Toronto Employment Survey 2014

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1 This bulletin summarizes the highlights of the 2014 City of Toronto annual Survey, marking its 32 nd consecutive year. This information resource presents a picture of change in Toronto s economy throughout the past three decades. For more information, please visit us at Highlights The 2014 survey counted 1,384,390 jobs. Toronto's overall employment in 2014 is up by 1.5% from 2013 adding 20,850 jobs to Toronto's employment base. Full-time employment has continued to stay above the 1 million mark for the eighth consecutive year. Part-time jobs increased by 1.7% over 2014, totalling 320,860 jobs. The Office sector remains the largest sector in Toronto, accounting for almost 1 out of every 2 jobs. The Institutional sector was the fastest growing sector in 2014, growing by 4.9% and adding 11,010 jobs. The number of establishments surveyed in 2014 was 75,180, a net gain of 430 establishments. In 2014, there were approximately 562,370 jobs in Toronto's Downtown and Centres, comprising 40.6% of all jobs in the City. Etobicoke Centre was the only Centre to gain employment in 2014, adding 690 jobs and growing by 7.9%. North York Centre remains Toronto's largest employment Centre outside of the Downtown with 34,830 jobs. In 2014, there were approximately 398,750 jobs in Toronto's Districts, accounting for 28.8% of jobs in Toronto. 83.2% of all Manufacturing sector establishments in the City reside in the Districts, representing 92.1% of all Manufacturing jobs in Toronto. The number of Manufacturing sector establishments in Toronto remained the same over 2014 with no net loss of establishments. Number of Jobs Toronto Survey % ,400,000 1,350,000 1,300,000 1,250,000 1,200,000 1,150,000 1,100,000 1,050,000 1,000,000 Toronto Job Count 1,384,390 Full Time 1,063, % of Toronto's jobs are located Downtown Part Time 320, % Toronto jobs are Service Based. 5,030 business establishments were new to Toronto in The Institutional sector was the fastest growing sector in Toronto in % of Toronto jobs are in the Office sector profile TORONTO - 1

2 Introduction In 2014, the Toronto Survey counted 1,384,390 jobs in the City of Toronto, surpassing 2013's employment count by 1.5% and adding 20,840 jobs to Toronto's employment base, in the course of one year (see Figure 1). Over the past decade, the City's total employment has grown by 127,450 jobs or 10.1% (see Table 1). The City of Toronto is home to 2.8 million people and spans over km 2 of land, making it Canada's largest city and the fourth largest city in North America. 1 Toronto's workforce constitutes one sixth of Canada's workforce, and is a major economic driver in the country. 2,3 The City's GDP of billion dollars accounts for nearly one quarter (24.9%) of Ontario's gross domestic product and 9.2% of our national GDP in ,5 The Toronto region's economy has performed well over the last year, generating retail sales of 62.3 billion dollars. The region's GDP is estimated to have grown by 2.4% in 2013, far outpacing the provincial growth rate of 1.3% and the national growth rate of 2.0%. 6,7,8 This bulletin summarizes the results of the 2014 Toronto Survey. It highlights the key findings by sector, the longevity of establishments and emerging patterns in the Centres, Downtown and Districts. The results from the Survey are used to gauge the City's economic and investment health and to monitor the progress of the Official Plan policies. It is also used to provide background information for the forecasting and planning of infrastructure and services. This annual survey offers a timely insight into the business climate across the City of Toronto to facilitate, accelerate and achieve economic growth. Toronto's 32 nd Survey was undertaken in the summer of Map 1 shows the distribution of employment across the City, with distinct concentrations in the Downtown, Centres and Districts, demonstrating their continued vitality. In 2014, the largest employer in the City of Toronto was the Toronto District School Board (see Table 2). It accounts for more than 32,400 jobs with more than 610 locations throughout the City, representing 2.3% of all jobs in Toronto. The second largest employer is the Government of Ontario, followed by the City of Toronto, employing 28,550 and 27,620 people in Toronto respectively. Of the ten largest employers in Toronto, five were financial institutions. This indicates the strong presence of major financial institutions as well as government establishments in Toronto's employment landscape. Figure 1: Toronto, City of Toronto, ,450,000 1,400,000 1,350,000 1,300,000 1,250,000 1,200,000 1,150,000 1,100,000 1,050,000 1,000, Number of Jobs Table 1: Total, 2004, 2013, 2014 Table 1: Total, 2004, 2013, 2014 Net Total Number of Employees Change Full-time 989,100 1,048,150 1,063,540 74, % 15, % Part-time 267, , ,860 53, % 5, % Total 1,256,950 1,363,560 1,384, , % 20, % Note: Numbers have been rounded to the nearest ten. Grow th Rate % Net Change Annual Growth Rate % Table 2: 10 Largest Employers, 2014 Employer Total Employees Toronto District School Board 32,400 Government of Ontario 28,550 City of Toronto 27,620 RBC Royal Bank 20,670 CIBC 18,850 TD Canada Trust 18,600 Scotiabank 15,270 BMO 12,970 Toronto Transit Commission 12,940 Government of Canada 11,300 2 Toronto City Planning JANUARY 2015

