REGIONAL MANUFACTURING PROFILE

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1 REGIONAL MANUFACTURING PROFILE WINDSOR REGION *place of residence (POR) Windsor 01 Economic and Demographic Profile Population 0,561 Employment* 167,690 Manufacturing Share of Employment 19% Unemployment Rate 9% Real GDP ($007 Millions) 1,9 Manufacturing Share of GDP 5% Manufacturing Hiring Requirement (01-0) 8,796 Recruitment Gap (01-0),8 HIGHLIGHTS The Windsor Region will experience significant recruitment challenges in the manufacturing industry, facing a recruitment gap of over,800 workers over the next 10 years. The reasons behind recruitment challenges are fourfold: 1) A large demographic challenge: the manufacturing workforce is older than the overall labour force of the region. As these workers retire in the next 10 years, the manufacturing industry is projected to have difficulty filling skilled trades and technical positions. ) Competition from other industries: occupations such as sheet metal workers, electrical and electronics engineers, and industrial mechanics are also highly demanded in other industries such as construction, utilities, and professional services. It will be especially difficult to attract those workers due to faster growth rates experienced by competing industries and higher wages offered in some cases (e.g., utilities and mining). ) Dependence on net migration: Windsor s recruitment challenges may be exacerbated by out-migration. The region will critically depend on net migration to fill many manufacturing positions during the next few years. ) Occupational characteristics: some occupations are harder to fill across the manufacturing industry and the country due to low supply. The Windsor Region will be particularly challenged to find construction millwrights, industrial electricians, machinists and machining and tooling inspectors, and motor vehicle assemblers. Potential solutions to these recruitment challenges include increasing training and apprenticeship in the workplace, advocating for increases in government support for training, promoting manufacturing as a career option, and establishing training consortia.

2 THE WINDSOR REGION The Windsor Region is the southernmost area in Canada. It is separated from Detroit, MI by the Ambassador Bridge, which crosses over the Detroit River. It is considered as the automotive capital of Canada as it is home to Chrysler Canada s headquarters. The Region was heavily impacted during the automobile industry crisis of and was bailed out by the Canadian government. The Windsor economy contracted by 7% during the 009 recession that affected the automobile industry severely. The manufacturing industry in the Region shrank by over 18% in that year. GDP bounced back the next year with a % increase overall, and 5% increase e in the manufacturing. After 010, the economy stabilized, growing at very marginal rates below 1% ever since. Over the next few years, a slightly higher GDP growth is projected, almost reaching the pre-recession levels of output by 016. Manufacturing still is the largest industry in the Windsor Region, making up over 5% of the Region s economic output and 19% of direct employment. Finance and insurance is the second largest industry in the Region, making up 15% of GDP and 5% of regional direct employment. Other notable industries include education, retail trade, and construction. Manufacturing in the Windsor Region is dominated by transportation equipment production due to the automotive industry s big presence in the area. The Canadian automotive industry is closely linked to the US due to geographical proximity and the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). The crisis in the US affected Canada similarly. After a few tumultuous years, the American auto industry emerged out of the recession, but did not fully recover in terms of output. Windsor s automotive manufacturing is also in the process of healing, with a slight GDP and employment growth in 01. Industry employment is expected to slightly increase during the next decade. Percentage Change Real GDP Source: Prism Economics, Strategic Projections Inc. Industry Share of GDP, 01 Source: Prism Economics, Strategic Projections Inc. REGIONAL MANUFACTURING PROFILE WINDSOR

3 THE MANUFACTURING OUTLOOK Manufacturing in Windsor is poised to recover during the next few years from the 009 recession s big impact on output. The overall Canadian economy was impacted less than the Windsor Region by the crisis due to Windsor s higher dependence on automobile manufacturing, which was the worse-hit segment. Looking forward, Windsor s manufacturing business is expected to recover slightly faster than Canada s during the next few years, growing over 1% year-over-year. The opportunities facing the industry include: Annual Change (%) in Manufacturing Output Favourable Canadian vs. U.S. dollar exchange rate Optimistic U.S. economic growth and therefore demand Decrease in fuel and therefore transportation costs Rising manufacturing machinery and equipment investment Strong demand for transportation equipment Source: Prism Economics, Strategic Projections Inc. Although manufacturing will maintain its role as an important economic force of the region, its rate of expansion will be surpassed by other industries such as construction, professional services, information and culture, agriculture, wholesale and retail trade, which are expected to grow at a rate of above % per year. Annual Average GDP Growth by Industry, Windsor, Source: Prism Economics, Strategic Projections Inc. REGIONAL MANUFACTURING PROFILE WINDSOR

