Going to a Mental Health Tribunal hearing

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "Going to a Mental Health Tribunal hearing"

Transcription

1 June 2015 Going to a Mental Health Tribunal hearing Includes: information about compulsory treatment and treatment orders information about Mental Health Tribunal hearings worksheets to help you represent yourself at a hearing. We have updated this booklet in line with the new mental health laws that began in July 2014.

2 Contents Do you need this booklet in a different format? Please ring us on (03) and ask for Publications. We can talk with you about what you need. About this booklet 3 What do these words mean? 4 Part one: Mental Health Tribunal hearings Decide what criteria to focus on 8 2. Fill in the worksheets Get evidence Check in with the Victoria Legal Aid duty lawyer 13 Worksheet 1 treatment criterion one 14 Worksheet 2 treatment criterion two 16 Worksheet 3 treatment criterion three 19 Worksheet 4 treatment criterion four 20 Worksheet 5 Type and length of treatment order 24 Part three: Going to the hearing 26 Where to get help 28 Produced by Victoria Legal Aid Victoria Legal Aid 350 Queen Street Melbourne 3000 For help with legal problems, call Legal Help on For business queries, call First edition 2013 Second edition June 2015 Acknowledgments: Thank-you to the contributions and feedback from the Victorian Mental Illness Awareness Council and the Mental Health Review Board in developing the first edition. Thank-you to the Mental Health Tribunal for their feedback on this edition Victoria Legal Aid. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 licence licenses/by/4.0/. You are free to re-use the work under that licence, on the condition that you credit Victoria Legal Aid as author, indicate if changes were made and comply with other licence terms. The licence does not apply to any images, photographs or branding including the Victoria Legal Aid logo. Disclaimer: The material in this publication is a general guide only. It is not legal advice. If you need to, please get legal advice about your own particular situation. Changes to the law The law changes all the time. To check for changes you can: call Victoria Legal Aid s Legal Help phone line on visit Victoria Legal Aid s website at Contents ISBN

3 About this booklet What is in this booklet? This booklet can help you represent yourself at a Mental Health Tribunal hearing about your treatment order. The first part of this booklet has information about: treatment orders and compulsory treatment the tribunal hearings. The second part of this booklet has information and worksheets to: help you think about what you will say in your hearing and what evidence you will need explain some of the questions the tribunal will consider at your hearing give you space to write notes that you can take into the hearing. Who is this booklet for? This booklet is for: people who will represent themselves at their own hearing family, friends, support workers or advocates helping you at a hearing. Getting more help We list the names of organisations that can provide you with legal advice and other support in the Where to get help section on page 28. You may also want to read our brochure Are you on a treatment order? The third part of this booklet explains what happens on the day of a hearing and what to do if you are not happy with the outcome of the hearing. What is not in this booklet? This booklet does not have information about: hearings about electro-convulsive treatment having a hearing if you do not want to be moved to a different hospital or clinic. For more information, contact Victoria Legal Aid or the Mental Health Legal Centre. See Where to get help on page 28. Victoria Legal Aid Victoria Legal Aid is a government funded agency set up to ensure that the most vulnerable people who cannot afford to pay for a private lawyer can get help with their legal problems. We provide free information for all Victorians, family dispute resolution for disadvantaged families, provide lawyers on duty in most courts and tribunals in Victoria, and fund legal representation for people who meet our eligibility criteria. We help Victorian people with legal problems about criminal matters, family breakdown, child protection, family violence, child support, immigration, social security, mental health, discrimination, guardianship and administration, tenancy and debt. About this booklet 2 3

4 What do these words mean? In every section of this booklet we highlight legal words in bold when they first appear. The definitions for these words are below. We have also included other legal words that you might hear used. advance statement a document that sets out your views and preferences about treatment in the event you become unwell. This is different from a medical power of attorney advocate someone who helps you to stand up for your rights. They can be a lawyer or paralegal but they can also be a friend, family member or support worker application for revocation if you disagree with compulsory treatment you may apply to the tribunal and ask them to revoke (cancel) the order assessment order an order that lets a doctor or a mental health practitioner assess whether you need compulsory treatment for a mental illness clinical file the collection of notes that your treating team make about you and your treatment. The notes will include things the treating team have seen, things you have told the treating team and things other people have told the treating team about you community patient a person getting compulsory treatment in the community compulsory treatment treatment you can be given for a mental illness under a treatment order, even if you do not agree to it evidence the information that the tribunal uses to make its decision. Evidence can be given verbally at the hearing or in documents. There is more information about evidence on page 10 hearing the tribunal holds a hearing to talk to you and your treating team to decide whether the four treatment criteria apply to you inpatient a person who is detained in hospital to get compulsory treatment mental health practitioner a social worker or registered psychologist, nurse or occupational therapist who works at a public mental health service. This can be either at a hospital or clinic Mental Health Tribunal the tribunal that decides whether the four treatment criteria apply to you nominated person someone you have formally asked to support you and receive information about your treatment psychiatrist the law refers to an authorised psychiatrist who is a senior psychiatrist with decision-making authority. In this guide we refer to authorised psychiatrists as a psychiatrist What do these words mean? Report on Compulsory Treatment a report your treating doctor writes for the tribunal explaining why the doctor thinks you need a treatment order for compulsory treatment revoke cancel treatment criteria the set of legal requirements that must all be met before you can be put on a treatment order for compulsory treatment treatment criterion one of the requirements that must be met before you can be put on a treatment order for compulsory treatment treatment order a document that lets a hospital or clinic give you compulsory treatment for a mental illness, even if you do not agree with it. There are different types of treatment orders: inpatient temporary treatment order, community temporary treatment order, inpatient treatment order and community treatment order. The law talks about temporary treatment orders and treatment orders differently. This booklet uses the term treatment order to refer to all these orders, where appropriate treating team your psychiatrist and the other healthcare professionals who work together to provide you with treatment and care Words that have changed under the new Mental Health Act 2014 involuntary treatment now compulsory treatment involuntary patient now compulsory patient involuntary treatment order now a treatment order Mental Health Review Board now the Mental Health Tribunal appeal now application for revocation request and recommendation now assessment order What do these words mean? 4 5