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4 Toronto by Land Use Activity Figure 2: Sectoral Changes Over Time, 2004, 2009, % % of City 40.0% 30.0% 20.0% 10.0% 0.0% Manufacturing Retail Service Office Institutional Other Over the last year, the number of jobs in Toronto has increased by 1.5% or 20,850 jobs. The Office sector remains the largest employment sector, accounting for nearly half (47.9%) of all jobs found in Toronto (see Figure 2). The Office sector grew by 1.0% over the last year adding 6,290 jobs (see Table 3). The Institutional sector is Toronto's second largest employment sector. It represents 16.9% of jobs in the City and was the fastest growing sector over 2014, up by 4.9% (see Figure 3). This sector added 11,010 jobs, more than any other sector over The Service sector represents 12.3% of jobs in Toronto. Over 2014, this sector experienced moderate growth adding 6,120 jobs and growing by 3.7%. The Manufacturing sector contains 9.0% of jobs in Toronto, making it Figure 3: Change in Total by Sector, ,000 10,000 8,000 6,000 4,000 2, ,000-4,000 Manufacturing -1.3% Retail the second smallest sector in the City. Over 2014, the sector lost 1,580 jobs shrinking by 1.3%. The Retail sector saw the greatest loss of employment of all sectors, losing 2,270 jobs in one year, shrinking by 1.5%. The smallest sector in Toronto is the Other sector 3.7% 1.0% 4.9% 2.7% Service Office Institutional Other -1.5% (Growth Rate) which includes entertainment venues, community and recreation uses. It represents 3.5% of jobs in the City. Over 2014, the Other sector grew by 2.7%. Table 3: by Sector Table 3: by Sector Total Number of Employees Net Change Grow th Rate % Net Change Grow th Rate % Net Change Grow th Rate % Manufacturing 169, , , ,610-44, % -5, % -1, % Retail 144, , , , % 2, % -2, % Service 141, , , ,630 28, % 19, % 6, % Office 577, , , ,970 85, % 52, % 6, % Institutional 189, , , ,730 44, % 17, % 11, % Other 35,110 42,460 46,640 47,920 12, % 5, % 1, % Total 1,256,950 1,293,200 1,363,550 1,384, , % 91, % 20, % Note: Numbers have been rounded to the nearest ten. Totals may differ from sum of full-time and part-time employment. f f 4 Toronto City Planning JANUARY 2015

5 The Past Decade Over the decade, there have been notable changes in the sectoral composition of Toronto's economy. The number of jobs in Toronto has grown from 1.26 million jobs in 2004 to 1.38 million in 2014, an increase of 10.1%. All sectors with the exception of the Manufacturing sector have grown over the last ten years. The Office Sector sector is the fastest growing sector in Toronto, adding 11,010 jobs in the last year alone. Over the last five years, the sector has added 17,230 jobs and grown by 8.0%. The Service Sector recession and the recession. Over the past twenty years, the sector has restructured its built form, use of technology and service delivery methods. The Manufacturing Sector Nearly half of all jobs in Toronto reside in the Office sector, representing 47.9% of Toronto's jobs. The Office sector has been Toronto's predominant sector for over thirty years, maintaining its dominance in Toronto's economy. Over the last ten years, Toronto employment has continued to concentrate in the Office sector, adding 85,470 jobs and growing by 14.8%. Over the last five years, the Office sector has continued its steady increase from 610,870 jobs in 2009 to 662,970 jobs in 2014, an increase of 52,100 jobs or 8.5%. The Institutional Sector The Institutional sector has been Toronto's second largest employment sector for nearly twenty years, surpassing the Retail sector in 1984 and the Manufacturing sector in Currently, the Institutional The Service sector represents 12.3% of Toronto's employment. Over the last ten years the sector has consistently maintained its share of employment in Toronto. Over ten years, the Service sector has added 28,720 jobs, growing by 20.2%. While over the last five years, the sector added 19,670 jobs, growing by 13.0%. The Retail Sector Toronto's Retail sector has seen significant change since At the beginning of the decade, the Retail sector experienced consistent growth in Toronto. The sector declined sharply over the following years due to the global recession, losing more than 10,990 jobs between 2007 and By 2011, the sector began to recover, showing steady growth. Between 2004 and 2014 the Retail sector managed a very modest net gain of 430 jobs overall, increasing just 0.3%. Over the last year, the sector again lost 2,270 jobs, shrinking by 1.5%. Retail sector employment has yet to recover from the All sectors except the Manufacturing sector have grown over the last ten years. The sector has transformed from what was once Toronto's second largest employment sector into Toronto's second smallest sector. Manufacturing sector employment continues to decline as a result of the evolution of the North American economy from goods production to services. This sector has shrunk from 169,210 jobs in 2004 to 124,610 jobs in This is a loss of 44,600 jobs in the last ten years, shrinking this sector by 26.4%. However, over the last five years, the rate of job loss has slowed with just 5,520 jobs lost since 2009 with nine out of ten jobs being lost prior to Further, over 2014 the Manufacturing sector lost just 1,580 jobs or 1.3%, with the number of Manufacturing establishments remaining the same over the last year. The Other Sector The Other sector is Toronto's smallest employment sector. This sector includes entertainment venues, community and recreation uses. This profile TORONTO - 5

