the same time, our staff are better qualified, with 85 per cent of those entering child protection induction having a bachelor-level qualification or above, compared with only 52 per cent in The department s staff are the most vital resource for delivering human services. We will continue to support and invest in staff through learning and development to strengthen the workforce and improve outcomes for vulnerable Victorians. Our responsibilities The department leads human services policy and planning and regulates, manages, funds and delivers programs and services that support Victorians to build better lives and achieve their potential. It is responsible for implementing the Victorian Government s policies and decisions and delivering on its reform initiatives. The department employs around 9,700 full time equivalent staff and manages a budget of approximately $4.2 billion. Of this, around $1.6 billion per year is provided across some 1,600 community organisations to deliver client services and community programs. Information about the distribution of organisations by funding level and registered agencies can be found on page Source: Department of Human Services Annual Report June 2010 workforce profiles - 6,997 FTE frontline staff / 10,188 total FTE = 69 per cent. Frontline staff percentage is based on employees payroll award classification at this point in time. 4 Source: June 2014 workforce profiles - 7,108 FTE frontline staff / 9,689 total FTE = 73 per cent. Frontline staff percentage is based on employees payroll award classification at this point in time. (See page 78). Service dimensions A significant proportion of our clients require support across more than one service area, due to multiple and often complex needs. These clients may be in contact with several parts of the human services system at the same time. What we deliver Immediate support Together with our funded service providers, we support people in crisis and help individuals and families get their lives back on track. Our services and programs support: children and adolescents subject to, or at risk of, harm, abuse and neglect including those in out-of-home care women and children experiencing or escaping family violence and sexual assault, who may also require access to accommodation children and young people who need support to remain safely with their family families who need support to ensure an appropriate, safe and stable developmental environment for their children children in state care who have high and complex needs children and young people with severe emotional or behavioural disturbance as a result of abuse or neglect vulnerable Aboriginal children and families men who are attempting to address their violent behaviour people who require assistance and support to stay in or move into the private rental and home ownership markets people who are homeless or at risk of homelessness including young people and people with a disability people with a disability requiring immediate support and assistance offenders with a disability

11 6 Annual report Victorian Department of Human Services young people who are at risk of entering, in, or exiting the youth justice system and needing help to address offending behaviour. Capabilities and participation Together with our funded service providers and community partners we work with families, individuals, young people and communities to improve their lives through building capabilities and resilience, and supporting participation in work, education and the community. Our services and programs support: all young people aged between 12 and 25 years, including those seeking opportunities for social, economic and civic participation children and young people subject to, or at risk of, harm, abuse and neglect including those in out-of-home care young people with severe emotional or behavioural disturbance as a result of abuse or neglect children and young people who need support to remain with their family families who need support to ensure an appropriate, safe and stable developmental environment for their children vulnerable Aboriginal children and families individuals and families experiencing disadvantage men who are attempting to address their violent behaviour all women, including women from diverse backgrounds and those seeking leadership opportunities young people and school leavers with a disability who require support to transition from school to employment or other activities people with a disability who face barriers to participating in the community people with a disability who may require aids and equipment to support their participation people who require support to maintain a safe, secure and affordable place to live young people who are at risk of entering, in, or exiting the youth justice system and need help to address offending behaviour. Quality of life Together with our funded service providers we provide services to support people in need to enjoy a positive life. Our services and programs support: people with a disability who need support to live as independently as possible and participate in work and the community people with a disability who require accommodation support families and carers of people with a disability who may need assistance in their role as carers, or short-term respite from their role as carers low-income households and people who need help to meet the cost of essential services low-income families and individuals who require assistance with affordable rental accommodation young people who are entering, in, or exiting the youth justice system and need help to address offending behaviour.

12 7 Our leaders Executives in the Department of Human Services play a critical role in the success of delivering high-quality, responsive and integrated services. There are high expectations of executives to model and embed a strong culture within the department that is responsive and transparent and meets the needs of our clients. One of the critical leadership responsibilities in the department is leaders holding themselves and others accountable for their actions and performance. Our leadership charter exemplifies behaviours that: help shape and sustain a client-centred culture; support the growth and development of staff; improve the delivery of integrated, high-quality services; and value the positive working relationships we have with our service partners. Our leadership charter We improve the lives of Victorians in need by: reducing their experience of disadvantage through support and protection providing housing and community services increasing opportunities for community participation. Our leadership capability set Our leaders are measured against the executive capability set, which aligns with our leadership charter and includes six key leadership capabilities: strategic thinking organisational sustainability leads change awareness of organisational context maintaining a client focus facilitates and sustains collaborative partnerships.

13 8 Annual report Victorian Department of Human Services Year in review The department s goal is to support Victorians in need to build better lives and achieve their potential. We provide critical human services, spanning housing support, services for young people, assistance for people with a disability and their carers, and protection and support for women and children. The year has been a year of transformation for the department, with an increased focus on improving outcomes for Victorians in need by providing more integrated, holistic services that take into account a person s or family's full range of circumstances. Connecting services for people in need Services Connect: the new integrated model for human services Services Connect is the new model for delivering integrated human services and improving outcomes in people s lives. It is designed to connect people with the right support, address the whole range of their needs and help people build their strengths and capabilities to improve their lives. The department has been testing the Services Connect client support model since 2012 at lead sites in Dandenong, Geelong and the South West Coast. In late 2013, the department established two new lead sites in Shepparton and Preston, and in mid-2014 four new sites were established in Bendigo, Wodonga, Box Hill and Glenroy. This brings the number of lead sites across Victoria to nine. In May 2014, the Victorian Government announced a further $17.8 million to continue developing and testing the Services Connect model, including establishing the Services Connect Partnerships, which will see the nongovernment sector test, refine and further develop the Services Connect model at eight sites across Victoria. The funding will also support the development of the Single Client View, an information communication technology platform that will provide a single source of client information across the various systems that currently exist in the department, making it easier for staff to access comprehensive information about clients and track their progress. One worker the key to better outcomes At 40 years of age, Theo* was at risk of homelessness and dealing with depression and persistent drug problems after the loss of his child. Over the past 12 years, Theo had interactions with at least ten different services delivered by government departments and the sector, and worked with more than 20 support workers. He was finding it difficult to navigate the system and struggled to get the support he needed. In late 2013, Theo was referred to Services Connect to help him identify his goals and aspirations and the steps he could take to achieve them and to develop his own independence. His key worker, Kathryn, looked at Theo s circumstances and full range of needs and helped connect him to appropriate services. She developed a plan with Theo that set out life goals, including a strategy to remove drugs from his life, better manage his finances and get back into the workforce. Theo says that having one key worker has made a huge difference and he is starting to see the light at the end of the tunnel. Kathryn has been amazed at Theo s progress and by the changes he has made. Theo s long-term goals are to reconnect with his family and find employment as a landscape gardener. *Not his real name.

14 9 Service sector reform: the release of the Professor Shergold report More than 1,600 community services organisations are funded by the Victorian Government to deliver community services to vulnerable and disadvantaged Victorians. To improve the way we support people to achieve better outcomes in their lives, government and the community services sector must ensure our efforts are coordinated and effective. Throughout 2013, Professor Peter Shergold AC led the Service Sector Reform project to independently review and make recommendations to improve the way that government and the sector work together to support Victorians in need. Professor Shergold published a discussion paper titled Towards a more effective and sustainable community services system to guide the consultation process with the community sector, service users and government representatives. The initial feedback from the consultation was outlined in his second report titled Service sector reform: reflections on the consultations. Professor Shergold s final report, Service sector reform: a roadmap for community and human services reform, was published on 1 November It emphasised the need for strong collaboration, partnership and governance between government and community sector organisations to achieve real and lasting change. Establishing the Community Sector Reform Council In response to Professor Shergold s 2013 Service Sector Reform project, the government established the Community Sector Reform Council. Announced in November 2013, the council brings together senior representatives from the public and community sectors across education, child protection, health and mental health, justice, disability, police and the Aboriginal community to advise on community and human services reform in Victoria. The council is co-chaired by the Secretary of the Department of Premier and Cabinet, Andrew Tongue, and the President of the Victorian Council of Social Services and CEO of MacKillop Family Services, Micaela Cronin. It held its inaugural meeting on 19 December 2013 and met again in March and June in The council s priorities are to: embed a stronger focus on articulating and measuring outcomes build capability to support collaboration, including streamlining governance arrangements in local areas support and enable improved sector efficiency and effectiveness. Partnering with the community sector Throughout 2013 and early 2014, the department has focused on a comprehensive engagement program with the community sector to continue the conversation about the range of human services reforms underway. In December 2013 and March 2014, the department and community sector came together to discuss and workshop components of the reforms at conferences held in Melbourne. The department also held statewide information and consultation sessions with sector partners on the Services Connect model, the new Services Connect Partnerships and a new outcomes framework that sets out the outcomes we aspire to achieve for Victorians in need, and how these can be measured. The department continued to meet with its community sector partners this year through regular partnering dialogues involving the Human Services and Health Partnership Implementation Committee (HSHPIC). The HSHPIC is a joint committee comprising peak bodies from community services, housing and community health, drugs and alcohol and mental health sectors and the departments of Human Services and Health.

15 10 Annual report Victorian Department of Human Services The committee s Memorandum of understanding was reviewed during the year to reflect a strengthened focus on the partnership between the departments and the sector and was jointly signed in October This year, HSHPIC considered the department s transformation program, including the trial of the Services Connect model, and the implementation of community services sector reforms. Giving people more choice and control National Disability Insurance Scheme A key feature of the department s transformation is providing people with more choice and control over the services they receive. During , the department took a lead role implementing the National Disability Insurance Scheme, giving people with a disability, their families and carers the power to decide what specific support they receive, based on their needs and aspirations. A trial of the NDIS began in the Barwon Area on 1 July 2013, with the department working closely with the National Disability Insurance Agency (NDIA) to transition clients in the trial area to the scheme. The NDIA was established in 2013 as an independent statutory agency of the Commonwealth Government to implement the scheme, and the opening of its interim head office in Geelong on 30 April 2014 was a major milestone for Victorians involved in the scheme. Through LEAD Barwon, 19 people with a disability or their carers who had experienced the NDIS received training and support to develop their media, communication, leadership and advocacy skills so that they could share their experiences of the scheme with government and the broader community. The insights gained through the program will shape how future trials of the NDIS will be rolled out across Victoria. The NDIS difference Peter s story As one of the first participants in the Barwon trial of the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS), Peter* has experienced first-hand how the scheme is supporting people with a disability to reach their goals. Peter is an active and outgoing 23-year-old who has been accessing support through the NDIS, which is allowing him to continue his work as an author, actor and disability awareness trainer. The support he is receiving includes a fully funded walking aid, a personal support worker who accompanies Peter to training sessions, and funding for accessible transport. Even though Peter felt many of his needs were outside the box, he found that his NDIS planner listened to him and together they developed a plan that allowed Peter to pursue his work and personal goals. Peter feels the NDIS makes a real difference by supporting people in new ways that allow them to really pursue their individual goals and aspirations. *Not his real name. Around 2,890 people with a disability had their plans approved during the year and everyone who was on the Disability Support Register in the trial site has now transitioned across to the NDIA. In 2013, the Victorian Government established the Leading, Educating and Advocating for Disability (LEAD) Barwon program, a leadership and advocacy program managed by the Committee for Geelong, to support the implementation of the NDIS.

16 11 Victorian state disability plan The Victorian state disability plan sets out how the Victorian Government is helping to make a positive difference in the lives of people with a disability by ensuring they have more opportunities to participate in work and in their community. In May 2014, more than 400 people with a disability from metropolitan and rural Victoria provided their views on the progress of the state disability plan as part of a statewide survey. The results are being used to monitor the effectiveness of the plan and help ensure that it is meeting the needs of people with a disability. Feedback has indicated that the plan is on the right track with employment and accessible communication highlighted as future areas of focus. Helping congregate care residents plan their transition to improved accommodation To ensure people with a disability in congregate care are living in homes that are tailored to their needs, plans are underway to build new accommodation and subsequently close two outdated congregate care facilities: Sandhurst Residential Services and the Oakleigh Centre. The department has worked closely with Sandhurst residents and their families to plan their transition to new homes designed to cater to their needs and better support their independence, and located close to services and other amenities. services, which accommodates 29 people with an intellectual disability. Strengthening the protection of women and children Victoria s vulnerable children s strategy During , significant progress was achieved in implementing Victoria s vulnerable children: our shared responsibility strategy , released in May The Victoria s vulnerable children: our shared responsibility baseline performance data report 2013 was published in December It provides a baseline to measure progress in reducing the incidence of vulnerability and improving life outcomes for vulnerable children. Annual performance reports will be released to measure progress against the baseline data and identify where government and service providers are doing well and where further work is required. Key achievements in supporting vulnerable children under the strategy this year include: the release of Out-of-home care: a five-year plan the establishment of eight Children and Youth Area Partnership launch sites the establishment of four new intensive Cradle to Kinder services progress on the development of three new multidisciplinary centres for victims of sexual assault. Over the past year the department has held more than 160 family and resident information forums and individual planning sessions and finalised client plans for Sandhurst s 29 residents. The consultation and plans will inform the design of new accommodation to be built over the next two and a half years. In May 2014, the Victorian Government announced $14.1 million in funding to develop new supported accommodation to allow the closure of the Oakleigh Centre congregate

17 12 Annual report Victorian Department of Human Services A five-year plan for out-of-home care The release of Out-of-home care: a five-year plan in March 2014 delivered on a core commitment of the Victoria s vulnerable children: our shared responsibility strategy directions paper, and responded to a key recommendation of the Protecting Victoria's Vulnerable Children Inquiry. The plan sets out the Victorian Government s intention to reform the way the out-of-home care system operates to deliver better personal, social and economic outcomes for children and young people in care. The plan is supported by a $128 million package to transform the way care is provided for more than 500 of Victoria s most vulnerable children and young people living in residential care, and thousands more in family and kinship care. The Out-of-Home Care Reform Advisory Group has been established to provide expert advice on the implementation of the five-year plan, made up of senior representatives from the department, the out-of-home care sector and peak organisations. As outlined in the plan, the Taskforce 1,000 project will examine the needs of all Aboriginal children and young people in out-of-home care, with work overseen by a steering committee, co-chaired by the Secretary, Department of Human Services and the Commissioner for Aboriginal Children and Young People. Four Taskforce 1,000 Area Panels are being piloted in four areas across the state, with panels to be established in the department s remaining areas. This work will inform the development of a complementary plan for Aboriginal children and young people in out-ofhome care. The difference a therapeutic approach can make for a young person Kate* began her placement at a therapeutic residential unit when she was 15 years old, after numerous placement breakdowns in kinship and residential care. She was experiencing difficulty with sleeping and had little control over her emotions due to her traumatic past. This often led to aggressive and threatening behaviour towards staff and other residents. Things began to change when Kate s therapist completed a comprehensive therapeutic assessment. It provided staff with better insight into Kate s history of loss and trauma and they were supported to implement a range of strategies and techniques that began to make a noticeable difference for Kate. A neuropsychological assessment gave Kate more understanding about her own capacity, strengths and areas where she could develop. A clinical consultation with a child psychiatrist provided further guidance to the therapeutic approach taken by residential staff. As a result, Kate made considerable progress and was better able to manage her feelings and behaviour, which gave her a more positive selfview. Kate has emerged from care with hope for a bright future and with the skills and resilience she needs to reach her goals. When she left the therapeutic unit, Kate moved into a lead tenant property, a type of semiindependent accommodation that is designed to support young people leaving care arrangements to transition to independence. At the unit, Kate started working and raising a child. She has said that one day she hopes to work with vulnerable young people. *Not her real name An additional 28 therapeutic residential care places were also established across the state in , bringing the total number of therapeutic places to 80.

18 13 Children and youth area partnerships Eight Children and Youth Area Partnership launch sites were announced in May 2014, bringing together Victorian Government departments including the Departments of Education and Early Childhood, Health, Human Services, Justice, and Victoria Police to work with local government and the community sector. The Area Partnerships ensure a shared responsibility at a local level for improving outcomes for vulnerable children and young people through better coordination across a range of partners and a focus on improving services, culture and practice. The launch sites have been established in the Mallee, Central Highlands, Southern Melbourne, Outer Eastern Melbourne, Loddon, Ovens Murray, Inner Gippsland and Western Melbourne Areas. What is learnt in these sites will inform the rollout of the remaining Area Partnerships across the state. Victoria s first Commissioner for Aboriginal Children and Young People On 15 July 2013 Andrew Jackomos PSM was appointed as the first Commissioner for Aboriginal Children and Young People. Mr Jackomos works with Bernie Geary OAM, the Principal Commissioner for Children and Young People at the Commission for Children and Young People. The appointment recognises the vulnerabilities and significant over-representation of Aboriginal children and young people in the child protection system, and the Victorian Government s commitment to improve outcomes for them. The key role of the Commissioner for Aboriginal Children and Young People is to provide advice to government and service providers about policies and practices that will promote the safety and wellbeing of Aboriginal children. Child protection operating model An external evaluation of the child protection operating model, introduced in November 2012, is being carried out to identify what s working well and make recommendations on areas for improvement. The evaluation includes online surveys with child protection practitioners and focus groups with practitioners and sector colleagues. The child protection operating model represents the most significant child protection workforce reform in more than three decades. It is designed to boost the proportion of the total staff group who work directly with children and families, provide better support and development for practitioners, and renew the focus on the fundamental importance of case practice. Preventing violence in the community Over the past year, the department has continued to support the Victorian Government s commitment to prevent violence against women and children through Victoria s action plan to address violence against women and children: everyone has a responsibility to act Since the action plan was released in 2012, the Victorian Government has expanded family violence and sexual assault counselling services, enacted broad reforms to legal, police and court processes, strengthened an interconnected service system for women and children who experience violence and accountability mechanisms for men who use violence, and implemented a number of prevention and early intervention initiatives. This included over $90 million investment from the Victorian Government in The department continues to build partnerships across government and community service organisations to drive the implementation of the plan. Initiatives that have progressed during include providing more family violence risk assessment training to workers across all sectors, expanding the successful adolescent family violence

19 14 Annual report Victorian Department of Human Services program, and delivering more places for men s behaviour change programs. Another key initiative was the successful evaluation of the Strengthening Risk Management Program which brings together police, the courts, family and family violence services to keep women and children at high risk of family violence safe; and to hold dangerous perpetrators to account. Funding was committed as part of the state budget to rollout this program statewide. Much of the work achieved under the action plan has been informed by the Addressing Violence Against Women and Children Ministerial Advisory Group, comprising relevant government ministers, legal and law enforcement representatives, sector experts and advocates. The group met twice in National Foundation to Prevent Violence Against Women and their Children Establishing the National Foundation to Prevent Violence against Women and Children in July 2013 was a significant milestone in the effort to address and prevent violence against women and children in Victoria and, more broadly, across Australia. The foundation, which was recently renamed Our Watch, was launched to inform, educate and empower the community to end violence against women and their children. It is a joint initiative between the Victorian and Commonwealth Governments, with the Victorian Government contributing an initial $3.4 million over two years to establish the foundation and support its efforts in the community. In April 2014, the Victorian Government committed a further $3 million up to June 2017 to continue support for the valuable work of the foundation, including awareness-raising, engaging with the community, and driving broad-based change in attitudes that condone or excuse violence. The foundation will build partnerships with business, philanthropic organisations and governments across Australia and will look to the community to get behind and support the cause. Strengthening prevention of, and response to, abuse In November 2013, the Family and Community Development Committee of Parliament tabled the report of its inquiry into the handling of child abuse by religious and other nongovernment organisations, entitled Betrayal of trust. The report exposed the abuse of children by adults who were entrusted with their care, and made evident the devastating impact of that abuse. In May 2014, the Victorian Government announced its response to the report, supporting all 15 recommendations in principle and committing $10.1 million over four years for reforms to better protect children from abuse. As part of the whole-of-government response, three new offences have been introduced to prevent abuse of children and assist police to bring offenders to justice. The government has also committed to strengthening organisations approaches to preventing and responding to abuse. The department and other relevant government agencies are working with the Commission for Children and Young People to develop new child safe standards to strengthen the capacity of organisations that have direct and regular contact with children to prevent and respond to child abuse. A 'reportable conduct scheme' will also be introduced, where organisations with the highest responsibility for children, including out-of-home care providers, schools and other education and care services for children, will be required to report allegations and findings of child abuse centrally to the Commission for Children and Young People. These reforms build on existing measures in place to protect children from the risk of abuse.