5 Part one: Mental Health Tribunal hearings If one or more of the treatment criteria stop applying to you, your psychiatrist must revoke your order. Compulsory treatment can stop, even if you have time left on your order. What is compulsory treatment? Compulsory treatment is treatment that you will get for a mental illness if the four treatment criteria apply to you. You can only be given compulsory treatment if you do not have capacity to give informed consent to treatment or you are refusing treatment, and there are no less restrictive means for you to be treated. What are the four treatment criteria? The four treatment criteria are: 1. You have a mental illness. 2. Because of your mental illness you need immediate treatment to prevent serious deterioration in your mental or physical health or to prevent serious harm to you or another person. 3. Immediate treatment will be given to you if you are on an order. 4. There are no less restrictive means, reasonably available, for you to get the treatment that is needed. What does the Mental Health Tribunal do? The tribunal holds hearings to make decisions about whether or not all four treatment criteria apply to you. If the psychiatrist has not varied or revoked your order when they should have, seek advice and consider making an application to the tribunal. If your treatment order is about to run out but your psychiatrist thinks you need more compulsory treatment, your psychiatrist may apply to the tribunal for another treatment order. When does the tribunal hold hearings? The tribunal will hold hearings when: a psychiatrist has made a temporary treatment order over you or changed your community treatment order to an inpatient treatment order. The tribunal must hold a hearing within 28 days of either of these things happening, and before your order ends your psychiatrist has applied to put you on another treatment order you are on a treatment order and make an application for revocation to the tribunal. How does the tribunal make its decisions? At the hearing the tribunal hears and reads evidence from you and your treating team about whether the four treatment criteria apply to you. The tribunal also hears and reads general background information about you. For more information about evidence, see page 10. If they decide that the four treatment criteria do apply, the tribunal will make a treatment order and also decide: whether you should be treated as a community patient or as an inpatient in hospital the length of your order. If the tribunal decides that at least one of the four treatment criteria does not apply to you, they must revoke your order. The tribunal can also make decisions about electro-convulsive treatment and can hold hearings if you do not want to be moved to a different hospital or clinic. This booklet does not have information on these sorts of hearings. Who sits on the tribunal? There will usually be three tribunal members, including a lawyer, a psychiatrist or a medical practitioner, and a community member. The psychiatrist or medical practitioner cannot be anyone treating you or working for your hospital or clinic. How long can the tribunal make a treatment order go for? The tribunal will decide the maximum amount of time the treatment order will last: community treatment order any time up to 12 months inpatient treatment order any time up to 6 months. However, if you are under 18 years, the order cannot be longer than 3 months in either case. If the tribunal makes a 5-month inpatient treatment order, it does not necessarily mean you need to stay in hospital for the full 5 months. When you are able to be treated in the community, the psychiatrist must discharge you from hospital and vary your order to a community treatment order for the time left on the order. What can't the tribunal decide? The tribunal cannot: decide that the doctor gave you the wrong diagnosis change your medication or treatment give you compensation money or punish the doctor if you are unhappy about the way you have been treated give you leave from the hospital. You can still talk about these issues in your hearing. They may be relevant to whether the four treatment criteria apply to you. With your medication, although the tribunal cannot have it changed, the tribunal can help you talk about it with your treating team. Part one: About Mental Health Tribunal hearings 6 7

6 1. Decide what criteria to focus on Use the diagram below to see what your situation is and what your case might be. Then you can see what worksheets and treatment criteria to focus on. You can use the diagram below to see what your situation is and what your case might be. It can help you work out which worksheets ets to focus on. You can use the diagram in two ways: you can respond to the statements in the green boxes and follow the arrows to the red boxes that match your responses OR you can go straight to reading the red My case boxes to find the one that best describes your situation. START HERE: I have a mental illness. NO MY CASE: I do not have a mental illness. Treatment criterion 1 is not met and so I do not need to be on a treatment order. FOCUS ON WORKSHEET 1 YES If I do not have immediate treatment for mental illness, my mental or physical health will seriously deteriorate OR I or someone else will be seriously harmed. NO MY CASE: I do not need mental health treatment to prevent serious deterioration or harm to myself or others. Treatment criterion 2 is not met and so I do not need to be on a treatment order. FOCUS ON WORKSHEET 2 YES I will get the treatment I need on a treatment order. NO MY CASE: Although I need treatment for my mental illness, the treatment I need will not be provided to me under the order. Treatment criterion 3 is not met and so I do not need to be on a treatment order. FOCUS ON WORKSHEET 3 YES I will take the treatment voluntarily without a treatment order. NO YES MY CASE: I will take the treatment voluntarily by choice. I do not need an order forcing me to take it. Taking the treatment voluntarily is less restrictive than being on a treatment order. Treatment criterion 4 is not met and so I do not need to be on a treatment order. (You might say this either because you agree you have an illness and need treatment, or because you will go along with the treatment the doctor thinks you need simply to avoid having an order.) FOCUS ON WORKSHEET 4 Even if the tribunal thinks I need an order, I do not agree with the type or length of order my treating team wants. OR MY CASE: I might need to stay in hospital as a compulsory inpatient but I do not need to be here as long as my treating psychiatrist says I do. MY CASE: I do not need to be in hospital to get the treatment. If I have to be on an order, I would prefer it to be a community treatment order. The tribunal should make a community treatment order rather than an inpatient treatment order. (You might also disagree with your treating team about how long the order should be.) FOCUS ON WORKSHEET 5 FOCUS ON WORKSHEET 5 8 9

7 2. Fill in the worksheets There is one worksheet per criterion. The worksheets guide you through: what that treatment criterion means questions the tribunal may ask you about that criterion. The worksheets have space for you to: write notes about your answers to the questions the tribunal may ask about that criterion list your evidence that backs up your answers write notes about the treating team s evidence that relates to that criterion. Focus on filling in the worksheets that are about the criteria that relate to your situation and case. These are the criteria you will need to show do not apply to you. If you have time, you can read through all the worksheets to get an idea of what else the tribunal will be looking at in the hearing. The worksheets are on pages 14 to Get evidence The tribunal makes its decision based on evidence. In the worksheets we suggest you list evidence that backs up your answers. You should bring as much evidence as you can to the hearing to back up what you say. You can give the evidence to the tribunal to read, listen to or look at. The treating team will also be bringing their evidence to the hearing for the tribunal to consider. Types of evidence Evidence can include: verbal evidence: - what you say at the hearing to the tribunal - what the treating team says at the hearing to the tribunal - any person ( witnesses ) who can provide information at the hearing to the tribunal about your situation documentary evidence (written documents and reports): - the Report on Compulsory Treatment - the clinical file - any advance statement you may have written - any written second psychiatric opinions about you - documents with the views of a family member, carer or nominated person - any other document that will help you explain what you want to say. For example, a written version of your story or a letter from your GP. The tribunal will send you a form called Your Report to the Mental Health Tribunal for patients, carers/ nominated persons with the notice of hearing. You can fill this in before the hearing. Organising your evidence If you want someone like a family member, carer or nominated person to give verbal evidence at the hearing, make sure you: give that person enough notice so they can get ready to come. For example, the person may need to arrange to take time off work give the person the date, time and address of the hearing tell the person the sort of things you want him or her to talk about at the hearing. If you have documentary evidence that backs up what you say, make sure you give yourself enough time to get the evidence. For example, if you are getting a written second psychiatric opinion, you will need time to have an appointment with the other psychiatrist and that psychiatrist will need enough time to write up the second opinion. The treating team s evidence The treating team will show the tribunal: the Report on Compulsory Treatment the clinical file. The Report on Compulsory Treatment is prepared by your treating team and will provide their opinion and information about: why the treating team think all four treatment criteria apply what happened shortly before you were admitted to hospital or put on the treatment order what mental illness the doctor thinks you have the treatment that you are being given the treatment that the doctor plans to give you in the future why the doctor thinks you need that treatment and for how long what the doctor thinks would happen if you did not get that treatment why the doctor thinks you need to be on a treatment order to get that treatment. The clinical file has: all the notes that the treating team made about you and your treatment. This may be things they have seen, things you have told them or things other people have told them documents such as risk assessments and reports other documents to do with your compulsory treatment. The treating team will also talk to the tribunal (give verbal evidence)