6 sector has shown strong growth over the last decade, increasing its size by 36.5%, much more than any other sector but with a net addition of just 12,810 jobs. Over the last five years, the sector has added 5,460 jobs and grew by 12.9%. by Economic Sector Service Based Toronto's establishments with 99.8% of businesses assigned a full 6-digit code. At the broadest level of analysis, NAICS categories can be broken down into three major industries: Goods Producing, Service Based and Government/Institutional (see Figure 4). More than three quarters (77.1%) of all jobs in the City are Service- Based Industries while 13.0% of employment is in Government/ Institutional-Based industries. The remaining 9.9% of jobs in the City The Health and Social Assistance sector remained the largest NAICS sector in 2014 with 168,830 employees, comprising 12.2% of total employment. This sector grew by 5.6% over 2014 and saw the greatest net increase of any sector, adding 8,940 jobs. This sector is followed closely by the Professional, Scientific and Technical Services sector with 153,360 jobs or 11.1% of all employment. This sector grew by 4.8% over 2014, adding 7,040 jobs. Toronto Jobs Figure 4: 2014 by Major Economic Sector Government / Institutional Goods Producing 13.0% 9.9% Service In 2011, City Planning undertook to incorporate the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) into the data collection process of the Toronto Survey. NAICS was established by Statistics Canada and the statistics agencies of Mexico and the United States to provide a coding standard that allows for data analysis and comparison across municipal, provincial and national boundaries. NAICS coding is extremely detailed and highly specific. Determining the precise industrial classification of individual business establishments requires rigourous training, standards and discipline. Coding the data to the lowest, most detailed coding enables it to be aggregated to higher levels during analysis and when making comparisons. The NAICS coding for establishments is now quite stable, enabling comparisons over time as well as comparisons to other municipalities in Canada and elsewhere. The Survey was extremely successful in coding 77.1% are in Goods Producing industries. All three industries experienced growth over 2014 with Service- Based Industries growing 1.6% or 16,970 jobs, the Government and Institutional sector gaining 3,530 jobs or 2.0% and the Goods Producing Industries growing a modest 0.2% or just 340 jobs in NAICS classifies the economy into 20 major sectors. In 2014, just over half (50.2%) of all jobs in Toronto fell into the top five NAICS sectors, indicating that while Toronto's economy is varied, there is a large concentration in certain fields. The top five categories are: Health and Social Assistance; Professional, Scientific and Technical Services; Retail Trade; Finance and Insurance; and Accommodation and Food Services (see Figure 5). Government / Institutional Goods Producing Over 2014, the Real Estate and Rental and Leasing sector and the Construction sector saw the greatest rate of growth with both increasing by 7.6%, adding 2,710 jobs and 2,610 jobs respectively. Other significant gains were seen in the Accommodation and Food Services sector (4.7%). The largest net loss was seen in the Administrative and Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services sector with 3,600 jobs lost (-5.8%). 6 Toronto City Planning JANUARY 2015

7 Figure 5: 2014 by Economic Sector Health Care and Social Assistance Professional, Scientific and Technical Services Retail Trade Finance and Insurance Accommodation and Food Services Educational Services Manufacturing Public Administration Other Services (Except Public Administration) Admin. & Support, Waste and Remediation Mgmt Information and Cultural Industries Management of Companies and Enterprises Wholesale Trade Transportation and Warehousing Real Estate and Rental and Leasing Construction Arts, Entertainment and Recreation Utilities Mining, Quarrying, and Oil and Gas Extraction Agriculture, Foresty, Fishing and Hunting 50.2% Toronto Jobs 0 20,000 40,000 60,000 80, , , , , , Number of Establishments In 2014, the Survey identified 75,180 business establishments in the City of Toronto (see Figure 6). After steadily declining due to the 2008/2009 global recession, the number of establishments in Toronto began to grow in For the third consecutive year, the number of establishments has increased, adding 430 establishments and growing by 0.6% in the last year alone and adding 1,540 (2.1%) establishments over the last five years. The number of establishments in 2014 is 330 establishments shy of 2007's prerecession high of 75,570. While the percentage of establishments increased moderately by 430 establishments (0.6%) in 2014, employment in the City of Toronto has grown by 28,850 jobs in that same time or 1.5%. This means that the average number of people employed per establishment has increased over 2014, to 18.4 versus 18.2 in The number of "large" Establishments Figure 6: Total Number of Establishments ,000 80,000 75,000 70,000 65,000 60, establishments, those with more than 100 employees, has grown by 15 establishments or 0.7% this year. Currently, 2.8% of establishments in Toronto have more than 100 employees. Manufacturing sector employment has seen a consistent downward trend over the last 10 years, reflecting a similar decline internationally as the North American economy has continued to shift from a goodsproducing economy to a servicebased economy. However, the loss of Manufacturing sector establishments stabilized this year with the net number of Manufacturing establishments holding steady over 2014 with 5,010 establishments, accounting for 6.7% of establishments in the City. profile TORONTO - 7

8 Toronto's sectoral composition reflects an evolving urban economy which remains competitive in a changing national and global market. The decline of Manufacturing sector employment in Toronto has begun to slow since the economic downturn of 2008, demonstrating a continuing demand for Manufacturing activities in the City. Still a centre for opportunity and industrial innovation, 4.7% of establishments new to the City in 2014 are part of the Manufacturing sector, bringing 1,360 Manufacturing jobs to the City. The Service sector saw the greatest net gain of establishments in 2014, adding 240 establishments or 1.3%, totaling 18,400 establishments in Over the last decade, the number of Service sector establishments has grown by 10.0% or 1,680 establishments. Establishments Figure 7: Change in the Number of Establishments, ,500 2,000 1,500 1, ,000-1,500-2,000 Manufacturing -4.8% Retail -9.2% 10.0% 7.2% 25.1% 52.6% Service Office Institutional Other Figure 8: Number of Employees per Establishment, Employees Per Establishment Since 2004, the Retail sector has lost 1,560 establishments, down by 9.2% to 15,360 establishments in 2014, the greatest decline by any sector over the period, by far outpacing the Manufacturing sector's losses of 250 establishments or 4.8% (see Figure 7). Over the last five years, the Retail sector outpaced the Manufacturing sector's rate of establishment loss, losing 780 more establishments than the Manufacturing sector. In 2014, the number of Retail establishments declined, losing 310 establishments (2.0%) and was in fact the only sector to lose establishments. The number of Retail establishments in Toronto has been declining, primarily since While the number of establishments has been falling, the number of jobs within the sector has not seen the same loss and in fact, has achieved modest net gains over the decade and growing by 2,260 jobs over the last five years. (Growth Rate) The continued growth of the Retail sector combined with the decline of Retail establishments has resulted in an increase in the average number of employees per Retail establishment (see Figure 8). In 2004, an average Retail store employed 8.5 employees whereas in 2014, on average, 9.4 employees were employed per establishment. This increase can also be seen over the last five years where the average number of employees per Retail store increased from 8.8 employees to 9.4 employees. This reflects the continued growth of larger retail formats. Full-Time, Part-Time and the Retail Sector Of the nearly 1.4 million jobs in the City; 76.8% are classified as full-time jobs, and growing by 1.5% over the last year (see Figure 9). In 2014, 23.2% of jobs in Toronto were classified as part-time (less than 30 hours per week). Figure 9: Full-Time and Part-Time in Toronto, % 76.8% Full-Time Part-Time 8 Toronto City Planning JANUARY 2015

