Timekeeping in VMware Virtual Machines

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1 Timekeeping in VMware Virtual Machines INFORMA TION GUIDE

2 Table of Contents Introduction... 4 Timekeeping Basics... 4 Tick Counting... 4 Tickless Timekeeping... 5 Initializing and Correcting Wall-Clock Time... 6 PC Timer Hardware... 6 PIT... 7 CMOS RTC... 8 Local APIC Timer... 8 ACPI Timer... 8 TSC... 8 HPET... 9 VMware Timer Virtualization... 9 Virtual PIT... 9 Virtual CMOS RTC Virtual Local APIC Timer Virtual ACPI Timer Virtual TSC Pseudoperformance Counters Virtual HPET Other Time-Dependent Devices VMI Paravirtual Timer Timekeeping in Specific Operating Systems Microsoft Windows Linux Kernels Before Clocksource Clocksource Kernels Paravirtual Kernels Solaris Synchronizing Virtual Machines and Hosts with Real Time Using VMware Tools Clock Synchronization Enabling Periodic Synchronization Disabling All Synchronization Using Microsoft W32Time in Windows Guests Using NTP in Linux and Other Guests Host Clock Synchronization Time and Performance Measurements Within a Virtual Machine Time Measurements Performance Measurements Event Counts Memory Usage CPU Usage INFORMATION GUIDE /2

3 Resource Pressure CPU Pressure Memory Pressure Troubleshooting Best Practices Gathering Information Observe Symptoms Carefully Test Operating System Clock Against CMOS TOD Clock Turn On Additional Logging Gather VM-Support Dump Resources INFORMATION GUIDE /3

4 Introduction Because virtual machines work by time-sharing host physical hardware, they cannot exactly duplicate the timing activity of physical machines. VMware virtual machines use several techniques to minimize and conceal differences in timing performance, but the differences can still sometimes cause timekeeping inaccuracies and other problems in software running in a virtual machine. This information guide describes how timekeeping hardware works in physical machines, how typical guest operating systems use this hardware to keep time and how VMware products virtualize the hardware. This paper is intended for partners, resellers and advanced system administrators who are deploying VMware products and need a deep understanding of the issues that arise in keeping accurate time in virtual machines. The VMware knowledge base contains additional and more frequently updated information, including best practices to configure specific guest operating system versions for the most accurate timekeeping, as well as recipes for diagnosing and working around known issues in specific versions of VMware products. Timekeeping Basics Computer operating systems typically measure the passage of time in one of two ways: Tick counting The operating system sets up a hardware device to interrupt periodically at a known rate, such as 100 times per second. The operating system then handles these interrupts, called ticks, and keeps a count to determine how much time has passed. Tickless timekeeping A hardware device keeps a count of the number of time units that have passed since the system booted, and the operating system simply reads the counter when needed. Tickless timekeeping has several advantages. In particular, it does not keep the CPU busy handling interrupts, and it can keep time at a finer granularity. However, tickless timekeeping is practical only on machines that provide a suitable hardware counter. The counter must run at a constant rate, be reasonably fast to read and either never overflow or overflow infrequently enough that the operating system can reliably extend its range by detecting and counting the overflows. Besides measuring the passage of time, operating systems are also called on to keep track of the absolute time, often called wall-clock time. Generally, when an operating system starts up, it reads the initial wall-clock time to the nearest second from the computer s battery-backed real-time clock or queries a network time server to obtain a more precise and accurate time value. It then uses one of the methods described above to measure the passage of time from that point. In addition, to correct for long-term drift and other errors in the measurement, the operating system might include a daemon that runs periodically to check the clock against a network time server and make adjustments to its value and running rate. Tick Counting Many PC-based operating systems use tick counting to keep time. Unfortunately, supporting this form of timekeeping accurately in a virtual machine is difficult. Virtual machines share their underlying hardware with the host operating system, or on VMware ESX, the VMkernel. Other applications and other virtual machines might also be running on the same host machine. At the moment that a virtual machine should generate a virtual timer interrupt, it might not actually be running. In fact, the virtual machine might not get a chance to run again until it has accumulated a backlog of many timer interrupts. In addition, even a running virtual machine can sometimes be late in delivering virtual timer interrupts. The virtual machine checks for pending virtual timer interrupts only at certain points, such as when the underlying hardware receives a physical timer interrupt. Many host operating systems do not provide a way for the virtual machine to request a physical timer interrupt at a precisely specified time. INFORMATION GUIDE /4

5 Because the guest operating system keeps time by counting interrupts, time as measured by the guest operating system falls behind real time whenever there is a timer interrupt backlog. A VMware virtual machine deals with this problem by keeping track of the current timer interrupt backlog and delivering timer interrupts at a higher rate whenever the backlog grows too large, in order to catch up. Catching up is made more difficult by the fact that a new timer interrupt should not be generated until the guest operating system has fully handled the previous one. Otherwise, the guest operating system might fail to see the next interrupt as a separate event and miss counting it. This phenomenon is called a lost tick. If the virtual machine is running too slowly, perhaps as a result of competition for CPU time from other virtual machines or processes running on the host machine, it might be impossible to feed the virtual machine enough interrupts to keep up with real time. In current VMware products, if the backlog of interrupts grows beyond 60 seconds, the virtual machine gives up on catching up, simply setting its record of the backlog to zero. After this happens, if VMware Tools is installed in the guest operating system and its clock synchronization feature is enabled, VMware Tools corrects the clock reading in the guest operating system sometime within the next minute by synchronizing the guest operating system time to match the host machine s clock. The virtual machine then resumes keeping track of its backlog and catching up any new backlog that accumulates. Another problem with timer interrupts is that they cause a scalability issue as more and more virtual machines are run on the same physical machine. Even when a virtual machine is otherwise completely idle, it must run briefly each time it receives a timer interrupt. If a virtual machine is requesting 100 interrupts per second, it becomes ready to run at least 100 times per second, at evenly spaced intervals. So roughly speaking, if N virtual machines are running, processing the interrupts imposes a background load of 100xN context switches per second even if all the virtual machines are idle. Virtual machines that request 1,000 interrupts per second create 10 times the context-switching load, and so forth. Tickless Timekeeping A growing number of PC-based operating systems use tickless timekeeping. This form of timekeeping is relatively easy to support in a virtual machine and has several advantages. But there are still a few challenges. On the positive side, when the guest operating system is not counting timer interrupts for timekeeping purposes, there is no need for the virtual machine to keep track of an interrupt backlog and catch up if the number of interrupts delivered has fallen behind real time. Late interrupts can simply be allowed to pile up and merge together, without concern for clock slippage caused by lost ticks. This saves CPU time that would otherwise be consumed in handling the late interrupts. Further, the guest operating system s view of time is more accurate, because its clock does not fall behind real time while the virtual machine is not running or is running slowly. In order to achieve these advantages, however, the virtual machine must be alerted that the guest operating system is using tickless timekeeping. The virtual machine must default to tick counting in the absence of knowledge to the contrary, because if the guest operating system is in fact counting timer interrupts, it is incorrect to drop any. VMware products use multiple methods to detect tickless timekeeping. First, if the guest has not programmed any of the virtual timer devices to generate periodic interrupts, it is safe to assume that tick counting is not in use. However, some operating systems do program one or more timer devices for periodic interrupts even when using tickless timekeeping. In such cases, the use of tickless timekeeping can usually be inferred from the guest operating system type. Alternatively, software in the virtual machine can make a hypercall to inform the virtual machine that it is tickless. An additional challenge for both forms of timekeeping is that virtual machines occasionally run highly timesensitive code for example, measuring the number of iterations of a specific loop that can run in a given amount of real time. In some cases, such code might function better under the tick-counting style of timekeeping, in which the guest operating system s timekeeping appears to slow down or stop while the virtual machine is not running. INFORMATION GUIDE /5