8 Getting copies of the treating team s evidence You have the right to read the Report on Compulsory Treatment and the clinical file at least 48 hours before the hearing. The treating team must give you a copy of the Report on Compulsory Treatment and explain it to you. However, your treating team may ask the tribunal for permission to refuse to give you certain documents if doing so may result in serious harm to you or another person. Try not to get too upset about the Report on Compulsory Treatment or the clinical file. Remember, it is the treating team s version of events. You will have a chance to tell the tribunal about what you think happened and why. If the treating team does not give you their evidence, or if you get the evidence late, tell the tribunal. If this has made it harder for you to prepare what you want to say, you may want to ask the tribunal to adjourn (delay) the hearing so you have more time to prepare. 4. Check in with the Victoria Legal Aid duty lawyer Victoria Legal Aid duty lawyers visit all hospitals and some community mental health clinics. The lawyers may not be able to come with you to the hearing but they can help you get ready by: going through this booklet with you and explaining what happens at the hearing going through your worksheets, once you have filled them in, and giving you suggestions or advice about what you have written looking through your evidence and giving advice about it looking through the treating team s evidence and giving advice about it. Check with the hospital or community mental health clinic to see when the lawyer is visiting next. You can ask for an appointment. You can also get legal advice over the phone by contacting Victoria Legal Aid's Legal Help line. See 'Where to get help' on page 28. Commenting on the treating team s evidence The tribunal will let you speak about the treating team s evidence. It may help if you spend some time before the hearing reading their evidence and thinking about what comments you will make. In the worksheets, we have left space for you to make notes about the treating team s evidence. Try to understand what the documents say about: why the treating team think you ended up in hospital or put you on the treatment order what treatment the treating team are giving you what treatment you have had before observations the treating team have made about your behaviour what the treating team think would happen if you did not have the treatment what the treating team say your mental health history is, including when they say you were first diagnosed and when doctors or psychiatrists put you on treatment orders before or when you have been in hospital for mental health issues before

9 Worksheet 1 treatment criterion one Do you have a mental illness? Your evidence to back up your answers: (List your evidence here. This could include a second opinion remember to give yourself enough time to get the second opinion in writing.) Does this criterion apply to you? The tribunal will consider that this criteria applies to you if the evidence shows that you have a mental illness. The law says that a mental illness is a medical condition that involves a significant disturbance of thought, mood, perception or memory. Some examples are depression, schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder and bipolar affective disorder. The tribunal will read the Report on Compulsory Treatment and the clinical file. It is not enough evidence for the tribunal to hear that the doctor thinks you appear to have a mental illness or that you have had a mental illness in the past. What might the tribunal members ask you? The tribunal may ask you: Are you experiencing any significant disturbance of thought, mood, perception or memory? When did you last experience this? Has a doctor diagnosed you with a mental illness? What do you think about that diagnosis? If you disagree with the diagnosis, why do you disagree? Have you been diagnosed with this mental illness or another mental illness before? If you do not think you have a mental illness, the tribunal may also ask you: Do you have evidence (for example, a second opinion) from another psychiatrist or doctor who agrees with you that you do not have a mental illness? What is your explanation for the things which the doctor on the treating team says are symptoms or evidence of mental illness? Why does your treating team think you need treatment? What happened? Why are you getting treatment or having treatment proposed for you. Your notes about the treatment team s evidence: (What does it say about you having a mental illness? What are your thoughts about this? Are there any mistakes or errors? Is the evidence recent or is it old and maybe out of date?) Worksheet 1 treatment criterion one Your answers: (Write your thoughts here.) 14 15

10 Worksheet 2 treatment criterion two Your answers: (Write your thoughts here.) Because of your mental illness you need immediate treatment to prevent serious deterioration in your own mental or physical health or serious harm to you or another person. Does this criterion apply to you? This is one of the more complicated criteria. The tribunal will consider that this criterion applies to you if the evidence shows that: your mental or physical health will seriously deteriorate if you do not get immediate treatment OR you or another person might be seriously harmed if you do not get immediate treatment. And the evidence must show that: these things would be caused by your mental illness AND the proposed treatment will help prevent these things AND the proposed treatment is done with professional care to make your illness go away or lessen symptoms and ill effects of mental illness. Treatment can include medication and psychotherapy. The tribunal must also take into account your views about treatment in your advance statement, if you have one. What might the tribunal members ask you? The tribunal members may ask you questions about treatment, such as: What treatment are you getting? What do you think about that treatment? Is it helping you? What are the side effects? Will the treatment fix your mental illness or lessen its symptoms or ill effects? Is there another type of treatment that would help or that you would prefer? Is there another way (other than treatment) for you to look after your mental or physical health? The tribunal members may ask you questions about what might happen if you do not get immediate treatment, for example: What do you think will happen if you do not have immediate treatment? o Would your mental or physical health get worse? How serious could this get? o Would you or another person be harmed? How serious might this harm be? Why does your treating team say that your mental or physical health would get seriously worse, or that you or another person would be seriously harmed, if you did not have the treatment? What do you say about whether these things could happen? Is your mental illness causing your mental or physical health to get worse? Is it causing the chance of harm to you or another person? Or is there something else going on that might be causing these things? Is there another way of stopping these things from happening that does not involve treatment? What has happened in the past when you were not treated? Your evidence that backs up your answers: (List your evidence here.) Worksheet 2 treatment criterion two 16 17

11 Worksheet 3 treatment criterion three Your notes about the treatment team s evidence: (What does it say about treatment? What does it say about your mental or physical health getting worse? Or about you or another person being harmed? What are your thoughts about this evidence? Are there any mistakes or errors? Is the evidence recent or is it old and maybe out of date?) Immediate treatment will be given on a treatment order. This is a simpler criterion. The tribunal will not generally spend too much time on it. The tribunal members may ask you about what treatment are you have been given since you have been on the order. They may also ask you or your doctors what treatment you might get in the near future. Your answers: (Write your thoughts here.) Worksheet 3 treatment criterion three 18 19

12 Worksheet 4 treatment criterion four There are no less restrictive means, reasonably available, for you to receive the immediate treatment. Does this criterion apply to you? The tribunal wants to know whether you would you take treatment without a treatment order if it were up completely up to you. If you would keep getting treatment without a treatment order, this criterion is not met. You could consider appointing a nominated person or creating an advance statement as the tribunal will take the views of the nominated person and your advance statement into account. What might the tribunal members ask you? The tribunal members may ask you questions about treatment, your supports in the community and what you would do if you became unwell again. Questions about treatment If you were not on a treatment order and free to make your own decisions, would you: o stay at the hospital as a voluntary patient? Why? o continue the treatment? Why? Do you think the treatment is helping you? In what way? What would happen to you if you forgot or stopped taking your treatment and medications? Have you been treated in a community mental health clinic before? How did that go? Do you have a relationship with the local clinic already? Would you be honest with the clinic about how things are going? Did you stick with your treatment and go to appointments when you went to the clinic in the past? If not, why not? What would be different this time? How would you remember your appointments? How would you get to the clinic? Questions about your supports in the community If you left the hospital, do you have somewhere to live? What sort of place is this? Is there someone there who can help you? For example, help you take your medication. What supports and help do you have in the community? Who has regular contact with you and makes sure you stay well and continue your treatment? Questions about becoming unwell again If you have stopped taking treatment in the past and become unwell, what would be different this time? Do you understand enough about your mental illness to make clear decisions about your treatment now? Would you be able to recognise if you are becoming unwell in the future? What signs would you notice? If you became unwell again, what would you do? Have you asked for help before when you were becoming unwell? Is there someone you see regularly who would notice any changes in your mental state and call your doctor or the Crisis Assessment and Treatment (CAT) team if they were worried about you? Would you work with your local doctor, a private psychiatrist or the community mental health service? Have you worked with them before? Your answers: (Write your thoughts here.) About the treatment Worksheet 4 treatment criterion four 20 21