4 The growth of competing industries are expected to translate into higher labour demand. This will create significant recruitment challenges for manufacturing, especially for the occupations that are also needed by other growing industries such as professional services (i.e. electrical engineers), construction (i.e. construction millwrights and industrial mechanics), and transportation and warehousing (i.e. transport truck drivers). RISING INVESTMENT IN MANUFACTURING AND RISING PRODUCTIVITY OF THE MANUFACTURING WORKFORCE Since the recession hit its lowest point in 009, manufacturing in Ontario has been investing heavily in machinery and equipment. The chart below displays provincial data and shows an increase of 5% in investment between the years However, the rise in investment did not effect into a similar increase in employment. In fact, the rise in manufacturing output can largely be explained by increasing productivity of the manufacturing workforce. Manufacturing Output and Employment, 1991 to 01 Source: Prism Economics, Statistics Canada POPULATION, DEMOGRAPHICS AND LABOUR FORCE Population Region years Growth Rate (01-18) Windsor 08,799 0,060 0, % Source: Prism Economics, Strategic Projections Inc. REGIONAL MANUFACTURING PROFILE WINDSOR

5 The population in the Windsor Region has contracted over the last decade, declining from about 08,800 in 006, to an estimated 0,806 in 01. The Region picked up positive population growth in 01, and will continue to expand through 018 to reach 0,806 individuals by 018. However, the growth rate will be very slow, at the 0.1% level per year, and may create labour shortages for certain industries. Age distribution of Windsor Population, Source: Prism Economics, Strategic Projections Inc. THE DEMOGRAPHICS OF THE MANUFACTURING WORKFORCE The aging manufacturing demographics are even more pronounced than the overall aging population of the region. The following chart illustrates the age differential between the manufacturing workforce and the total working age population in Windsor. The manufacturing workforce is stacked on the right hand side of the graph, with a larger portion of workers over the age of 5 than the total working age population. Windsor, Manufacturing Demographic Distribution Source: Prism Economics REGIONAL MANUFACTURING PROFILE WINDSOR 5

6 The manufacturing workforce is somewhat older compared to other industries in the Region, 8 percent of its workforce being above the age of fourty-five, as opposed to 1 percent for other industries. However, this will not constitute a big problem in the short run, due to the abundance of 5- years old manufacturing employees. In the longer run though, manufacturing is expected to face higher replacement demand, as a result of the 15- year olds making up only 6% of the workforce. Employers can expect to replace 15 to 0 percent of their experienced workers over the next 10 years. Some immediate retirement is expected in the 65+ age category, however the numbers will be low enough to be easily compensated by the younger generations. Age distribution of the Windsor Region Labour Force, Manufacturing and Total (Excluding Manufacturing) Source: Prism Economics, Statistics Canada, National Household Survey 011 THE MANUFACTURING LABOUR FORCE IN WINDSOR IS OLDER THAN THE OVERALL WORKING AGE POPU- LATION. THE INDUSTRY WILL FACE SIGNIFICANT RECRUITMENT CHALLENGES AS A LARGE NUMBER OF WORKERS RETIRES DURING THE NEXT DECADE. In order to meet the recruitment demand in the next 10 years, manufacturing companies in the Windsor Region should pay attention to two main challenges. The first one is the growing competition for key trades and technical occupations employed by local manufactures from sectors such as construction, professional/scientific, utilities and government, which are poised to experience faster growth. The second is the substantially lower rate of younger generations in the current manufacturing labour force. The 15- age bracket represents only 6% of manufacturing, whereas it makes up 15% of other industries. Manufacturing will need to develop innovative ways to attract younger workers. 6 REGIONAL MANUFACTURING PROFILE WINDSOR