9 Figure 10: Full-Time and Part-Time Retail, , ,000 80,000 60,000 40,000 20,000 0 % of Establishments Retail FT Retail PT The proportion of jobs that are categorized as part-time have increased steadily over thirty years. In 1984, only 11.4% of Toronto's jobs were part-time while in 2014, 23.2% are defined as part-time employment; adding 194,470 part-time jobs over thirty years. Since 2009, the percentage of part-time jobs has increased by 1.2% or 36,050 jobs. The trend of increased part-time employment can be seen most strongly in the Retail sector where in 2014 nearly half of all jobs were parttime (47.2%). The evolution of the sector shows a steady trend towards part-time work from 1984 to present (see Figure 10). The prevalence of stable forms of employment such as permanent full-time jobs with benefits have declined significantly. Figure 11: Longevity of Existing Establishments Years at Present Location The changes in the Retail sector are consistent with trends seen in a "jobless recovery". This is a phenomenon characterized by slow or declining employment growth despite economic gains. 9 As mentioned previously, Toronto is home to a strong retail economy with the region generating more than 62.3 billion dollars in sales annually, yet the employment growth in this sector has declined over This jobless recovery is further characterized by the loss of higher paying full-time jobs replaced by part-time jobs with fewer benefits and less security. The evolution of the Retail sector is unlike other sectors in that it has not recovered to the employment levels prior to the 1991/1992 recession. in the Retail sector peaked in 1990 with 155,220 jobs. Longevity Despite the unsettled global economic conditions, Toronto remains an attractive place for new start-ups and for business to relocate from elsewhere. In 2014, 32.7% of Toronto's business establishments were 5 years old or younger. They comprised the largest number of establishments by length of tenure. This is a decrease over 2013 of 3.5% or -1,500 establishments (see Figure 11). The proportion of establishments in the same location for five years or less has declined over the last five years from 38.4% in 2009 to 32.7% in This demonstrates that while Toronto remains an attractive place for new business to locate, many of its existing establishments are stable with one quarter (25.2%) of all establishments remaining in the same location for 20 years or longer. The percentage of establishments present between 11 and 15 years in the same location has remained consistent since 2009, between 13.3% and 13.5%. The proportion of establishments that have been well established in Toronto for sixteen years or more stands at 34.5% or 25,960 establishments. This reflects the long-run stability of the local economy despite recessions, economic slumps and continued suburbanization of employment in the areas outside the City. This profile TORONTO - 9

10 proportion has grown by 4.1% or 3,250 establishments during the past year alone. Further, 19.1% of establishments have operated at their present location for over 25 years, showing a great degree of stability in the City. New Establishments in the City The 2014 Toronto Survey identified more than 5,030 establishments that were new to the City, accounting for 40,870 jobs (see Table 4). In 2014, 6.7% of business establishments were new to Toronto. This number is much greater than the 4,340 establishments that chose to locate in Toronto the previous year. It should be noted that these establishments were not necessarily all new business start-ups, but also includes firms relocating from outside the City or new locations of multi-location firms such as banks Figure 12: New Establishments by Location, % 3.9% 31.3% 22.0% Centres Downtown Districts Rest of the City Table 4: New Establishments and coffee shops. Of the 5,030 newly located establishments, more than half (53.3%) were located in the Downtown and in the Districts and employment-related lands, with 1,110 and 1,570 establishments respectively. Another 190 new establishments were in the Centres, and the balance of 2,160 establishments were found elsewhere in the City (see Figure 12). The greatest number of new establishments in Toronto are in the Office sector and account for 42.6% of all new establishments in The Service sector followed with 24.2% of new establishments (see Figure 13). Retail sector establishments represented 16.5% of new establishments, and 830 Retail jobs, followed by the Institutional and Other sectors with 7.0% and 5.0% respectively demonstrating the variety of the types of establishments the City attracts and contributing to Toronto's overall economic health. Figure 13: New Establishments by Sector, % 7.0% 5.0% 4.7% 16.5% 24.2% Mfg Retail Service Office Inst. Other Location Sector Centres Manufacturing Downtown 970 1,110 Retail District 1,180 1,570 Service 1,070 1,220 Rest of the City 2,000 2,160 Office 1,690 2,150 Institutional Other City Total 4,340 5,030 City Total 4,340 5,030 Despite the trend of reduced Manufacturing sector presence in North American cities, Toronto remains an attractive location for industrial establishments with 230 new Manufacturing establishments choosing to locate in Toronto in 2014 accounting for 1,360 Manufacturing jobs. Downtown and Centres The strength of the regional economy is evident by the concentration of jobs in the Downtown and the four Centres identified in the Official Plan. Downtown Toronto is the largest employment area in the Greater Golden Horseshoe. The Downtown and Centres are critical to the City's growth management strategy as attractive mixed use settings for a diverse range employment and residential growth, making them, and Toronto, an attractive place to live, work, and do business. Map 1 shows the locations and boundaries of the Downtown and Centres, as outlined in the City's Official Plan. Note: Numbers have been rounded to the nearest Toronto City Planning JANUARY 2015