13 About your supports in the community (You can talk about your housing situation, whether you are studying or working, your interests or hobbies, and your aims and aspirations, for example, whether would you like to study or work.) Your evidence that backs up your answers: (List your evidence here.) Evidence to back up your answers to questions about the treatment Evidence to back up your answers to questions about supports in the community Worksheet 4 treatment criterion four About becoming unwell again (You can talk about your history living in the community and managing your health, and people and services that can provide you with support.) Evidence to back up your answers to questions about getting unwell again Your notes about the treating team s evidence: 22 23

14 Worksheet 5 Type and length of treatment order How will the tribunal decide the type of treatment order to put you on? If the tribunal finds that the four treatment criteria apply to you, the tribunal will then need to decide what type of treatment order to make. This will decide where you get treatment. The types of orders are: inpatient treatment order - you will get treatment in hospital community treatment order - you will get treatment in the community. Your answers: (Write your thoughts here. You must show that you do not need to be kept in hospital to get compulsory treatment. Instead, you could receive that treatment in the community.) The tribunal can only make an inpatient treatment order if it thinks you cannot get compulsory treatment in the community. The tribunal will want to know whether you can get the treatment without being forced to stay in hospital and without hospital staff closely supervising you. How will the tribunal decide the length of your treatment order? There are maximum lengths that the tribunal can make a treatment order last for: community treatment order any time up to 12 months inpatient treatment order any time up to 6 months. If you are under 18 years, the order cannot be longer than 3 months in either case. The tribunal cannot make an order last for any longer than these maximum lengths. To decide the exact length of your order, the tribunal will think about: how long you would like it to go for and why you feel this way the point in time at which the evidence shows that the four treatment criteria would no longer apply to you. What questions might the tribunal members ask you? The tribunal members may ask you questions about your supports in the community: Is your medication still being trialled or adjusted in the hospital? Is your mental state still changing? Do the hospital staff need to closely supervise you at the moment? Are there any benefits to you staying in the hospital? Or are the benefits of you being home greater than any benefit for you staying in the hospital? Have you been treated in a community mental health clinic before? How did that go? Do you have a relationship with the local clinic already? Would you be honest with the clinic about how things are going? Did you stick with your treatment and go to appointments when you went to the clinic before? If not, why not? What would be different this time? How would you remember your appointments? How would you get to the clinic? Do you have somewhere to live? What sort of place is this? Is there someone there who can help you? For example, help you take your medication. Is there someone you see regularly who would notice any changes in your mental state and call your doctor or the Crisis Assessment and Treatment (CAT) team if they were worried about you? Are you happy to have extra support such as the CAT team visit you when you get out of hospital? Your evidence that backs up your answers: (List your evidence here.) Worksheet 5 Type and length of treatment order 24 25

15 Part three: Going to the hearing Where do hearings happen? Tribunal hearings generally happen where you get your treatment. The tribunal comes to your hospital or clinic and runs the hearing in a meeting room there. At some hospitals and clinics, the tribunal members may not be there in person but be there by video link. What if I am not happy with the tribunal s decision? It is a good idea to speak to a lawyer before doing any of these things below. How long are hearings? Hearings go for about an hour. You may have to wait a while for your hearing to start. A number of hearings will happen on the same day. The hospital or clinic staff will let you know when it is time for your hearing. Who is at the hearing? You. You can also bring a lawyer or advocate to your hearing. Tribunal members. These are people who run the hearing and make the decisions. See 'Who sits on the tribunal?' on page 6. The treating team. The doctor who is treating you will usually be there. Your nurse or case worker may also be there. Family and carers. You can choose to bring other people. You can ask a friend or family member to come to give evidence for you. If you do not want family members or other people to be there, make sure you tell the tribunal at the start of the hearing. Nominated person. You can nominate (ask) someone you trust to support you and receive information. The tribunal will listen to the nominated person s views. However, if you decide that you do not want the nominated person there, let the tribunal know. Interpreters. If you do not speak English very well, you can have an interpreter at the hearing. The tribunal can organise this and pay for this. Ask for a written Statement of Reasons You can write to the tribunal and ask for a written Statement of Reasons. This document will explain why the tribunal made their decision. You must ask the tribunal for the statement within four weeks of the hearing. They should give you the statement within four weeks of your request. Before you ask for a statement, you should be aware that a copy of this will probably go on the clinical file. Ask for another hearing You can make an application for revocation and return to the tribunal for another hearing. You can do this as many times as you need to. Is the hearing private? Yes. Members of the public cannot sit in and listen. The tribunal members and everyone at the hearing should not tell anyone else what happened at your hearing. What should I bring to the hearing? Bring your: notes for your verbal evidence or the people giving the verbal evidence your documentary evidence any of the worksheets that you filled in. Apply to VCAT You can apply to the Victorian Civil and Administrative Tribunal (VCAT) and have a new hearing there. You must apply to VCAT within four weeks of your tribunal hearing or of getting the statement. Get a second opinion You have the right to get a second opinion from another psychiatrist. Your treating psychiatrist must consider the second opinion but does not have to change your treatment. You can ask for reasons why they did not change your treatment. You can ask the Chief Psychiatrist to review your treatment if your psychiatrist does not follow the recommendations of the second opinion. Contact details for the Chief Psychiatrist are on page 28. Part three: Going to the hearing 26 27

16 Where to get help Victoria Legal Aid Legal Help For free information about the law and how we can help you, call Legal Help on Monday to Friday, 8.45 am and 5.15 pm More information More information is on our website at Do you need help calling us? Translating and Interpreting Service Tel: National Relay Service TTY users: Call Speak and Listen users: Call Internet relay users: See Local offices We have offices all over Victoria. Our offices are open Monday to Friday, 8.45 am to 5.15 pm. See the back cover for office locations. All offices are accessible to people with a disability. Useful Victoria Legal Aid resources To order publications We have free booklets about the law in English and other languages. Visit to order or download booklets. Call (03) and ask for Publications to find out more. Our public law library Open Monday to Friday, 9 am to 5 pm 350 Queen Street, Melbourne Victoria Legal Aid help card Available in English and 25 languages Other contacts Are you on a treatment order? Mental Health Legal Centre Tel: (03) or (country callers) Mental Health Complaints Commissioner The Commissioner deals with complaints about Victorian public mental health services. Tel: Mental Health Tribunal Tel: Victorian Civil and Administrative Tribunal Tel: (03) or (toll-free, country callers) Victorian Mental Illness Awareness Council For advocacy and support. Tel: (03) Chief Psychiatrist Tel: Watch our community legal education videos. 28

17 Going to a Mental Health Tribunal hearing Victoria Legal Aid For help with legal problems, call Legal Help on For business queries, call (03) Offices Melbourne Suburban offices Broadmeadows Dandenong Frankston Ringwood Sunshine Regional offices Bairnsdale Ballarat Bendigo Geelong Horsham Morwell Shepparton Warrnambool Publication orders To download or order our publications in English or other languages go to If you need help ordering online please call (03) and ask for Publications or MRB-CL-ENG-0615

Eighth edition July 2010. Patients' rights. A self-help guide to Victoria's Mental Health Act

Eighth edition July 2010. Patients' rights. A self-help guide to Victoria's Mental Health Act Eighth edition July 2010 Patients' rights A self-help guide to Victoria's Mental Health Act Do you need this booklet in a different format? Please ring us on 9269 0223 so we can talk with you about what

More information

This factsheet covers:

This factsheet covers: Mental Health Act Sectioning This factsheet is about detention under the Mental Health Act 1983. This is called sectioning. We explain why you may be sectioned and what rights you have. If you care for

More information

Detention under the Mental Health Act

Detention under the Mental Health Act Detention under the Mental Health Act This factsheet gives information about detention under the Mental Health Act. This is also known as being sectioned. It explains what the Mental Health Act is, why

More information

How to respond to a family violence intervention order

How to respond to a family violence intervention order July 2012 How to respond to a family This booklet is about family s. It explains what intervention orders are and how they work How to respond to a family Do you need this booklet in a different format?