7 POPULATION MUST BE DRAWN FROM OUTSIDE THE REGION The population of the Windsor Region is aging rapidly. Even though the birth minus death number is consistently positive, i.e. newborns replace the dying population, the number of individuals living in the area declined up until 011. This was largely due to the out migration from the Region as a result of the economic downturn. Net migration in 008 reached -,91, a big drag on population growth. Net migration returned to positive levels in 01, albeit with a small margin. It is expected to rise slightly and wane again during the next few years, which will be a significant problem for the Region s labour supply. The following chart illustrates the annual change in the Region s population. The chart shows the annual number of births, deaths and the net-migration required (people moving in and out of the Region) to meet population requirements. The Windsor Region will have a population increase of 550 persons annually over the remainder of the decade on average. Population growth will remain very moderate and dependent on economic shocks that will determine the outflow of working-age individuals from the Region. Components of Annual Change in Windsor Labour Force, Source: Prism Economics, Strategic Projections Inc. REGIONAL MANUFACTURING PROFILE WINDSOR 7

8 COMMUTING WORKFORCE PATTERNS About 65% of Windsor s residents work in the Windsor area. Most commuters of the city come from LaSalle, Tecumseh, and Lakeshore. Some residents of Amherstburg, Essex, Kingsville, Leamington, and Chatnam-Kent also commute to Windsor for work; but their numbers do not amount to more than 5% of their resident population. Commuters are an important factor contributing to the labour force of the region in addition to migrants and residents. Places of Residence - Windsor Workforce Source: Prism Economics NEED TO ATTRACT PEOPLE WITH THE RIGHT SKILLS The 5 to age demographic is an important source of new hires for employers. The educational attainment of this demographic provides insight into general qualifications and planned career paths. The Windsor Region has a much lower level of individuals who have a bachelor degree or above, when compared to the overall Ontario. This may be a function of the high number of jobs that do not require higher education, but certificates or other diplomas. In fact, the Region has a higher percentage of individuals who acquired a non-university certificate or diploma than Ontario. The Region also has a higher percentage of persons with only a high school diploma. Special attention should be paid to future labour demands of employers and their educational requirements. 8 REGIONAL MANUFACTURING PROFILE WINDSOR

9 Windsor, Highest Level of Educational Attainment, 5 to years STABLE LABOUR FORCE, FALLING UNEMPLOYMENT Source: Prism Economics, Statistics Canada Employment in the Windsor Region has been in recovery, experiencing positive growth since 010, making up for the lost jobs of the 009 recession. Employment declined again by 1.6% in 01, so did unemployment, by 0. percentage point. This development was a consequence of the decline in the labour force: almost,00 persons withdrew from the labour force, either leaving their jobs, or stopped looking for work. As in the case of slow population growth, a shrinking labour force is indicative of future labour supply shortages, which can partly be remedied by an influx of migrants. The future of the labour force is estimated to be fairly flat whereas unemployment will decline to 8.% by 016. This points to a sustained increase in employment. As the economy expands to fully offset the effects of the recession, hiring more employees will be necessary for the majority of industries operating in Windsor. Employers should plan accordingly to avoid labour shortages. Labour Force, Employment and Unemployment Rate (All Industries), Windsor, Source: Prism Economics, Strategic Projections Inc. REGIONAL MANUFACTURING PROFILE WINDSOR 9