11 Downtown Figure 14: Change in Downtown and Centres in the Downtown increased 3.2% or 14,890 jobs over 2014, growing 14.8% or 62,250 jobs over five years (see Table 5). The Downtown continues to attract new establishments and in 2014, 22.0% of business establishments new to Toronto chose to locate in Toronto's Downtown. The Office sector is by far the largest sector in the Downtown, accounting for two of every three jobs (65.4%). The next largest sector is the Institutional sector, which accounts for 13.8% of employment. The Institutional sector grew significantly in 2014, comprising a larger share of employment in the Downtown than in years past. Over the last year, the Institutional sector was also the fastest growing sector in the Downtown, adding 8,090 jobs and growing by 13.8% in just one year. The sector far outpaced the Office sector which grew by 4,640 jobs or 1.5%, a lower level when compared to last year's growth of 13,200 jobs (4.3%) between 2012 and The smallest sector is the Manufacturing sector, representing just 0.9% of employment in the Downtown. Since 2009, all sectors have experienced some growth with the exception of the Manufacturing sector which lost 580 jobs, shrinking 12.0%. The Service sector was the fastest growing sector between 2009 and 2014, growing a substantial 24.2% and adding 10,040 jobs to the Downtown. The Other sector showed strong growth, increasing by 16.7% over the last five years adding some 2,590 jobs. The Centres In total, the Centres are home to 79,660 jobs, representing 5.8% of employment in the City. The Centres shrunk by 1,010 jobs in the last year or 1.3%. However, over the last decade, the Centres have grown by 15.8% and 10,850 jobs. Over the last five years, the Centres have grown considerably, increasing by 7.3% and 5,430 jobs (see Figure 14 and 15). is predominantly Office-related with more than three quarters (75.4%) of all employment in this sector (see Figure 16). Table 5: Total in the Centres and Downtown, Net Change % Change Net Change % Change Downtown 420, , , , , ,710 62, % 14, % North York Centre 34,650 38,790 36,520 36,060 35,350 34, % % Yonge-Eglinton 15,540 15,840 16,820 17,740 19,760 19,010 3, % % Scarborough Centre 14,190 14,700 15,030 15,400 16,870 16,440 2, % % Etobicoke Centre 9,850 9,190 8,840 8,660 8,690 9, % % Downtown and the Centres 494, , , , , ,370 67, % 13, % Rest of City 798, , , , , ,020 23, % 6, % City Total 1,293,190 1,298,300 1,293,960 1,331,570 1,363,550 1,384,390 91, % 20, % Note: Numbers have been rounded to the nearest ten. Centres are in descending order by size of employment base. profile TORONTO - 11

12 Jobs Figure 15: Net Change in Centres ,000 6,000 5,000 4,000 3,000 2,000 The Institutional sector grew the most over 2014 adding 250 jobs and growing by 17.1%. Both the Manufacturing and Service sectors saw very modest employment gains of 10 jobs each. All other sectors lost employment, totalling 780 jobs lost from the Retail, Office and Other sectors combined with the Office sector losing the greatest number of jobs (530 or 1.8%). 1, ,000 North York Centre Etobicoke Centre Yonge-Eglinton Scarborough Centre Location Yonge-Eglinton Figure 16: Total in Downtown and Centres by Six Sectors, , ,000 Jobs 400, , , ,000 0 North York Centre Year Manufacturing Retail Service Office Institutional Other North York Centre is Toronto's largest Centre and is home to 34,830 jobs, representing 2.5% of jobs in the City. Over the last five years, the Centre has grown by 180 jobs and has consistently lost employment since 2010 with 520 jobs lost this past year. The Office sector is by far the predominant sector in North York Centre, representing 82.3% of employment, totalling 28,680 jobs. Over 2014, the Office sector shrank by 1.8%, losing 530 jobs and declining for the fourth consecutive year. Over the last five years however, the Office sector has declined by just 0.3%, losing 90 jobs. Yonge-Eglinton Centre is the second largest Centre in Toronto. The Centre contains 19,010 jobs representing 1.4% of employment in the City. in this Centre declined for the first time in five years, down 750 jobs or 3.8% over However, over the last five years, Yonge-Eglinton has grown by 22.3%, adding 3,470 to the Centre. in the Yonge-Eglinton Centre is overwhelmingly Officerelated, with nearly 8 out of every 10 jobs in this sector (79.9%). Over the last five years, the Office sector has increased in size, growing an impressive 29.8% over five years but declining by 4.6% in the last year. Only the Service and Other sectors achieved employment growth in the last year, with all other sectors showing modest losses since Toronto City Planning JANUARY 2015