More information

Health (Compulsory Assessment and Treatment) Act 1992

Health (Compulsory Assessment and Treatment) Act 1992 2 Mental Health (Compulsory Assessment and Treatment) Act 1992 PART 1 Terms and definitions 27 PART 2 Compulsory Assessment and Treatment 38 PART 3 Your rights under the Mental Health Act 60 PART 4 Young

More information

The New Mental Health Act A Guide to Named Persons

The New Mental Health Act A Guide to Named Persons The New Mental Health Act A Guide to Named Persons The New Mental Health Act A Guide to Named Persons Scottish Executive, Edinburgh 2005 Crown copyright 2005 ISBN: 0-7559-4732-0 Scottish Executive St Andrew

More information

Rethink 2008 www.rethink.org. the mental health act. essential information for parents and carers

Rethink 2008 www.rethink.org. the mental health act. essential information for parents and carers Rethink 2008 www.rethink.org the mental health act essential information for parents and carers 1 About Rethink Rethink, the leading national mental health membership charity, works to help everyone affected

More information

Families with Children in Care

Families with Children in Care Families with Children in Care A guide to your rights if your child is in care Partnership with Families Project Family Advocacy Service support for families with children in care Handbook This guide for

More information

Care Programme Approach (CPA)

Care Programme Approach (CPA) Care Programme Approach (CPA) The Care Programme Approach (CPA) is the system that is used to organise many people s care from 'secondary mental health services'. This factsheet explains what you should

More information

Borderline personality disorder

Borderline personality disorder Understanding NICE guidance Information for people who use NHS services Borderline personality disorder NICE clinical guidelines advise the NHS on caring for people with specific conditions or diseases

More information

Mental Health Act. Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience

Mental Health Act. Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust in association with reliable and up-to-date information about psychosis for family members and friends

More information

Personal Safety Intervention Orders

Personal Safety Intervention Orders Personal Safety Intervention Orders A guide to resolving disputes and protecting your safety. This booklet is about personal safety intervention orders, which can help protect you from threats and violence

More information

NHS Complaints Advocacy. A step by step guide to making a complaint about the NHS. www.pohwer.net

NHS Complaints Advocacy. A step by step guide to making a complaint about the NHS. www.pohwer.net NHS Complaints Advocacy A step by step guide to making a complaint about the NHS NHS Complaints Advocacy Important Information Please read this section before the rest of this guide to ensure you take

More information

1. Glossary Some information in this factsheet is quite technical. This glossary gives an explanation of some of the phrases and words that are used:

1. Glossary Some information in this factsheet is quite technical. This glossary gives an explanation of some of the phrases and words that are used: Nearest Relative This factsheet looks at the role of the nearest relative. This is a term used in the Mental Health Act. It covers who someone s nearest relative would be, what the nearest relative s rights

More information

the new mental health act: an easy read guide

the new mental health act: an easy read guide the new mental health act: an easy read guide the new mental health act: an easy read guide Scottish Executive, Edinburgh 2007 We wish to thank the Scottish Consortium for Learning Disability for writing

More information

B A R B A R A S H A L I T & C A M E R O N N O L A N M E N T A L H E A L T H L E G A L C E N T R E

B A R B A R A S H A L I T & C A M E R O N N O L A N M E N T A L H E A L T H L E G A L C E N T R E Mental Health Law B A R B A R A S H A L I T & C A M E R O N N O L A N M E N T A L H E A L T H L E G A L C E N T R E Mental health in Victoria Approximately 60,000 Victorians are currently registered as

More information

Community Treatment Orders (CTOs)

Community Treatment Orders (CTOs) Community Treatment Community Treatment Orders (CTOs) Orders (CTOs) This factsheet gives information about community treatment orders (CTO). It explains how your CTO is made and what your rights are. It

More information

Court-Ordered Mental Health Evaluation and Treatment in Arizona: Rights and Procedures

Court-Ordered Mental Health Evaluation and Treatment in Arizona: Rights and Procedures The Arizona State Hospital The Arizona State Hospital is the only long-term inpatient psychiatric facility in Arizona. Before ordering that you receive treatment at the Arizona State Hospital, the court

More information

Care Programme Approach (CPA)

Care Programme Approach (CPA) Care Programme Approach (CPA) The Care Programme Approach (CPA) is used to plan many people s mental health care. This factsheet explains what it is, when you should get and when it might stop. The Care

More information

Major non-psychiatric treatment

Major non-psychiatric treatment Major non-psychiatric treatment About your rights In summary If your psychiatrist or doctor recommends you have major non-psychiatric treatment you: will be provided with information about the treatment

More information

PROTECTING YOUR HEALTH INFORMATION A GUIDE TO PRIVACY ISSUES FOR USERS OF MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES

PROTECTING YOUR HEALTH INFORMATION A GUIDE TO PRIVACY ISSUES FOR USERS OF MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES PROTECTING YOUR HEALTH INFORMATION A GUIDE TO PRIVACY ISSUES FOR USERS OF MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES Prepared for the Mental Health Commission by the Wellington Community Law Centre, September 1999 The Mental

More information

Information Sheet Updated March 2007

Information Sheet Updated March 2007 Duty of Care and Negligence Villamanta Disability Rights Legal Service Inc. Information Sheet Updated March 2007 What is Negligence? Negligence is when someone who owes you a duty of care, has failed to

More information

The Australian Charter of Healthcare Rights in Victoria

The Australian Charter of Healthcare Rights in Victoria The Australian Charter of Healthcare Rights in Victoria The Australian Charter of Healthcare Rights in Victoria The Australian Charter of Healthcare Rights The Australian Charter of Healthcare Rights describes

More information

Involuntary Mental Health Commitments

Involuntary Mental Health Commitments 3710 LANDMARK DRIVE, SUITE 208, COLUMBIA, SC 29204 (803) 782 0639; FAX (803) 790-1946 TOLL FREE IN SC: 1-866-275-7273 (VOICE) AND 1-866-232-4525 (TTY) E-mail: info@pandasc.org Website: www.pandasc.org

More information

FIRST EDITION. Involuntary Medication Hearing Handbook

FIRST EDITION. Involuntary Medication Hearing Handbook FIRST EDITION Involuntary Medication Hearing Handbook FIRST EDITION Involuntary Medication Hearing Handbook 2012 Disability Rights Oregon 610 SW Broadway, Suite 200, Portland OR 97205 Voice: 503-243-2081

More information

Plain Language. Guide

Plain Language. Guide Plain Language Guide Mental Health Act 2009 Disclaimer The information contained in this publication is intended to assist in the interpretation of the Mental Health Act 2009 and is not a substitute for

More information

Islanders' Guide to the Mental Health Act

Islanders' Guide to the Mental Health Act Community Legal Information Association of Prince Edward Island, Inc. Islanders' Guide to the Mental Health Act Prince Edward Island's Mental Health Act defines mental disorder as "a substantial disorder

More information

Section 117 after-care

Section 117 after-care Section 117 after-care Free services for people who have been sectioned This factsheet explains if you can get free after-care under section 117 (pronounced one-one-seven ) of the Mental Health Act 1983.