10 MANUFACTURING EMPLOYMENT Manufacturing accounts for just over 19 percent of the employment in the Windsor Region. Transportation equipment employs almost half of the total manufacturing workforce. Machinery and plastic and rubber product industries follow with 15% and 7% respectively. Other prominent manufacturing activities in the Region include fabricated metal, food, chemical, and printing products. Clearly, the automotive industry is the driving force of the Region and any shock to that industry has a large impact on the overall economy of Windsor. Manufacturing Sub-sectors - Percentage of Total Manufacturing Employment Source: Prism Economics, Strategic Projections Inc. Employment levels in the region s manufacturing industry have been in steady decline over the past decade. This decline reached a trough around 011 when the industry started to recover from the recession. However, the recovery remained inconsequential, with little employment gains in the total manufacturing employment. Forecasts of manufacturing output for the region project expansion during the next decade, which will translate into a slight increase in employment in the next few years. The upward trend will stabilize around 018 and employment will remain flat after that. The following graphs illustrate the employment forecast for the top three manufacturing sectors in the region as well as the total manufacturing industry. Employment is expected to recover modestly during the next 8 years with minor increases in select industries. Total manufacturing employment in the region is expected to stay within the 5,000-0,000 band by 0. Transportation equipment manufacturing and machinery manufacturing will exhibit modest increases in employment in the medium run. Plastic and rubber manufacturing employment will remain more or less flat during the same period. 10 REGIONAL MANUFACTURING PROFILE WINDSOR

11 Total Manufacturing Employment, Windsor, Source: Prism Economics, Statistics Canada. Transportation Equipment Manufacturing Employment, Windsor, Source: Prism Economics, Statistics Canada Machinery Manufacturing Employment, Windsor, Source: Prism Economics, Statistics Canada. REGIONAL MANUFACTURING PROFILE WINDSOR 11

12 Plastic and Rubber Manufacturing Employment, Windsor, Source: Prism Economics, Statistics Canada PROFILE OF MANUFACTURING EMPLOYERS The Windsor Region has a variety of manufacturing sectors, concentrated around 6 main types of businesses. These include machinery, fabricated metal products, transportation equipment, plastic and rubber, food, and printing products. These businesses also tend to employ the most workers within the manufacturing industry. The majority of manufacturers are small and medium sized companies with less than 100 employees. The number of manufacturing establishments is on the decline in Windsor, just like the other regions of the country, displaying a drop of 117 establishments between 008 and 01. The number of machinery, fabricated metal, and plastic and rubber product manufacturers dropped sharply during this period, whereas chemical manufacturing establishments increased in number. Data also show that the number of very small-size employers (1-to- employees) in the Region increased but mid and large employers dropped in quantity. Change in Number of Manufacturing Establishments Manufacturing Establishments by Employment Size Source: Prism Economics, Statistics Canada Source: Prism Economics, Statistics Canada 1 REGIONAL MANUFACTURING PROFILE WINDSOR

13 Number of Manufacturing Establishments, by Segment Source: Prism Economics, Statistics Canada Largest Manufacturing Employers Company Employees Industry Chrysler Canada 700 Motor Vehicle Body Manufacturing Ford Motor Company of Canada 700 Motor Vehicle Gasoline Engine and Engine Parts Manufacturing A.P. Plasman Corporation 1000 Plastic Product Manufacturing Valiant Machine & Tool Inc. 650 General-Purpose Machinery Manufacturing Jamieson Laboratories Ltd. 50 Pharmaceutical and Medicine Manufacturing A.P. Plasman - Windsor Plant 1 00 Miscellaneous Fabricated Metal Product Manufacturing Accucaps Industries Limited 00 Miscellaneous Chemical Product Manufacturing NutriCorp International 00 Pharmaceutical and Medicine Manufacturing Source: Prism Economics, Statistics Canada REGIONAL MANUFACTURING PROFILE WINDSOR 1

14 MANUFACTURING LABOUR MARKET HIRING REQUIREMENTS The forecasts presented above are based on the projected needs of the manufacturing industry in the region. However, they only calculate the total manufacturing workforce, not the hiring requirement. Workers exiting the labour force also need to be taken into account in order to estimate the hiring requirements and the recruitment gap facing the industry. To solve this issue, the labour forecast model developed for this project examines demographics and estimates the number of workers who will retire or die over time, hence exiting the labour force and making up the replacement demand. Hiring requirement is then the summation of the replacement demand and the expansion demand. It is also the summation of the new entrants and the recruitment gap. The chart below summarizes the results of the labour forecast model for each of these categories. By 0, the projected 5,85 individuals who enter the workforce will cover only 66% of the hiring requirements. Therefore, the manufacturing industry in Windsor will need to find an additional,8 workers (recruitment gap) from other industries and other jurisdictions to fulfill its labour needs. DEFINITIONS Hiring Requirement: The number of workers needed to fill all the positions necessary for full-capacity production Recruitment Gap: The number of workers needed after new entrants to the workforce are taken into account New Entrants: Younger generations entering the labour force for the first time Replacement Demand: The number of workers needed to replace the retiring and others exiting the workforce Expansion Demand: The number of workers needed to add to the current workforce as the sector grows Hiring requirement = New Entrants + Recruitment Gap + Labour Force Change = Replacement Demand + Expansion Demand Labour Demand and Supply in Manufacturing, Windsor, 01 9,000 8,000 7,000 6,000 5,000,000,000,000 1,000 - Replacement Demand Expansion Demand Recruitment Gap New Entrants Source: Prism Economics 1 REGIONAL MANUFACTURING PROFILE WINDSOR