6 Initializing and Correcting Wall-Clock Time A guest operating system faces the same basic challenges in keeping accurate wall-clock time when running in either a virtual or physical machine: initializing the clock to the correct time when booting, and updating the clock accurately as time passes. For initializing the clock, a VMware virtual machine provides mechanisms similar to those of a physical machine: a virtual battery- backed CMOS clock and virtual network cards that can be used to fetch the time from a network time server. One additional mechanism is also provided: VMware Tools resets the guest operating system s clock to match the host s clock upon startup. The interface between guest and host uses UTC (Coordinated Universal Time, also known as Greenwich Mean Time or GMT), so the guest and host do not have to be in the same time zone. Virtual machines also have another issue: when the virtual machine is resumed from suspend, or is restored from a snapshot, the guest operating system s wall-clock time remains at the value it had at the time of the suspension or snapshot and must be updated. VMware Tools handles this issue too, setting the virtual machine s clock to match the host s clock upon resume or restore. However, because users sometimes need a virtual machine to have its clock set to a fictitious time unrelated to the time kept on the host, VMware Tools can optionally be instructed never to change the virtual machine s clock. Updating the clock accurately over the long term is challenging because the timer devices in physical machines tend to drift, typically running as much as 100 parts per million fast or slow, with the rate varying with temperature. The virtual timer devices in a virtual machine have the same amount of inherent drift as the underlying hardware on the host, and additional drift and inaccuracy can arise as a result of such factors as round-off error and lost ticks. In a physical machine, it is generally necessary to run network clock synchronization software such as NTP or the Windows Time Service to keep time accurately over the long term. The same applies to virtual machines, and the same clock synchronization software can be used, although it sometimes must be configured specially to deal with the less smooth performance of virtual timer devices. VMware Tools can also optionally be used to correct long-term drift and errors by periodically resynchronizing the virtual machine s clock to the host s clock, but it might be less precise. In VMware Workstation 6.5 and earlier and in ESX/ESXi 4.0 and earlier, VMwareTools does not correct errors in which the guest clock is ahead of real time, only those in which the guest clock is behind. PC Timer Hardware For historical reasons, PCs contain several different devices that can be used to keep track of time. Different guest operating systems arrive at different determinations as to which of these devices to use and how to use them. Using several of the devices in combination is important in many guest operating systems. Sometimes one device that runs at a known speed is used to measure the speed of another device. Sometimes a fine-grained timing device is used to add additional precision to the tick count obtained from a more coarsely grained timing device. It is necessary to support all of these devices in a virtual machine, and the times read from different devices usually must appear to be consistent with one another, even when they are somewhat inconsistent with real time. All PC timer devices can be described using roughly the same block diagram, as shown in Figure 1. Not all the devices have all the features shown, and some have additional features, but the diagram is a useful abstraction. INFORMATION GUIDE /6

7 Figure 1. Abstract Timer Device The oscillator provides a fixed input frequency to the timer device. The frequency might be specified, or the operating system might have to measure it at startup time. The counter might be readable or writable by software. It counts down one unit for each cycle of the oscillator. When it reaches zero, it generates an output signal that might interrupt the processor. At this point, if the timer is set to one-shot mode, it stops; if set to periodic mode, it continues counting. There might also be a counter input register whose value is loaded into the counter when it reaches zero; this register allows software to control the timer period. Some real timer devices count up instead of down and have a register whose value is compared with the counter to determine when to interrupt and restart the count at zero, but count-up and count-down timer designs provide equivalent functionality. Common PC timer devices include the programmable interval timer (PIT), the CMOS real time clock (RTC), the local advanced programmable interrupt controller (APIC) timers, the advanced configuration and power interface (ACPI) timer, the time stamp counter (TSC), and the high precision event timer (HPET). PIT The PIT is the oldest PC timer device. It uses a crystal-controlled MHz input oscillator and has 16-bit counter and counter input registers. The oscillator frequency was not chosen for convenient timekeeping; it was simply a handy frequency available when the first PC was designed. (The oscillator frequency is one-third of the standard NTSC television color burst frequency.) The PIT device actually contains three identical timers that are connected in different ways to the rest of the computer. Timer 0 can generate an interrupt and is suitable for system timekeeping. Timer 1 was historically used for RAM refresh and is typically programmed for a 15µs period by the PC BIOS. Timer 2 is wired to the PC speaker for tone generation. INFORMATION GUIDE /7

8 CMOS RTC The CMOS RTC is part of the battery-backed memory device that keeps a PC s BIOS settings stable while the PC is powered off. The name CMOS comes from the low-power integrated circuit technology in which this device was originally implemented. There are two main time-related features in the RTC. First, there is a continuously running time of day (TOD) clock that keeps time in year/month/day hour:minute:second format. This clock can be read only to the nearest second. There is also a timer that can generate periodic interrupts at any power-oftwo rate from 2Hz to 8,192Hz. This timer fits the block diagram model in Figure 1, with the restriction that the counter cannot be read or written, and the counter input can be set only to a power of two. Two other interrupts can also be enabled: the update interrupt and the alarm interrupt. The update interrupt occurs once per second. It is supposed to reflect the TOD clock turning over to the next second. The alarm interrupt occurs when the time of day matches a specified value or pattern. Local APIC Timer The local APIC is a part of the interrupt routing logic in modern PCs. In a multiprocessor system, there is one local APIC per processor. On current processors, the local APIC is integrated onto the processor chip. The local APIC includes a timer device with 32-bit counter and counter input registers. The input frequency is typically the processor s base front-side memory bus frequency (before the multiplication by two or four for DDR or quadpumped memory). This timer is much more finely grained and has a wider counter than the PIT or CMOS timers, but software does not have a reliable way to determine its frequency. Generally, the only way to determine the local APIC timer s frequency is to measure it using the PIT or CMOS timer, which yields only an approximate result. ACPI Timer The ACPI timer is an additional system timer that is required as part of the ACPI specification. This timer is also known as the power management (PM) timer or the chipset timer. It has a 24-bit counter that increments at MHz (three times the PIT frequency). The timer can be programmed to generate an interrupt when its high-order bit changes value. There is no counter input register; the counter always rolls over. (That is, when the counter reaches the maximum, 24-bit binary value, it goes back to zero and continues counting from there.) The ACPI timer continues running in some power-saving modes in which other timers are stopped or slowed. The ACPI timer is relatively slow to read (typically 1 2µs). TSC The TSC is a 64-bit cycle counter on Pentium CPUs and newer processors. It runs off the CPU clock oscillator, typically 2GHz or more on current systems. At current processor speeds, it would take years to roll over. The TSC cannot generate interrupts and has no counter input register. It can be read by software in one instruction (rdtsc). The rdtsc instruction is normally available in user mode, but operating system software can choose to make it unavailable. The TSC is, by far, the finest grained, widest, and most convenient timer device to access. However, it also has several drawbacks: As with the local APIC timer, software does not have a reliable way to determine the TSC s input frequency. Generally, the only way to determine the TSC s frequency is to measure it approximately using the PIT or CMOS timer. Several forms of power management technology vary the processor s clock speed dynamically and thereby change the TSC s input oscillator rate with little or no notice. In addition, AMD Opteron K8 processors drop some cycles from the TSC when entering and leaving a halt state if the halt clock ramping feature is enabled, even though the TSC rate does not change. The latest processors from Intel and AMD no longer have these limitations, however. Some processors stop the TSC in their lower-power halt states (the ACPI C3 state and below). INFORMATION GUIDE /8