20 15 Ensuring strong and sustainable social housing for the future Victorian Social Housing Framework The past year has seen clear new directions being set for social housing by the Victorian Government, building on work already done to improve public housing through better management of the waiting list and the commencement of new innovative redevelopment models. New directions for social housing: a framework for a strong and sustainable future (the framework) was released by the government on 28 March 2014, outlining the steps that will be taken to create a social housing system that supports the most vulnerable Victorians now and in the future. It commits to building better communities, delivering better opportunities to current and future tenants, and developing and maintaining better quality social housing assets in a financially sustainable way. As part of the framework, a neighbourly behaviour statement has been introduced outlining the responsibilities of tenants. The department has committed to establishing a new housing assistance website, which will make it easier for prospective and existing tenants to find information about their housing options. The department will also invest $1.3 billion over five years to upgrade 9,500 properties. Major redevelopments New Norlane New Norlane is an $80 million initiative to build 320 new affordable homes on vacant blocks of land in Norlane in Geelong. The project is progressing well, with development partners Burbank Australia, Hamlan Homes and Porter Davis building 160 private homes and 160 public housing homes in the area. The New Norlane display village showcases private home designs and opened in August 2013, with developers having sold over 70 private units. In , the project delivered its target of 53 public housing homes to achieve a total of 86 public housing homes to 30 June Olympia Housing initiative The Olympia Housing initiative continues to improve the quality and diversity of public housing in and near Heidelberg West. The $160 million initiative will see more than 600 new homes built over 10 years to replace outdated and unsuitable properties in the area, while ensuring no net loss of the number of public housing homes. A Community Liaison Committee has been set up to invite and consider the views of local residents. A total of 41 new homes are complete and construction is underway on a further 22 homes. Community support for the project is strong and continues to improve, with 470 tenant households having agreed to participate in the project or in discussions with the department about their housing options.

21 16 Annual report Victorian Department of Human Services Carlton redevelopment The Carlton redevelopment is a nine-stage mixed housing redevelopment being implemented in partnership with the Living Carlton Consortium. It will provide 246 new social housing homes and over 800 private homes across three sites. The third stage of the project was completed in April 2014, providing 112 public housing homes and 120 private homes. Stages four to nine are currently being constructed or designed. All 246 public housing units have now been delivered while the balance of the private housing is scheduled for completion by late Master planning for Prahran s estates Public consultation on draft masterplans for Prahran s public housing estates commenced this year, funded through the Commonwealth Government s Housing Affordability Fund. The first stage of the funding agreement involved the delivery of 547 new social housing properties at the Fitzroy, Prahran and Richmond housing estates in 2012 and 2013, and once delivered in 2015, the masterplan will guide the long-term renewal of the Prahran estates. Valley Park redevelopment The Valley Park redevelopment in Westmeadows is a partnership between the department and Australand to deliver 144 new social housing homes and more than 200 private homes in a mixed housing development. Construction has commenced on the estate, with future construction to take place on two adjacent sites. Baptcare has been selected through a Commonwealth Government tender to deliver a 90 to 120-bed aged care facility. Intervening early with the right support Victorian homelessness action plan The Victorian homelessness action plan focuses on delivering services in a new way to people experiencing homelessness. The $82.6 million plan includes supporting innovative approaches to addressing homelessness, investigating models that focus on early intervention and prevention and better targeting resources to when and where they are most needed and where they will make the biggest difference. During the past 12 months, the government has reviewed homelessness and family violence services with the sector and existing governance and network bodies. In October 2013, seven Innovation Action Projects commenced stage two of a sector-led initiative to trial new ways of delivering homelessness services in Victoria. Independent evaluation found that these projects were delivering promising outcomes and warranted further trial. A further $5.9 million has been invested in the Innovation Action Projects to extend the trials to June 2015, bringing the total funding for the initiative to $30.9 million over a three-year period from July 2012 to June Findings from the second stage will inform a future service response to homelessness for individuals and families. Social housing program During Victoria's community housing sector delivered over 280 new homes under the social housing program.

22 17 Youth foyers The department is working in partnership with the Brotherhood of St Laurence, Hanover Welfare Services and local tertiary education providers to establish three new 40-bed youth foyers. Youth foyers give young people who are unable to stay at home a stable place to live while they undertake courses that lead to employment. Staffed 24 hours a day, the youth foyers also provide support services such as life skills development courses, mental and physical health support, mentoring and employment assistance. In August 2013, the first of three youth foyers co-located with Holmesglen TAFE at the Waverley campus was officially opened. Construction of the second youth foyer at the Kangan Institute of TAFE in Broadmeadows was completed in May 2014 and students began moving in June. The third youth foyer is being established in Shepparton in association with the Goulburn Ovens Institute of TAFE (GOTAFE). The Greater Shepparton City Council granted planning approval for the foyer in January 2014, with construction to start in the second half of Youth foyers providing more than a place to stay Andrew* is a 17-year-old VCE student who became homeless after some difficult circumstances in his family home. Andrew spent about six months sleeping on friends couches while also struggling with depression and anxiety. Departmental youth worker, Susan*, encouraged Andrew to apply for a tenancy at the Holmesglen Youth Foyer. He says living at the youth foyer has been a huge support to him, especially when his father passed away shortly after he became a tenant. Andrew has really benefited from the positive environment at the youth foyer and feels like he is part of a small community. In addition to greater support and stability, it has opened up opportunities for Andrew and helped him establish friendships with other young people in the foyer. Staff at the youth foyer have helped Andrew get back on track with school, work on his mental health and assisted him in contacting specialist workers and Centrelink. They have also supported Andrew in becoming integrated in the youth foyer community, encouraging him to get involved in activities and to make friends among his peers. Youth foyer staff are delighted with Andrew s progress. Andrew entered the foyer as a shy, disengaged young person who was struggling with life s challenges now he is independent, has more confidence and feels more connected with his local community. After Andrew completes his VCE, he hopes to study a double degree in art and secondary teaching and pursue his dream to become an art teacher. *Not their real names.

23 18 Annual report Victorian Department of Human Services Youth Support Service The Youth Support Service provides early intervention support to young people aged 10 to 17 years old who are at risk of entering the youth justice system. The majority of referrals are from Victoria Police at their first point of contact with a young person. The service engages with young people to address the underlying factors that contribute to their offending behaviour. The service is having a positive impact on young people at risk, by preventing them from progressing into the youth justice system. An evaluation of the service in late 2013 found that most young people who had received support from the service did not have any further contact with police and were more likely to engage in education, training or employment and remain living at home with improved family relationships. The Victorian Government announced $17.1 million funding to continue the Youth Support Service in the State Budget. Helping people to participate in the community Supporting women to participate and reach their potential Supporting Victorian women to reach their full economic and social potential is an ongoing priority for the department. During several initiatives were delivered to help achieve this under the $2.4 million commitment to improve women s economic participation through the Women s economic participation action agenda Under the plan, 34 women received scholarships to undertake professional development with the Australian Institute of Company Directors through the Women s Governance Scholarship Program. Over 100 women have participated in social enterprise and small business workshops to enhance women s business opportunities and support and connect women entrepreneurs with business mentors. Eight Skill Women Trade Workshops were also held to encourage women to consider non-traditional careers. The department continues to manage the Women s Register, where women register their interest in serving on boards and committees. The register is used by government, nongovernment and community boards and committees to identify suitable candidates. The Rural women s network news moved to an online platform during the year and was ed to subscribers living in rural and regional Victoria. Improving outcomes for Aboriginal people The Human services Aboriginal strategic framework , which commenced in June 2013, articulates the department s focus on improving outcomes for Aboriginal children, families, young people and communities, and strengthening the service system to better support Aboriginal people. In July 2013 the first Commissioner for Aboriginal Children and Young People was appointed to improve outcomes for Aboriginal children and young people by addressing their vulnerabilities and significant overrepresentation in the child protection system. The department is also in the process of developing an Aboriginal inclusion action plan to ensure that services to support Aboriginal people are better coordinated and delivered. Men s sheds The department is continuing to support men to interact with their communities by providing grants for the development and refurbishment of men s sheds around Victoria. The sheds are especially valuable for men who have experienced a change in their lives and are at risk of becoming isolated and lonely by providing them with an opportunity to learn and use new skills, establish social networks and give back to their local community.

24 19 In 2014, $2.2 million in funding was announced to support the construction of 41 new men s sheds across Victoria, including one at Federation Square in Melbourne s CBD, which was officially opened in February Another $500,000 funding round opened in March 2014 to support the refurbishment of existing men s sheds. Neighbourhood houses Over 370 neighbourhood houses in Victoria were supported through the Neighbourhood House Coordination program during the year. The program funds neighbourhood houses to employ a coordinator to deliver a range of programs and activities for the community, including education and training. Neighbourhood houses play an important role in our communities. Around 154,000 people from various backgrounds and ages come together to meet, share information and learn in a supportive environment at Victorian neighbourhood houses each week. In May 2014, $2.9 million in additional funding was announced to continue to support the operation of neighbourhood houses across Victoria. Work and Learning Centres Work and Learning Centres are located near public housing estates and assist clients in these communities by providing pathways to employment and ultimately a job. In , 829 clients registered for assistance, including 425 public housing residents. Over 1,000 training engagements were undertaken and over 500 people engaged in employment. Since opening, the centres have supported 1,767 clients, provided 1,851 training engagements and placed 793 clients into employment. The initiative is delivered in partnership with the Brotherhood of St Laurence and local community services organisations. Engage, involve, create youth statement Engage, involve, create outlines the government s vision to see all young people reach their full potential, participate in the workforce and get involved in their community. This year, over 200,000 young Victorians participated in a range of departmental programs and initiatives under Engage, involve, create. These included Advance, a secondary schoolbased program giving over 20,000 students an opportunity to make a difference to their communities through volunteering; Engage!, which annually supports 35,000 young people to be actively involved in the community to build their skills and experience and support them with career pathways; and through FReeZa which annually engages 130,000 young people in supervised, drug, alcohol, smoke-free music events across Victoria. In April 2014, over 20,000 young Victorian participated in 94 National Youth Week events and projects across Victoria which were funded by the Victorian Government. Young people also had the opportunity to work with senior AFL reporters and editors through the AFL Rookie Reporter program, while others were able to provide advice to the Minister for Youth Affairs about issues that affect young people through the Involve Committee. During the year, 28 Scouts and Girl Guide halls received upgrades or renovation through the Scouts and Guides Facilities Grants program. Over 235 employers are now connected to the centres, which are located in Carlton, Geelong, Ballarat, Shepparton and Moe.

25 20 Annual report Victorian Department of Human Services Budding reporters hit the big time Giulio and Susan are 23-year-old aspiring journalists who were awarded an internship with the Australian Football League (AFL) media team as part of the Victorian Government s Rookie Reporter program. They both share a passion for sport and were ecstatic about getting a chance to work alongside senior AFL reporters and editors. The program provides two young people with a unique opportunity to cover games for the AFL website and gain invaluable experience at one of Australia s busiest digital media outlets. Although a bit awestruck at first, Susan found the program very rewarding and made the most of the opportunity. She enjoyed the chance to be part of all the behind-the-scenes action in the production room and see how news pieces unfold. For Giulio, who has always had a passionate interest in the AFL, this was a natural career progression where he could get hands-on experience in the world of sports journalism. Enterprise Strategy for Young Victorians The Enterprise Strategy for Young Victorians is designed to encourage and support entrepreneurship and innovation among young people in Victoria. There are currently two exciting enterprisefocused programs being run for young people in Victoria, with more in development. Getting Down to Business started in March 2014 and provides tailored training, mentoring and specialised support for young people who want to grow their existing business, start one from scratch or commercialise their new idea or innovation. New Gen began in August 2013 and provides training and support for both new and existing youth-led social enterprises who want to deliver better social outcomes through an enterprise model. The Exchange: an online forum for young people To encourage new ideas and discussion among young people, a new interactive website, the Exchange, was launched in March 2014, as part of the Victorian Government s Shape It! strategy. The Exchange is a network for youth advisory groups to share information, get involved in online discussions, and let each other know about conferences and events in their area. Since its launch, more than 50 groups and nearly 200 young people have registered on the site. The Exchange also enables consultation with young Victorians about issues that matter to them. The Shape It! strategy is about helping young people living in regional and rural Victoria get involved and engaged in decisions that affect them.

26 21 Youth Central Youth Central, the government s popular website for young people, received 2.13 million unique visitors in , an increase of 530,000 from the previous year. The design of the website was refreshed in May In the following 12 months, the unique visitors to the website increased by 27 per cent and page views increased by 25 per cent. VCE student scholarships At an event in December 2013, 150 secondary school students who live in social housing or are at risk of homelessness were presented with a $1,100 scholarship to help them continue their studies. The department s Student Scholarship Program is delivered in partnership with Kids Under Cover and aims to improve school retention rates. Schools nominate students for the scholarships, and the funding, which is distributed through the schools, is used for a range of items to help recipients stay at school, including books, specialist and computer equipment, disability aids, transport and childcare. Helping young people at risk get back on track Expanding the Malmsbury youth justice centre Construction commenced in November 2013 on a new $46 million 45-bed centre at the Malmsbury Youth Justice Precinct to address growing needs. The purpose-built facility will expand capacity in the youth justice system and provide greater flexibility in the way that young people are accommodated across both the Parkville and Malmsbury precincts. The centre is on track for completion in 2015 and will include increased security and better facilities with stand-alone education and recreation buildings. Visitors centre at Parkville Visitors and young people at the Parkville Youth Justice Precinct have been making good use of the new Yannabil Visitor Centre since its official opening in December The $1.6 million centre enhances safety and security at the precinct and includes a number of indoor and outdoor spaces. The purpose-built centre is designed to provide a welcoming environment, where young people and their visitors can interact to support and maintain important family relationships. Enhanced health and education services in secure settings The Victorian Government s focus on the importance of education led to the development of Parkville College, a specialised school, in The Parkville College model has created a unique hub of best practice in the successful engagement of at-risk young people. The college has attracted award winning teachers to its staff team, including the 2014 Secondary Teacher of the Year.

27 22 Annual report Victorian Department of Human Services Further development of the school over the past year has seen the college assume responsibility for vocational training, programs and some recreational activities at both youth justice precincts. This allows for program delivery by a single provider with expertise in working within a custodial setting and working with marginalised young people. From February 2014, Parkville College also commenced education classes at the Disability Forensic Assessment and Treatment Service. On 1 January 2014, the Youth Health and Rehabilitation Service (YHaRS) began providing health services to youth justice clients in the two precincts. YHaRS provides a comprehensive range of primary health and mental health services, risk screening, health promotion and illness prevention services, as well as rehabilitation programs to address offending behaviour. The service is a non-incorporated consortium comprising the Youth Support and Advocacy Service (the lead provider), St Vincent s Hospital Melbourne, and Caraniche. It also provides rehabilitation services to youth justice clients in the community, allowing for seamless health services for this vulnerable group of young people. Helping people through hard times Supporting individuals and communities after natural disasters and emergencies Over the summer, Victoria experienced a very active bushfire and heatwave season that impacted many communities across the state. Sadly, a life was lost, and fire destroyed 61 primary residences. Many Victorians affected by bushfire had previously been impacted by other natural disasters in recent years. A major emergency during this season was the Hazelwood coal mine fire. Hazelwood coal mine fire The people of Morwell were significantly impacted by the Hazelwood coal mine fire that started on 9 February and burned for 45 days, releasing smoke and ash. It was the largest coal fire experienced in Australia, covering a three-kilometre section of a disused coalmine face. The department worked closely with response, relief and recovery partners, local government and affected communities to provide support, including: personal hardship respite and relocation grants totalling over $3.3 million outreach to almost 6,500 households establishing a respite centre in Moe for Morwell residents free V/Line travel; entry into Museum Victoria venues; transport; food and drink vouchers for the Morwell community a departmental hotline which received over 10,300 calls psychosocial recovery information sessions with expert disaster psychologists a Community Information and Recovery Centre, opened in partnership with Latrobe City Council.

28 23 Connecting Anna with the right support during the Hazelwood coal mine fire Anna* is an elderly Morwell South resident who lives on her own without any support services. After experiencing some respiratory irritation from the smoky conditions caused by February s open cut mine fire in Hazelwood, Anna caught a bus to the Moe Town Hall Respite Centre to seek some assistance and relief. The department identified that Anna fitted into the department s vulnerable category for this incident and that she was eligible for aged care supported accommodation in a nearby town. To make her relocation as smooth and easy as possible, the department contacted the Red Cross who helped Anna pack her belongings so her stay would be pleasant and comfortable. Anna also received payments through the Victorian and Commonwealth Governments Personal Hardship Voluntary Relocation Payment program to help with some of the costs incurred during the relocation. *Not her real name. Helping communities affected by emergencies During the year the department coordinated relief and recovery services for emergencyaffected communities. Local councils established relief centres for people with nowhere else to go during each emergency. With department guidance, local councils also opened recovery centres to provide information and support to affected communities. The department established the 2014 State Bushfire Recovery Coordination Team to coordinate state recovery for the 2014 bushfires. The Victorian Government also announced a $2.3 million psychosocial and community recovery package. The department will roll out the recovery package, which includes counselling, case support, community development officers, capacity building initiatives and local government recovery support. Emergency Relief and Recovery Victoria website As the Victorian Government s coordinating agency for emergency relief and recovery, the department launched the Emergency Relief and Recovery Victoria website in August The site provides information for Victorian communities and local governments during and after a major emergency, such as a bushfire, flood or storm. This includes practical information and advice about emergency relief centres, emergency financial assistance and support programs. The site is accessible on a range of mobile devices and Victoria s Office of Multicultural Affairs and Citizenship has helped develop recovery information in 14 languages for Victorians from culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) backgrounds as part of a best practice pilot project.

29 24 Annual report Victorian Department of Human Services Valuing and showcasing achievements in human services The Making a Difference Awards The Making a Difference Awards recognise the department s star achievers each year, including staff and teams who have demonstrated our organisational values in their work and made a significant difference in the lives of Victorians in need. The department s Secretary, Gill Callister, presented nine awards at the award ceremony on 5 December 2013, congratulating the winners and finalists for their passion and dedication to supporting clients, and awarding a Secretary s award for the second year running. Robin Clark Memorial Awards Now in its 12th year, the Robin Clark Memorial Awards were held on 2 September 2013, and for the second year running incorporated the Aboriginal Carer of the Year Award. There were 10 awards presented across four categories, recognising the volunteers, individuals and organisations that are demonstrating excellence in improving outcomes for children, young people and families. Protecting Children Awards The Protecting Children Awards were also held on 2 September 2013 as part of Child Protection Week. Fifty-eight departmental child protection practitioners were recognised across six award categories for their significant achievements and for demonstrating best practice in protecting vulnerable children and young people. Disability Sector Awards The annual Victorian Disability Sector Awards recognise the achievements and contributions made by individuals, businesses and organisations to the lives of people with a disability. This year, the awards received a record 182 nominations and the awards ceremony in June was hosted by television personality and comedian Tim Ferguson. Seven individuals and 11 groups across nine award categories were finalists in the awards and three individuals and six teams took out the top award in their categories. Women s Honour Roll Coinciding with International Women s Day celebrations held in March 2014, 20 inspirational women were inducted into the Victorian Honour Roll of Women in recognition of their contributions across science, engineering, health, education, arts and community services. Frances Penington and Molly Hadfield Awards The annual Frances Penington Award, which recognises social housing tenants who are contributing to their community through volunteering, was presented in December For the first time in , the inaugural Molly Hadfield Award was also presented to a social housing tenant in recognition of outstanding services to older people. The award is named after the late Mary (Molly) Hadfield OAM, who was a dedicated advocate for public housing tenants.