15 Within the hiring requirement, some occupations are poised to be in more demand than others. These professions tend to concentrate on skilled trades and technical occupations. As the manufacturing industry is going through a transformation of technological advancement, the kind of workers it needs in the future is quickly shifting towards more skilled labour. The next table illustrates some of the occupations that will be most in demand within the next 8 years in Windsor s manufacturing industry. Occupations Total Hiring Requirement 01-0 Share of 01 Employment 95 Motor vehicle assemblers, inspectors and testers 1,981 9% 0911 Manufacturing managers 0 % 71 Machinists and machining and tooling inspectors 67 8% 75 Material handlers 81 1% 9 Plastics processing machine operators 5 % 711 Construction millwrights and industrial mechanics 1% 7 Industrial electricians 0 0% 7511 Transport truck drivers 1 % 151 Shippers and receivers 118 1% 77 Welders and related machine operators 100 7% 0016 Senior managers 6 % 701 Supervisors, machining, metal forming, shaping and erecting trades 59 % All Occupations in Manufacturing 8,796 1% REGIONAL MANUFACTURING PROFILE WINDSOR 15

16 WINDSOR COMPETING DEMAND FROM OTHER INDUSTRIES In 01, approximately 19 percent of the local workforce is employed in manufacturing. As employment in other industries grows, this share is likely to decline. Overtime, competing employment demands from outside the manufacturing industry will make the attraction and retention of certain key trades and occupations increasingly more difficult for local manufacturers. The degree of difficulty will vary across occupational groups. Distribution of Employment by Occupational Category across Industries, 01 Source: Prism Economics, Statistics Canada The above chart illustrates the competition from construction, professional services, and other industries in hiring certain occupations that could present hiring challenges for manufacturing. These include: Sheet metal workers Industrial sewing machine operators Welders and related machine operators Construction millwrights and industrial me- chanics 16 REGIONAL MANUFACTURING PROFILE WINDSOR Some industries in the region are better positioned than manufacturing to recruit the workers they need due to their projected faster growth and higher wages (e.g., mining, utilities). Competing demand for same occupations will be one of the major complications that manufacturing hiring managers will face during the next decade.

17 The manufacturing industry in the Windsor Region may find itself at a disadvantage in hiring these workers compared to the utilities and professional services sectors because these are both projected to grow faster than manufacturing and may be paying higher wages to attract skilled workers. A quick look at wage differentials across industries in Ontario suggests that utilities and mining tend to pay higher wages than other industries, and therefore can exacerbate manufacturing companies recruitment challenges. Wage Differentials across Industries, Ontario, Source: Prism Economics, Statistics Canada REGIONAL MANUFACTURING PROFILE WINDSOR 17

18 MANUFACTURING LABOUR MARKET SHORTAGE RANKINGS BY OCCUPATION The supply and demand labour market forecast model developed for this project generated forecasts for 5 manufacturing-related occupations. These forecasts estimate the labour demand for each occupation in the Windsor Region for the 01-0 period. On the supply side, labour force exits (i.e. deaths and retirements) and new entrants (i.e. younger generations entering the labour force) were taken into account to create labour market shortage rankings for select occupations. The following legend describes the meaning of the ranks ranging between 1 and 5. a) Technical and Technologist Occupations and Managers Rankings Several technical and technologist occupations are projected to pose significant and chronic recruitment challenges during the next few years. These include occupations such as manufacturing managers, electrical and electronics engineers, and industrial and manufacturing engineers. Other professions such as mechanical engineers will also remain difficult to fill partly due to the lack of a wide talent pool in the region. These occupational categories will be harder to fill than others for the manufacturing industry due to competition from other industries, demographic challenges, and a limited labour supply. Human resources managers may need to widen their search beyond the region to find the skills they need during the next few years. The following chart ranks technical and technologist occupations and managerial positions in terms of their recruitment challenges through the forecast period. 18 REGIONAL MANUFACTURING PROFILE WINDSOR