9 On shared-bus SMP machines, all the TSCs run off a common clock oscillator So (in the absence of the issues noted above) they can be synchronized closely with each other at startup time and thereafter treated essentially as a single system-wide clock. This does not work on IBM x-series NUMA machines and their derivatives, however. In these machines, different NUMA nodes run off separate clock oscillators. Although the nominal frequencies of the oscillators on each NUMA node are the same, each oscillator is controlled by a separate crystal with its own distinct drift from the nominal frequency. In addition, the clock rates are intentionally varied dynamically over a small range (2 percent or so) to reduce the effects of emitted RF (radio frequency) noise, a technique called spread-spectrum clocking, and this variation is not in step across different nodes. Despite these drawbacks of the TSC, both operating systems and application programs frequently use it for timekeeping. HPET The HPET is a device available in some newer PCs. Many PC systems do not have this device, and operating systems generally do not require it, although some can use it if available. The HPET has one central up-counter that runs continuously unless stopped by software. It might be 32 or 64 bits wide. The counter s period can be read from a register. The HPET provides multiple timers, each consisting of a timeout register that is compared with the central counter. When a timeout value matches, the corresponding timer fires. If the timer is set to be periodic, the HPET hardware automatically adds its period to the compare register, thereby computing the next time for this timer to fire. The HPET has a few drawbacks. The specification does not require the timer to be particularly fine grained, to have low drift, or to be fast to read. Some typical implementations run the counter at about 18MHz and require about the same amount of time (1 2µs) to read the HPET as with the ACPI timer. Implementations have been observed in which the period register is off by 800 parts per million or more. A drawback of the general design is that setting a timeout races with the counter itself. If software attempts to set a short timeout, but for any reason its write to the HPET is delayed beyond the point at which the timeout is to expire, the timeout is effectively set far in the future instead (about 2 32 or 2 64 counts). Software can stop the central counter, but doing so would spoil its usefulness for long-term timekeeping. The HPET is designed to be able to replace the PIT and CMOS periodic timers by driving the interrupt lines to which the PIT and CMOS timers are normally connected. Most current hardware platforms still have physical PIT and CMOS timers and do not need to use the HPET to replace them. VMware Timer Virtualization VMware products use a patent-pending technique that allows the many timer devices in a virtual machine to fall behind real time and catch up as needed while remaining sufficiently consistent with one another so that software running in the virtual machine is not disrupted by anomalous time readings. In VMware terminology, the time that is visible to virtual machines on their timer devices is called apparent time. Generally, the timer devices in a virtual machine operate identically to the corresponding timer devices in a physical machine, but they show apparent time instead of real time. The following sections note some exceptions to this rule and provide some additional details about each emulated timer device. Virtual PIT VMware products fully emulate the timing functions of all three timers in the PIT device. In addition, when the guest operating system programs the speaker timer to generate a sound, the virtual machine requests a beep sound from the host machine. However, the sound generated on the host might not be of the requested frequency or duration. INFORMATION GUIDE /9

10 Virtual CMOS RTC Current VMware products emulate all the timing functions of the CMOS RTC, including the time-of-day clock and the periodic, update, and alarm interrupts that the CMOS RTC provides. Many guest operating systems use the CMOS periodic interrupt as the main system timer, so VMware products run it in apparent time to be consistent with the other timer devices. Some guest operating systems use the CMOS update interrupt to count off precisely one second to measure the CPU speed or the speed of other timer devices, so VMware products run the CMOS update interrupt in apparent time as well. In contrast, VMware products base the virtual CMOS TOD clock directly on the real time as known to the host system, not on apparent time. This choice makes sense because guest operating systems generally read the CMOS TOD clock mainly to initialize the system time at power on and occasionally to check the system time for correctness. Operating systems use the CMOS TOD clock this way because it provides time only to the nearest second but is battery backed and therefore continues to keep time even when the system loses power or is restarted. Specifically, the CMOS TOD clock shows UTC as kept by the host operating system software, plus an offset. The offset from UTC is stored in the virtual machine s nvram file along with the rest of the contents of the virtual machine s CMOS nonvolatile memory. The offset is needed because many guest operating systems require the CMOS TOD clock to show the time in the current local time zone, not in UTC. When a new virtual machine is created (or the nvram file of an existing virtual machine is deleted) and it is powered on, the offset is initialized, by default, to the difference of the host operating system s local time zone from UTC. If software running in the virtual machine writes a new time to the CMOS TOD clock, the offset is updated. You can force the CMOS TOD clock s offset to be initialized to a specific value at power on. To do so, set the option rtc.difffromutc in the virtual machine s.vmx configuration file to a value in seconds. For example, setting rtc.difffromutc = 0 sets the clock to UTC at power on, while setting rtc.difffromutc = sets it to Pacific Daylight Time, seven hours earlier than UTC. The guest operating system can still change the offset value after power on by writing a new time to the CMOS TOD clock. You can also force the CMOS TOD clock to start at a specified time whenever the virtual machine is powered on, independent of the real time. To do this, set the configuration file option rtc.starttime. The value you specify is in seconds since Jan 1, :00 UTC, but it is converted to the local time zone of the host operating system before setting the CMOS TOD clock (under the assumption that the guest operating system requires the CMOS TOD clock to read in local time). If your guest operating system is running the CMOS TOD clock in UTC or some other time zone, you should correct for this when setting rtc.starttime. The virtual CMOS TOD clock has the following limitation: Because the clock is implemented as an offset from the host operating system s software clock, it changes value if you change the host operating system time. (Changing the host time zone has no effect, only changing the actual time.) In most cases this effect is harmless, but it does mean that you should never use a virtual machine as a time server providing time to the host operating system that it is running on. Doing this can create a harmful positive feedback loop in which any change made to the host time incorrectly changes the guest time too, causing the host time to appear wrong again, which causes a further change to the host time, etc. Whether or not this effect occurs and how severe it is depend on how the guest operating system uses the CMOS TOD clock. Some guest operating systems might not use the CMOS TOD clock at all, in which case the problem does not occur. Some guests synchronize to the CMOS TOD clock only at boot time, in which case the problem does occur but the system goes around its feedback loop only once per guest boot. You can use rtc.difffromutc to break such a feedback loop, but it is better to avoid the loop in the first place by not using the virtual machine as a time server for the host. Some guest operating systems periodically resynchronize to the CMOS TOD clock (say, once per hour), in which case the feedback is more rapid and rtc.difffromutc cannot break the loop. Because the alarm interrupt is designed to be triggered when the CMOS TOD clock reaches a specific value, the alarm interrupt also operates in real time, not apparent time. INFORMATION GUIDE /10