13 Scarborough Centre Scarborough Centre contains 16,440 jobs, representing 1.2% of employment found in Toronto. In 2014, Scarborough Centre lost 430 jobs, shrinking by 2.5%. Over the last five years, Scarborough Centre has grown by 15.9%, adding 2,250 jobs and weathering the recession remarkably well. The majority of employment in Scarborough Centre is Office-related. However, unlike North York and Yonge-Eglinton Centres, Scarborough Centre has greater sectoral diversity. The Office sector in Scarborough represents 55.1% of jobs, followed by the Retail sector with 24.7% of jobs in the Centre. Etobicoke Centre Etobicoke Centre is the smallest Centre in Toronto. It is home to 9,380 jobs, representing just 0.7% of employment in Toronto. Etobicoke Centre was the only Centre in 2014 to gain employment, adding 690 jobs and growing by 7.9%. Over the last five years, the Centre has lost 470 jobs, shrinking 4.8% since This decline in jobs is attributed to downsizing by a number of businesses in the Service, and Retail sectors, which have shrunk by 22.6% and 14.3% since Similar to Toronto's other Centres, employment in this Centre is dominated by the Office sector with 7 out of every 10 jobs (70.3%) and totalling 6,590 of jobs found in Etobicoke Centre. In fact, Etobicoke Centre is the only Centre where Office sector employment grew. Districts and -Related Lands Districts and other employment-related lands are characterized by manufacturing, warehousing and product assembly activities as well as commercial business parks. These are regionally and globally competitive locations for national and international business and are areas for business formation. They provide a broad range of job opportunities for Toronto residents and the regional labour force. Map 2 shows the location, boundaries and sectoral breakdowns of the Districts identified in the City's Official Plan at the time of the 2014 Toronto Survey. The lands represented by the Districts are structural elements of Toronto's economic future in order to ensure a stable environment for investment and to maintain and grow the City's revenue base. The Importance of Lands Places to Grow is the Ontario government's program to plan for growth and development in a way that supports economic prosperity, protects the environment and helps communities achieve a high quality of life across the province. Through Places to Grow, we develop regional growth plans that guide government investments and policies. - Ontario Ministry of Infrastructure 11 The Provincial Growth Plan for the Greater Golden Horseshoe was amended in 2013 with revised forecasts. The City of Toronto is forecasted to reach employment of Toronto Official Plan Growth Plan for the Greater Golden Horseshoe Planning Act Provincial Policy Statement 1,640,000 jobs by 2031 and 1,720,000 jobs by This anticipates that the City will add approximately 7,000 jobs per year over 40 years ( ), increasing the employment base by 19.4%. 12 Districts and employment-related lands are of particular importance to Toronto's economic health. Currently, 21,670 establishments are located in Toronto's Districts. This accounts for more than a quarter (28.8%) of all business establishments in the City and accounts for 398,750 jobs, representing 28.8% of all jobs in Toronto. Further, 83.2% of all Manufacturing establishments reside in Districts, accounting for 92.1% of all Manufacturing jobs in Toronto. Over the last five years, 100 Manufacturing establishments closed their doors in Toronto, and with them 5,060 Manufacturing jobs were lost from Toronto. The continued loss of Manufacturing sector jobs in Toronto and the conversion of the land they once occupied highlights the need to protect employment lands for other employment uses. The presence of sensitive uses, such as residential uses in an District can destabilize an District, resulting in further losses of Manufacturing establishments. It is the diversity of Toronto's economy that has enabled the City to weather the recent recession reasonably well. The protection of Districts is imperative. profile TORONTO - 13

14 14 Toronto City Planning JANUARY 2015

15 Districts Toronto's Districts contain 398,750 jobs; comprising 28.8% of all jobs found in the City (see Table 6). The Districts continued to attract new businesses with 31.3% of new businesses in Toronto in 2014 choosing to locate in Districts. Of those 1,570 new establishments in Districts, 180 were Manufacturing establishments. In fact, four of every five new Manufacturing establishments in Toronto chose to locate in Districts. Districts are particularly important to the Manufacturing sector with 83.2% of all Manufacturing establishments in the City residing in Districts, representing 92.1% of all Manufacturing jobs. Over 2014, the net number of Manufacturing establishments in Toronto remained constant at 5,010 establishments, while the number of Manufacturing jobs declined by 1,690 or 1.5%. Since 2009, Toronto has lost 100 Manufacturing establishments and 5,060 Manufacturing jobs, or 4.2% of the sector. Nearly one third of all District jobs are in the Manufacturing sector, totalling 114,760 jobs (see Figure 17). Nearly a quarter (24.7%) of all Office sector employment resides in the Districts with 163,720 jobs. The Office sector is now the largest sector in the Districts, representing 41.1% of all District. The Office sector saw a net increase of 3,660 jobs or 2.3% over 2014, this is a greater rate of growth than the Centres and the Downtown saw over the year. In the last five years, the Office sector gained 1,190 jobs, growing by 0.7%. The third largest sector is the Service sector, representing 12.6% of District employment, and is followed closely by the Retail sector comprising 10.5% of District jobs. The Service sector has continued to grow adding 1,100 jobs last year and 2,880 jobs or 6.1% over the past five years. The Retail sector has declined by 140 jobs over the last year or -0.3%. Over the last five years, the Retail sector has grown modestly, adding 2,020 jobs and 5.1%. The Institutional and Other sectors are the smallest sectors in the Districts with 17,430 and 10,710 jobs respectively. Both of these sectors saw employment growth over 2014, adding a combined 2,270 jobs to the Districts. The following section presents trends of the Districts in descending order of employment base (see Figure 18). Districts by sector for 2011 to 2014 are profiled in Table 7 on page 22. Table 6: Total in Districts, Net Change % Net Change Change % Change 1. South Etobicoke 43,180 40,960 39,820 40,390 41,080 41,040-2, % % 2. Rexdale 44,690 40,000 38,940 39,510 40,790 40,730-3, % % 3. Highway 400 Corridor 32,380 31,470 32,810 33,540 32,490 32, % % 4. Tapscott/Marshalling Yard 30,290 30,420 30,950 30,960 31,440 30, % % 5. Dufferin Keele North 29,500 31,540 32,430 31,080 30,350 30,850 1, % % 6. Dufferin Keele South 24,320 23,990 24,610 25,100 26,400 27,100 2, % % 7. South West Scarborough 17,830 18,020 18,990 18,670 19,030 19,240 1, % % 8. Duncan Mills 17,780 17,900 17,560 18,580 19,090 19,110 1, % % 9. Consumers Road 19,790 19,040 18,140 17,490 17,660 18,080-1, % % 10. Scarborough Highway 401 Corridor 17,410 16,080 16,670 16,820 16,990 17, % % 11. North West Etobicoke 13,160 12,810 12,820 13,010 13,450 14,320 1, % % 12. West Central Scarborough 15,060 15,490 15,360 14,730 14,270 13,790-1, % % 13. Steeles & Victoria Park 13,260 12,420 12,500 13,270 13,020 12, % % 14. Liberty 7,710 7,550 8,140 8,300 9,450 11,240 3, % 1, % 15. Don Mills 11,380 11,910 11,390 11,990 11,550 11, % % 16. Milliken 7,140 7,070 7,430 7,300 7,550 8, % % 17. Overlea 6,060 6,270 6,090 6,220 6,150 6, % % 18. Laird 4,380 4,680 4,550 4,390 4,960 5,620 1, % % 19. South of Eastern 5,080 4,650 4,000 3,970 4,280 4, % % 20. Weston Road / Mount Dennis 1,720 1,730 1,650 1,850 1,940 2, % % 21. South East Scarborough % % 22. Airport Corporate Centre 1,060 1,040 1,140 1, % % 23. Other Related Lands 28,430 29,540 28,780 29,480 29,720 30,610 2, % % All Districts 392, , , , , ,750 6, % 5, % Rest of the City 900, , , , , ,640 85, % 15, % City Total 1,293,190 1,298,300 1,293,960 1,331,570 1,363,550 1,384,390 91, % 20, % Note: Numbers have been rounded to the nearest ten. Districts are in descending order by size of employment base. profile TORONTO - 15