19 WINDSOR Technical and Managerial Occupational Rankings, Windsor, 01-0 Occupations 0911 Manufacturing managers 151 Shippers and receivers 1 Mechanical engineers 1 Electrical and electronics engineers 11 Industrial and manufacturing engineers 11 Chemical technologists and technicians Mechanical engineering technologists and technicians Industrial engineering and manufacturing technologists and technicians 1 Electrical and electronics engineering technologists and technicians 5 Drafting technologists and technicians Source: Prism Economics b) Skilled Trades Occupations Rankings Several skilled trades occupations are projected to pose chronic recruitment challenges during the next few years. Professions such as tool and die makers, industrial electricians, transport truck drivers, construction millwrights, and motor vehicle assemblers will remain difficult to fill partly due to the lack of interest in skilled trades training in the region. These occupational categories will be harder to fill than others in the manufacturing industry due to competition from other industries, demographic challenges, and a limited labour supply. Human resources managers may need to widen their search beyond the region to find machinists, welders, and carpenters during the next few years. REGIONAL MANUFACTURING PROFILE WINDSOR 19

20 Skilled Trades Occupational Rankings, Windsor, 01-0 Occupations Contractors and supervisors, other construction trades 71 Machinists and machining and tooling inspectors 7 Tool and die makers 7 Sheet metal workers 75 Structural metal and platework fabricators and fitters 77 Welders and related machine operators 71 Electricians (except industrial and power system) 7 Industrial electricians 751 Plumbers 75 Steamfitters, pipefitters and sprinkler system installers 771 Carpenters 711 Construction millwrights and industrial mechanics 75 Material handlers 7511 Transport truck drivers 9 Plastics processing machine operators 96 Industrial sewing machine operators 961 Process control and machine operators, food, beverage 95 Motor vehicle assemblers, inspectors and testers 95 Furniture and fixture assemblers and inspectors 961 Labourers in wood, pulp and paper processing Labourers in food, beverage and associated products processing 9619 Other labourers in processing, manufacturing and utilities All Occupations in Manufacturing Source: Prism Economics 0 REGIONAL MANUFACTURING PROFILE WINDSOR

21 SURVEY RESULTS As part of the Windsor Region labour market forecast project, a survey among employers based in the region was conducted to assess their labour needs and perceived challenges. The survey results are not statistically significant due to small sample size. Nonetheless, they are informative and confirm the findings of the model described above. The occupations that survey respondents identified as posing significant recruitment challenges are similar to the occupations identified by the labour demand forecast model. Survey respondents are facing recruitment challenges in hiring predominantly skilled trades and technical occupations. The occupations cited by respondents are: Machinists and machining and tooling inspectors Industrial electricians Construction millwrights and industrial mechanics Heavy-duty equipment mechanics Tool and die makers Chemical technologists and technicians Industrial engineering and manufacturing technologists and technicians Mechanical engineering technologists and technicians Welders and related machine operators Structural metal and platework fabricators and fitters Electrical and electronics engineering technologists and technicians Survey respondents also provided information on wages for specific occupations: Wages across Canada, Survey Results, 01 Source: Prism Economics, CME Survey REGIONAL MANUFACTURING PROFILE WINDSOR 1