11 The choice of real or apparent time for each feature of the CMOS RTC device reflects the way guest operating systems commonly use the device. Guest operating systems typically have no difficulty with part of the device operating in apparent time and other parts operating in real time. However, one unsupported guest operating system (USL UNIX System V Release 4.21) is known to crash if it sees the CMOS device s update-in-progress (UIP) bit set while starting up. It is not known whether this crash would occur on real hardware or whether the guest operating system is confused by the fact that the update interrupt, the UIP bit, and the rollover of the CMOS TOD clock to the next second do not all occur at the same moment, as they would on real hardware. You can work around this problem by setting rtc.douip = FALSE in the virtual machine s configuration file, which forces the UIP bit to always return 0. NOTE: Do not use the rtc.douip = FALSE setting unless you are running a guest operating system that requires it. Setting this value for other guest operating systems might prevent timekeeping from working correctly. Virtual Local APIC Timer VMware products fully emulate the local APIC timer on each virtual CPU. The timer s frequency is not dependent on the host s APIC timer frequency. In most cases, the local APIC timer runs in apparent time, matching the other timer devices. However, some VMware products are able to recognize cases in which the guest operating system is using tickless timekeeping but has nevertheless set up a periodic local APIC timer interrupt. In these cases, the local APIC timer runs in a lazy mode, in which reading its counter returns the current apparent time but late APIC timer interrupts are allowed to pile up and merge rather than being accumulated as a backlog and causing apparent time to be held back until the backlog is caught up. Also, APIC timer interrupts on different virtual CPUs are allowed to occur slightly out of order. Virtual ACPI Timer VMware products fully emulate a 24-bit ACPI timer. The timer runs in apparent time, matching the other timer devices. It generates an interrupt when the high-order bit changes value. Virtual TSC Current VMware products virtualize the TSC in apparent time. The virtual TSC stays in step with the other timer devices visible in the virtual machine. Like those devices, the virtual TSC falls behind real time when there is a backlog of timer interrupts, and catches up as the backlog is cleared. The virtual TSC does not count cycles of code run on the virtual CPU; it advances even when the virtual CPU is not running. The virtual TSC also does not match the TSC value on the host hardware. When a virtual machine is powered on, its virtual TSC is set, by default, to run at the same rate as the host TSC. If the virtual machine is then moved to a different host without being powered off (that is, either using VMware vsphere vmotion (vmotion) or suspending the virtual machine on one host and resuming it on another), the virtual TSC continues to run at its original power-on rate, not at the host TSC rate on the new host machine. Each virtual CPU has its own TSC. A desirable property of such a system is that the TSCs of all of the virtual CPUs in a VM are exactly synchronized. If the TSCs are exactly synchronized, when software reads the TSC of vcpu A and then reads the TSC of vcpu B, the read on B is guaranteed to be a larger value than the read on A. If the TSCs are not exactly synchronized, this is not necessarily true. As of ESX 5.0, Workstation 8.0 and Fusion 4.0, the virtual TSCs are exactly synchronized by default if permitted by the physical hardware. As on physical hardware, the virtual TSCs are writable, so the guest OS may write to them and de-synchronize them. To provide exactly synchronized virtual TSCs with high performance, VMware products require the physical TSCs on the host hardware to be exactly synchronized. The host TSCs are checked for synchronization, and if they are not exactly synchronized, the virtual TSC uses a different implementation that makes TSC reads substantially slower. INFORMATION GUIDE /11

12 There is one pitfall in this area: if the host TSCs are approximately but not exactly synchronized, it is possible for the check to miss the lack of synchrony, leading to the high performance algorithm being used when it is not applicable. In this case the guest TSCs will be out of synchronization too. This case is most likely to occur with VMware hosted products, where the host operating system might try to synchronize the TSCs in software but do an imperfect job. It is very unlikely with ESX. You can force the use of the virtual TSC implementation that does not require physical TSCs to be synchronized by adding the following option to the VM's configuration: monitor_control.disable_tsc_offsetting=true This option increases the cost of emulating the RDTSC instruction, but should not otherwise harm performance. ESX 4.x does not provide exactly synchronized virtual TSCs by default. Instead, it provides approximately synchronized TSCs: the TSCs may be temporarily out of sync by a small amount, but they will not drift apart over the long term. The amount they may be out of sync is bounded by roughly two timer interrupt periods. This property makes the TSCs suitable for timekeeping in most guest operating systems, but may cause problems in guest operating systems that expect TSCs to be exactly synchronized. ESX 4.x can be configured to provide exactly synchronized TSCs at the cost of decreased performance for guest TSC reads. To do this, add these configuration options to the VM's configuration: monitor_control.disable_tsc_offsetting=true monitor_control.disable_rdtscopt_bt=true timetracker.forcemonotonicttat=true All three configuration options are necessary to ensure that the TSCs are exactly synchronized in ESX 4.x. These options increase the cost of emulating the RDTSC instruction, but should not otherwise harm performance. ESX 3.5 behaves similarly to ESX 4.x by default, but it does not support the timetracker.forcemonotonicttat option, so there is no set of options that will exactly synchronize the TSCs in all cases. However, using the following options will synchronize the TSCs more closely than they are by default and may improve the behavior of software running in the virtual machine that expects synchronized TSCs. monitor_control.disable_tsc_offsetting=true monitor_control.disable_rdtscopt_bt=true Again, these options increase the cost of emulating the RDTSC instruction, but should not otherwise harm performance. You can force the virtual TSC s rate to a specific value N (in cycles per second or Hz) by adding the setting timetracker.apparenthz = N to the virtual machine s.vmx configuration file. This feature is rarely needed. One possible use is to test for bugs in guest operating systems for example, Linux 2.2 kernels hang during startup if the TSC runs faster than 4GHz. NOTE: This feature does not change the rate at which instructions are executed. In particular, you cannot make programs run more slowly by setting the virtual TSC s rate to a lower value. You can disable virtualization of the TSC by adding the setting monitor_control.virtual_rdtsc = FALSE to the virtual machine s.vmx configuration file. This feature is no longer recommended for use. When you disable virtualization of the TSC, reading the TSC from within the virtual machine returns the physical machine s TSC value, and writing the TSC from within the virtual machine has no effect. Migrating the virtual machine to another host, resuming it from suspended state, or reverting to a snapshot causes the TSC to jump discontinuously. Some guest operating systems fail to boot, or exhibit other timekeeping problems, when TSC virtualization is disabled. In the past, this feature has sometimes been recommended to improve performance of applications that read the TSC frequently, but performance of the virtual TSC has been improved substantially in current products. The feature has also been recommended for use when performing measurements that require a precise source of real time in the virtual machine. But for this purpose, the pseudoperformance counters discussed in the next section are a better choice. INFORMATION GUIDE /12

