Miscellaneous Paper 9 WOMEN S ACCESS TO LEGAL ADVICE AND REPRESENTATION. A consultation paper

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "Miscellaneous Paper 9 WOMEN S ACCESS TO LEGAL ADVICE AND REPRESENTATION. A consultation paper"

Transcription

1 Miscellaneous Paper 9 WOMEN S ACCESS TO LEGAL ADVICE AND REPRESENTATION A consultation paper

2 The Law Commission The Law Commission is an independent advisory body, established by statute and funded by the taxpayer. Its main function is to undertake the systematic review, reform and development of the law of New Zealand. Its purpose is to help achieve law that is just, principled and accessible, and that reflects the heritage and aspirations of the peoples of New Zealand. The Law Commission s processes are essentially public, and are subject to the Official Information Act Thus copies of comments and submissions will normally be made available on request, and the Commission may mention them in its reports. Any request for the withholding of information on the grounds of confidentiality or for any other reason will be determined in accordance with the Official Information Act. Any personal information supplied in submissions will be used only for the purposes of the project on Women s Access to Justice and nothing the Commission publishes in respect of the project will identify any individual in any way. ISSN ISBN Law Commission Miscellaneous Paper 9 April 1997, Wellington, New Zealand

3 CONTENTS Page SOME WOMEN S EXPERIENCES...1 PART 1 INTRODUCTION...2 PART 2 WHAT WOMEN HAVE TOLD THE COMMISSION...5 Difficulties finding legal advice and representation...5 Fear of the cost of lawyers...5 Lack of information about the law...6 A lack of information about available legal advice and representation...6 Choosing an appropriate legal service provider...7 Distrust of lawyers and the law...7 Shortage of women lawyers...9 Shortage of Maori lawyers...9 Shortage of lawyers from Pacific Islands and other cultures...10 Shortage of non-english speaking lawyers...10 Physical access to legal services...11 Working with the legal service provider...13 PART 3 WHO IS PROVIDING LEGAL ADVICE AND REPRESENTATION?...16 Lawyers in private practice...17 Profile of lawyers...17 Membership of Law Societies...18 Training and registration...18 Regulation of lawyers...18 Advertising of services...18 Charges for services...19 Community law centres...19 Location of community law centres...20 Functions of community law centres...20 Staffing of community law centres...21 Funding of community law centres...21 Advertising of services...21 When and how legal services are provided...21 Cost of services to the public...22 Regulation of community law centres...22

4 Citizens Advice Bureaux...23 Location of Citizens Advice Bureaux (CAB)...23 The service provided by CAB...23 Marketing...23 Cost to members of the public...24 Funding...24 Other advice providers...24 PART 4 CREATING CLIENT CHOICE...24 Information about providers of legal advice and representation...24 Community initiatives...25 New Zealand Law Society initiatives...26 District Law Societies initiatives...27 Lawyers advertising...29 A greater diversity of lawyers...30 Physical access to lawyers offices...32 Providing alternative legal advice and representation services...33 Telephone/facsimile/TTY legal advice...33 More community law centres...34 A greater diversity of legal advisers community workers...39 PART 5 IMPROVING COMMUNICATION...42 Communication skills...42 Cultural training...44 Gender training...44 CONCLUSION...44 BIBLIOGRAPHY...45

5 WOMEN S ACCESS TO JUSTICE: HE PUTANGA MO NGA WAHINE KI TE TIKA The scope of this project has been determined after extensive consultation with New Zealand women. At meetings and hui all around the country and in written and telephoned submissions, thousands of women have described to the Commission their experiences with the law and identified the ways in which their expectations or needs have and have not been met. It has been made clear that for a great many New Zealand women access to justice means ready access to quality legal services and procedures. That quality is measured to a significant extent by the responsiveness of legal services to clients social and economic situations and cultural backgrounds. The project team is focusing on four major areas in its report to the Minister of Justice which is due at the end of These areas are: access to legal information, the cost of legal services, access to legal representation and advice, and the education of lawyers. Three consultation papers have already been produced: Information About Lawyers Fees (NZLC MP3), Women s Access to Legal Information (NZLC MP4) and Women s Access to Civil Legal Aid (NZLC MP8). Research is now underway on several topics within the remaining areas and further consultation papers will be made available in the first half of These will include a paper presenting the findings of the consultation process with Maori women, and papers on Lawyers Costs in Family Law Disputes and Lawyers Education. This paper has been prepared by the project team for the purposes of consultation. The paper does not contain Law Commission policy nor does it necessarily reflect the views of the Law Commission. The Commissioner responsible for this project is Joanne Morris. Please contact Michelle Vaughan if you would like further information about the project Freephone , or write to Freepost 56452, Law Commission, PO Box 2590, Wellington.