22 Compensation is an important factor in recruitment. The chart below reports additional wage data by region. This data was provided by Wanted Analytics which maintains a large database of online job postings across Canada, allowing users to compare information by region, industry, and occupation. The first column reports the CME survey data whereas the remaining columns report Wanted Analytics wage data by region. Overall, survey respondents seem to report higher wages than Wanted Analytics online job postings database. The difference between the survey results and Wanted Analytics wage data stems from several factors: 1. Survey respondents were asked to report the wage they were paying their existing workers in these occupations while Wanted Analytics reports wage data from online job advertisements for new recruits. The differential may be a function of the experience level required in new recruits vs. the experience level of survey respondents employees.. Wanted Analytics data is generated using an algorithm that combines wage data from online job advertisements of the last years and some other factors affecting wages. Online job advertisements include a range of positions from apprentices to Red Seal Certificate owners and with titles ranging from industrial mechanic millwright to field service technician. Survey respondents only report the wage they pay to their millwright.. The Wanted Analytics database includes over wage samples. Although this number is significantly reduced after selecting for region, job title, and industry, it is still much higher than the wage data reported by each survey respondent. Wages for Select Occupations across Regions, 01 Source: CME Survey, Prism Economics, Wanted Analytics REGIONAL MANUFACTURING PROFILE WINDSOR

23 Finally, the Windsor Region can be compared to other manufacturing hubs across the country in terms of recruitment challenges reported by employers in the survey. 68% of the survey respondents in the Windsor Region report experiencing immediate or chronic recruitment challenges. An additional 18% of respondents reported occasional recruitment challenges. Only % of the respondents said they are experiencing no recruitment challenges in the region. Survey results suggest that the Windsor Region s recruitment challenges are more pronounced than virtually any other manufacturing region in Canada. Recruitment challenges are less severe in some other Ontario Regions such as Peel-Halton, where 9% of respondents report immediate or chronic challenges, and London where 5% do. Outside of Ontario, survey respondents from Greater Halifax report minor or no recruitment challenges. Calgary and Edmonton also face some recruitment challenges but not as much as Ontario Regions. Recruitment Challenges across Manufacturing Regions, 01 Source: CME Survey, Prism Economics REGIONAL MANUFACTURING PROFILE WINDSOR

24 CONCLUDING REMARKS AND RECOMMENDATIONS The manufacturing industry in the Windsor Region is positioned for modest growth during the next decade. Output growth will not translate into large gains in employment due to increasing investment levels and rapidly improving productivity of the manufacturing labour force. As a result, the industry will not face severe recruitment challenges to fill new positions added to the manufacturing workforce. Instead, significant recruitment challenges will present themselves as a result of the retiring workforce. The manufacturing industry s demographics demonstrate a larger segment over the age of 55 than the overall working population. This will result in high replacement demand during the next few years and even in the longer run. Recruitment challenges will not be ubiquitous across all occupations. As the manufacturing industry becomes more technologically advanced, the kinds of jobs needed to maintain full capacity output are shifting towards more skilled trades and technical occupations. Both model and survey results confirm this point, identifying these occupations as the main culprits of recruitment challenges now and in the projected future. Moreover, these recruitment challenges will be exacerbated by competition from other industries poised to grow faster. These industries include professional services, construction, and information and culture. Occupations needed by other industries which tend to pay higher wages (i.e. utilities, mining and oil extraction ) are especially prone to generating recruitment challenges for the manufacturing sector. Based on this state of the manufacturing labour force, the industry needs to respond as a whole before the recruitment challenges become unmanageable. Some potential solutions to the problem include: Increasing training and apprenticeship in your workplace Collaborating with other regional employers and stakeholders Advocating for increases in government support for training Working with educational institutions to ensure programs meet industry needs Promoting manufacturing as a career option Establishing training consortia EGIONAL MANUFACTURING PROFILE WINDSOR

25 This Regional Manufacturing Profile was prepared for the project Regional Labour Market Information to Address Skills and Human Resources Issues in the Manufacturing Sector. This project is sponsored by the Canadian Manufacturers & Exporters and the Canadian Skills Training and Employment Coalition. This project is funded by the Government of Canada s Sector Initiatives Program. The opinions and interpretations in this publication are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of the Government of Canada. REGIONAL MANUFACTURING PROFILE Windsor Prepared by Prism Economics & Analysis for: Canadian Manufacturers & Exporters & the Canadian Skills Training & Employment Coalition

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