30 25 Strengthening transparency and accountability A focus on performance in service delivery The department is continuing to hold Divisional Performance Assurance and Compliance (DPAC) meetings, which are a new way for the department s board members and senior divisional managers to have regular discussions about how the divisions are performing against agreed performance indicators, to get the best outcomes for Victorians in need. Two meetings are held in each of the department s four divisions annually. At each meeting, a series of evidence-based questions are put to the divisional leadership group by the board members regarding the division s performance, focusing in particular on the quality of service that has been delivered to clients. The meetings, which are regularly attended by staff, provide an opportunity for the board to focus and build on areas of strength and examine those that need improvement. Strategies are discussed to address any emerging performance issues, drawing on best practice examples from across the department. The DPAC meetings have demonstrably lifted performance across the department and helped our executives and senior managers build on approaches that are working well, as well as focusing on areas for improvement. Tracking how services are delivered by funded organisations In , the department implemented a new service delivery tracking process for funded community service organisations to account for service delivery against service agreement targets, in line with public accountability requirements. funded by the department are required to directly account for the services they have provided against their service agreement targets on a monthly basis, providing the organisation and the department with an up-todate picture of how services are being delivered. Developing an outcomes framework One of the main goals of the department s transformation program is to improve outcomes for people who use human services. To do this, the department is developing an outcomes framework, which sets out the outcomes we aspire to for Victorians in need, and how these can be measured. The measurement of outcomes is essential if we are to understand whether the services being funded and delivered are having a real and lasting impact for people. The outcomes framework is being tested through Services Connect and is driving a stronger connection between performance accountability and client outcomes. This year, the department has consulted on the framework with non-government service providers and experts, departmental staff and other government departments. Overall, there is strong support for moving to an outcomesfocused way of working. The Services Connect outcomes framework will also inform the Community Sector Reform Council s work to develop a statewide approach to measuring outcomes by the sector and government. The new tracking process, introduced in January 2014, improves the flow of information about service delivery between the department and funded organisations. Organisations

31 26 Annual report Victorian Department of Human Services Easing cost of living pressures Concessions This year, the Victorian Government continued to ease cost of living pressures by supporting low income households to pay for vital services, including gas, water, electricity and council rates. The annual electricity and winter gas concessions benefited more than 900,000 households in , by providing a concession on electricity and winter gas bills. Bond loan scheme The department s Bond Loan Scheme assists people establish tenancies in private rental housing by helping with the upfront costs of moving in. The scheme provides eligible people with an interest-free loan to cover the cost of the bond. In , the department issued 12,443 bond loans to people in need. On 1 December 2013, the Excess Energy Concession was also introduced, requiring households with annual bills of more than $2,763 in electricity, or more than $1,462 in gas during the six winter months, to apply to continue to receive concessions on energy consumed above these amounts. The Excess Energy Concession was introduced to ensure that concession discounts are better targeted to those most in need of assistance. The Victorian Government has committed to cover a shortfall in Commonwealth Government contributions to the concessions program announced in May 2014, to ensure concessions cardholders continue to receive the same discounts they have previously. Carer Card The Victorian Carer Card Program continues to provide unpaid carers with access to benefits and discounts on a range of retail and lifestyle products as well as other goods and services. In a direct outreach campaign saw over 110 new businesses, councils and other organisations partner with the program to help recognise the significant contribution made by carers in the Victorian community. A public awareness campaign was also held during Carers Week in October 2013 and as a result, over 300 new carers joined the program.

32 27 Structural changes to the department during To ensure the department is appropriately organised to successfully deliver high quality, responsive and integrated services we made some important structure changes to our highlevel management arrangements during the year. The two output measures were included in the Department of Human Services output performance reporting from as part of the Community Participation output group. The changes included the establishment of the Social Housing and National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) Reform Group. This new group is responsible for overseeing the Social Housing Reform Branch, the NDIS Implementation Branch and the Property and Asset Services Branch. This group is also responsible for Director of Housing statutory requirements. The Community and Executive Services Office for Youth, Disability and Women s Affairs and the Royal Commission teams were moved to the Service Design and Implementation Group, to better facilitate collaboration across the relevant policy and program delivery areas. The Corporate Services Group was renamed Financial and Corporate Services Group to reflect the department s focus on strong fiscal management. Since the Office for the Community Sector moved to the department on 3 June 2013, following a machinery of government change, two Office for the Community Sector output measures are now aligned into the department s output structure. These are: Strategy implementation actions within agreed performance targets: community organisations and Strategy implementation actions within agreed performance targets: volunteering. Ministers responsible for the former Department of Planning and Community Development tabled an annual report on 18 September 2013 acquitting those two measures for

33 28 Annual report Victorian Department of Human Services Capital projects The department and its related portfolio entities manage a number of capital projects. For information on recent capital projects for the department and the broader Victorian public sector, please refer to the Victorian State Budget State capital program (Budget Paper 4) available on the Department of Treasury and Finance s website: publications/budget-paper-no-4-state-capital- Program This publication also contains information on the department s and its related portfolio agencies asset investment programs.

34 29 Departmental objectives, indicators and progress As outlined in the in Budget Paper No.3 Service Delivery, the department s objectives and indicators 5, together with the progress on those indicators, are outlined below. Departmental objective Immediate support Immediate support Indicators and progress Indicator: Stability in out-of-home care placements Out-of-home care: a five-year plan was released in March 2014, outlining the Victorian Government s plan to reform the way the out-of-home care system operates to deliver better personal, social and economic outcomes for children and young people. The plan is supported by a $128 million package to transform the way care is provided for more than 500 vulnerable children and young people living in residential care, and thousands more in family and kinship care. Between and , the proportion of children and young people in out-of-home care who had two or less placements in the last 12 months increased by 5.8 per cent to 91 per cent. (Budget Paper No. 3). Indicator: Improved safety of children reported to child protection During , significant progress was achieved in implementing many of the core commitments outlined in the Victoria s vulnerable children: our shared responsibility strategy , released in May Key milestones achieved under the strategy this year include: the release of Out-of-home care: a five-year plan the establishment of eight Children and Youth Area Partnership launch sites the establishment of four new intensive Cradle to Kinder services, and progress on the development of three new multidisciplinary centres for victims of sexual assault. Between and the number of ChildFIRST assessments and interventions increased by 12.6 per cent or 1,362 to a total of 12,142 children (Budget Paper No. 3). In Victoria had the lowest proportion of children of all states and territories with substantiated cases of neglect at 4.8 per cent. This reflects Victoria s targeted statutory interventions and service responses from ChildFIRST and funded family services; 91 per cent of Victorian children commencing intensive family support services in lived in the care of their families (with parents or other relatives/kin) (Child Protection Australia 2014). In May 2014, the Victorian Government announced its response to the Betrayal of trust report, supporting in principle all 15 recommendations and committing $10.1 million over four years for reforms to protect children from abuse. The department is contributing to the whole-of-victorian Government response to the report, including the introduction of the 'reportable conduct scheme', where organisations with the highest responsibility for children, including out-of-home care, schools and other education and care services for children, will be required to report allegations and findings of child abuse centrally to the Commission for Children and Young People. These reforms build on existing measures in place to protect children from the risk of abuse. 5 Most recently published datasets have been used.

35 30 Annual report Victorian Department of Human Services Departmental objective Immediate support Capabilities and participation Capabilities and participation Indicators and progress Indicator: Achievement of independent and sustainable housing upon exit from homelessness services The Victorian homelessness action plan was released by the Victorian Government in October It focuses on delivering services to people experiencing homelessness in a new way, including innovative approaches to addressing homelessness and investigating models that focus on early intervention and prevention to better target resources when and where they are most needed and will make the biggest difference. The government announced a further $5.9 million to extend the Innovation Action Projects trials, under the plan, to June This brings the total funding for the initiative to $30.9 million over a three-year period from July 2012 to June The projects are designed to trial new ways of delivering homelessness services in Victoria and findings from the second stage will help inform a future service response to homelessness for individuals and families. Victorian homelessness services assisted 20,637 or 22.4 per cent more clients in who needed assistance to obtain or maintain independent housing and who achieved independent housing after support, and did not present again with a need for accommodation within the reporting period. (Report on Government Services 2014) Indicator: People with a disability participating in social and community activities The Victorian state disability plan , released on 19 December 2012, sets out how the government is helping to make a positive difference in the lives of people with a disability by ensuring they have access to more opportunities to participate in work and their community. In May 2014, more than 400 people with a disability from metropolitan and rural Victoria provided their views on the progress of the state disability plan as part of a statewide survey. The results are being used to monitor the effectiveness of the plan and help ensure that it is meeting the needs of people with a disability. In , 14,593 people were supported with individualised support funding (ISP), and 5,041 community based shared supported accommodation beds were provided. Only a very small number of clients still live in residential institutions (125). In , 72,170 individuals in Victoria used disability services, of which 71 per cent or 51,581 people accessed two or more services including accommodation support, community support, community access, respite care and employment services (Disability Services Australia ). Indicator: Attendance of young people in detention in accredited education or training Parkville College is a joint project between the departments of Human Services and Education, providing education up to year 12, as well as the Victorian Certificate of Applied Learning and the Victorian Certificate of Education across the Parkville and Malmsbury campuses. The college holds classes for every young person in the youth justice centres six days a week, every week of the year. Literacy and numeracy are the focus on weekdays, and weekend classes consist of vocational education and training to prepare young people for employment or further training once they leave custody. Since the establishment of Parkville College in February 2013, education hours have increased from eight hours per week to 30 hours.

36 31 Departmental objective Capabilities and participation Quality of life Quality of life Indicators and progress Katherine Tsagaris who leads a team of teachers at Parkville College won the state s Secondary Teacher of the Year award this year. Of the total number (82) of young people in detention of compulsory school age that were eligible to attend, 100 per cent attended an accredited education or training course in Indicator: Children in out-of-home care meeting literacy and numeracy benchmarks The department is committed to improving the educational progress and achievement of children and young people in out-of-home care. The Victoria s vulnerable children: our shared responsibility baseline performance data report 2013 was published in December 2013, providing a baseline to measure progress in reducing the incidence of vulnerability and improving life outcomes for vulnerable children. Annual performance reports will be released each year to measure progress against the baseline data and identify where government and service providers are doing well and where further work is required. Data from the Victoria s vulnerable children: our shared responsibility baseline data report 2013 will also be used as the benchmark for future reporting on National Assessment Program for Literacy and Numeracy (NAPLAN) results for children in out-of-home care as they become available during Indicator: New housing allocations to those in greatest need and efficient management of housing stock (including occupancy rate and turnaround time) The past year has seen a strong commitment by the Victorian Government to develop and maintain better quality social housing for Victorians that is financially sustainable for the future. New directions for social housing: a framework for a strong and sustainable future was released on 28 March 2014, outlining the steps that will be taken to create a social housing system that supports the most vulnerable Victorians now and in the future. Under the framework, a neighbourly behaviour statement has been introduced outlining the responsibilities of tenants, and a new housing assistance website is being developed, which will make it easier for prospective and existing tenants to find information about their housing options. In addition, $1.3 billion will be invested over five years to upgrade 9,500 housing properties. There has been an increase in the allocation of housing to people in greatest need in both public housing (to 76.7 per cent) and community housing (to 89.8 per cent) between and (Report on government services 2014) The average turnaround time (days) for vacant stock in public housing reduced 1.6 days to 30.3 in Housing occupancy rates increased to 97.3 per cent in public housing and 95 per cent in community housing. (Report on government services 2014) Indicator: Disability clients receiving individualised support to live in the community A key feature of the transformation of human services in Victoria is providing people with more choice and control over the services they receive. During , the department took a lead role implementing the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS), giving people with a disability, their

37 32 Annual report Victorian Department of Human Services Departmental objective Indicators and progress families and carers the power to decide what specific support they receive, based on their needs and aspirations. A trial of the NDIS began in the Barwon Area on 1 July 2013, with the department working closely with the National Disability Insurance Agency (NDIA) to transition clients in the trial area to the scheme. The NDIA was established in 2013 as an independent statutory agency of the Commonwealth Government to implement the scheme, and the opening of its interim head office in Geelong on 30 April 2014 was a major milestone for Victorians involved in the scheme. The department s Individual Support Package (or ISP) program continues to provide people with a disability with flexible funding to meet their disability support needs. Recipients develop a personal plan that outlines their goals and aspirations and the support required to meet these, often helping to support them to maintain their independence, help them to continue living in their own home, connect them with new skills or support them to participate in community life. A total of 14,593 clients were provided with individualised support to live in the community in Following the announcement of the closure of the Sandhurst Centre in Bendigo in May 2013, the Victorian Government has this year partnered with the Oakleigh Centre for Intellectually Disabled Citizens (the Oakleigh Centre) to redevelop the Allen Street congregate care service and build up to five new supported accommodation homes for the residents. The homes will be built over the next three years in Oakleigh and surrounding areas, and will be designed to better meet the needs of residents and support them to participate in their local community. The Victorian Government has allocated $14.1 million to developing the facilities, with a contribution also to be made by the Oakleigh Centre.

38 33 Operational and budgetary objectives and performance against objectives The following sections outline details of the outputs provided by the department to the government, including performance measures and costs for each output, followed by the actual performance results against budgeted targets by output for the department for the full year ending 30 June Output performance Disability Services The Disability Services output, through the provision of continuing care and support services for people with disabilities, their carers and their families, aims to make a positive difference for Victorians experiencing disadvantage and provide excellent community services to meet clients needs. This output provides: programs and resources that enable clients with a disability to exercise choice and control through the use of packages of individualised funding specialised support for people with a disability and resources and programs that build capacity to respond to the needs of people with a disability, and bed and facility-based services characterised by the bundling of accommodation services and disability support. This output supports the department s capabilities and participation and quality of life objectives. Major output / Deliverable Performance measures Unit of measure target actual Quantity Clients accessing aids and equipment number 29,827 29,119 The result reflects the more complex equipment requirements and assistance levels in The average number of items provided through the Aids and Equipment Program has decreased while the amount of subsidy per item and average subsidy per client has increased. Clients in residential institutions number The result reflects the continuing reduction in the number of individuals living in residential institutions. Clients receiving case management services number 5,300 5,435 The result reflects the ongoing focus on supporting and assisting clients to achieve their goals. Clients receiving individualised support number 14,924 14,593 The target included a number of ISPs to be funded through the introduction of the board and lodging fee model in residential services. Due to withdrawal of the fee model, a number of ISPs were unable to be allocated. Hours of community-based respite number 1,000,000 1,012,920 Number of respite days number 96, ,006 Number of supported accommodation beds number 5,043 5,041

39 34 Annual report Victorian Department of Human Services Major output / Deliverable Performance measures Unit of measure target actual Quality Clients satisfied with the aids and per cent (est.) equipment services system Actual data to be available through survey results due in October Clients who have had a comprehensive health per cent status review The positive result reflects the ongoing focus on improving the quality of service to clients. Organisations that have successfully completed a quality review (accommodation supports) Organisations that have successfully completed a quality review (client services and capacity) Organisations that have successfully completed a quality review (individualised supports) Support plans reviewed at least once during each period of three years commencing from when the support plan was first prepared (accommodation supports) per cent per cent per cent per cent Support plans reviewed at least once during per cent (est.) each period of three years commencing from when the support plan was first prepared (individualised supports) The department has a plan to collect data by the end of the 2014 calendar year for reporting in the Budget papers. Support plans reviewed every 12 months for persons residing in residential institutions per cent

40 35 Major output / Deliverable Performance measures Unit of measure target actual Timeliness Applications for aids and equipment per cent acknowledged in writing within ten working days A positive result indicating a more timely and responsive service. Proportion of clients whose support is per cent commenced within departmental timelines This measure includes the transfer of clients from Futures For Young Adults to Individualised Support which has undergone significant growth within Support plans prepared within 60 days of the person commencing to regularly access the disability services (accommodation supports) Support plans prepared within 60 days of the person commencing to regularly access the disability services (individualised supports) per cent per cent Supported accommodation occupancy rate per cent Cost Total output cost $ million 1, ,573.5

41 36 Annual report Victorian Department of Human Services Child Protection and Family Services The Child Protection and Family Services outputs, fund statutory child protection services, family support and parenting services, family violence and sexual assault services, adoption and placement care services and specialist support services, to ensure the safety and wellbeing of adolescents and children at risk of harm, abuse and neglect. This output aims to make a positive difference for Victorians experiencing disadvantage by providing excellent community services to meet clients needs. This output provides: child protection services to ensure the safety and wellbeing of children and young people at risk of harm, abuse, and neglect specialist support and placement services to ensure the safety and wellbeing of children and young people who require support to remain with their family or are placed in out-of-home care, and a range of early intervention and support services to ensure the safety and wellbeing of children, young people, and families. This output supports the department s immediate support and capabilities and participation objectives. Major output / Deliverable Performance measures Unit of measure target actual Quantity Daily average number of children in number 7,200 7,283 out-of-home care placements The higher than expected actual reflects increased demand for out-of-home care placements. Number of ChildFIRST assessments number 9,870 12,142 and interventions This result reflects an increase in assistance provided due to increasing demand for ChildFIRST services. The measure was reviewed in with the target increased from 9,870 to 11,171 to better reflect actual assistance being delivered and additional budget funding being provided in Number of children in kinship care whose number placements are managed by community service organisations The lower than expected actual is due to a lower number of referrals and issues with attracting and retaining staff. These matters are being addressed through Out-of-home care: a five-year plan. Number of children receiving an number 900 1,410 intensive support service The higher than expected actual is a result of a more robust data collection method. This measure was reviewed in with target increased from 900 to 1,400 to better reflect actual number of children receiving an intensive support service and additional budget funding being provided in Number of family services cases number 1,500 2,388 provided to Aboriginal families This result reflects increased numbers of Aboriginal families engaged in both Aboriginal and mainstream family services. The measure was reviewed in with the target increased from 1,500 to 2,400 to better reflect actual assistance being delivered.