13 Pseudoperformance Counters For certain applications it can be useful to have direct access to real time (as opposed to apparent time) within a virtual machine. For example, you might be writing performance-measuring software that is aware it is running in a virtual machine and does not require its fine-grained timer to stay in step with the number of interrupts delivered on other timer devices. VMware virtual machines provide a set of pseudoperformance counters that software running in the virtual machine can read with the rdpmc instruction to obtain fine-grained time. To enable this feature, use the following configuration file setting: monitor_control.pseudo_perfctr = TRUE The following machine instructions then become available: INSTRUCTION rdpmc 0x10000 rdpmc 0x10001 rdpmc 0x10002 TIME VALUE RETURNED Physical host TSC Elapsed real time in ns Elapsed apparent time in ns Table 2. Instructions Available When Pseudoperformance Counters Are Enabled Although the rdpmc instruction normally is privileged unless the PCE flag is set in the CR4 control register, a VMware virtual machine permits the above pseudoperformance counters to be read from user space regardless of the setting of the PCE flag. NOTE: The pseudoperformance counter feature uses a trap to catch a privileged machine instruction issued by software running in the virtual machine and therefore has more overhead than reading a performance counter or the TSC on physical hardware. There are some limitations. Some or all of these counters might not be available on older versions of VMware products. In particular, elapsed real time and elapsed apparent time were first introduced in VMware ESX 3.5 and VMware Workstation 6.5. The zero point for the counters is currently unspecified. The physical host TSC might change its counting rate, jump to a different value, or both when the virtual machine migrates to a different host or is resumed from suspend or reverted to a snapshot. The elapsed real time counter runs at a constant rate but might jump to a different value when the virtual machine migrates to a different host or is resumed from suspend or reverted to a snapshot. Virtual HPET A virtual HPET was introduced with Virtual Hardware version 8 (which first appeared in ESX 5.0, Workstation 8.0 and Fusion 4.0). It runs in apparent time. Currently supported guest operating systems do not require a HPET, but some will use a HPET if one is present (including Windows Vista and later, and many versions of Linux). It can be disabled by setting hpet0.present=false in the VM's configuration. Other Time-Dependent Devices Computer generation of sound is time sensitive. The sounds that a virtual machine generates are always played by the host machine s sound card at the correct sample rate, regardless of timer functioning in the virtual machine, so they always play at the proper pitch. Also, there is enough buffering between the virtual sound card of the virtual machine and the host machine s sound card so that sounds usually play continuously. However, there can be gaps or stuttering if the virtual machine falls far enough behind that the supply of buffered sound information available to play is exhausted. INFORMATION GUIDE /13

14 Playback of MIDI music (as well as some other forms of multimedia), however, requires software to provide delays for the correct amount of time between notes or other events, so playback can slow down or speed up if the apparent time deviates too far from real time. VGA video cards produce vertical and horizontal blanking signals that depend on a monitor s video scan rate. VMware virtual machines currently make no attempt to emulate these signals with accurate timing. There is very little software that uses these signals for timing, but a few old games do use them. These games currently are not playable in a virtual machine. VMI Paravirtual Timer The virtual machine interface (VMI) is a paravirtualization interface developed by VMware with input from the Linux community. VMI is an open standard, the specification for which is available at VMI is currently defined only for 32-bit guests. VMI is no longer supported in the most recent VMware products. It is supported in Workstation 6.x, 7.x, ESX 3.5, and ESX 4.x. VMI includes a paravirtual timer device that the guest operating system kernel can use for tickless timekeeping. In addition, VMI allows the guest kernel to explicitly account for stolen time; that is, time when the guest operating system was ready to run, but the virtual machine was descheduled by the host scheduler. VMI can be used by any guest operating system, but currently only Linux uses it. See Linux on page 15. Timekeeping in Specific Operating Systems This section details some of the peculiarities of specific operating systems that affect their timekeeping performance when they are run as guests in virtual machines. A few of these issues also affect timekeeping activity when these operating systems are run as hosts for VMware Workstation and other VMware hosted products. Microsoft Windows Microsoft Windows operating systems generally keep time by counting timer interrupts (ticks). System time of day is precise only to the nearest tick. The timer device used and the number of interrupts generated per second vary depending on which specific version of Microsoft Windows and which Windows hardware abstraction layer (HAL) are installed. Some uniprocessor Windows configurations use the PIT as their main system timer, but multiprocessor HALs and some ACPI uniprocessor HALs use the CMOS periodic timer instead. For systems using the PIT, the base interrupt rate is usually 100Hz, although Windows 98 uses 200Hz. For systems that use the CMOS timer, the base interrupt rate is usually 64Hz. Microsoft Windows also has a feature called the multimedia timer API that can raise the timer rate to as high as 1,024Hz (or 1,000Hz on systems that use the PIT) when it is used. For example, if your virtual machine has the Apple QuickTime icon in the system tray, even if QuickTime is not playing a movie, the guest operating system timer rate is raised to 1,024Hz. This feature is not used exclusively by multimedia applications. For example, some implementations of the Java runtime environment raise the timer rate to 1,024Hz, so running any Java application might raise your timer rate, depending on the version of the runtime you are using. This feature is also used by VMware hosted products running on a Windows host system, to handle cases in which one or more of the currently running virtual machines require a higher virtual timer interrupt rate than the host s default physical interrupt rate. Microsoft Windows has an additional time measurement feature accessed through the QueryPerformanceCounter system call. This name is a misnomer, because the call never accesses the CPU s performance counter registers. Instead, it reads one of the timer devices that have a counter, allowing time measurement with a finer granularity than the interrupt-counting system time of day clock. Which timer device is used (the ACPI timer, the TSC, the PIT, or some other device) depends on the specific Windows version and HAL in use. INFORMATION GUIDE /14