More information

The second edition was reviewed by Sandra Boulter, Nicholas Snare, Gabriela Serrano, Patrick Spillane and Bozena Guzewicz.

The second edition was reviewed by Sandra Boulter, Nicholas Snare, Gabriela Serrano, Patrick Spillane and Bozena Guzewicz. Acknowledgments The first edition of this guide was researched and written by Robyn Ayres, Amanda Blackburn, Kim Bunt, Edward Cade, Nathan Collins, Rebecca Eldred, James Fletcher, Sarah Ford, Ante Golen,

More information

Antisocial personality disorder

Antisocial personality disorder Understanding NICE guidance Information for people who use NHS services Antisocial personality disorder NICE clinical guidelines advise the NHS on caring for people with specific conditions or diseases

More information

Code of Practice: Mental Health Act 1983

Code of Practice: Mental Health Act 1983 Code of Practice: Mental Health Act 1983 Easy Read version What is in this booklet About this booklet About the Mental Health Act About the Code of Practice Why the Code of Practice needs to change How

More information

Mid Essex. Specialist Psychosis Service

Mid Essex. Specialist Psychosis Service Mid Essex Specialist Psychosis Service What is psychosis? Why have you been referred to us? Psychosis is general term used to describe a number of symptoms. Some of the symptoms of psychosis include: False

More information

asist The Mental Health Act and You advocacy services in staffordshire asist making advocacy a right not a privilege

asist The Mental Health Act and You advocacy services in staffordshire asist making advocacy a right not a privilege asist advocacy services in staffordshire The Mental Health Act and You asist making advocacy a right not a privilege Contents 2 2 The Mental Health Act and you The Mental Health Act What you have a right

More information

A basic guide to the Court of Protection

A basic guide to the Court of Protection 1 A basic guide to the Court of Protection 2 Table of contents Page Who is this guide for? 4 What is the Court of Protection? 4 What can the Court of Protection do? 5 What is the law that applies to the

More information

Changes to special educational needs and disability support

Changes to special educational needs and disability support Changes to special educational needs and disability support Easy read guide for children and young people Who is this guide for? This guide will be useful if you: are a child or a young person have a learning

More information

The Court and your child:

The Court and your child: The Court and your child: when social workers get involved easy words and pictures The Court and your child when social workers get involved People These are the people who appear in the booklet. 2 3 Text

More information

Frequently asked questions about Residential Tenancy disputes (July 2013)

Frequently asked questions about Residential Tenancy disputes (July 2013) Frequently asked questions about Residential Tenancy disputes (July 2013) What types of applications can the Residential Tenancies List hear? The Residential Tenancies List can hear cases under the Residential

More information

The Mind guide to insurance cover and mental health. guide to. insurance cover and mental health

The Mind guide to insurance cover and mental health. guide to. insurance cover and mental health The Mind guide to insurance cover and mental health guide to insurance cover and mental health The Mind guide to insurance cover and mental health This booklet is for anyone who wants to know how a mental

More information

Assessment and services from your local council in England

Assessment and services from your local council in England Guide Guide 12 Assessment and services from your local council in England This guide explains about how to ask for a needs assessment and what support services you may receive from your local council if

More information

making sense of psychiatric medication making sense psychiatric medication

making sense of psychiatric medication making sense psychiatric medication making sense of psychiatric medication making sense psychiatric medication Making sense of psychiatric medication This booklet is for anyone who wants to know more about psychiatric medication. It explains

More information

How we consider information that applicants or registrants declare. Guidance on health and character

How we consider information that applicants or registrants declare. Guidance on health and character How we consider information that applicants or registrants declare Guidance on health and character Contents Who is this document for? 2 About the structure of this document 2 Section 1 Introduction 3

More information

NHS Complaints Advocacy

NHS Complaints Advocacy NHS Complaints Advocacy Raising Concerns or Complaints About the NHS Advocacy in Surrey is provided by Surrey Disabled People s Partnership (SDPP) In partnership with SDPP is a registered Charity: 1156963

More information

When a Person Wants to Be Released from a Psychiatric Hospital

When a Person Wants to Be Released from a Psychiatric Hospital 50 West Broad Street, Suite 1400 Columbus, Ohio 43215-5923 Tel. 614-466-7264 local / 800-282-9181 in Ohio TTY 614-728-2553 / 800-858-3542 in Ohio Fax 800-644-1888 Web: disabilityrightsohio.org Disclaimer:

More information

Court-Ordered Mental Health Evaluation and Treatment in Arizona: Rights and Procedures

Court-Ordered Mental Health Evaluation and Treatment in Arizona: Rights and Procedures The Arizona State Hospital The Arizona State Hospital is the only long-term inpatient psychiatric facility in Arizona. Before ordering that you receive treatment at the Arizona State Hospital, the court

More information

HAWAII DISABILITY RIGHTS CENTER. Hawaii s Protection and Advocacy System for People with Disabilities Hawaii s Client Assistance Program

HAWAII DISABILITY RIGHTS CENTER. Hawaii s Protection and Advocacy System for People with Disabilities Hawaii s Client Assistance Program HAWAII DISABILITY RIGHTS CENTER Hawaii s Protection and Advocacy System for People with Disabilities Hawaii s Client Assistance Program A BILL OF RIGHTS FOR PEOPLE WITH MENTAL ILLNESS 1132 Bishop Street,

More information

There are other sections that may be used to detain the patient without consent, which are described in later sections of this booklet.

There are other sections that may be used to detain the patient without consent, which are described in later sections of this booklet. L12 Understanding the Mental Health Act Information for Patients/Relatives and Carers What happens when a patient is detained in hospital? Usually two doctors will examine and assess the patient not necessarily

More information

7. MY RIGHTS IN DEALING WITH CRIMINAL LAW AND THE GARDAÍ

7. MY RIGHTS IN DEALING WITH CRIMINAL LAW AND THE GARDAÍ 7. MY RIGHTS IN DEALING WITH CRIMINAL LAW AND THE GARDAÍ 7.1 Victim of a crime What are my rights if I have been the victim of a crime? As a victim of crime, you have the right to report that crime to

More information

Getting Medi-Cal Outpatient Specialty Mental Health Services

Getting Medi-Cal Outpatient Specialty Mental Health Services California s Protection & Advocacy System Toll-Free (800) 776-5746 Getting Medi-Cal Outpatient Specialty Mental Health Services August 2010, Pub #5084.01 I was told that I need Medi-Cal specialty mental

More information

Resolving problems and making a complaint about NHS care

Resolving problems and making a complaint about NHS care Factsheet 66 August 2011 Resolving problems and making a complaint about NHS care About this factsheet The factsheet explains the approach to handling complaints about National Health Service (NHS) services,

More information

Guide to making a complaint about an NHS service

Guide to making a complaint about an NHS service Guide to making a complaint about an NHS service February 2014 Healthwatch Coventry www.healthwatchcoventry.org.uk Contents 1. About this guide page 3 2. The NHS complaints procedure page 3 3. About the

More information

Care Programme Approach

Care Programme Approach Care Programme Approach care plan What is Care Programme Approach? care programme approach Plan Care Programme Approach is also called CPA. CPA makes sure you get all the help you need to improve your

More information

2. Planning your support how to use your Personal Budget

2. Planning your support how to use your Personal Budget 2. Planning your support how to use your Personal Budget About this guide A Personal Budget is money from a local authority that can be used to pay for social care services and support. The money may be

More information

Child Abuse, Child Neglect. What Parents Should Know If They Are Investigated

Child Abuse, Child Neglect. What Parents Should Know If They Are Investigated Child Abuse, Child Neglect What Parents Should Know If They Are Investigated Written by South Carolina Appleseed Legal Justice Center with editing and assistance from the Children s Law Center and the

More information

Note that the following document is copyright, details of which are provided on the next page.