42 37 Major output / Deliverable Performance measures Unit of measure target actual Reports to Child Protection Services about number 81,000 82,075 the wellbeing and safety of children The higher actual reflects an increase in demand driven by a range of factors including family violence reports and greater public attention on child abuse. Total number of family services cases provided number 26,364 31,962 The higher than target actual result reflects an increased level of demand for family services. The measure was reviewed in with the target increased from 26,364 to 33,600 to better reflect actual assistance being delivered and additional funding being provided in Quality Children and young people in out-of-home care per cent who have had two or less placements in the last 12 months (not including placements at home) This over performance may have been influenced by initiatives to support carers introduced in the past 12 months. Children and young people who were the subject per cent of a substantiated report within 12 months of the closure of a previous substantiated report The small over target result may reflect an over reliance on voluntary plans rather than on children's court intervention orders. Children and young people who were the subject per cent 5 3 of an investigation which led to a decision not to substantiate, who were subsequently the subject of a substantiation within three months of case closure A positive result reflecting good investigation and risk assessment practice and appropriate decision making that occurred in case closure. Organisations that have successfully per cent completed a quality review (family and community services) A positive result, all organisations that had a scheduled review against the Department of Human Services Standards have successfully completed their reviews. Organisations that have successfully completed a per cent quality review (specialist support and placement services) A positive result, all organisations that had a scheduled review against the Department of Human Services Standards have successfully completed their reviews. Proportion of Aboriginal children placed per cent with relatives/kin, other Aboriginal carers or in Aboriginal residential care. The higher than expected actual is a positive result as a result of increased focus on the Aboriginal Child Placement Principle in the past 12 months. Proportion of placements that are home-based care per cent 90 93

43 38 Annual report Victorian Department of Human Services Major output / Deliverable Performance measures Unit of measure target actual Timeliness Percentage of child protection reports requiring a priority investigation visited within two days Sexual assault support services clients receiving an initial response within five working days of referral per cent per cent Cost Total output cost $ million

44 39 Youth Services and Youth Justice Youth Services and Youth Justice outputs fund a range of services including the provision of advice to courts, community-based and custodial supervision, and youth services, to make a positive difference for Victorians experiencing disadvantage by providing excellent community services to meet clients needs. Youth Justice Custodial Services This output provides supervision and rehabilitation, through the provision of case management, health and education services and the establishment of structured community supports, to assist young people address offending behaviour, develop non-offending lifestyles and support the re-integration of the young person into the community at the completion of their sentence. This output supports the department s immediate support objective and capabilities and participation objective. Major output / Deliverable Performance measures Unit of measure target actual Quantity Annual daily average number of young people in custody: Male (under 15 years) and female Annual daily average number of young people in custody: males (15 years plus) Average daily custodial centre utilisation rate: males (15 years plus) number number per cent Average daily custodial centre utilisation rate: per cent males (under 15 years) and female The above results reflect Victoria s strong diversion program. Quality Clients participating in community per cent re-integration activities This positive result reflects increased participation in the temporary leave program. This is dependent upon a thorough risk assessment of each client and the length of time that clients remain in custody. Timeliness Young people on custodial orders who have a client assessment and plan completed within six weeks of commencement of the order per cent Cost Total output cost $ million

45 40 Annual report Victorian Department of Human Services Community-Based Services This output provides community statutory supervision and support to young people subject to community-based dispositions in order to divert young people from the youth justice system and minimise the likelihood of further offending. This output supports the department s immediate support objective and capabilities and participation objective. Major output / Deliverable Performance measures Unit of measure target actual Quantity Average daily number of clients under number 1,625 1,076 community-based supervision This positive result reflects that young people are being diverted from youth justice supervision. Proportion of youth justice clients under community-based supervision per cent Quality Community-based orders completed successfully per cent Performance above target reflects that more young people have been supported to successfully complete community-based orders. Timeliness Young people on supervised orders who have a client assessment and plan completed within six weeks of commencement of the order per cent Cost Total output cost $ million

46 41 Concessions to Pensioners and Beneficiaries Concessions to Pensioners and Beneficiaries outputs, through the development and coordination of the delivery of concessions and relief grants to eligible consumers and concession card holders, aim to make a positive difference for Victorians experiencing disadvantage by providing excellent community services to meet clients' needs. This output provides reductions in the price of energy, water and municipal rates to eligible consumers and concession card holders. It also provides trustee services for people on a low income or those who are subject to an order by the Victorian Civil and Administrative Tribunal, and other social and community services, including the provision of emergency relief for individuals or families who are experiencing immediate and personal distress due to a financial or domestic crisis. This output supports the department's quality of life objective. Major output / Deliverable Performance measures Unit of measure target actual Quantity Households receiving mains electricity concessions number 889, ,106 Households receiving mains gas concessions number 590, ,341 Households receiving non-mains energy concessions Households receiving pensioner concessions for municipal rates and charges Households receiving water and sewerage concessions number 21,600 22,091 number 427, ,118 number 683, ,220 Number of clients receiving trustee services number 14,600 14,252 Quality Percentage of Community Service Agreement per cent performance targets that have been achieved by State Trustees. This is a positive result for the compliance of financial administration and trustee services with agreed service standards. Timeliness Percentage of customer requests answered by per cent State Trustees within the timelines set in the Community Service Agreement This is a positive result for ongoing management within agreed product-specific service levels. Cost Total output cost $ million

47 42 Annual report Victorian Department of Human Services Housing Assistance Housing Assistance outputs, through the provision of homelessness services, crisis and transitional accommodation and long-term adequate, affordable and accessible housing assistance, coordinated with support services where required, home renovation assistance and the management of the home loan portfolio, aim to make a positive difference for Victorians experiencing disadvantage by providing excellent housing and community services to meet clients' needs. This output supports the department s immediate support and quality of life objectives and provides: housing assistance for low-income families, older people, singles, youth, and other households. Responding to the needs of clients through the provision of appropriate accommodation, including short-term and long-term properties that assist in reducing and preventing homelessness, and housing support services to people who are homeless or at risk of homelessness, in short-term housing or crisis situations. Support will assist clients in accessing and maintaining tenancies in appropriate accommodation. Services provided will assist in the prevention and overall reduction of homelessness and decrease demand for social housing. Major output / Deliverable Performance measures Unit of measure target actual Quantity Bond loans provided during year number 11,900 12,443 This result reflects increased demand for this service. Households assisted with housing establishment assistance during year number 36,000 36,000 (est.) Number of clients assisted to address number 106, ,000 (est.) and prevent homelessness Estimate provided due to information not being available at the time of publication. The target has been revised to 100,000 reflecting improved demand forecasting. Number of households assisted with number 9,400 9,046 crisis/transitional accommodation The lower actual reflects lower turnover rates in transitional housing management properties. Number of households assisted with long term number 77,303 77,343 (est.) social housing (public, Indigenous and community long-term tenancies at end of year) The actual result will be available end of Q Community sector data collections are expected in late Number of new households assisted to maintain or enter home ownership (including home renovation inspections as well as loans) Number of public housing dwellings upgraded during year number 4,300 4,181 number 1,600 1,648 Total number of social housing dwellings number 84,351 85,199 Total number of social housing dwellings acquired during the year number

48 43 Major output / Deliverable Performance measures Unit of measure target actual Quality Percentage of clients with case plans in per cent (est.) homelessness support programs with some, most or all of their case plan goals achieved. Estimate provided due to information not being available at the time of publication. The result will be reported in the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare Specialist homelessness collection Percentage of neighbourhood renewal projects that have achieved active resident participation in governance structures Social housing tenants satisfied with completed urgent maintenance works per cent per cent Timeliness Average waiting time for public rental housing months (est.) for those clients who have received early housing allocation Estimate provided due to information not being available at the time of publication. The data system reporting has a scheduled resolution for Q Proportion of homelessness support episodes per cent (est.) where an accommodation need was unable to be either provided or referred The result is estimated to be above target due to changes in the way the data is collected. A new method of data collection has resulted in a wider range of service providers; different service models and expanded needs being captured and amended data definitions. It records clients who request long-term housing from specialist homelessness services that do not provide such services and also includes data from specialist homelessness services that do not provide accommodation. The data therefore is no longer directly comparable. Replaced with new measure in BP3 that more accurately measures unmet need for accommodation. Cost Total output cost $ million The higher actual reflects additional funding from the Commonwealth for the Transitional Homelessness National Partnership Agreement and the Social and Community Services Pay Equity Case. Appropriation was also transferred from contributed capital to output appropriation for provision of additional services to housing assistance clients.

49 44 Annual report Victorian Department of Human Services Empowering Individuals and Communities Empowering Individuals and Communities is delivered through funded programs that support community participation including neighbourhood houses, men s sheds, community support projects and programs for youth, women and people with a disability. Leadership is delivered for whole of government policy on youth, women and disability that will create an environment that encourages equity and improves outcomes in all aspects of life for youth, women and people with a disability. The output description has been revised to reflect the completion of community renewal activities and the addition of elements following machinery of government changes that resulted in the transfer of community support projects into the department. Office for Disability Office for Disability leads and coordinates whole of government policy, supports disability action planning, and provides funding and support to disability advocacy and self-advocacy organisations so that people with a disability experience reduced disadvantage, can fully participate in the community, and have their rights upheld. This output supports the department's capabilities and participation objective. Major output / Deliverable Performance measures Unit of measure target actual Quantity Number of Disability Advocacy clients number 1,700 1,701 Quality Client satisfaction with advice provided per cent Timeliness Office for Disability Projects per cent delivered within agreed timeframes The Victorian state disability plan is the key deliverable for the Office for Disability. All timeframes have been met. Cost Total output cost $ million

50 45 Office of Women s Affairs The Office of Women s Affairs leads and coordinates whole of government policy, engages with women from diverse backgrounds and delivers initiatives to improve the lives of Victorian women and support their economic, social and civic participation. This output supports the department's capabilities and participation objective. This output supports the department s capabilities and participation objective. Major output / Deliverable Performance measures Unit of measure target actual Quantity Number of women engaged with the Office number 800 1,228 of Women's Affairs through delivery of funded projects and targeted meetings as part of program delivery and policy development This result is above target due to the one-off consultation with subscribers regarding an electronic newsletter publication. Number of women participating in funded number 625 1,167 programs, projects and events The result is due to increased enrolments in family violence risk assessment training as a result of increased awareness and response to family violence issues. Quality Funded projects (any project or activity funded from the Office of Women's Affairs budget, including programs funded by Office of Women's Affairs, but delivered in partnership with another agency or service) meet agreed project objectives Participant satisfaction with Office of Women's Affairs funded programs, projects and events Timeliness Office of Women's Affairs projects delivered within agreed timeframes per cent per cent per cent Cost Total output cost $ million The lower actual primarily reflects funding carried over to meet service and project commitments in

51 46 Annual report Victorian Department of Human Services Community Participation Community Participation programs include the Neighbourhood House Coordination Program, men's sheds, community renewal and community finance initiatives. These programs support the social and economic participation of Victorian communities, particularly vulnerable populations. This output supports the department's capabilities and participation objective. This output supports the department s capabilities and participation objective. Major output / Deliverable Performance measures Unit of measure target actual Quantity Hours of coordination funding provided to Neighbourhood Houses Quality Strategy implementation actions within agreed performance targets: community organisations Strategy implementation actions within agreed performance targets: volunteering Timeliness Grants acquitted with the timeframe specified in the terms and conditions of the funding agreement number ('000) per cent per cent per cent Cost Total output cost $ million The lower actual primarily reflects funding carried over for the completion of project commitments relating to men's sheds and Office of Community Sector (OCS) social finance projects in

52 47 Youth Affairs Youth Affairs leads and coordinates whole-of-government policy advice and delivers targeted programs for young people aged between 12 and 25 to confidently participate in their communities. This output supports the department s capabilities and participation objective. Major output / Deliverable Performance measures Unit of measure target actual Quantity Participation by young people in programs that number 200, ,665 provide opportunities to be involved in social and economic life in their communities The higher actual is due to increased demand for a number of youth affairs programs, especially Advance and FReeZA. Participation by young people in programs that number 1,775 2,667 support young people to be involved in decision making in their community The higher actual is due to a greater number of young people involved in the planning of FReeZA and National Youth Week events than originally projected. Quality Participants reporting development of per cent transferrable skills that support education, training and vocational opportunities The higher actual is due to a greater percentage of young people completing the Advance program including recognised training, than originally projected. Timeliness Percentage of programs delivered within agreed timeframes per cent The higher actual is due to a greater number of programs, including Advance, FReeZA, National Youth Week and Engage!, delivered within agreed timeframes than originally projected. Cost Total output cost $ million

53 48 Annual report Victorian Department of Human Services Additional service delivery data Number of clients on the Disability Support Register Applications for ongoing support are registered on the Disability Support Register, which is used to help determine who receives ongoing supports and to record current needs. Support is prioritised to people who have the most urgent/critical need. Statewide June 2014 Support to live in the community 2,973 Supported accommodation 1,419 Housing waiting list A waiting list applicant is a person who has made a valid application for public housing, but has not yet been housed, including early housing and wait-turn applicants. This excludes applicants who are in public housing and wish to transfer to another property. At 30 June 2014, there were 34,632 waiting list applications. In addition there were 7,321 transfer applications. Demand indicators for child protection Child protection receives, assesses and investigates reports where children may be at risk of significant harm from abuse or neglect within their family, and ensures that appropriate services are provided to protect children from harm. A report is a report to child protection about a child s wellbeing or safety. Reports can also be made about the anticipated wellbeing and safety of unborn children after their birth. An investigation is a comprehensive assessment of allegations made and other concerns about the reported child s safety and wellbeing, including direct assessment of the child and discussion of concerns, and how to address them, with the child s parents or carers. The number of reports received in was 12 per cent higher than the number in the previous year, while investigations increased by 12 per cent. Substantiations showed a 14 per cent increase from the previous year. Of the 12,411 substantiated cases, 1,971 (16 per cent) involved children who had been part of a previously substantiated case that had been closed in the previous 12 months. The number of reports received on unborn children in was 10 per cent higher than the number in the previous year. Child protection demand (quarterly data) Total for September 2013 December 2013 March 2014 June 2014 Reports on unborn children 1, Reports on children 82,075 19,598 20,470 20,983 21,024 Investigations 21,231 5,373 4,935 5,054 5,869 Substantiations 12,411 3,212 3,000 2,989 3,210 Re-substantiations within 12 months 1,971

54 49 Child protection and out-of-home care data The following table shows further performance data on child protection and out-of-home care for the Department of Human Services for Child protection Child protection practitioners receiving regular supervision for (percentage) Percentage 84.8 Average rates of unallocated clients (percentage) North South East West State Quarter one Quarter two Quarter three Quarter four Annual Data in the above table represents the average number of unallocated clients for each end of month data extract (point in time snap shots) per quarter. The count excludes cases in intake phase and cases awaiting allocation for less than four days. Division and State total includes regional services.

55 50 Annual report Victorian Department of Human Services Out-of-home care The percentage of children in out-of-home care, who are less than 12 years of age, and placed in residential care, as at 30 June Quality of care concerns The Department of Human Services encourages reporting of concerns to ensure that the safety and best interests of the child are paramount at all times, and that children and young people in out-of-home care reside in safe, stable and high-quality placements. Quality of care concerns can range from minor quality issues through to possible physical or sexual abuse. All reports are treated seriously at the outset of the process and the best interests of the child or young person are considered paramount. Investigations may often take some time to complete, particularly as the department and agencies have increased emphasis on reporting to the police. All cases under investigation are carefully monitored to ensure the safety of children. This may involve removing the child from placement, negotiating the removal of the alleged perpetrator or, where the alleged perpetrator does not live in the placement, making arrangements for the child to have no further contact with them. Number of completed quality of care cases that had an outcome of substantiated abuse during Number of new quality of care cases investigated in relation to quality of care concerns during Number of quality of care cases that were completed within the period of Children aged 12 years and under in residential care may be in specialised arrangements to accommodate sibling groups or to care for children with high and complex needs. 3. The Department of Human Services implemented a new database to capture information regarding quality of care concerns during and therefore these figures are not comparable with previous quality of care annual report data figures. Investigations undertaken in relation to quality of care concerns encompass allegations or concerns about the quality of care provided to children residing in out- of-home care. This data includes investigations that commenced during the period (1 July June 2014) involving children and young people who were (at the time of the incident) child protection clients residing in out- of- home care. The number of completed quality of care cases includes cases that were reported, investigated and completed within the financial year period. Substantiated abuse encompasses completed investigations where allegations of abuse are substantiated and action is taken in response.

56 51 Advertising campaigns and sponsorship Advertising campaigns The department has rigorous oversight processes for developing advertising campaign materials to ensure compliance with the Victorian Government communication guidelines Entities are required to disclose advertising campaign expenditure with total media buy of $150,000 or greater (exclusive of GST) in their annual reports. During the financial year, the Department of Human Services had no campaigns with a total media buy of $150,000 or greater (exclusive of GST). Attestation As Secretary of the Department of Human Services I certify that all advertising campaigns implemented by the department were developed independent of any intention to benefit a political party or minister, and that they comply with relevant advertising and communications guidelines with objective evidence. Gill Callister Secretary Department of Human Services

57 52 Annual report Victorian Department of Human Services Sponsorships provided Sponsorship Recipient Description Amount (including GST) 2013 Australasian Conference on Child Abuse and Neglect The Australian Institute of Criminology Biennial conference for child protection and family support practitioners $20,000 Wakakirri Secondary School Challenge Wakakirri Story- Dance Association School-based performance and arts event for secondary school students $200,000 The Good Childhood Conference Berry Street Childhood Institute Conference attended by sector leaders, policy makers and practitioners $10,000 Victorian Young Achiever Awards Awards Australia Southern Sponsorship of an awards category that recognises young people who are demonstrating environmental leadership $18,150 Australian Childhood Foundation s masterclass workshop for carers Australian Childhood Foundation Masterclass workshop for foster and kinship carers $38, United National Association of Australian Media Peace Awards United Nations Association of Australia Sponsorship of the Increasing awareness and understanding of women s rights and issues award category $12,650 Victorian Council of Social Services Summit 2014 Victorian Council of Social Services Annual summit focused on finding ways to address Victoria s social and economic challenges $22,000 Joint World Conference on Social Work, Education and Social Development International Schools of Social Work International social work and social development conference $30,000 Australian Teenage Expo Australian Teenage Expo Annual event that provides information and guidance on issues that are important to young people $14,300 Melbourne Careers Expo Melbourne Careers Expo A careers and employment expo for job seekers $18,700 National Disability Services State Conference National Disability Services Victoria Annual conference for the disability services sector $20,000 Foundation for Young Australians Unleashed event Foundation for Young Australians Two-day annual event for young people to share ideas, build networks and get inspired $110,000 Power to Persuade Symposium 2014 Good Shepherd Victoria Annual symposium focusing on improving social policy design, implementation and outcomes. $2,500 Total sponsorship spend (inclusive of GST) $516,300

58 53 Sponsorships received There were no sponsorships received by the Department of Human Services in

59 54 Annual report Victorian Department of Human Services Five year financial summary 2014 $m 2013 $m 2012 $m 2011 $m 2010 $m Revenue from Government 3, , , , ,441.9 Total income from transactions 4, , , , ,885.0 Total expenses from transactions 4,208.2 (4,043.8) (4,386.7) (3,946.8) (6,247.1) Net result from transactions (21.3) (40.4) (537.0) (234.7) Net result for the period (14.1) (55.6) (562.5) (225.3) Net cash flow from operating activities (14.5) Total assets 22, , , , ,284.0 Total liabilities Current year financial review Overview The Victorian Government considers the net result from transactions (net operating balance) to be the appropriate measure of financial management that can be directly attributed to government policy. This measure excludes the effect of revaluations (holding gains or losses) arising from changes in market prices and other changes in the volume of assets shown under other economic flows on the Comprehensive Operating Statement, which are outside the control of the department. Financial performance and business review The department recorded a net deficit from transactions of $21.3m in This result is primarily due to a net operating deficit from housing rental operations.

60 55 Organisational and governance structure Department of Human Services ministers and parliamentary secretary The Hon. Mary Wooldridge MP Minister for Community Services; Minister for Disability Services and Reform; and Coordinating Minister for Human Services The Hon. Mary Wooldridge MP was appointed as Minister for Community Services and Coordinating Minister for Human Services on 2 December 2010 and as the Minister for Disability Services and Reform on 13 March She is also the Minister for Mental Health and from 2 December 2010 to 13 March 2013 was also the Minister for Women s Affairs. The Hon. Wendy Lovell MLC Minister for Housing The Hon. Wendy Lovell MLC was appointed as the Minister for Housing on 2 December She is also Minister for Children and Early Childhood Development, the Deputy Leader of the Government (Legislative Council) and the Manager of Government Business (Legislative Council). The Hon. Ryan Smith MP The Hon. Heidi Victoria MP Mrs Andrea Coote MLC Minister for Youth Affairs The Hon. Ryan Smith MP was appointed as the Minister for Youth Affairs on 2 December He is also the Minister for Environment and Climate Change. Minister Women's Affairs The Hon. Heidi Victoria MP was appointed as the Minister for Women's Affairs on 13 March She is also the Minister for the Arts and Minister for Consumer Affairs. Parliamentary Secretary for Families and Community Services Mrs Andrea Coote MLC was appointment Parliamentary Secretary for Families and Community Services on 2 December 2010.