15 Some versions of Windows, especially multiprocessor versions, set the TSC register to zero during their startup sequence, in part to ensure that the TSCs of all the processors are synchronized. Microsoft Windows also measures the speed of each processor by comparing the TSC against one of the other system timers during startup, and this code also sets the TSC to zero in some cases. Some multiprocessor versions of the Windows operating system program the local APIC timers to generate one interrupt per second. Other versions of Windows do not use these timers at all. Some multiprocessor versions of Windows route the main system timer interrupt as a broadcast to all processors. Others route this interrupt only to the primary processor and use interprocessor interrupts for scheduler time slicing on secondary processors. To initialize the system time of day on startup, Microsoft Windows reads the battery-backed CMOS TOD clock. Occasionally, Windows also writes to this clock so that the time is approximately correct on the next startup. Windows keeps the CMOS TOD clock in local time, so in regions that turn their clocks ahead by an hour during the summer, Windows must update the CMOS TOD clock twice a year to reflect the change. Some rare failure modes can put the CMOS TOD clock out of step with the Windows registry setting that records whether it has been updated, causing the Windows clock to be off by an hour after the next reboot. If VMware Tools is installed in the virtual machine, it corrects any such error at boot time. A daemon present in Windows NT-family systems (that is, Windows NT 4.0 and later) checks the system time of day against the CMOS TOD clock once per hour. If the system time is off by more than 60 seconds, it is reset to match the TOD clock. This is generally harmless in a virtual machine and might be useful in some cases, such as when VMware Tools or other synchronization software is not in use. One possible (though rare) problem can occur if the daemon sets the clock ahead while the virtual machine is in the process of catching up on an interrupt backlog. Because the virtual machine is not aware that the guest operating system clock has been reset, it continues catching up, causing the clock to overshoot real time. If you turn on periodic clock synchronization in VMware Tools, it disables this daemon. For a discussion of W32Time and other Windows clock synchronization software, see Synchronizing Virtual Machines and Hosts with Real Time on page 19. Linux Timekeeping in Linux has changed a great deal over its history. Recently, the direction of kernel development has been toward better operation in a virtual machine. However, along the way, a number of kernels have had specific bugs that are strongly exposed when run in a virtual machine. Some kernels have very high interrupt rates, resulting in poor timekeeping performance and imposing excessive host load even when the virtual machine is idle. In most cases, the latest VMware-supported version of a Linux distribution has the best timekeeping performance. See VMware knowledge base article (http://kb.vmware.com/kb/ ) for specific recommendations, including workarounds for bugs and performance issues with specific distribution vendor kernels. The remainder of this section describes the overall development and characteristics of the Linux timekeeping implementation in more detail. Linux kernel version 2.4 and earlier versions of 2.6 used tick counting exclusively, with PIT 0 usually used as the source of ticks. More recently, a series of changes amounting to a rewrite of the timekeeping subsystem were made to the kernel. The first major round of changes, which went into the 32-bit kernel in version and the 64-bit kernel in , added an abstraction layer called clocksource to the timekeeping subsystem. The kernel can select from several clock sources at boot time. Generally, each one uses a different hardware timer device with appropriate support code to implement the clocksource interface. Almost all the provided clock sources are tickless, including all the commonly used ones. The next major round of changes, completed in 32-bit and 64-bit , added the clockevents abstraction to the kernel. These changes added the NO_HZ kernel configuration option, which, when enabled at kernel compile time, switches the kernel to using a periodic (oneshot) interrupt for system timer callbacks, process accounting and scheduling. INFORMATION GUIDE /15

16 Versions of Linux prior to the introduction of NO_HZ require a periodic interrupt for scheduler time slicing and statistical process accounting. Most configurations use the local APIC timer on each CPU to generate scheduler interrupts for that CPU, but in some uniprocessor configurations, the scheduler is driven from the same interrupt used for timekeeping. User applications on Linux can request additional timer interrupts using the /dev/rtc device. These interrupts come either from the CMOS periodic timer or the HPET. This feature is used by some multimedia software. It is also used by VMware hosted products running on a Linux host system, to handle cases in which one or more of the currently running virtual machines require a higher virtual timer interrupt rate than the host s default physical interrupt rate. See VMware knowledge base article 892 (http://kb.vmware.com/kb/892). The Linux implementation of this feature using the HPET can sometimes stop delivering interrupts because of the timeoutsetting race mentioned in HPET on page 9. Most Linux distributions are set up to initialize the system time from the battery-backed CMOS TOD clock at startup and to write the system time back to the CMOS TOD clock at shutdown. In some cases, Linux kernels also write the system time to the CMOS TOD clock periodically (once every 11 minutes). You can manually read or set the CMOS TOD clock using the /sbin/hwclock program. Kernels Before Clocksource Linux kernels prior to the introduction of the clocksource abstraction count periodic timer interrupts as their basic method of timekeeping. Linux kernels generally use PIT 0 as their main source of timer interrupts. The interrupt rate used depends on the kernel version. Linux 2.4 and earlier kernels generally program the PIT 0 timer to deliver interrupts at 100Hz. Some vendor patches to 2.4 kernels increase this rate. In particular, the initial release of Red Hat Linux 8 and some updates to Red Hat Linux 7 used 512Hz, but later updates reverted to the standard 100Hz rate. SUSE Linux Professional 9.0 uses 1000Hz when the desktop boot-time option is provided to the kernel, and the SUSE installation program sets this option by default. Early Linux 2.6 kernels used a rate of 1,000Hz. This rate was later made configurable at kernel compile time, with 100Hz, 250Hz and 1,000Hz as standard choices and 250Hz as the default; however, some vendors (including Red Hat in the Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4 and Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5 series) continued to ship kernels configured for 1,000Hz. The latest versions in both the Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4 and Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5 series include a divider= boottime option that can reduce the interrupt rate for example, divider=10 reduces the interrupt rate to 100Hz. As mentioned above, most kernels also program the local APIC timer on each CPU to deliver periodic interrupts to drive the scheduler. These interrupts occur at approximately the same base rate as the PIT 0 timer. Therefore, a one-cpu virtual machine running an SMP Linux 2.4 kernel requires a total of 200 timer interrupts per second across all sources, while a two-cpu virtual machine requires 300 interrupts per second. A one-cpu Linux 2.6 kernel virtual machine that uses tick counting for timekeeping and the local APIC timer for scheduling requires a total of 2,000 timer interrupts per second, while a two-cpu virtual machine requires 3,000 interrupts per second. 32-bit Linux kernel 2.4 and earlier versions interpolate the system time (as returned by the gettimeofday system call) between timer interrupts using an algorithm that is somewhat prone to errors. First, the kernel counts PIT timer interrupts to keep track of time to the nearest 10 milliseconds. When a timer interrupt is received, the kernel reads the PIT counter to measure and correct for the latency in handling the interrupt. The kernel also reads and records the TSC at this point. On each call to gettimeofday, the kernel reads the TSC again and adds the change since the last timer interrupt was processed to compute the current time. Implementations of this algorithm have had various problems that result in incorrect time readings being produced when certain race conditions occur. These problems are fairly rare on real hardware but are more frequent in a virtual machine. The algorithm is also sensitive to lost ticks (as described earlier), and these seem to occur more often in a virtual machine than on real hardware. As a result, if you run a program that loops calling gettimeofday repeatedly, you might occasionally see the value go backward. This occurs both on real hardware and in a virtual machine but is more frequent in a virtual machine. Most 32-bit versions of Linux kernel 2.6 that predate clocksource implement several different algorithms for interpolating the system time and let you choose among them with the clock= kernel command line option. INFORMATION GUIDE /1 6