6

7 SOME WOMEN S EXPERIENCES How do we choose a lawyer who will represent us well? We just don t know who is the right lawyer for us. I rang a lawyer for help and the secretary said she would get him to ring me. He didn t even bother to contact me. Transcript of hui held with Maori women in Rohe 2 I think that if there are a lot more Pacific Island lawyers out there perhaps I would feel more comfortable. The difference is between telling secrets to a stranger and telling your secrets to somebody that you might feel comfortable with and I know that I would feel more comfortable with one of my own people/culture. Report on Consultation with Pacific Island Women 11 The women felt that although lawyers may feel they are explaining things often the language is such that the women do not understand what is being said. This means they fail in some cases to be in a position to predict what the long term results of a decision will be. Sometimes they have agreed to arrangements without understanding what is inherent in that decision eg, guardianship rights. Sometimes lawyers assume a basic understanding of the law on the part of their client that just is not there. One woman said that after she had asked a question once and not understood the reply she felt too dumb to ask again. Submission 29 In some situations there has been a lack of recognition of the emotions women tend to express more openly than men and often feel more strongly. This is usually ridiculed, ignored or played down. Often this emotion is directly related to the stress the woman is feeling. This approach is unsatisfactory. There is also a lack of recognition given to the lack of confidence women feel when involved in a legal dispute and particularly when coming out of a failed relationship. Submission 58 A very upsetting process in marriage break-up is the often condescending attitude of the young lawyer often a woman who is appointed to cases through legal aid. Many women feel they are treated as simpletons and their comments and requests are often ignored. A common reply to women who related the behaviour of the male partner is often He is such a nice man, he wouldn t do that and the lawyer often becomes one more hurdle for the woman to deal with. While it is understood that there must be communication between lawyers of both parties many women feel a decision is often reached in the back room and the woman has no input into the outcome. Often the feeling is it is for the expediency of the lawyers concerned and not for the good of the family. Submission 257

8 2 PART 1 INTRODUCTION Barriers to ready access to justice can come in many forms. They include cost, cultural barriers, language difficulties, time delays, non-availability of information, and incomplete understanding between those providing legal services and their clients. If these barriers to access to the law and to resolution of disputes are not minimised, the overall framework of justice will come into disrepute, and so pose a significant threat to social cohesion. 1 1 The Commission s consultations on the subject of Women s Access to Justice attracted a large number of women whose experiences with the legal system led them to believe they had been unfairly treated by the law or its processes and agents. The great majority of the women who attended more than 100 hui and meetings held throughout New Zealand or made written and telephoned submissions to the Commission spoke about barriers they had experienced obtaining legal services appropriate to their needs. 2 This paper examines the barriers women experience when trying to obtain legal advice and representation. It focuses particularly on the lack of choice of legal services and shortcomings in the communication skills of those providing legal advice and representation, usually lawyers. 2 The criticisms voiced by women about their access to user-friendly legal services may seem to be at odds with the recently released New Zealand Law Society Poll of the Public. 3 That poll, conducted by telephone with a representative sample of 500 randomly selected members of the public, 250 women and 250 men, found that most had a very positive perception of the lawyers whose services they had engaged. In particular: 93% of the public agreed that their own lawyer was professional, 90% found their lawyer to be reliable, 84% said their lawyer understood their situation, 79% agreed that their lawyer explained things well and 89% agreed that their lawyer was competent in the job that they did (14 15). 3 The Poll of the Public reveals that the three most common matters for members of the public to consult lawyers about are property transactions, making a will and borrowing money/arranging finance (20). It also shows that only 4% of adult New Zealanders had ever consulted a lawyer in relation to family violence, 16% in matrimonial matters, 10% in custody and access matters, 4% as witnesses in criminal matters and 3% as defendants in criminal matters (20). The Poll of the Public, with 21% of its sample with a household income of less than $20 000, found that one third (32%) of New Zealanders mentioned that there had been a time when they could have used a lawyer s help but did not seek it (61). Cost was the major factor for those who chose not to use a lawyer, with 56% saying they did not consult a lawyer because of the cost (62). Cost was also more of an issue for women, with 66% of the women who chose not to consult a lawyer mentioning cost as a reason for not getting help, compared to 49% of men (62). 4 While the New Zealand Law Society Poll of the Public interviewed a representative sample of the New Zealand population, the far greater number of women who spoke to the Ministry of Justice Briefing Paper for the Minister of Justice (October 1996) 14. At the time this paper was published the Commission had received approximately 500 written and telephoned submissions in response to its call for submissions. Approximately 300 submissions were received from individual women and community groups and 200 from individual lawyers. Further comments were received from 60 Pacific Islands women in a Report on Consultation with Pacific Island Women prepared for the Commission by Ida Malosi and Sandra Alofivae and from approximately 100 lesbians in a Report on Consultation with Lesbian Women prepared for the Commission by Strategic Legal Services. The Commission has also received further submissions on the consultation papers Information About Lawyers Fees (NZLC MP3), Women s Access to Legal Information (NZLC MP4) and Women s Access to Civil Legal Aid (NZLC MP8). The Law Commission has also held numerous meetings with lawyers in Auckland, Hamilton, Rotorua, Christchurch, Invercargill, Nelson, Wellington and Hastings, at District and New Zealand Law Society level and with members of the judiciary and government officials. Poll of the Public The New Zealand Law Society (MRL Research Group, Wellington, February 1997).