61 56 Annual report Victorian Department of Human Services Department of Human Services senior executive and Board members Gill Callister Secretary, Department of Human Services Gill commenced as Secretary of the Victorian Department of Human Services in August She has had an extensive career in human services in both the public and community sectors, beginning her career with a ten-year stint in the community sector working with children, young people and families. Gill commenced with the Department of Human Services in the early 1990s and has held responsibilities across the child protection, community services and mental health programs. As executive director for the related portfolios, Gill led major policy, legislative and service delivery reforms for the child protection, family services and mental health systems in Victoria. Gill was Deputy Secretary at Skills Victoria prior to her current appointment. Gill has Bachelor degrees in Arts and Social Work with Honours. She is President of the Institute of Public Administration Australia (Victoria). The Secretary is appointed by the Premier of Victoria and is responsible for developing strategic priorities, implementing policy and funding approaches and monitoring service delivery in the areas of: disability services; housing support; children, young people and families; women; concessions; and emergency management. As Secretary, Gill supports four ministers through the provision of timely, high-quality advice and the implementation of Victorian Government policy directions through the leadership and management of the Department of Human Services. Gill chairs the Department of Human Services Board, which manages and implements corporate strategy and performance relating to the department s responsibilities. Arthur Rogers Deputy Secretary, Social Housing and NDIS Reform and Director of Housing Arthur was appointed as Deputy Secretary Social Housing and NDIS Reform and Director of Housing in May 2014 to lead the implementation of the National Disability Insurance Scheme and social housing reform. Before being appointed to his current role, Arthur was the Deputy Secretary, Service Design and Implementation Group and Director of Housing. Arthur has held a number of senior executive positions in the department. He was acting Executive Director of Housing and Community Building for six months, and prior to this, was the Executive Director of Disability Services, a role he held for ten years. He also has extensive experience as a regional director of the department in rural and metropolitan regions. Before joining the department, Arthur was the chief executive of a community health and aged care service. Arthur has a Bachelor of Arts and a Bachelor of Health Administration. Kathryn Anderson Acting Deputy Secretary, Community and Executive Services Kathryn was appointed as acting Deputy Secretary, Community and Executive Services in May Kathryn joined the department in As Director, Executive Services, Kathryn was responsible for key strategic support and accountability functions. Prior to this, Kathryn led Victoria s youth justice program for three years. She has more than 20 years experience as a public servant, across Commonwealth, Queensland and Victorian jurisdictions, including six years with the Queensland Department of the Premier and

62 57 Cabinet. Kathryn has spent several years focused on work to address Aboriginal disadvantage, including working with the Cape York Institute for Policy and Leadership. Kathryn holds a Bachelor of Arts from the University of Queensland and a Graduate Certificate in Business (Communications) from the Queensland University of Technology. Katy Haire Deputy Secretary, Service Design and Implementation Katy was appointed as Deputy Secretary, Service Design and Implementation in May Prior to this, Katy was the Deputy Secretary, Community and Executive Services. From 1989 to 2003 Katy worked in the Northern Territory in various positions in Aboriginal education and policy. From 2003, until joining the department, Katy held a range of policy and senior executive positions at the Victorian Department of Premier and Cabinet, including three years as Director of Social Policy. Katy has a Bachelor of Arts (Hons) in political science and history and a Master of Arts in history; an Executive Master of Public Administration; a Graduate Diploma of Education (Secondary); and is a Senior Executive Fellow of the Harvard Kennedy School of Government. She is a board member at the Institute of Public Administration Australia, Victorian Division (IPAA Victoria). Simon Phemister Deputy Secretary, Policy and Strategy Simon has headed the Policy and Strategy Group since late Before being appointed to his current role, Simon was the department s acting Executive Director Industry, Workforce and Strategy under the department s former structure. Before joining the department in 2010, Simon held various senior roles in the Victorian Department of Premier and Cabinet, the Victorian Department of Education and the Commonwealth Government Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet. Simon has an Executive Master of Public Administration; a Bachelor of Business (Asia Pacific Studies); and studied International Studies and Mandarin Chinese at Yunnan University in China. Anne Congleton Acting Deputy Secretary, Financial and Corporate Services Anne was appointed as acting Deputy Secretary, Financial and Corporate Services in May Anne s substantive position is the Deputy Secretary, West Division. Anne joined the department in 1999 after five years in the Budget and Financial Management Division of the Department of Treasury and Finance. Under the department s previous structure, Anne was the Regional Director, Barwon-South Western Region. Anne has also held senior executive officer positions across policy and resource management roles in housing and community building, disability services and public health. Anne has a Bachelor of Arts in History and Economics and a Bachelor of Economics. Jan Snell Executive Director, North Division Jan was appointed as Executive Director, North Division in late Jan has extensive clinical and management experience in the health and human services industries, having spent 26 years working in hospital systems in New Zealand, the United Kingdom and Australia before commencing her career with the Victorian Government in Bendigo in Jan has a strong track record of leading service delivery. Fourteen of her 20 years with the department were spent as a regional director of Loddon Mallee, Barwon-South Western and North and West Metropolitan regions under the department s previous structure.

63 58 Annual report Victorian Department of Human Services Jan has also held positions on the boards of both North West Victoria Ambulance and La Trobe University (Bendigo campus) and has considerable experience working with health boards. Jan is a Fellow of the Australian Institute Company Directors and has: a Master of Health Sciences (Management); a Bachelor of Health Sciences (Nursing); postgraduate cardiothoracic surgery qualifications; and is a registered nurse. Angela Connors Acting Executive Director, West Division Angela was appointed as acting Executive Director, West Division in May Angela has an undergraduate degree in both sociology and political science. Angela is currently completing a Masters in Commerce and a Masters in Science (Global Leadership). Angela began her career after university as a child protection worker. She moved to the UK and held various positions in the social services sector, most notably in youth and family services. Upon her return to Australia, Angela worked in local government community services and the education sector writing training materials for social/youth workers giving evidence in court. Angela joined the department 12 years ago and has held various positions since that time. Angela was the Regional Director for the eastern metropolitan area after five years of undertaking the same role in the Hume region. Most recently Angela was the Director of Service Development and Design. Chris Asquini Executive Director, East Division Chris was appointed as Executive Director, East Division in April 2013 after acting in the role since it came into effect in December an operational manager across a range of programs. Prior to moving to East Division, Chris held executive positions such as the Executive Director Children, Youth and Families Division and Director of Community and Individual Support in Disability Services. Chris has Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Social Work degrees. Michael De Ath Executive Director, South Division Michael was appointed as Executive Director, South Division in late Michael began his career as a teacher and has served as a school principal in a number of New Zealand schools. He also served for a year as the principal of an independent school in Pakistan. Michael then worked in the New Zealand Ministry of Education managing the development and nationwide rollout of a series of school leadership capability building initiatives. He also led a complex program of school reorganisations across 18 communities. For four years he was the regional manager for the South Island, encompassing approximately 670 schools and 1,000 early childhood centres and services. From late 2009, until he commenced with the Department of Human Services, Michael was regional director for the Victorian Department of Education and Early Childhood Development s Eastern Region. Michael has a Master of Educational Administration (First Class Hons.), an Executive Master of Public Administration, a Bachelor of Education and a Diploma of Teaching. Chris began her career as a child protection practitioner and has significant experience as

64 59 High-level senior executive changes On 27 May 2014, the Secretary announced changes to the Department of Human Services senior executive arrangements, to enable a stronger focus on supporting the areas and divisions and the sector in implementing major reforms and initiatives. The key changes were: the establishment of the Social Housing and NDIS Reform Group, led by Arthur Rogers the titles of Board members were changed to Deputy Secretaries, consistent with other Victorian Government departments 6. 6 The change of title for divisional board members came into effect on 1 July 2014.

65 60 Annual report Victorian Department of Human Services Figure 1: Department of Human Services organisational structure as at 30 June 2014

66 61 Department of Human Services organisational structure The department delivers human services through its 17 areas across the state, where the people who need them live, work and interact with their community. Each division covers a mix of rural, outermetropolitan and inner-metropolitan locations and has three key branches: Child Protection; Client Outcomes and Service Improvement; and Corporate Services. Making decisions about how services are delivered at the local level enables us to work flexibly and collaboratively, focusing on a person s full range of needs and helping them plan for their future. Four geographic divisions provide strategic oversight, coordination and support for these 17 local areas. Five centrally based groups work to improve service delivery and support areas, divisions and the Victorian community services sector to implement human services initiatives and a broad program of reforms to improve the way these services are accessed and experienced by Victorians in need. Areas Each of the 17 local areas is led by an area director who is an executive officer of the department. The areas deliver integrated services; address local issues and trends; manage local networks, partnerships and relationships; and build the capacity of their communities. In each of the local areas there are three units, designed to enable client-centred service delivery: Local Connections; Individual Family and Support; and Residential Client Services. Divisions Four administrative divisions, North, South, East and West, support the 17 areas, managing resource distribution, monitoring performance and directly managing some specialised or high-risk services like child protection; secure services; family records and inter-country adoption services; and emergency management.

67 62 Annual report Victorian Department of Human Services Figure 2: Map of Department of Human Services areas.

68 63 South Division The South Division includes extensive coastline, national parks and state forests, spanning from South Melbourne in the inner city, to the rural town of Mallacoota near the border of New South Wales, 423 kilometres east of Melbourne. The division supports four areas from which local services are delivered: Outer Gippsland Area, Inner Gippsland Area, Southern Melbourne Area, and Bayside Peninsula Area. The South Division manages the statewide Family Records and Inter-country Service, including an inter-country adoption service team and a program for refugee minors. The department s statewide housing call centre is also located in Moe. There are more than 22,000 social housing dwellings across the South Division and 236 disability group homes, 87 of which are run by the department and 149 by community service organisations. The department has also funded 46 men s sheds and 104 neighbourhood houses. Bayside Peninsula Area Bayside Peninsula Area is home to 857,765 people who live in the Bayside, Glen Eira, Mornington Peninsula, Stonnington, Frankston, Kingston, and Port Phillip local government areas. A multidisciplinary centre for victims of sexual assault opened in this area in The centre improves safety and supports adults and children who have experienced sexual assault by bringing together Victoria Police, child protection and sexual assault counselling services at one site. Outer Gippsland Area Outer Gippsland Area is home to 84,738 people living in the Wellington and East Gippsland local government areas. Geographically, this is the largest area within South Division but has the lowest population. The area population is steadily growing but the population is ageing. This area has established a community building program to help support the inclusion of people with a disability and some of the most vulnerable people within the community. Inner Gippsland Area Inner Gippsland Area is home to 174,533 people living in the Bass Coast, Baw Baw, Latrobe, and South Gippsland local government areas. This area is one of the fastest growing rural areas in the state. The Inner Gippsland Area has a work and learning centre based in Moe. This year a Child and Youth Area Partnership launch site was announced and is in the formation stage. Southern Melbourne Area Southern Melbourne Area is home to 478,568 people living in the Cardinia, Casey and Greater Dandenong local government areas. The area is characterised by significant cultural diversity, with approximately 39 per cent of residents identifying as being born overseas. The Services Connect client support model has been tested in Dandenong since 2012, and this year a Child and Youth Area Partnership launch site was announced and is in the formation stage. North Division The North Division starts in the inner-urban suburbs of Fitzroy, Collingwood and Richmond, and stretches through Victoria s central highlands, as far as the cities of Swan Hill and Mildura on the Murray river in far north west Victoria to the South Australian border township of Murrayville. The division supports four areas from which local services are delivered: Loddon Area, Mallee Area, Hume Moreland Area and North Eastern Melbourne Area. The North Division manages statewide secure services: the Parkville Youth Justice Precinct; the Malmsbury Youth Justice Centre; the Disability Forensic and Assessment Treatment Services in Fairfield; and two Secure Welfare Services in Ascot Vale and Maribyrnong. There are more than 23,000 social housing dwellings in the North Division and 228 disability group homes, 152 of which are run by the department and 76 by community

69 64 Annual report Victorian Department of Human Services service organisations. The department has also funded 38 men s sheds and 88 neighbourhood houses. North Eastern Melbourne Area The North East Melbourne Area is home to 596,850 people across the Banyule, Darebin, Yarra, Nillumbik, and Whittlesea local government areas. There is a higher than average concentration of social housing in this area and the populations within this area are diverse. A Services Connect lead site is operating in Preston. Loddon Area The Loddon Area is home to 224,388 people living in the Greater Bendigo, Campaspe, Central Goldfields, Loddon, Macedon Ranges, and Mount Alexander local government areas. In 2014 the department established a Children and Youth Area Partnership launch site in this area and plans to establish a Services Connect trial site in Bendigo. The department is also in the process of closing the Sandhurst Residential Services congregate care facility so its residents may move into community based residential services. Mallee Area The Mallee Area is home to 90,099 people living in the Mildura, Swan Hill, Buloke, and Gannawarra local government areas. This area is mainly agricultural farming land, and in general, experiences below average or negative population growth. The department established a Children and Youth Area Partnership launch site in this area in Hume Moreland Area Hume Moreland Area is home to 343,292 people living in the Hume and Moreland local government areas. A youth foyer was opened in Broadmeadows during 2014 and a Services Connect lead site is operating across the area. West Division The West Division covers the Melbourne central business district and the western suburbs, including Footscray, Sunshine, Altona, Werribee, the major growth areas of Point Cook and Caroline Springs, and the metropolitan fringe towns of Melton and Bacchus Marsh. It also includes Geelong, the Bellarine Peninsula, the Surf Coast, extending to the South Australian border as well as much of the goldfields including Ballarat, Daylesford, Ararat and Stawell. The division has five areas from which local services are delivered: Western District Area, Central Highlands Area, Barwon Area, Western Melbourne Area, and Brimbank Melton Area. There are more than 25,000 social housing dwellings in areas in West Division. Areas in the division also have 216 disability group homes, 113 of which are run by the department and 103 by community service organisations. The department has also funded 65 men s sheds and 91 neighbourhood houses. Barwon Area Barwon Area is home to 260,084 people living in the Greater Geelong, Surf Coast, Queenscliffe, and Colac-Otway local government areas. This area includes rapidly developing coastal communities around the South Cost and well-established communities in the Bellarine Peninsula. A trial of the National Disability Insurance Scheme began in the Barwon Area on 1 July A Services Connect trial site has been operating in Geelong since 2012 and there is also a work and learning centre based in north Geelong. Western District Area Western District Area is home to 148,555 people living in the Hindmarsh, Horsham, Northern Grampians, West Wimmera, Yarriambiack, Corangamite, Glenelg, Moyne, Southern Grampians, and Warrnambool local government areas. Western District is the largest departmental area in Victoria, comprising about one quarter of the physical land surface of Victoria, with less than three per cent of the state s population. A Services Connect trial site has been operating in the South West Coast since 2012.

70 65 Central Highlands Area Central Highlands is home to 172,616 people living in the Ararat, Ballarat, Golden Plains, Hepburn, Moorabool, and Pyrenees local government areas. Parts of Golden Plains are growing strongly, in part due to the proximity to Geelong and Ballarat. Parts of Moorabool are also growing strongly due to the proximity of Bacchus Marsh to Melbourne. A Child and Youth Area Partnership launch site was established in this area in 2014 and a work and learning centre is located in Ballarat. Western Melbourne Area Western Melbourne Area is home to 518,141 people living in Hobsons Bay, Maribyrnong, Melbourne, Moonee Valley, and Wyndham local government areas. This area is characterised by very high population growth and includes Melbourne s central business district and Docklands areas as well as the Wyndham growth corridor. A Child and Youth Area Partnership launch site was established in this area in 2014 and a work and learning centre is located in Carlton, along with a work and learning broker in Footscray. Brimbank Melton Area Brimbank Melton Area is home to 291,995 people living in the Brimbank and Melton local government areas. The population of this area is diverse and growing. This year, the area hosted the statewide Aboriginal Roundtable and Community Conversation. East Division The East Division extends from the inner eastern suburbs extending out through the Yarra Ranges, taking in outer suburbs as Lilydale and Belgrave to the Murray River in the north-east Victoria and from the Alps to Tatura in Central Victoria. The division has four areas from which local services are delivered: Goulburn Area, Ovens Murray Area, Outer Eastern Melbourne Area, and Inner Eastern Melbourne Area. There are more than 13,000 social housing dwellings in areas in East Division. Areas in the division also have 304 disability group homes, 159 of which are run by the department and 145 by community service organisations. The department has also funded 39 men s sheds and 90 neighbourhood houses. Goulburn Area Goulburn Area is home to 151,281 people living in the Greater Shepparton, Mitchell, Moira, Murrindindi, and Strathbogie local government areas. Parts of this area experience high levels of disadvantage. The department has been testing the Services Connect client model in Shepparton since late This area also has a work and learning centre and a youth foyer is being established in Shepparton. Ovens Murray Area Ovens Murray Area is home to 123,621 people living in the Alpine, Benalla, Indigo, Mansfield, Towong, Wangaratta, and Wodonga local government areas. Geographically, this is the largest area of within East Division but has the lowest population. A Services Connect trial site based in Wodonga will begin operating in Outer Eastern Melbourne Area Outer Eastern Melbourne Area is home to 414,127 people living in the Knox, Maroondah, and Yarra Ranges local government areas. A Child and Youth Area Partnership was established in this area in Inner Eastern Melbourne Area Inner Eastern Melbourne Area is home to 623,220 people living in the Boroondara, Manningham, Monash, and Whitehorse local government areas. The department will begin testing the Services Connect client model in Box Hill in 2014 and a youth foyer is located in Glen Waverley. The East Division is also responsible for the Child Protection Central After Hours service.

71 66 Annual report Victorian Department of Human Services Groups Five central groups lead the development of policy, strategy, service design, reform and development and provide regulatory oversight for the department. The groups support service delivery by setting directions in: service design and implementation; social housing and National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) reform; community and executive services; financial and corporate services; and policy and strategy. The groups functions include: developing plans and policies translating policy into improved practice monitoring service delivery standards driving consistency to enable service delivery objectives. Social Housing and NDIS Reform The Social Housing and NDIS Reform Group leads the implementation of key reforms, including the social housing reform and the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS). The Deputy Secretary of Social Housing and NDIS Reform is also the Director of Housing, who is accountable for the exercise of functions under the Housing Act Community and Executive Services The Community and Executive Services Group leads the effective delivery of executive services to the ministers and the secretary, including service delivery performance, professional practice, emergency management, legal services, parliamentary services and communications. Service Design and Implementation The Service Design and Implementation Group develops cross-program and integrated service delivery responses to facilitate the implementation of high-level policy into improved practice. The group also includes the Offices for Youth, Disability and Women s Affairs, and the Royal Commission Response Branch. Policy and Strategy Policy and Strategy is responsible for policy, strategy, workforce and service reform to ensure the needs of vulnerable Victorians are met, and to sustain the future of the department and the human services system. It leads the implementation of Out-of-home care: a five-year plan, Services Connect and the Victorian vulnerable children s strategy. The group also includes the Office for the Community Sector. Financial and Corporate Services The Financial and Corporate Services Group drives consistency in internal practice and excellence in corporate service delivery. It delivers critical corporate functions and infrastructure across the department, with a strong focus on financial management.