Note that the following document is copyright, details of which are provided on the next page. Please note that the following document was created by the former Australian Council for Safety and Quality in Health Care. The former Council ceased its activities on 31 December 2005 and the Australian

More information

information for children and young people in wales

information for children and young people in wales information for children and young people in wales YOUR RIGHTS The United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child sets out a list of rights that all children and young people everywhere in the world

More information

Pain Clinic Psychological Service. Information for patients Department of Psychological Services

Pain Clinic Psychological Service. Information for patients Department of Psychological Services Pain Clinic Psychological Service Information for patients Department of Psychological Services page 2 of 8 You have been referred to the Pain Clinic Psychological Service at the Northern General Hospital.

More information

A step-by-step guide to making a complaint about health and social care

A step-by-step guide to making a complaint about health and social care A step-by-step guide to making a complaint about health and social care www.healthwatchhampshire.co.uk Step by step Page 3 Are you concerned about something that is happening now? Do you need to make a

More information

have to appear before the Youth Justice Court *, or

have to appear before the Youth Justice Court *, or Chapter 3: Lawyers Part 1: The right to a lawyer 1. When do I need a lawyer? You should talk to a lawyer whenever you: are charged* with breaking the law, are arrested or detained by the police, have to

More information

Guidance on health and character

Guidance on health and character Guidance on health and character Who is this document for?... 2 About the structure of this document... 2 Section 1: Introduction... 4 About us (the HPC)... 4 How we are run... 5 About registration...

More information

A STEP-BY-STEP GUIDE FOR YOUNG PEOPLE FOR MAKING YOUR OWN HEALTH DECISIONS AND WHAT TO DO WHEN YOU CAN T MAKE YOUR OWN DECISIONS

A STEP-BY-STEP GUIDE FOR YOUNG PEOPLE FOR MAKING YOUR OWN HEALTH DECISIONS AND WHAT TO DO WHEN YOU CAN T MAKE YOUR OWN DECISIONS A STEP-BY-STEP GUIDE FOR YOUNG PEOPLE FOR MAKING YOUR OWN HEALTH DECISIONS AND WHAT TO DO WHEN YOU CAN T MAKE YOUR OWN DECISIONS The Office of the Provincial Advocate for Children & Youth. Copyright 2014.

More information

Supporting relatives and informal carers top tips for mental health workers

Supporting relatives and informal carers top tips for mental health workers Supporting relatives and informal carers top tips for mental health workers These top tip cards have been produced in partnership by NHS Education for Scotland and Support in Mind Scotland. NHS Education

More information

OFFICE OF THE PUBLIC GUARDIAN AND TRUSTEE POWERS OF ATTORNEY AND LIVING WILLS. Questions and Answers

OFFICE OF THE PUBLIC GUARDIAN AND TRUSTEE POWERS OF ATTORNEY AND LIVING WILLS. Questions and Answers OFFICE OF THE PUBLIC GUARDIAN AND TRUSTEE POWERS OF ATTORNEY AND LIVING WILLS Questions and Answers The Office of the Public Guardian and Trustee Powers of Attorney and Living Wills ISBN 978-1-4249-3918-3

More information

Parents Rights, Kids Rights

Parents Rights, Kids Rights Family Law in BC Parents Rights, Kids Rights A parent s guide to child protection law in BC British Columbia www.legalaid.bc.ca March 2013 2013 Legal Services Society, British Columbia First edition: 1997

More information

Your duties as a registrant. Standards of conduct, performance and ethics

Your duties as a registrant. Standards of conduct, performance and ethics Your duties as a registrant Standards of conduct, performance and ethics Contents Foreword 1 Introduction 3 The standards of conduct, performance and ethics 8 Fitness to practise 15 Glossary 16 Foreword

More information

A guide to the Adults with Incapacity (Scotland) Act

A guide to the Adults with Incapacity (Scotland) Act A guide to the Adults with Incapacity (Scotland) Act Introduction Mental capacity refers to our ability to make decisions for ourselves and act on them. Brain injury can impair this ability and when this

More information

Utah Advance Directive Form & Instructions

Utah Advance Directive Form & Instructions Utah Advance Directive Form & Instructions 2009 Edition published by Utah Medical Association 310 E. 4500 South, Suite 500 Salt Lake City, UT 84107 Instructions for Completing the Advance Health Care Directive

More information

Bipolar Disorder. Some people with these symptoms have bipolar disorder, a serious mental illness. Read this brochure to find out more.

Bipolar Disorder. Some people with these symptoms have bipolar disorder, a serious mental illness. Read this brochure to find out more. Bipolar Disorder Do you go through intense moods? Do you feel very happy and energized some days, and very sad and depressed on other days? Do these moods last for a week or more? Do your mood changes

More information

Employment and Support Allowance

Employment and Support Allowance Employment and Support Allowance Employment and Support Allowance (ESA) is a benefit for people who are too unwell to work. This factsheet explains how to claim, how you will be assessed and how to challenge

More information

Worried about someone s mental health?

Worried about someone s mental health? Worried about someone s mental health? This factsheet can help you if you are worried about the mental health of a friend, relative or loved one. It explains what you can do and where to go to get help

More information

The treatment of depression in children and young people. Issue date: September 2005

The treatment of depression in children and young people. Issue date: September 2005 Issue date: September 2005 The treatment of depression in children and Understanding NICE guidance information for children and young with depression, their families and carers, and the public Information

More information

the ombudsman and smaller businesses

the ombudsman and smaller businesses the ombudsman and smaller businesses your guide to the Financial Ombudsman Service the independent expert in settling complaints between consumers and businesses providing financial services about this

More information

PLANNING FOR YOUR MENTAL AND PHYSICAL HEALTH CARE

PLANNING FOR YOUR MENTAL AND PHYSICAL HEALTH CARE PLANNING FOR YOUR MENTAL AND PHYSICAL HEALTH CARE AND TREATMENT THE ADVANCE DIRECTIVE PROVIDER TRAINING PROJECT New York Association of Psychiatric Rehabilitation Services One Columbia Place Albany, NY

More information

Mental Health Act 2009

Mental Health Act 2009 Version: 29.3.2015 South Australia Mental Health Act 2009 An Act to make provision for the treatment, care and rehabilitation of persons with serious mental illness with the goal of bringing about their

More information

Making the components of inpatient care fit

Making the components of inpatient care fit Making the components of inpatient care fit Named nurse roles and responsibillities booklet RDaSH Adult Mental Health Services Contents 1 Introduction 3 2 Admission 3 3 Risk Assessment / Risk Management

More information

Discrimination and mental health

Discrimination and mental health Discrimination and mental health Equality Act 2010 This factsheet may be useful if you feel that you have been treated unfairly (discriminated against) because of your mental illness. This factsheet explains

More information

Submission. Mental Health Legislative Review

Submission. Mental Health Legislative Review Submission Mental Health Legislative Review Carers Association of SA Inc. 58 King William Rd GOODWOOD 5034 PO Box 410 UNLEY SA 5061 Contact: Rosemary Warmington Tel 8271 6288 Fax 8271 6388-1 - Mental Health

More information

Choosing, Arranging and Managing Your Care and Support

Choosing, Arranging and Managing Your Care and Support Adult Care and Health Services Choosing, Arranging and Managing Your Care and Support Your guide to Personal Budget Support www.reading.gov.uk/communitycare Welcome You have been given this booklet because

More information

This chapter will focus on your right to a lawyer, the different ways to get a lawyer, and what you should expect from your lawyer.