17 Unfortunately, all the available options have some drawbacks. Three of the algorithms incorporate code that attempts to detect lost ticks from nonprocessed timer interrupts automatically and add extra ticks to correct for the time loss. Unfortunately, these algorithms often overcorrect: they add extra, spurious ticks to the operating system clock when timer interrupt handling is delayed such that two interrupts are handled in close succession but neither is lost. Such bunching of interrupts occurs occasionally on real hardware, usually because a CPU is busy handling other tasks while interrupts are temporarily disabled. This problem occurs much more frequently in a virtual machine because of the virtual machine s need to share the real CPU with other processes. This problem can cause the clock to run too fast both on real hardware and in a virtual machine, but the effect is much more noticeable in a virtual machine. The following paragraphs describe the time interpolation algorithms of 32-bit Linux 2.6 kernels predating clocksource that are usable in a virtual machine: The option clock=tsc selects an algorithm that makes use of the PIT counter and the TSC for time interpolation. This algorithm is similar to that of Linux kernel 2.4 but incorporates lost-tick correction. As previously noted, the methods used to adjust time for lost ticks might overcorrect, making the clock run too fast. Time gains of 10 percent or more have been observed when running this algorithm in a virtual machine. This option is the default on some kernels. The option clock=pmtmr selects a simpler but more robust algorithm that makes use of the ACPI timer for interpolation. This option also includes lost-tick correction code that might cause time gains. However, when used in a virtual machine, time gains from using this option are much smaller. This option is usable in a virtual machine, if you can tolerate the small time gain. This option is the default on some kernels. The option clock=pit uses only the PIT counter for interpolation. It does not include lost-tick correction code, so it does not gain time, but it does lose time when a tick is actually lost. Unfortunately, this option has a different bug on most kernels, such that if you write a program that calls gettimeofday repeatedly, it frequently jumps backward by about 1ms, then corrects itself. The option clock=hpet uses the HPET counter for interpolation. Similar to clock=tsc, it often overcompensates for lost ticks in timekeeping. It also has a bug that causes time to jump forward by 5 minutes occasionally. This option is the default on many kernels if the virtual HPET is present. The 64-bit Linux kernels that predate clocksource implement timekeeping with a method different from that used in the corresponding 32-bit kernels. Unfortunately, this implementation also has problems with lost-tick correction code that overcorrects and causes a time gain. Even some 64-bit kernels in the 2.4 series have losttick overcorrection for example, the kernel included in 64-bit Red Hat Enterprise Linux 3 has this problem. The 64-bit timekeeping implementation has a slightly different set of available algorithms and is controlled by a different boot-time option. One algorithm is similar to the 32-bit clock=tsc algorithm discussed above and has the same problem of severe lost-tick overcorrection. This option is the default on most kernels and is the only one available on older kernels. A second algorithm is similar to the 32-bit clock=hpet algorithm discussed above and has the same problems of severe lost-tick overcorrection and 5 minute jumps. This option is the default on many kernels when the virtual HPET is present. It can be disabled by using the nohpet kernel command line option. A third algorithm is similar to the 32-bit clock=pmtmr algorithm discussed above. It has the same problem of minor lost-tick overcorrection. On some kernels this algorithm is not available at all; on some it is selected automatically for AMD processors but cannot be selected manually. On most kernels, however, this algorithm can be selected using the notsc and nohpet kernel command line options. See VMware knowledge base article (http://kb.vmware.com/kb/ ) for recommended options to use on specific vendor kernels. INFORMATION GUIDE /17

18 Clocksource Kernels With the new clocksource abstraction, the kernel s high-level timekeeping code basically deals only with wallclock time and NTP rate correction. It calls into a lower-level clocksource driver to read a counter that reflects the raw amount of time (without rate correction) that has passed since boot. The available clocksource drivers generally do not use any of the problematic techniques from earlier Linux timekeeping implementations, such as using one timer device to interpolate between the ticks of another or doing lost-tick compensation. In fact, most of the clocksource drivers are tickless. The TSC clocksource (usually the default) basically just reads the TSC value and returns it. The ACPI PM timer clocksource is similar, as the kernel handles timers that wrap (which occurs about every four seconds with a 24-bit ACPI PM timer) and extends their range automatically. The clocksource abstraction is a good match for virtual machines, though not perfect. The TSC does not run at a precisely specified rate, so the guest operating system has to measure its rate at boot time, and this measurement is always somewhat inaccurate. Running NTP or other clock synchronization software in the guest can compensate for this issue, however. The ACPI PM timer does run at a precisely specified rate but is slower to read than the TSC. Also, when clocksource is used without NO_HZ, the guest operating system still programs a timer to interrupt periodically, so by default, the virtual machine still keeps track of a backlog of timer interrupts and tries to catch up gradually. The NO_HZ option provides a further significant improvement. Because the guest operating system does not schedule any periodic timers, the virtual machine can never have a backlog greater than one timer interrupt, so apparent time does not fall far behind real time and catches up very quickly. Also important, NO_HZ tends to reduce the overall average rate of virtual timer interrupts, improving system throughput and scalability to larger numbers of virtual machines per host. Alternatively, even on kernels without NO_HZ, software running in the virtual machine can make a hypercall to inform the virtual machine that it is tickless. For example, the 64-bit SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 10 SP2 kernel does this. Paravirtual Kernels With some 32-bit kernel versions, you can use VMI (see VMI Paravirtual Timer on page 14) to obtain tickless timekeeping in a virtual machine. The VMI patches developed for kernel and earlier include changes to the timekeeping subsystem that use the VMI paravirtual timer device for tickless timekeeping and stolen-time accounting. Some distribution vendors have shipped kernels that include this version of VMI, so if you run one of these distributions in a virtual machine, you get the benefits of these changes. In particular, both Ubuntu 7.04 (2.6.20) and SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 10 SP2 (2.6.16) ship with VMI enabled in the default kernel. The VMI patches were accepted into the mainline 32-bit kernel in version However, the clocksource abstraction was also added to the kernel in this version, making tickless timekeeping available using the generic high-level timekeeping code. Accordingly, the timekeeping portion of the VMI patches was dropped at this point, because it was no longer needed. (Stolen time accounting was also dropped). VMI was removed from the mainline kernels in , and is not enabled in the kernels shipped with SLES11 SP1 (and later), RHEL 6.x, Ubuntu and Ubuntu VMI is no longer supported in the most recent VMware products. It is supported in Workstation 6.x, 7.x, ESX 3.5, and ESX 4.x. Solaris Timekeeping in Solaris 10 is tickless. The operating system reads a hardware counter (by default, the TSC) to obtain the raw amount of time since the system booted. The wall clock time at boot is read from the CMOS time of day clock. In addition, while running, Solaris periodically checks its estimate of wall clock time against the CMOS TOD clock and uses this information to correct and refine its boot- time measurement of the TSC s running rate. The Solaris timer callback service also does not use a periodic interrupt. Instead, it maintains a one-shot interrupt INFORMATION GUIDE /18