72 67 Corporate governance arrangements The department s corporate governance arrangements facilitate direction setting and decision making, the assessment and treatment of risk, the achievement of compliance and accountability requirements, and performance monitoring and improvement. Key corporate governance decision making bodies Secretary The Secretary, as head of the department, is accountable to the human services ministers for the overall leadership and management of the department s functions and activities. Department of Human Services Board The Department of Human Services Board is the Secretary s senior leadership team and operates as an executive management board to support the Secretary in the stewardship of the department. The five key areas of responsibility for the board are: establishing departmental strategy and direction, including service, asset and budget strategy and operational planning directing investment and monitoring financial performance monitoring an integrated approach to departmental-wide performance and quality improvement, and directing appropriate responses as required overseeing risk management, compliance and assurance mechanisms, including managing key strategic and enterprise risks driving the development of organisational leadership and culture. The board consists of the following members: the Secretary (Chair); deputy secretaries; and executive directors. Figure 3: Department of Human Services Board and committee structure

73 68 Annual report Victorian Department of Human Services Department of Human Services governance committees and their roles The Secretary and the Board have established a number of governance committees to assist them with fulfilling their responsibilities. Several of the committees support the Secretary s statutory assurance responsibilities and include independent non-executive members to provide independent expertise and advice. These committees include the Audit and Risk Management Committee and the Financial Management Advisory Committee. Audit and Risk Management Committee The Audit and Risk Management Committee oversees accountability, risk and internal control activities of the department and provides advice to the Secretary on these matters. The committee consists of the following independent members: Peter Lewinsky (Chair); Carol Pagnon; and Michael Perry; and the following departmental members: Deputy Secretary, Policy and Strategy Group; Deputy Secretary, Community and Executive Services Group; Executive Director, West Division; and Director, Executive Services. Financial Management Advisory Committee The Financial Management Advisory Committee is a time-limited committee which provides independent advice to the Secretary regarding financial management and governance, and strategic financial risk. The Financial Management Advisory Committee consists of the following independent members: Peter Lewinsky (Chair); Graeme Billings; John Phillips; Rhonda O'Donnell; Stephen Marks, and the following departmental members: Deputy Secretary, Financial and Corporate Services Group; and Secretary, Department of Human Services (ex officio). Executive Staffing and Remuneration Committee In accordance with Victorian Public Sector Commission requirements for Victorian Public Service executive employment, the Secretary is also supported by the Executive Staffing and Remuneration Committee. The committee oversees key elements of employment for executive officers, senior medical advisers and senior technical specialists. The Executive Staffing and Remuneration Committee consists of the following members: Secretary (Chair); Deputy Secretary, Community and Executive Services Group; Deputy Secretary, Financial and Corporate Services Group; and Director, People and Culture. Department of Human Services Board subcommittees and their roles A range of board subcommittees have been established to support the board in critical areas of its responsibility. People Committee This committee: provides overall strategic direction for workforce and people issues across the whole department monitors emerging issues and risks relating to people and culture monitors the implementation of people strategies monitors sector activity and issues with a view to assessing impacts on the department s workforce provides Category Management for learning and development procurement. The People Committee consists of the following members: Executive Director, South Division (Co-chair); Deputy Secretary, Financial and Corporate Services Group (Cochair); Deputy Secretary, Community and Executive Services Group; Director, Child Protection, East Division; Director, Corporate Services, East Division; Area Director, Hume Moreland, North Division; Area Director, Central Highlands, West Division; Area

74 69 Director, Southern Melbourne, South Division; Director, People and Culture; Director, Statutory and Forensic Services Design; Director, Industry Workforce and Transformation; Director, Office of Professional Practice; and Director, Procurement and Contract Management (Chief Procurement Officer). Client Experience and Service Improvement Committee This committee: provides overall strategic direction for client experience, feedback and service improvement across the whole department identifies emerging issues and key risks related to client outcomes and service delivery, and reports to the board on these with mitigation strategies identifies opportunities for service and quality improvement, develops and implements improvement strategies, and monitors their impact on performance monitors key client experience initiatives provides guidance and support in the preparation, planning, build and full implementation of Services Connect. The Client Experience and Service Improvement Committee consists of the following members: Deputy Secretary, Service Design and Implementation Group (Co-chair); Executive Director, West Division (Co-chair); Deputy Secretary, Community and Executive Services Group; Area Director, Inner East, East Division; Director, Client Outcomes and Service Improvement, North Division; Director, Client Outcomes and Service Improvement, South Division; Director, Service Development and Design; Director, Service Implementation and Support; Director, Performance Regulation and Reporting; Director, Strategic Planning; Director, Office of Professional Practice; and Assistant Director, Services Connect Design. Capital Committee This committee: provides overall strategic direction for asset strategy identifies emerging issues and key risks related to departmental assets and reports to the board on these with mitigation strategies monitors the delivery of the annual capital plan provides direction and oversight for the incorporation of place management principles into major projects as appropriate monitors the delivery of major projects assesses and makes recommendations to the Board on proposals for future asset investment. The Capital Committee consists of the following members: Deputy Secretary, Social Housing and NDIS Reform Group and Director of Housing (Co-chair); Deputy Secretary, Financial and Corporate Services Group (Cochair); Executive Director, North Division; Deputy Secretary, Policy and Strategy Group; Area Director, West Melbourne, West Division; Director, Property and Asset Services; Director, Corporate Services, East Division; Director, Corporate Services, South Division; Assistant Director, Service Outcomes; Director, Strategic Planning; and Director, and Financial Services (Chief Financial Officer). Information Management and Technology Committee This committee: provides overall strategic direction and prioritisation for funding of information management and technology within the context of the department s information management and technology strategic plan, departmental budget and other departmental strategic plans and priorities identifies emerging issues and key risks related to information management and technology, and reports to the board on these with mitigation strategies

75 70 Annual report Victorian Department of Human Services oversees planning, policy and standards as they relate to information management and information and communication technology oversees planning, policy, standards and management of information privacy and data security, particularly in the area of compliance with the Information Privacy Act 2000 and Health Records Act The Information Management and Technology Committee consists of the following members: Chief Information Officer (Co-chair); Executive Director, East Division (Co-chair); Deputy Secretary, Financial and Corporate Services Group; Deputy Secretary, Social Housing and NDIS Reform Group and Director of Housing; Director, Secure Services, North Division; Area Director, Outer Gippsland, South Division; Director, Corporate Services, West Division; Director, Centre for Human Services Research and Evaluation; and Director, Performance Regulation and Reporting. Human resource management Incident management The department is committed to providing workplaces that are safe and promoting the health and wellbeing of staff. During , the following initiatives have been delivered to support the department s continuous improvement approach to health and safety: the establishment and appointment of a new executive officer role, the Chief Occupational Health and Safety (OHS) Officer, to provide greater focus and authority in managing and improving occupational health and safety performance across the department. implementation of consistent OHS action plans in all divisions, with an emphasis on increasing management awareness and accountability for occupational health and safety and targeting key risks and high risk environments. implementation of a revised departmental OHS consultation framework to support extensive and regular consultation with staff on OHS issues and improvements. improved training for managers on understanding and meeting their OHS responsibilities. review and implementation of an improved occupational violence risk assessment and management tool for use in disability group homes and respite services, including mandatory training for all house supervisors and managers responsible for applying the tool. continued implementation of sustainable risk management systems for client related manual handling tasks in high risk environments. implementation of the Mindful Employer program, an online program that provides information and advice for managers and staff about creating a positive and supportive workplace and responding appropriately to support someone in the

76 71 workplace who is affected by a mental health issue. introduction of a range of safe driving programs to reduce the risk of accidents and injuries for staff required to drive as part of their work. strengthening of OHS performance reporting through the introduction of comprehensive monthly performance assurance and compliance reports to the department s board and executive officers and inclusion of OHS data in the online departmental corporate reporting tool to provide desktop access to information. The department s results in have included: a reduction in the number of incidents and rate of incidents an increase in the overall number and cost of WorkCover claims as a result of staff being injured fewer claims arising from work related stress and non-client related manual handling a reduced number of claims within the child protection workforce a reduction in the number of claims in the department s South and West Divisions and central office an increase in the number of staff absent from work for more than 13 weeks as result of injury. To address the issue of an increase in overall claims, the department is focused on the continued implementation of early intervention strategies and initiatives.

77 72 Annual report Victorian Department of Human Services Performance against OHS measures 7 Measure KPI Incidents and hazards No. of incidents Rate per 100 FTE Claims No. of standard claims Rate per 100 FTE No. of time-lost claims Rate per 100 FTE No. of claims exceeding 13 weeks Rate per 100 FTE Fatalities No. of fatalities Claims costs 10 Average cost per claim 11 $48,128 $57,039 $74,496 Return to work index Percentage of claims (with 10 days or more off work) where worker has returned to work within six months of when the claim was lodged with Victorian WorkCover Authority agent 73% 80% 83% FTE = full-time equivalent OHS = occupational health and safety Data related to claims, fatalities and claims costs provided by Victorian WorkCover Authority. Includes accepted, pended and rejected claims that met the standard claims threshold. Data extracted with a six-month lag to allow for claims to reach 13-weeks compensation Includes payments and estimated future costs. Data extracted with a three-month lag to allow for the claims estimate to develop to give an accurate picture of associated costs. Figures for and are calculated as at June 2014.

78 73 Performance against OHS measures continued Measure Management commitment Consultation Risk management Key performance indicators OHS policy statement and OHS criteria Designated work group structures and issue resolution procedures Regular internal audits conducted and issues identified actioned Performance The department s People Committee has been established with occupational health and safety (OHS) governance as a key function. Comprehensive OHS information is reported to the committee on a bi-monthly basis. A new reporting regime was introduced after the department s restructure in 2013, including monthly performance assurance and compliance reporting to the department s board and executive officers and detailed bi-annual board reviews of divisional performance with a specific focus on OHS performance. A consistent set of actions was adopted in by all divisions in their executive-endorsed OHS action plans to meet the objectives of the department s Occupational health and safety strategy The department has developed and implemented a revised OHS consultation structure. The structure comprises a statewide consultation committee, OHS committees in each of the four divisions, and OHS committees in each of the 17 areas. This structure ensures timely and appropriate referral of OHS issues to relevant committees. The department continues to maintain an extensive network of 394 designated work groups represented by 433 health and safety representatives and 89 deputy health and safety representatives. The department acknowledges and congratulates employee Lawrence Mwangi on winning the WorkSafe Health and Safety Representative of the Year award in The department has a range of mechanisms in place to identify and control OHS hazards and prevent or reduce the likelihood of harm. These include Disease, Injury, Near Miss and Accident (DINMA) reports, specific risk management tools and workplace inspections. Action was taken to address 25 provisional improvement notices that were issued by health and safety representatives during the period. WorkSafe made 151 visits to the department s worksites and issued 36 WorkSafe notices. The department commenced a project to review and improve occupational violence procedures for youth justice custodial environments.

79 74 Annual report Victorian Department of Human Services Measure Training Key performance indicators Managers and health and safety representatives trained Performance The department revised the Managing A Safe Workplace training program for managers and engaged a provider with capacity to train up to 1,000 managers between January 2014 and December All health and safety representatives elected in were encouraged and supported by the department to undertake the five-day health and safety representative training program. The department instigated a Health and Safety Representative forum in 2013 which will occur annually as part of Health and Safety Week celebrations. Approximately 200 health and safety representatives, union representatives, OHS professionals and managers attended the forum in OHS surveys Perception survey The results of the department s 2014 People Matter staff survey showed that 90 per cent of respondents agreed that they are encouraged to report health and safety incidents and injuries. Definitions: 1. Standard claims are those that have exceeded the employer excess (days or dollars) or are open claims that have been received but have no payments at the time of extraction and may be rejected. 2. A time-lost claim is one with one or more days compensation paid by the Victorian WorkCover Authority (that is, once the employer has paid the 10-day excess) at the time of extraction week claims are claims that involve 13 weeks or more of weekly benefits paid. The 13-week measure begins at day one (that is, employer excess and Victorian WorkCover Authority payments).

80 75 Employment and conduct principles The department has continued to develop policies, procedures and opportunities to advance the Victorian Government s employment principles and the provisions of the Public Administration Act A key achievement in has been the introduction of a new Conflict of Interest Policy which provides a framework for departmental employees and contractors to address and manage any real or apparent conflict of interest risks.

81 76 Annual report Victorian Department of Human Services Workforce data Public administration values and employment principles The department is committed to applying merit and equity principles when appointing staff. The selection processes ensure that applicants are assessed and evaluated fairly and equitably on the basis of the key selection criteria and other accountabilities without discrimination. Developing staff and leaders Across human services, the department invests in staff training and development to strengthen the workforce and improve outcomes for vulnerable Victorians. In 2014, $8 million has been invested in staff training and development, of which around $3.2 million of that will go towards training and development for staff in community sector organisations. In 2013, more than 90 per cent of the department s housing support staff undertook training and development programs. More than 4,500 disability staff attended a learning program, as did 960 child protection staff. To support the department s new Services Connect delivery model, all staff involved in Services Connect have participated in a range of learning programs to make sure they have the knowledge and skills to implement the model. culture and issues affecting Aboriginal staff through programs such as the Building Aboriginal Cultural Competence foundation program. Support for executives in the department has also continued through the Executive Officer Development Program and regular Executive Officer Forums. The Executive Officer Development Program is underpinned by six key leadership capabilities: strategic thinking; organisational sustainability; leads change; awareness of organisational context; maintaining a client focus; and facilitating and sustaining collaborative partnerships. Participants have worked to develop and implement individual development goals against the department s leadership capabilities, while also attending a number of team-based master classes on delivering effective feedback. The Executive Officer Forums provided executives with the opportunity to reflect on their role as leaders, both in supporting staff through the department s transformation reforms, and in the broader context of public sector leadership. The department continues to support awareness-building with regard to Aboriginal

82 77 In May 2014, the department introduced a new leadership development program for middle managers. The program has a strong emphasis on learning by doing and learning from others. In its first 12 months, the program targets the key leadership capabilities of strategic decision making, relationship management, change leadership and effective feedback. A broad cohort of people managers across the department will continue the program throughout To complement leadership capability building, the department has continued to build core management skills. Over 800 managers have participated in customised management development programs, which include programs on managing performance, change, teams, workplace safety and projects. In that time, 298 new managers attended either the Manager s Orientation or Transition to Manager programs or both. The programs target new and aspiring leaders and provide the basis for building sound management skills. Youth Employment Scheme The Youth Employment Scheme is a Victorian Government initiative to enable unemployed and disadvantaged young people aged between years to enter the workforce and build sustainable careers through traineeships. The department employed 44 young people through the scheme during Graduate recruitment In , the department engaged 10 graduates from a diverse range of academic backgrounds through the Graduate Recruitment and Development Scheme. Graduates participating in the scheme complete three placements in the Victorian Public Service to develop a broad range of experience and are employed within the department at the conclusion of the program.

83 78 Annual report Victorian Department of Human Services Department of Human Services workforce profiles Comparative workforce data Table 1: Full-time equivalent (FTE) staffing trends from 2014 to 2010 June 2014 June 2013 June 2012 June 2011 June ,689 9,671 10,081 10,329 10,188 Table 2: Summary of employment levels in June of 2014 and 2013 Ongoing employees Fixed-term and casual employees Employees (headcount) Full-time (headcount) Part-time (headcount) FTE FTE June ,936 5,782 3,154 8,179 1,510 June ,835 5,798 3,037 8,095 1,576 Table 3: Details of employment levels in June of 2014 and 2013 June 2014 June 2013 Ongoing Ongoing Fixed-term and casual employees Ongoing Ongoing Fixed-term and casual employees Employees head count FTE FTE Employees head count FTE FTE Gender Female 6,206 5, ,169 5,535 1,009 Male 2,730 2, ,666 2, Total 8,936 8,179 1,510 8,835 8,095 1,576 Age ,487 1, ,209 1, ,750 2, ,921 1, Total 8,936 8,179 1,510 8,835 8,095 1,576

84 79 June 2014 June 2013 Ongoing Ongoing Fixed-term and casual employees Ongoing Ongoing Fixed-term and casual employees Employees head count FTE FTE Employees head count FTE FTE Classification Allied health Child protection 1,566 1, ,533 1, Disability development and support 3,849 3, ,850 3, Executives Housing services Other Youth justice Senior tech services VPS VPS VPS VPS VPS VPS Total 8,936 8,179 1,510 8,835 8,095 1,576 Notes: FTE = full-time equivalent. Data has been rounded and balanced to zero decimal places. June 2014 Includes FTE staff from the Commission for Children and Young People. The child protection classification includes payroll award classifications: child protection practitioner and children youth and families. The child protection June 2014 FTE level for the child protection practitioner classification was 1,362 FTE. June 2013 Includes FTE staff from Child Safety Commissioner. The child protection classification includes the payroll award classifications: child protection practitioner, children youth and families and child protection worker. The child protection June 2013 FTE level for the child protection practitioner classification was 1,342 FTE.

85 80 Annual report Victorian Department of Human Services Executive officer data An executive officer is defined as a person employed as a public service body head or other executive under Part 3, Division 5 of the Public Administration Act All figures reflect employment levels at the last full pay period in June of the current and corresponding previous reporting year. The definition of an executive officer does not include Governor in Council appointments as statutory office holders. The total group of executives is classified into two distinct categories based on the following definitions: ongoing executives are executives who are responsible for functions or outputs that are expected to be ongoing at the end of the reporting period special projects executives are executives who are employed for a specific project. These projects are generally for a fixed period of time and relate to a specific government priority. For the department s portfolio authorities (public authorities as defined under the Public Administration Act), an executive officer is defined as a person employed as an executive officer at an annual remuneration rate not less than an executive officer employed by a department. The following tables disclose information pertaining to the executive officers within the department and its portfolio authorities for 30 June 2014: Table 4 discloses the number of executive officers in the categories of ongoing and special projects and the total numbers of executive officers for the department Table 5 provides a breakdown of executive officers according to gender for the categories of ongoing and special projects Table 6 provides a reconciliation of executive numbers presented between the report of operations and Note 19(a) Remuneration of executives in the financial statements Table 7 provides the total executive numbers for all of the department s portfolio agencies Tables 4 to 7 also disclose the variations, denoted by var, between the current and previous reporting periods. Current vacancies are shown in tables 5 and 7.

86 81 Table 4: Number of executive officer positions classified into ongoing and special projects All Ongoing Special projects Class No. Var. No. Var. No. Var. Secretary EO EO EO Total EO = executive officer, No. = number, Var. = variations Special projects as at 30 June 2014: Director, Department of Human Services Royal Commission Response Band 2 Table 5: Breakdown of active executive officers into gender for ongoing and special projects Ongoing Special projects Male Female Vacancies Male Female Vacancies Class No. Var. No. Var. No. No. Var. No. Var. No. Secretary EO EO EO Total EO = executive officer, No. = number, Var. = variations The number of executives in the report of operations is based on the number of executive positions that are occupied at the end of the financial year. Note 19(a) in the Department of Human Services financial statements lists the actual number of and amount of remuneration paid to executive officers over the course of the reporting period. The financial statements note does not distinguish between executive levels, nor does it disclose separations, vacant positions, nor does it include the accountable officers.

87 82 Annual report Victorian Department of Human Services Table 6: Reconciliation of executive officer numbers Executives with total remuneration over $100,000 (Financial Statement Note 19a) Add Vacancies (refer to Table 5 above) 9 7 Executives employed with total remuneration below $100,000 (Financial Statement Note 19(a)) 27 8 Accountable Officers (Secretary and Director of Housing) 2 2 Chief Executive Officer, Commission for Children and Young People 1 1 Less Separations Total executive numbers at 30 June All vacancies are filled on a temporary basis while undergoing recruitment action. Table 7: Number of executive officers for the department s portfolio agencies June 2014 June 2013 Annual change Organisation name Female Male Total Female Male Total Female Male Total Queen Victoria Women s Centre Trust The Queen Elizabeth Centre Tweddle Child and Family Health Service Total

88 83 Other disclosures Implementation of the Victorian Industry Participation Policy The Victorian Industry Participation Policy Act 2003 requires departments and public sector bodies to report on the implementation of the Victorian Industry Participation Policy. Departments and public sector bodies are required to apply the Victorian Industry Participation Policy in all procurement activities valued at $3 million or more in metropolitan Melbourne and for statewide projects, or $1 million or more for procurement activities in regional Victoria. During , the department commenced five procurement activities to which the Victorian Industry Participation Policy applied totalling $39 million. Of those projects, all were located in regional Victoria. The outcomes expected from the implementation of the Victorian Industry Participation Policy to these projects where information was provided are as follows: an average of 93 per cent of local content commitment was made a total of 184 jobs were committed, including the creation of two new jobs and the retention of 182 existing jobs a total of eight positions for apprentices/trainees were committed, including the creation of two new apprenticeships/traineeships, and the retention of the remaining six existing apprenticeships/traineeships. The commitment to the Victorian economy in terms of skills and technology transfer include use of the latest building skills techniques and embedding new technology into building design. During , the department completed nine projects to which the Victorian Industry Participation Policy applied. These were collectively valued at around $17 million. Of these, one contract was in metropolitan Melbourne ($6 million) and eight were in regional Victoria ($11 million). The outcomes reported from the implementation of the Victorian Industry Participation Policy where information was provided, were as follows: an average of 93 per cent of local content outcome was recorded a total of 23 positions were created and 402 existing positions retained 15 new apprenticeships/traineeships were created and 19 existing apprenticeships/ traineeships retained. The benefits to the Victorian economy relating to the retention of skills from the completed projects included the transfer of both general and specialised knowledge and skills specifically in relation to carpentry joinery and framing training, electrical and plumbing training, and further training for new apprentices.