16 Figure 17: Total in Districts by Six Sectors, , , , ,000 Jobs 200, , ,000 50, Manufacturing Retail Service Office Institutional Other Figure 18: Change in Districts ,000 40,000 30,000 Jobs 20,000 10, , South Etobicoke 2. Rexdale 3. Highway 400 Corridor 4. Tapscott/Marshalling Yard 5. Dufferin Keele North 6. Dufferin Keele South 7. South West Scarborough 8. Duncan Mills 9. Consumers Road 10. Scarborough Highway 401 Corridor 11. North West Etobicoke 12. West Central Scarborough 13. Steeles & Victoria Park 14. Liberty 15. Don Mills 16. Milliken 17. Overlea 18. Laird 19. South of Eastern 20. Weston Road/Mount Dennis 21. South East Scarborough 22. Airport Corporate Centre 23. Other Related Lands Location Net Change 16 Toronto City Planning JANUARY 2015

17 Districts 1. South Etobicoke The South Etobicoke District is Toronto's largest concentration of employment outside of the Downtown, containing 41,040 jobs or 10.3% of all District employment. has declined in the District by 0.1% over past year and 5.0% over the past five years. Manufacturing is the largest sector in the District accounting for 33.5% of jobs. in this sector has decreased significantly over the past five years, losing 2,770 jobs or 16.8%. Over the past year, the Manufacturing sector lost 1,730 jobs declining by 10.5%, the greatest rate of loss seen in the District in the last five years. Declining employment in the Manufacturing sector has been offset by growth in other sectors, particularly the Office, Institutional and Other sectors. The Office sector is the second largest sector in the District, accounting for 31.3% of employment. Over the past five years, employment in this sector has fluctuated, falling from 2009 to 2011 then rising from 2011 to In 2014, the Office sector added 740 jobs for an increase of 6.1%. The Institutional sector has seen the largest percentage increase over the last five years, increasing from 630 jobs in 2009 to 1,260 in Rexdale Rexdale is home to 40,730 jobs, accounting for 10.2% of all employment found in the Districts. Its share of District employment has decreased from 11.4% in 2009, when Rexdale was the largest District in the City with 44,690 jobs. Over the last year, employment in the District remained relatively stable, decreasing by only 0.1%. The Office sector is the largest sector in the District accounting for 35.3% of employment. This sector has fluctuated over the past five years, shedding 2,110 jobs since 2009 and 1,220 jobs since Manufacturing is the second largest sector in the District, accounting for 31.1% of jobs. This sector gained 650 jobs in 2014 after experiencing two consecutive years of employment decline. Manufacturing sector employment remains 1.6% lower than in Rexdale has the largest number of Service sector jobs of all Toronto Districts with 7,210. In 2014, the Service sector added 320 jobs, an increase of 4.6%. 3. Highway 400 Corridor The Highway 400 Corridor contains 32,430 jobs, or 8.1% of employment found in the Districts. Since 2009, total employment in the District has remained relatively stable, increasing by only 0.2%. Over the past year, the District experienced a modest loss of 60 jobs, decreasing by 0.2%. The District contains the highest number of Manufacturing sector jobs of all Districts with 16,230, representing 13.0% of all Manufacturing employment in the City. Manufacturing sector jobs account for 50.0% of employment in the Highway 400 Corridor. The Processed Goods Processing subsector accounts for 47.8% of the District s Manufacturing sector employment. The Office sector accounts for 25.1% of employment in the District. Over the last year, this sector added 550 jobs, an increase of 7.3%. The Retail sector experienced the largest percentage employment change over the last year, declining by 330 jobs or 11.0%. 4. Tapscott-Marshalling Yard There are 30,900 jobs in Tapscott- Marshalling Yard, accounting for 7.7% of all employment found in the Districts. The District lost 540 jobs in 2014, decreasing by 1.7%. Since 2009, total employment in the District has increased by 2.0% or 610 jobs. The Manufacturing sector is the largest sector in the District, accounting for 40.6% of employment. In the past five years, the District has seen a 5.1% decrease in Manufacturing sector employment, shedding 670 jobs. The Office sector has grown for three consecutive years and is the second largest sector in the District, accounting for 25.6% of employment. Despite these sectoral gains, Office employment remains 10.1% lower than in The Retail and Service sectors in Tapscott-Marshalling Yard are significant, and account for 14.0% and 13.9% of employment in the District respectively. The Service sector in particular has increased in importance over the past five years, adding 1,350 jobs for an increase of 45.8%. 5. Dufferin Keele North Dufferin Keele North contains 7.7% of employment found in the Districts, with a total of 30,850 jobs. Over the past year, the District added 500 jobs, an increase of 1.6%. The Office sector and Manufacturing sector are the largest sectors in the District, accounting for 37.6% and 29.8% of employment respectively. Since 2009, Manufacturing sector employment has increased by 15.3%, adding 1,220 jobs. The Office sector in contrast, lost 540 jobs since 2009, a decrease of 4.4%. Since 2013, Office sector employment increased by 150 jobs or 1.3%. profile TORONTO - 17