This chapter will focus on your right to a lawyer, the different ways to get a lawyer, and what you should expect from your lawyer. Chapter 3: Getting a Lawyer This chapter will focus on your right to a lawyer, the different ways to get a lawyer, and what you should expect from your lawyer. It is always best to get a lawyer. Other

More information

WSIC Integrated Care Record FAQs

WSIC Integrated Care Record FAQs WSIC Integrated Care Record FAQs How your information is shared now Today, all the places where you receive care keep records about you. They can usually only share information from your records by letter,

More information

RIGHTS OF DEAF AND HARD OF HEARING PEOPLE COURTS AND LAWYERS

RIGHTS OF DEAF AND HARD OF HEARING PEOPLE COURTS AND LAWYERS RIGHTS OF DEAF AND HARD OF HEARING PEOPLE COURTS AND LAWYERS PLEASE NOTE: For information in alternative formats or a language different than English, contact the Disability Rights Network at 800-692-

More information

Mental illness and life insurance What you need to know a detailed guide. This information sheet was produced in association with

Mental illness and life insurance What you need to know a detailed guide. This information sheet was produced in association with Mental illness and life insurance What you need to know a detailed guide This information sheet was produced in association with Mental illness and life insurance What you need to know - a detailed guide

More information

The Social Fund. Part of the Department for Work and Pensions

The Social Fund. Part of the Department for Work and Pensions The Social Fund Part of the Department for Work and Pensions What is the Social Fund? If you are on a low income and faced with costs that are difficult to pay for out of your normal income, the Social

More information

Complaints - what to do if you re not happy with a service

Complaints - what to do if you re not happy with a service IS 22 April 2009 Information sheet Complaints - what to do if you re not happy with a service Introduction... 1 Before you make a complaint... 2 Help with making your complaint... 2 How to make a complaint

More information

Your local specialist mental health services

Your local specialist mental health services Your local specialist mental health services Primary Care Liaison Service B&NES Primary Care Mental Health Liaison service is a short-term support service to help people with mental health difficulties

More information

Rights for Individuals in Mental Health Facilities

Rights for Individuals in Mental Health Facilities HANDBOOK Rights for Individuals in Mental Health Facilities Admitted Under the Lanterman-Petris-Short Act C A L I F O R N I A D E P A R T M E N T O F Mental Health How to Reach Your Patients Rights Advocate

More information

Guide to Criminal procedure

Guide to Criminal procedure Guide to Criminal procedure This free guide gives a general idea to members of the public as to what you may expect to encounter if you or someone you know is charged with a criminal offence. The overriding

More information

Lanterman Petris Short (LPS) Conservatorship

Lanterman Petris Short (LPS) Conservatorship What is LPS* Conservatorship? California s Protection & Advocacy System Toll-Free (800) 776-5746 Lanterman Petris Short (LPS) Conservatorship April 2000, Pub #5225.01 LPS Conservatorship is a process in

More information

Raising Concerns or Complaints about NHS services

Raising Concerns or Complaints about NHS services Raising Concerns or Complaints about NHS services Raising concerns and complaints A step by step guide Raising concerns and complaints Questions to ask yourself: 1. What am I concerned or dissatisfied

More information

The New Mental Health Act

The New Mental Health Act The New Mental Health Act What s it all about? A Short Introduction This leaflet was written by Sandra McDougall, Legal Officer, Scottish Association for Mental Health (SAMH), Cumbrae House, 15 Carlton

More information

MAKING SUBSTITUTE HEALTH CARE DECISIONS

MAKING SUBSTITUTE HEALTH CARE DECISIONS OFFICE OF THE PUBLIC GUARDIAN AND TRUSTEE MAKING SUBSTITUTE HEALTH CARE DECISIONS The Role of the Public Guardian and Trustee The Office of the Public Guardian and Trustee Making Substitute Health Care

More information

APPLICATION FOR COMPENSATION FORM FOR A PERSONAL INJURY (Do not use this form for claims relating to fatal injuries)

APPLICATION FOR COMPENSATION FORM FOR A PERSONAL INJURY (Do not use this form for claims relating to fatal injuries) Compensation Services 6th Floor Millennium House 17-25 Great Victoria Street Belfast BT2 7AQ Telephone: 0300 200 7887 Criminal Injuries Compensation Scheme (2009) Made under the Criminal Injuries Compensation

More information

Understanding Bipolar Disorder

Understanding Bipolar Disorder Barnet, Enfield and Haringey Mental Health NHS Trust Understanding Bipolar Disorder Information for patients and carers Page What is bipolar disorder? Bipolar disorder is a serious mental illness involving

More information

EFE FACT SHEET Mental Health

EFE FACT SHEET Mental Health EQUIP FOR E Q U A L I T Y EFE FACT SHEET Mental Health INVOLUNTARY ADMISSION TO A MENTAL HEALTH FACILITY IN ILLINOIS Statutory References: 405 ILCS 5/1-119; 5/3-601-5/3-611; 5/3-700 5/3-706; 5/3-800; 5/3-802-814;

More information

Advice for employers on workplace adjustments for mental health conditions

Advice for employers on workplace adjustments for mental health conditions Advice for employers on workplace adjustments for mental health conditions At any one time, one in six adults 1 will be experiencing a mental health condition. It is crucial that employers are playing

More information

Health Committee information

Health Committee information Health Committee information This leaflet is for nurses and midwives who have been referred to our Health Committee because an allegation has been made against them and, after initial investigation, we

More information

Notice of Privacy Practices

Notice of Privacy Practices SHANNON LERACH, Ph.D. Licensed Clinical Psychologist PSY23705 243 N. Highway 101, Suite 16, Solana Beach, CA 92075 Telephone: (619) 817.5320 Fax: (858) 481.1674 Notice of Privacy Practices This Notice

More information

Information about cases considered by Case Examiners

Information about cases considered by Case Examiners Information about cases considered by Case Examiners Information for nurses and midwives who have been referred to the Nursing and Midwifery Council s (NMC s) Case Examiners Introduction 1 This means someone

More information

Mental Health Act 2000. Brief guide to the Act

Mental Health Act 2000. Brief guide to the Act Mental Health Act 2000 Brief guide to the Act Overview Purpose This brief guide to the Act provides a quick reference to the main provisions and processes under the mental health legislation. It has been

More information

A GUIDE TO THE SUBSTITUTE DECISIONS ACT

A GUIDE TO THE SUBSTITUTE DECISIONS ACT A GUIDE TO THE SUBSTITUTE DECISIONS ACT 0-7794-2147-7 Queen s Printer for Ontario, 2000 Introduction to the Guide 03 The Subsitute Decisions Act 06 Some Important Definitions 08 Decisions About Property

More information

Guide to occupational therapy driver assessment

Guide to occupational therapy driver assessment Guide to occupational therapy driver assessment MAY 2014 Occupational therapy driver assessment VicRoads is responsible for ensuring that all drivers and applicants for a licence have appropriate and safe

More information