89 84 Annual report Victorian Department of Human Services Consultancies Consultancies expenditure The definition of consultancy is broader under the new reporting requirements that were introduced from 1 July 2013 (FRD 22D). Consequently, disclosures on the consultancy expenditure cannot be compared with previous year disclosures. The primary difference between the previous and new definition is the removal of the requirement that the individual or organisation performs a task involving skills or perspectives which would not normally be expected to reside within the department. This change means that tasks such as business case development, evaluations and review, are now reported under the new direction. Details of consultancies (valued at $10,000 or greater) In , there were 35 consultancies where the total fees payable to the consultants were $10,000 or greater. The total expenditure incurred during in relation to these consultancies is $3.93 million (excluding GST). Details of individual consultancies are outlined below. Consultant Purpose of consultancy Start date End date Total approved project fee (excluding GST) Expenditure (excluding GST) Future expenditure (excluding GST) Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu Generation-E Productivity Solutions Pty Ltd Financial management project Planning for Windows 7 upgrade 1 July June 2014 $1,762,037 $1,434,427 $327, Aug Jan 2014 $381,405 $381,405 $0 Ernst and Young NDIS-Ready 1 Feb July 2014 $343,035 $320,265 $22,770 KPMG Risk Advisory Services Pty Ltd Business case for social housing demonstration project 6 Dec Jan 2014 $150,000 $150,000 $0 Accuteque KPMG Accuteque KPMG Joanne Stephenson Clayton Utz Thomson Geer Local government single funding agreement Review quality of care processes Common funding agreement Local area governance Financial governance Legal advice (property maintenance) Disability carer exclusion list 1 Aug Dec 2013 $136,184 $136,184 $0 20 Aug Dec 2013 $136,000 $136,000 $0 1 Aug Dec 2013 $135,673 $135,673 $0 31 Oct Dec 2013 $126,525 $126,525 $0 1 July June 2014 $118,334 $118,334 $0 16 Aug June 2014 $136,364 $111,742 $24,621 7 Oct Dec 2014 $136,277 $101,245 $35,032

90 85 Consultant Purpose of consultancy Start date End date Total approved project fee (excluding GST) Expenditure (excluding GST) Future expenditure (excluding GST) SMS Consulting Group Pty Ltd Aspex Consulting Pty Ltd Shiftwork Solutions Price Waterhouse Coopers Review business processes (Housing Integrated Information Program) Evaluate (aids and equipment program) Analyse business and roster Services Connect business case support 4 Feb Apr 2014 $96,000 $96,000 $0 13 Dec May 2014 $88,921 $88,921 $0 31 Mar June 2014 $82,979 $82,979 $0 14 Nov June 2014 $120,109 $75,510 $44,599 Dandolo Partners Mentor and advise on strategic priorities 2 July June 2014 $82,818 $55,178 $27,640 LKA Group Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu Cube Management Solutions Ernst & Young Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu Hudson Howells Synergistiq Pty Ltd Victorian Government Solicitor s Office Review Kyeema support services day program Market analysis (Records storage) Project Management Evaluate Sale and lease back V2 Review (movable units program) Identify industry export opportunities (Victorian Human Services) Professional coaching (child protection frontline managers) Legal advice (Social Housing Framework) 30 Sept Dec 2013 $41,000 $41,000 $0 19 Aug Aug 2013 $29,375 $29,375 $0 12 Nov June 2014 $73,340 $28,013 $45,327 7 Aug Nov 2013 $22,727 $22,727 $0 29 July Sept 2013 $22,727 $22,727 $0 6 Feb Feb 2014 $22,718 $22,718 $0 11 Sept Oct 2014 $22,710 $22,710 $0 29 Oct Dec 2013 $22,068 $22,068 $0

91 86 Annual report Victorian Department of Human Services Consultant Purpose of consultancy Start date End date Total approved project fee (excluding GST) Expenditure (excluding GST) Future expenditure (excluding GST) John Leatherland Quality of care investigation 20 Oct Nov 2013 $21,000 $21,000 $0 Performa Solutions Pty Ltd Ernst & Young Develop upgrade roadmap (Budget management system) Evaluate Sale and lease back V3 3 June June 2014 $20,250 $20,250 $0 9 Dec Mar 2014 $19,725 $19,725 $0 John Leatherland Review (Murray Valley Aboriginal Cooperative) 14 Apr June 2014 $35,091 $18,552 $16,539 Price Waterhouse Coopers Symbolix Pty Ltd Heather Michaels & Associates Benefits management framework for Services Connect Incident reporting data set analyst Review support services (Group Homes) 2 Dec Dec 2013 $16,591 $16,591 $0 20 Oct June 2014 $28,898 $15,762 $13,135 1 Aug Sept 2013 $15,273 $15,273 $0 FBG Group Flannagan Brown Greaves Pty Ltd Review CCTV footage and consultation 1 Aug Aug 2013 $14,000 $14,000 $0 Jennifer L Hocking Charismatek Software Metrics Grant Thornton Australia Ltd Professional advice (Mallee integrated family violence project) Concession provider system change adviser project Review zerobased budget 26 Feb Apr 2014 $13,636 $13,636 $0 1 Jan Mar 2014 $12,500 $12,500 $0 2 June July 2014 $53,995 $0 $53,995 Details of consultancies under $10,000 In , there were five consultancies engaged during the year, where the total fees payable to the consultants was less than $10,000. The total expenditure incurred during in relation to these consultancies was $17,000.

92 87 Disclosure of major contracts The department has disclosed, in accordance with the requirements of government policy and accompanying guidelines, all contracts greater than $10 million in value which it entered into during the year ending 30 June Details of contracts that have been disclosed in the Victorian Government contracts publishing system can be viewed on the internet at: Contractual details have not been disclosed for those contracts for which disclosure is exempted under the Freedom of Information Act 1982 or other government guidelines, or both. Freedom of information The Freedom of Information Act 1982 allows the public a right of access to documents held by the department. In , the department received 923 freedom of information requests. Of these requests, 15 were from Members of Parliament, 19 were from the media and the remainder were from the general public. Of the total requests received by the department, the majority were granted in full. In , 18 decisions were reviewed by the Freedom of Information Commissioner and four appeals were made to the Victorian Civil and Administrative Tribunal. Freedom of Information Principal Officer Ms Gill Callister Secretary Department of Human Services GPO Box 4057 Melbourne Victoria 3001 Making a request Access to documents may be obtained through written request to the Freedom of Information Manager, as detailed in s. 17 of the Freedom of Information Act. it should identify as clearly as possible the document being requested it should be accompanied by the appropriate application fee (the fee may be waived in certain circumstances). Requests for documents in the possession of the Department of Human Services should be addressed to: Manager, Freedom of Information Department of Human Services GPO Box 4057 Melbourne Victoria 3001 Requests and payment of the application fee can also be lodged online at Telephone enquiries can be made by calling (03) Access charges for photocopying and search retrieval may also apply once the request has been finalised. Further information regarding Freedom of Information can be found at Compliance For , the department processed 65 per cent of requests within statutory requirements, 30 per cent of requests within 46 to 90 days and five per cent of requests in over 90 days. The average time taken to finalise requests was 44 days which is within the 45 day statutory time limit. In summary the requirements for making a request are: it must be in writing

93 88 Annual report Victorian Department of Human Services Compliance with the Building Act 1993 The department has procedures in place for publicly owned buildings to ensure compliance with the building and maintenance provisions of the Building Act National Competition Policy Under the National Competition Policy, the guiding legislative principle is that legislation, including future legislative proposals, should not restrict competition unless it can be demonstrated that: the benefits of the restriction to the community as a whole outweigh the costs the objectives of the legislation can only be achieved by restricting competition. The department continues to comply with the requirements of the National Competition Policy. Competitive neutrality requires government businesses to ensure where services compete, or potentially compete with the private sector, any advantage arising solely from their government ownership be removed if they are not in the public interest. Government businesses are required to cost and price these services as if they were privately owned and thus be fully cost reflective. Competitive neutrality policy provides government businesses with a tool to enhance decisions on resource allocation. This policy does not override other policy objectives of government and focuses on efficiency in the provision of service. The department is working to ensure that Victoria fulfils its requirements on competitive neutrality reporting for technological based businesses against the enhanced principles as required under the national reform agenda.

94 89 Compliance with the Protected Disclosure Act 2012 The Protected Disclosure Act 2012 encourages and facilitates disclosures of improper conduct by public officers, public bodies and other persons, and provides protection from detrimental action taken against a person making a disclosure, witnesses and persons subject to an investigation. The department does not tolerate improper conduct by employees, or the taking of reprisals against those who disclose improper conduct. The department will support officers who disclose conduct involving the dishonest performance of public functions, knowingly or recklessly breaching public trust, misusing information obtained in an official capacity, substantially mismanaging public resources, or substantially risking public health, safety or the environment. The department will take all reasonable steps to ensure that any person involved in a disclosure is not subjected to detrimental action. It will also afford natural justice to a person who is the subject of a disclosure. Reporting procedures Disclosures of improper conduct or detrimental action by the department or its employees may be made to the following officers: Alternatively, a person may make a disclosure of improper conduct or detrimental action by the department or its employees directly to the Independent Broad-based Anti-corruption Commission: Level 1, 459 Collins Street (North Tower) Melbourne Victoria 3000 Phone: (toll free) Website: Further information Written guidelines outlining the system for reporting disclosures of improper conduct or detrimental action by the department, its officers or other persons are available on the department s website at (see About the Department > Documents and Resources > Reports and Publications > Protected disclosures). Disclosures under the Protected Disclosure Act The current procedures established by the public body under Part 9 of the Protected Disclosure Act are available on the department s website and from the Protected Disclosure Coordinator. The number and types of disclosures made under the Protected Disclosure Act to the department since 10 February 2013: Protected Disclosure Coordinator (Manager, Corporate Integrity) the discloser s manager or supervisor the manager or supervisor of the person who is subject of the disclosure the Secretary, the Department of Human Services or by calling: (toll free 24 hour answering service). The number of disclosures notified to the Independent Broadbased Anti-corruption Commission number number 0 0

95 90 Annual report Victorian Department of Human Services Compliance with the Carers Recognition Act 2012 The Carers Recognition Act 2012 promotes the role of people in care relationships and formally recognises the contribution that carers and people in care relationships make to the social and economic fabric of the Victorian community. During , in line with its obligations under the Act, the department has: offered training programs for new staff on the Act and its statement of principles ensured that the department s employment policies include flexible working and leave arrangements that comply with the statement of principles in the Act distributed printed material about the Act at community events and through community organisations provided digital information and links to resource materials via the department s website developed and implemented a range of projects to: promote the support available for carers and improve awareness of these services among carers improve the capacity of families, carers and the people they care for to understand and make decisions about the support they receive. Disability action plan The Disability Act 2006 requires Victorian public sector bodies to develop a disability action plan to help reduce barriers and enhance opportunities for people with a disability. During the department progressed a number of initiatives to meet this requirement under the Act, which are outlined below. Reducing barriers to accessing goods, services and facilities In 2013, the department partnered with the Department of Premier and Cabinet to develop the Victorian Government accessible communications guidelines to ensure information for the community is easily accessible and can be easily understood. Training was provided to relevant departmental staff to ensure they were aware of and understood the new guidelines. During the department s Language services policy was reviewed and updated. The policy now includes information about AUSLAN interpreting through the Video Relay Interpreting Service. During the year the department also began to implement commenced the implementation of the Delivering for all: Department of Human Services access and equity framework Reducing barriers to gaining and maintaining employment In 2014, the department established a working group for human resources professionals, hiring managers and representatives from the Office for Disability to share experiences and develop new initiatives that encourage greater employment of people with a disability within the department. The department has introduced new resources and a central contact for managers who are hiring people with a disability. The department is seeking to understand more about the experiences of candidates with a disability that apply for, or are interviewed for employment at

96 91 the department through improved data collection. The department also continues to provide opportunities for people with a disability to undertake work experience. Through its partnership with the Australian Network on Disability, the department has offered Stepping Into internships for university students with a disability to provide them with valuable insight into working within the department and establishing a career in the Victorian Public Service. Promoting inclusion and participation in the community To support the inclusion and participation of people with a disability in the community during , the department has provided: On 3 December 2013, the department hosted a whole-of-government event to celebrate International Day of People with a Disability. It brought together staff from across government to demonstrate the benefits of employing people with a disability and to hear from a panel of speakers about breaking down barriers to participation. The department also updated staff performance plans to include access and equity principles and provided supporting resources for staff and managers to complete this section. funding for the Leading, Educating and Advocating for Disability (LEAD) Barwon program, which provided training and support to 19 people with a disability, their families or carers who have an early experience of the National Disability Insurance Scheme so they can effectively share their experiences of the scheme with others funding for disability self-help groups to build the capacity of people with a disability through peer support, information sharing and community education recurrent funding for the Quill Awards for Excellence in Victorian Journalism, and the establishment of a new award category entitled the Victorian Government Quill for Reporting on Disability Issues. This award recognises and acknowledges the work of journalists to positively and sensitively represent people with a disability. Achieving tangible changes in attitudes and practices which discriminate against people with a disability The department is strongly committed to actively discouraging discrimination against marginalised groups, including people with a disability.

97 92 Annual report Victorian Department of Human Services Corporate environmental sustainability report Environmental sustainability and performance In the department has continued its commitment to minimising its environmental impacts and managing climate change risks for our clients and assets by integrating considerations of environmental sustainability into all business operations. Progress has been made towards environmental sustainability goals through the implementation of a number of initiatives during the year. Energy The department is committed to reducing its energy use and assisting clients to reduce their energy consumption. In , the department met its target of developing a draft department-wide energy management plan. The department also: engaged an energy services company to conduct a detailed feasibility study to deliver energy savings to 14 high-rise public housing buildings under the Efficient Government Buildings Program completed stage three of the Carlton housing redevelopment, in partnership with the Living Carlton Consortium. The development features an average 7-star energy rating, gas-boosted solar hot water, rainwater recycling and an extensive building management system to monitor energy use. installed efficient hot water systems in 14 public housing locations over three years, which includes 1,082 public housing units. Low-efficiency boilers were replaced with boilers of 90 to 95 per cent efficiency, and solar hot water panels were installed expanded the environmental management system to include the department s entire property portfolio. This includes monitoring and mapping of energy usage and expenditure in disability services group homes, comprising of 570 electricity accounts and 550 gas accounts. completed lift upgrades at three public housing buildings in Richmond and Flemington. This resulted in energy savings up to six per cent (Richmond buildings) and up to 65 per cent (Flemington building) upgraded the energy star rating of 358 public housing high-rise apartments from 2 and 3.5 star to 5.1 and 6.5 star ratings, with better wall insulation and window replacements. Installed over 180 energyefficient lighting sensors at two public housing sites achieved a nine per cent reduction in monitored gas use, a seven per cent reduction in monitored energy use, and a two per cent reduction in monitored greenhouse gas emissions in the property portfolio achieved more than 10 per cent reduction in electricity use from seven of the department s offices including Sale, Prahran, Wangaratta, Colac, Stawell, Footscray and Armstrong Street, Ballarat participated in the World Wildlife Fund s worldwide environmental awareness Earth Hour initiative by turning off all office lighting over the March 2014 weekend environmental management system 12 target: to achieve energy efficiency upgrades in 310 public housing high rise apartments. Waste The department s waste management system provides separate waste streams for landfill, recycling, compost and paper, and is being extended progressively to offices across the state. In , the department: installed waste recycling bins at three public housing estates with the City of Melbourne 12 An environmental management system is the management of an organisation s environmental programs and performance in a comprehensive, systematic, planned and documented manner.

98 93 and Environment Victoria and encouraged local residents to recycle. A survey of two of the buildings estimated that that the trial diverted over 50 tonnes of waste a year from landfill conducted 20 waste audits of departmental offices to better understand waste management practices provided advanced plastics and polystyrene recycling at the department s 50 Lonsdale Street, Box Hill and Ringwood offices maintained a reusable items storage system at 50 Lonsdale Street so staff can reuse stationery and office products continued its policy to encourage staff to reuse, recycle or return to manufacturers all paper, paper-based products, cardboard, ink and toner cartridges, printers and other electronic items environmental management system target: to review current waste segregation practices at the department s office at 50 Lonsdale Street, Melbourne. Paper The department continues to implement papersaving initiatives and has a reporting strategy to provide feedback to managers on paper usage, which continues to drive the reduction in paper use. In , the department met its target to promote double-sided black and white printing to staff. The department achieved: a 15 per cent reduction in office paper consumption, resulting in $40,000 in cost savings on paper purchased, and a 16 per cent reduction in office paper consumption per full-time equivalent staff. The department continued to implement its paper and printing policy, which: encourages staff to reduce printing, print using default settings for black and white and two-sided printing and use of online versions of publications ensures A4 white paper purchased meets good environmental standards, with at least 50 per cent or higher recycled content. Water The department continues its drive to reduce water consumption across its facilities. The department met its target to scope the opportunity for further water efficiency projects in public housing high-rise buildings by including this as part of the feasibility study that is underway. During the year, the department: installed 3-star rated showerheads and dual-flush toilets in 358 public housing apartments and distributed 5,000 watersaving handouts to new public housing tenants ensured all Victorian Government-owned departmental office facilities have water efficiency measures equivalent to an average 4-star NABERS 13 water performance rating had the blackwater recycling system at 50 Lonsdale Street upgraded in late This resulted in a six per cent reduction in water used to flush toilets in the first six months and the system is estimated to produce an annual water savings of 11,000 kilolitres expanded the environmental management system to include a greater number of property portfolio sites in streamlined water retailer reports for monitoring usage and expenditure. Sustainable transport The department encourages staff to use sustainable transport for both commuting and work related travel. The department met its target to review the Vehicle fleet strategy and developed the Efficient fleet procurement policy to guide the purchase of efficient, lowemission vehicles, as part of this. 13 NABERS: The National Australian Built Environment Rating System (NABERS) is a suite of tools that measure and rate the environmental performance of buildings.