18 In the past five years, the Service sector has increased in importance in Dufferin Keele North, adding 350 jobs, an increase of 13.1%. 6. Dufferin Keele South Dufferin Keele South is home to 27,100 jobs, accounting for 6.8% of District employment. An increase of 700 jobs or 2.7% was recorded in the District in Dufferin Keele South has grown by 2,780 jobs in the past five years, increasing by 11.4%. The Office sector is the largest sector in Dufferin Keele South, representing 40.5% of employment, followed by the Manufacturing sector with 21.1% and the Retail sector at 18.6%. Office sector employment has grown for three consecutive years, and now exceeds the 2009 total by 14.5% or 1,390 jobs. After losing 540 Manufacturing sector jobs between 2009 and 2010, employment has increased steadily; adding 790 jobs over the past four years. in the Retail sector has grown by 10.5% in the last five years, increasing by 450 jobs. 7. South West Scarborough There are 19,240 jobs in South West Scarborough, accounting for 4.8% of jobs found in the Districts. An increase of 1.1% or 210 jobs was recorded in the District in The District is dominated by two sectors, the Office sector and the Manufacturing sector, accounting for 31.3% and 30.4% of jobs in the District respectively. Office sector employment reached 6,350 jobs in 2013, the highest number of jobs recorded in the past five years, then declined this year by 5.2% losing 330 jobs. Manufacturing employment has grown over the past five years adding 300 jobs, increasing by 5.4%. The Institutional sector experienced a significant increase of 21.8% over the past year, adding 270 jobs. 8. Duncan Mills Duncan Mills contains 4.8% of employment found in the Districts, with a total of 19,110 jobs. remained relatively stable in 2014 as only a net 20 additional jobs were recorded. The District is heavily dominated by the Office Sector, accounting for 69.5% of employment. The Institutional sector and the Service sector account for 11.1% and 8.6% of employment respectively. Office sector employment, while the largest in the District, has grown at a slower rate than other sectors over the past five years. The Institutional sector has grown by 1,010 jobs since 2009, increasing by 91.0%. Manufacturing sector employment has increased by 23.2% over the past five years, adding 220 jobs, and Service sector employment has increased by 24.1%, adding 320 jobs. The Office sector in comparison has decreased by 2.2% since 2009, losing 320 jobs. 9. Consumers Road The Consumers Road District contains 18,080 jobs or 4.5% of employment found in the Districts. In 2013, the District experienced an increase of 2.4% or 420 jobs. The Consumers Road District contains 16,150 Office sector jobs, the highest of any District in the City. Office sector jobs account for 89.3% of employment in the District. The largest Office subsectors in the District are Finance, Insurance and Real Estate and Business Services, together accounting for 52.7% of total employment. Since 2009, employment in the Office sector has declined, losing 2,370 jobs or 12.8%. In the past year, an increase of 750 jobs in the Institutional sector has partially offset this decrease. The Manufacturing, Service, Retail and Other sectors together account for only 3.4% of employment in the District. 10. Scarborough Highway 401 Corridor The Scarborough Highway 401 Corridor is home to 17,210 jobs, representing 4.3% of District employment. Over 2014, an additional 220 jobs were recorded in the District, an increase of 1.3%. Total employment in the District experienced a sharp decrease of 7.6% between 2009 and 2010 but has increased steadily over the past four years. The Office sector accounts for 46.2% of jobs in the District and is the largest employment sector. Office sector employment has fluctuated over the past five years, losing 760 jobs since 2009 but adding 310 jobs in the past year. The Manufacturing sector is the second largest sector in the District, accounting for 4,520 jobs or 26.3% of employment. In the past five years, this sector has added 1,170 jobs, increasing by 34.9%. 11. North West Etobicoke There are 14,320 jobs in North West Etobicoke or 3.6% of all jobs in the Districts. Over the past year, total employment in the District increased by 6.5%, adding 870 jobs. Since 2009, total employment in North West Etobicoke has increased by 8.8%. This District contains a diversity of jobs across industry sectors. The Manufacturing sector is the largest sector in the District, accounting for 45.0% of employment. The Processed Goods 18 Toronto City Planning JANUARY 2015

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