19 set to wake the system up in time for the next scheduled callback. This interrupt is rescheduled as timer callbacks fire, are added, or are removed. These characteristics of Solaris are similar to Linux with the clocksource and NO_HZ features and are a good match for running in a virtual machine. Solaris may exhibit two minor problems when running in a virtual machine. First, when running on multiple processors, Solaris attempts to resynchronize the TSCs at boot time by measuring how far out of sync they are, computing a TSC offset for each processor, and applying that offset in software as a correction to each subsequent reading of the corresponding TSC. Unfortunately, while a virtual machine is booting, all virtual processors are not necessarily simultaneously scheduled on physical processors when Solaris takes its measurement, causing Solaris to measure the TSCs as being slightly out of sync and compute an unwanted offset. This sort of problem is not unique to Solaris, but other operating systems that attempt to resynchronize the TSCs do so in hardware, by writing to the TSCs, which gives the virtual machine the opportunity to detect the problem and apply a heuristic to correct it. This issue was fixed in Solaris 10 Update 8. A second small issue is that Solaris can occasionally find the CMOS TOD clock to be too far off from the value it expects to see and conclude that the CMOS clock is not working properly. This results in a harmless warning message printed to the Solaris console log. Synchronizing Virtual Machines and Hosts with Real Time As discussed in Initializing and Correcting Wall-Clock Time on page 6, for long-term accuracy, both physical and virtual machines generally must run software that periodically resynchronizes the wall clock time maintained by the operating system to an external clock. There are two main options available for guest operating system clock synchronization: VMware Tools periodic clock synchronization or the native synchronization software that you would use with the guest operating system if you were running it directly on physical hardware. Some examples of native synchronization software are Microsoft W32Time for Windows and NTP for Linux. Each option has some advantages and disadvantages. We discuss each briefly here and then add details in subsequent sections. VMware Tools periodic clock synchronization has the advantage that it detects the virtual machine s built-in catch-up and interacts properly with it. If the guest operating system clock is in error only by the known backlog that the built-in catch-up is in the process of correcting, VMware Tools takes no action. Otherwise, if VMware Tools must correct the guest clock, it instructs the virtual machine to set its backlog to zero, causing it to stop trying to catch up. An additional advantage of VMware Tools clock synchronization is that it does not require networking to be set up in the guest. Newer versions of VMware Tools periodic clock synchronization correct a guest clock that is ahead of real time by causing it to run more slowly than normal until real time catches up with it. In ESX 5.0 the Linux and Windows versions of VMware Tools periodic clock synchronization have been improved to be more sophisticated in how they speed up and slow down the time, so that they should approach NTP in accuracy. Older versions of VMware Tools periodic clock synchronization have some disadvantages, however. Some versions use less sophisticated algorithms than most native clock synchronization software and might track real time less precisely. Moreover, in VMware Workstation 6.5 and earlier and VMware ESX/ESXi 4.0 and earlier, VMware Tools periodic clock synchronization has a serious limitation: it cannot correct the guest clock if it gets ahead of real time except in the case of NetWare guest operating systems. Note that all versions of VMware Tools make one-shot corrections of the virtual machine clock in certain cases (see the next section for details), independently of whether the periodic synchronization feature is on or off. The corrections in two of those cases do set the clock backward if needed: when the VMware Tools daemon starts (normally while the guest operating system is booting), and when a user toggles the periodic clock synchronization feature from off to on. Native synchronization software has the advantage that it is generally INFORMATION GUIDE /19

20 prepared to deal with the virtual machine clock being either ahead of or behind real time. It has the disadvantage that it does not detect the virtual machine s built-in catch-up and therefore typically does not synchronize time as well in a virtual machine as it does when run directly on physical hardware. One specific problem occurs if native synchronization software happens to set the guest operating system clock forward to the correct time while the virtual machine has an interrupt backlog that it is in the process of catching up. Setting the guest operating system clock ahead is a purely software event that the virtual machine cannot detect, so it also does not detect that it should stop the catch-up process. As a result, the guest operating system clock continues to run fast until catch-up is complete, and it ends up ahead of the correct time. Fortunately, such events are infrequent, and the native synchronization software generally detects and corrects the error the next time it runs. Another specific problem is that native synchronization software might employ control algorithms that are tuned for the typical rate variation of physical hardware timer devices. Virtual timer devices have a more widely variable rate, which can make it difficult for the synchronization software to lock onto the proper correction factor to make the guest operating system clock run at precisely the rate of real time. As a result, the guest operating system clock tends to oscillate around the correct time to some degree. The native software might even determine that the timer device is broken and give up on correcting the clock. Despite these potential problems, however, testing has shown that NTP in particular behaves fairly well in a virtual machine when appropriately configured (see Using NTP in Linux and Other Guests on page 23). NTP is prepared for some of its readings to be anomalous because of network delays, scheduling delays on the local host and other factors and is effective at filtering out such readings. Generally, it is best to use only one clock synchronization service at a time in a given virtual machine to ensure that multiple services do not attempt to make conflicting changes to the clock. So if you are using native synchronization software, we suggest turning VMware Tools periodic clock synchronization off. Using VMware Tools Clock Synchronization VMware Tools includes an optional clock synchronization feature that can check the guest operating system clock against the host operating system clock at regular intervals and correct the guest operating system clock. VMware Tools periodic clock synchronization works in concert with the built-in catch-up feature in VMware virtual machines and avoids turning the clock ahead too far. VMware Tools also performs one-time corrections of the guest operating system clock after certain events, even if periodic synchronization is turned off. Enabling Periodic Synchronization To enable VMware Tools periodic clock synchronization in a guest, first install VMware Tools in the guest operating system. You can then turn on periodic synchronization from the graphical VMware Tools control panel within the guest operating system. Alternatively, you can set the.vmx configuration file option tools.synctime = true to turn on periodic synchronization. Synchronization in a Linux guest works even if you are not running the VMware Toolbox application. All that is necessary is that the VMware vmware-guestd, vmtoolsd.exe or guest process is running in the guest operating system and that tools.synctime is set to TRUE. Starting with ESX 4.1 this can also be verified by using the command vmware-toolbox-cmd timesync status on Linux or the command VMwareToolboxCmd.exe timesync status on Windows. INFORMATION GUIDE /20

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