99 94 Annual report Victorian Department of Human Services The department also: conducted a staff survey on travel behaviour, including types of transport used to attend meetings and use of video and phone conferencing coordinated Ride to Work Day activities on 16 October 2013, including a breakfast for more than 200 staff, supported by facilities managers and local cafes environmental management system target: to review the draft Efficient fleet procurement policy in quarter four to check its efficacy. Procurement The department continued its strategy to ensure the efficient use of printers and multifunction devices. This has enabled paper and ink savings through improved printer management and a reduced printer-tocomputer ratio. Since January 2014, the department has removed 321 printers from use. endorsed the proposal to consider climate change in business and asset planning endorsed the Property and Asset Services adaptation plan to start incorporating climate change adaptation into public housing business and asset planning completed research into the vulnerability of funded agencies to climate change, and designed a program of resilience planning for the sector. The study was completed in partnership with the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology and the Victorian Centre for Climate Change Adaptation environmental management system target: to implement the Property and Asset Services adaptation plan. In addition, the department: put a requirement in place for staff to consider energy efficiency ratings when purchasing electrical equipment such as computers, laptops and white goods determined the department s gas usage and tariff structures to enable bulk purchasing arrangements for more than 1,000 small and residential accounts environmental management system target: to decrease communal printer-tocomputer ratios to 1:20 by Climate change adaptation The department is committed to managing climate change risks for its clients, assets and services as part of the Victorian climate change adaptation plan. In , the department: presented study findings on the climate change risks to the department s public housing to the Capital Committee which

100 95 Environmental performance reporting The following information has been prepared in accordance with Financial Reporting Direction 24C and the Global Reporting Initiative (G3.1) environmental indicators (EN) EN2, EN3, EN4, EN8, EN16, EN17, EN18 and EN29. Reporting scope was determined by the environmental performance of the department s existing building portfolio s utility meters, currently monitored in the environmental management system, as occupied on 30 June In , the environmental performance reporting data represents property and assets utilised in the delivery of the department s core functions, including corporate offices, secure services and residential housing. This report includes clients residential energy and water usage related to disability accommodation and base building energy and water in shared public housing facilities. All data is based on best available information at the time of preparation. Where data was not available or was provided as an estimate in and has since become available, it has been adjusted to reflect actual figures representing the reported building portfolio as at 30 June Where environmental performance cannot be directly attributed to a specific department, data has been calculated using a proportional split, based on the percentage of full-time equivalent staff. For example, the Department of Human Services utilities and waste disposal is shared in office facilities with 81 per cent fulltime equivalent and 19 per cent full-time equivalent Department of Health staff. As at 30 June 2014, the department provided its administrative services from 45 office locations across the state. In addition, the department operates from operational centres providing secure services and disability residential services. Public housing energy data is representative of community facilities, general lighting, and bulk hot water equipment from high rises, walk ups and general rental stock public housing. Water data is representative of the high-rise public housing locations under the environmental management system.

101 96 Annual report Victorian Department of Human Services Staff and building reference data Human Services Governmentowned buildings Leased buildings Total Office-based FTE 684 4,919 5,603 Operational FTE 4,085 4,085 Total FTE 9,688 Number of office-based sites Number of high-rise public housing sites 44 Office-based area (m 2 ) 11, , ,823 Energy Office-based energy use (estimate) Total energy usage segmented by primary source Megajoules $ Megajoules $ Electricity 41,384,040 2,592,271 41,916,956 2,607,830 Green power 549,112 16, ,286 18,978 Natural gas 17,035, ,115 16,417, ,752 Total 58,969,055 3,028,913 58,964,547 3,057,560 Office-based energy use (estimate) Total greenhouse gas emissions by primary source Tonnes CO 2 -e Tonnes CO 2 -e Electricity 13,271 13,623 Natural gas Total 14,145 14,466 Office-based energy use (estimate) Energy used per FTE (megajoules/fte) 11,710 10,523 Energy intensity (megajoules/m 2 ) Green power purchased 1.3 per cent 1.5 per cent Notes: This data represents 100 per cent of office-based FTE and 100 per cent of office locations. Green power relates to electricity use only. In , the total energy use and greenhouse gas emissions were based on a proportional split of the Department of Human Services and the Department of Health and co-located office-based FTE of 78 per cent, 20 per cent and two per cent respectively. In , the total energy use and greenhouse gas emissions were based on a proportional split of the Department of Human Services and the Department of Health based FTE of 80.9 per cent and 19.1 per cent respectively. Greenhouse gas emissions are based on the Australian Government Department of Industry, Innovation, Climate Change, Science, Research and Tertiary Education s July 2013 Australian national greenhouse accounts factors. Differences between the data reported in this report and the Annual report are due to refinements in data quality in this year s report.

102 97 Property portfolio energy use Non-office Property portfolio energy use (estimate) Total energy usage segmented by primary source Megajoules $ Megajoules $ Electricity (includes green power) 113,872,596 6,308, ,983,983 6,349,103 Natural gas 398,041,373 4,549, ,439,024 4,190,596 Total 511,913,970 10,858, ,423,007 10,539,868 Property portfolio energy use (estimate) Total greenhouse gas emissions by primary source Tonnes CO 2 -e Tonnes CO 2 -e Electricity 37,000 37,687 Natural gas 26,277 24,557 Total 63,277 62,244 Notes: Property portfolio energy data combines electricity and gas from 12 large operational locations, 44 high-rise housing facilities and other disability and public housing accommodation facilities. This data represents 1991 electricity meters and 777 gas meters from the property portfolio program. Figures have been adjusted to include the most up-to-date data and may differ from those estimated for the same period in the Department of Human Services Annual report to reflect our monitored portfolio. Greenhouse gas emissions are based on the Australian Government Department of Industry, Innovation, Climate Change, Science, Research and Tertiary Education s July 2013 Australian national greenhouse accounts factors. Waste Office-based waste Total units of waste disposed of by destination kilograms/year kilograms/year Landfill 83, ,107 Recycling 470, ,885 Compost 23,190 37,043 Total 577, ,034 Office-based waste Total units of waste disposed of per FTE by destination kilograms/fte/year kilograms/fte/year Landfill Recycling Compost 5 7 Total

103 98 Annual report Victorian Department of Human Services Office-based waste Recycling rate (per cent) Greenhouse gas emissions associated with waste to landfill (tonnes of CO 2 -e) Notes: Waste data is based on one-day waste audits conducted at 20 selected co-located Department of Human Services and Department of Health offices then extrapolated for estimating annual production data. A revised methodology was utilised for both years reporting in this report Factors used to calculate greenhouse gas emissions are based on the Financial Reporting Direction 24C and its accompanying greenhouse gas emission reporting template. In total waste generated and greenhouse gas emissions were based on a proportional split of the Department of Human Services and the Department of Health and co-located office based FTE of 78 per cent, 20 per cent and two per cent respectively. In , the total waste generated and greenhouse gas emissions were based on a proportional split of the Department of Human Services and the Department of Health office based FTE of 81 per cent and 19 per cent respectively. This data has been extrapolated to represent 100 per cent of office based FTE and 100 per cent of office locations. Paper Total department paper use (estimate) Total units of paper used A4 equivalent (reams) 91,547 77,520 Units of paper used per FTE (reams/fte) Total cost of paper used (dollars) 455, ,251 Greenhouse gas emissions associated with paper use (tonnes of CO 2 -e) Percentage of recycled content copy paper purchased (estimate) per cent recycled 35 per cent 37 per cent per cent recycled 48 per cent 58 per cent 0 50 per cent recycled 17 per cent 5 per cent Notes: This data represents all operational FTE. Greenhouse gas emissions are based on the Financial Reporting Direction 24C and its accompanying greenhouse gas emission reporting template, which calculates both Australian made and imported emissions.

104 99 Water Office-based water use (estimate) Total water used (kilolitres) 42,770 46,039 Total water charges (excluding service and sewage charges) 106, ,054 Water used per FTE leased offices (litres/fte) 8,776 8,333 Water used per FTE government-owned offices (litres/fte) 6,714 7,194 Total water used per FTE (litres/fte) 8,573 8,216 Water used per unit of office space (litres/m 2 ) Notes: Water data represents 43 administrative office locations. This data represents 99.5 per cent of office-based FTE and 95.5 per cent of office locations. Total water use is based on an FTE split of office based Department of Human Services and Department of Health of 78 per cent, 20 per cent, and two per cent respectively for and 80.9 per cent and 19.1 per cent respectively for Differences between the data reported in this report and the Department of Human Services Annual report are due to refinements in data quality in this year s report. Property portfolio water use Non-office Description (estimate) Total water used (kilolitres) 82,435 kl 82,507 kl Water-use charges (excluding service and sewage charges) $168,602 $182,391 Notes: Water data represents the 14 property portfolio sites under the environmental management system which includes the larger secure services and disability operational facilities. High-rise public housing water use Description (estimate) Total water used (kilolitres) 1,195,000 kl 1,223,747 kl Total water charges includes usage and sewage charges $3,994,034 $4,912,970 Notes: Water data represents the 44 public housing high rise sites under 29 accounts based on available data.

105 100 Annual report Victorian Department of Human Services Transportation Vehicle fleet Size of vehicle as at 30 June 2014 Vehicle type LPG Dual fuel Hybrid 1 3 cylinder unleaded petrol 4 cylinder unleaded petrol 6 cylinder unleaded petrol Diesel Commercial Executive Passenger bus Passenger car Total (1603 vehicles) Vehicle type Operational (per cent) Executive (per cent) LPG 15 0 Dual fuel 4 0 Hybrid cylinder unleaded petrol cylinder unleaded petrol 1 64 Diesel Total energy consumption (megajoules) LPG 11,850,275 16,004,914 Dual fuel 14,892,888 7,660,366 Hybrid 18,644,297 18,651,493 Unleaded petrol 47,666,395 51,042,911 Diesel 28,736,542 33,097,531 Total 121,790, ,457,240 Total vehicle travel (kilometres) LPG 3,420,266 4,664,867 Dual fuel 4,235,620 2,092,337 Hybrid 8,140,066 8,247,927 Unleaded petrol 12,767,418 12,055,066 Diesel 7,937,459 8,942,745 State Government Vehicle Pool 625, ,348 Total 37,126,260 36,380,290

106 101 Total greenhouse gas emissions (tonnes of CO 2 -e) LPG Dual fuel Hybrid 1,298 1,298 Unleaded petrol 3,318 3,553 Diesel 2,009 2,314 State Government Vehicle Pool Total 8,379 8,678 Greenhouse gas emissions efficiency (tonnes of CO 2 -e per 1,000 kilometres) LPG Dual fuel Hybrid Unleaded petrol Diesel State Government Vehicle Pool Total Notes: This data represents all operational FTE. Energy use, distance travelled and greenhouse gas emissions transport data is based on a total FTE split between the Department of Human Services and Department of Health of 88 per cent and 12 per cent in , and 88 per cent and 12 per cent respectively in Energy use, distance travelled and greenhouse gas emissions transport data for and is based on a 1 April to 31 March financial year. The State Government Vehicle Pool greenhouse gas emissions data for dual-fuel vehicles was determined using the LPG conversion co-efficient. Greenhouse gas emissions are based on the Australian Government Department of Industry, Innovation, Climate Change, Science, Research and Tertiary Education s July 2013 Australian national greenhouse accounts factors. Air travel Description (estimate) Total distance travelled (kilometres) 1,995,216 2,581,612 Greenhouse gas emissions (tonnes of CO 2 -e) Notes: Figures have been adjusted to include the most up-to-date data and may differ from those presented in the Department of Human Services Annual report These data represent all operational FTE. Factors used to calculate greenhouse gas emissions are based on FCM Travel Solutions methodology. Calculations for emissions are based on three categories: short-haul flights (less than 500 kilometres), medium-haul flights (between 500 3,700 kilometres) and long-haul flights (more than 3,700 kilometres).

107 102 Annual report Victorian Department of Human Services Commuting Percentage of employees regularly using sustainable travel (public transport, cycling, walking, car-pooling or working from home) to commute Central business district Metropolitan Regional/rural Total Notes: Sustainable transport data is obtained from the department s travel survey conducted in May Results exclude responses from staff surveyed who were on leave or did not travel to work during the survey period. Greenhouse gas emissions Total greenhouse gas emissions (tonnes CO2-e) associated with: (estimate) Office-based energy use 14,145 14,466 Property portfolio energy use 63,277 62,244 Vehicle fleet 8,379 8,678 Air travel Waste production Paper use Total 86,762 86,482 Notes: Figures have been adjusted to include the most up-to-date data and may differ from those presented in the Department of Human Services Annual report Greenhouse gas emissions for energy and vehicle fleet are based on the Australian Government Department of Industry, Innovation, Climate Change, Science, Research and Tertiary Education s July 2013 Australian national greenhouse accounts factors. Greenhouse gas emissions for waste and paper were calculated based on Financial Reporting Direction 24C and its accompanying greenhouse gas emission reporting template. Greenhouse gas emissions for air travel are based on FCM Travel Solutions methodology. Glossary FTE = full-time equivalent employee CO 2 -e = carbon dioxide equivalent m 2 = metres squared LPG = liquefied petroleum gas

108 103 Additional departmental information available on request In compliance with the requirements of the Standing Directions of the Minister for Finance, details in respect of the items listed below have been retained by the department and are available on request, subject to the provisions of the Freedom of Information Act 1982: a) a statement that declarations of pecuniary interests have been duly completed by all relevant officers b) details of shares held by a senior officer as nominee or held beneficially in a statutory authority or subsidiary c) details of publications produced by the entity about the entity, and how these can be obtained l) details of all consultancies and contractors including: consultants/contractors engaged services provided and expenditure committed to for each engagement. The information is available on request from: Director, Executive Services Department of Human Services GPO Box 4057 Melbourne Victoria 3001 Telephone: (03) To ensure the department is meeting its accountability and compliance requirements, some of this additional information has been included in the annual report where relevant. d) details of changes in prices, fees, charges, rates and levies charged by the entity e) details of any major external reviews carried out on the entity f) details of major research and development activities undertaken by the entity g) details of overseas visits undertaken including a summary of the objectives and outcomes of each visit h) details of major promotional, public relations and marketing activities undertaken by the entity to develop community awareness of the entity and its services i) details of assessments and measures undertaken to improve the occupational health and safety of employees j) general statement on industrial relations within the entity and details of time lost through industrial accidents and disputes k) list of major committees sponsored by the entity, the purposes of each committee and the extent to which the purposes have been achieved

109 104 Annual report Victorian Department of Human Services Risk management attestation Context The Department of Human Services has a risk management approach that is consistent with the Australian/New Zealand Risk Management Standard (AS/NZS ISO 31000:2009). Risks in meeting the department s business objectives are managed across all levels of the organisation in accordance with the department s risk management framework and guidelines. Supporting the organisation s growth in risk management maturity, the department has a three year risk management strategy that will: drive risk management direction and improve service delivery efficiencies through a greater integration of risk management with business planning and performance. strengthen risk management culture through the provision of targeted risk management training; engaging staff and keeping risk management in the spotlight. meet compliance requirements, ensuring the department s risk management approach complies with relevant obligations and meets organisational needs. undertake risk management processes by supporting groups and divisions to better manage their risks in the new structure and transformation program. Risk management is embedded within the department and focuses on service delivery reform and innovation. Risk management is supporting the reform initiatives that are underway including: Services Connect, the National Disability Insurance Scheme, Out-ofhome Care and the New Directions for Social Housing. Attestation statement I, Gill Callister, Secretary, Department of Human Services certify that the Department of Human Services has risk management processes in place consistent with the Australian/New Zealand Risk Management Standard (AS/NZS ISO 31000:2009) and an internal control system is in place that enables the executive to understand, manage and satisfactorily control risk exposures. The Audit and Risk Management Committee verifies this assurance and that the risk profile of the Department of Human Services has been critically reviewed within the last 12 months. Gill Callister Secretary Department of Human Services 20 August 2014

110 105 Attestation for compliance with Ministerial Standing Direction Insurance I, Gill Callister, Secretary, Department of Human Services certify that the Department of Human Services has complied with Ministerial Direction Insurance except for procedure (b) whereby only partial compliance was achieved. Compliance with DataVic Access Policy Consistent with the DataVic Access Policy issued by the Victorian Government in 2012, all data tables included in this Annual Report will be available at in machine readable format. Procedure (b) requires a register of all insurances and indemnities to be maintained. The register of indemnities was incomplete due to delays in implementing a robust administrative process to capture and record all contracts providing an indemnity to a contracting party(s) over the full term of the financial year. A revised process has been implemented to ensure compliance for the financial year. Gill Callister Secretary Department of Human Services 8 September 2014

111 106 Annual report Victorian Department of Human Services Disclosure index The annual report of the Department of Human Services is prepared in accordance with all relevant Victorian legislation. This index has been prepared to facilitate identification of the department s compliance with statutory disclosure requirements. Report of operations Ministerial directions Requirement Page Chapter and purpose FRD 22E Manner of establishment and the relevant ministers 55 FRD 22E Objectives, functions, powers and duties 1, 4 6 FRD 22E Nature and range of services provided 5 6, 8 28 Management and structure FRD 22E Organisational structure Financial and other information FRD 8B Budget portfolio outcomes FRD 10 Disclosure index FRD 12A Disclosure of major contracts 87 FRD 15B, FRD 22E Executive officer data FRD 22E, SD 4.2 (k) Operational and budgetary objectives and performance against objectives FRD 22E Employment and conduct principles 75 FRD 22E Occupational health and safety management measures FRD 22E Summary of the financial results for the year 54 FRD 22E Significant changes in financial position during the year 54 FRD 22E Major changes or factors affecting performance 54 FRD 22E Subsequent events 198 FRD 22E Application and operation of Freedom of Information Act FRD 22E Compliance with building and maintenance provisions of Building Act FRD 22E Statement on National Competition Policy 88 FRD 22E Application and operation of the Protected Disclosures Act FRD 22E Application and operation of the Carers Recognition Act FRD 22E Details of consultancies over $10, FRD 22E Details of consultancies under $10, FRD 22E Statement of availability of other information on request 103 FRD 24C Reporting of office-based environmental impacts FRD 25B Victorian Industry Participation Policy disclosures 83 FRD 29, FRD 22E Workforce data disclosures SD Risk management compliance attestation 104

112 107 Report of operations Ministerial directions Requirement Page SD Attestation for compliance with Ministerial Standing Direction Insurance 105 SD 4.2(g) Specific information requirements 1 32 SD 4.2(j) Sign-off requirements iii Financial report Ministerial directions Requirement Page Financial statements required under Part 7 of the Financial Management Act 1994 SD 4.2(a) Statement of changes in equity 115 SD 4.2(b) Operating statement 113 SD 4.2(b) Balance sheet 114 SD 4.2(b) Cash flow statement 116 Other requirements under Standing Directions 4.2 SD 4.2(c) Compliance with Australian accounting standards and other authoritative pronouncements 117 SD 4.2(c) Compliance with ministerial directions 117 SD 4.2(d) Rounding of amounts 121 SD 4.2(c) Accountable Officer s declaration 110 SD 4.2(f) Compliance with model financial report 117 Other disclosures in notes to the financial statements FRD 9A Departmental disclosure of administered assets and liabilities by activity 193 FRD 11A Disclosure of ex-gratia payments 194 FRD 13 Disclosure of parliamentary appropriations FRD 21B Disclosures of responsible persons, executive officers and other personnel (contactors with significant management responsibilities) in the financial report FRD 102 Inventories 130 FRD 103D Non-current physical assets FRD 104 Foreign currency N/A FRD 106 Impairment of assets 130 FRD 109 Intangible assets 165 FRD 107 Investment properties N/A FRD 110 Cash flow statements 194 FRD 112D Defined benefit superannuation obligations 171 FRD 113 Investments in subsidiaries, jointly controlled entities and associates N/A

113 108 Annual report Victorian Department of Human Services Report of operations Ministerial directions Requirement Page FRD 114A Financial instruments general government entities and public non-financial corporations FRD 119A Transfers through contributed capital 173 Note: FRD = Financial reporting direction Full report Legislation Page Administrative Arrangements Act Audit Act Building Act Carers Recognition Act Children, Youth and Families Act Disability Act , Financial Management Act Freedom of Information Act Gambling Regulation Act , , 196 Housing Act Mental Health Act Protected Disclosure Act Public Administration Act Victorian Industry Participation Policy Act

114 Note XX. XXXXXXX (continued) Department of Human Services financial statements Accountable officer s and chief finance and accounting officer s declaration 110 Independent auditor s report 111 Comprehensive operating statement for the financial year ended 30 June Balance sheet as at 30 June Statement of changes in equity for the financial year ended 30 June Cash flow statement for the financial year ended 30 June Notes to and forming part of the financial statements 30 June

115 110 Annual Report Victorian Department of Human Services...

116 111...

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