9 3 Commission did so because they had negative experiences of some aspect of the legal system. The great majority of the women told the Commission that resort to the legal system was, for them, a luxury which they would only contemplate in a crisis. As a result, the matters for which most had sought legal assistance arose from a family breakdown, when protection from family violence, the resolution of a custody and access dispute and/or a division of matrimonial or de facto property was required. Less commonly, women who spoke to the Commission had been involved with the legal system as a witness to or a defendant in criminal matters. 5 The over-representation in the Commission s consultation of women who had resorted to the legal system only in connection with family and criminal matters is consistent with the findings of a recent Canadian study: Many of the [legal] problems [women experience] have to do with their current or past relationships. Single-parent mothers, and some women who still live with their husbands, need legal assistance for family law matters such as separation or divorce, division of matrimonial property, child custody and access and support payments.... Women also need assistance as victims of crimes of violence The Canadian study also found that low income people, a group in which women are over-represented in New Zealand, 5 have a great but unmet need for civil law services. A major cause of this need is that many low income people are so badly informed that they do not know or believe they have any rights. 6 The Commission s consultations suggest that this problem also exists in New Zealand. While women described barriers to obtaining legal services in connection with particular types of matters that they could not avoid becoming involved in, family breakdown and criminal matters, the barriers described may also apply across a much broader range of legal matters where people are currently unaware that they have legal rights to protect and enforce. 7 A working definition of legal advice for the purpose of this paper is: law related information provided to a person that explains how the law and legal processes apply to that person s particular situation. Legal representation for the purposes of this paper means: advice to and advocacy on behalf of another person in a proceeding before a court or tribunal in which the person is a party. 8 Clearly both women and men experience barriers to obtaining legal advice and representation and for some of the same reasons. Yet women experience particular problems because of the effects of gender. The Australian Law Reform Commission defined gender as: A social construction [which] arises from the commonly held values, beliefs and perspectives of an identifiable group of people. It develops over time and becomes part of the culture of the group. Gender describes more than biological differences between men and women. It Legal Aid and the Poor A report by the National Council of Welfare (Canadian Government, Winter 1995) 12. Legal Aid and the Poor A report by the National Council of Welfare, 10. At the time of the 1991 Census half of the women in New Zealand earned less than $ (1996 $12 405) compared with men earning $ (1996 $21 167) (All About Women in New Zealand (Statistics New Zealand, Wellington, 1993), 109). The results form the 1996 are not yet available. Statistics New Zealand advises that from 1991 until the end of 1995, the Consumer Price Index moved upwards by 10.4%. However, income levels did not move upwards to that extent. A rough indication of the current value of the 1991 income dollar figures can be achieved by multiplying the 1991 figures by 10% as has been done for the bracketed figures. Legal Aid and the Poor A report by the National Council of Welfare, 15. The Poll of the Public acknowledges that it does not take into account the fact that there may be New Zealanders who had been in a situation where a lawyer could have helped but were not aware that this was the case (58).

10 4 includes the ways in which those differences, whether real or perceived, have been valued, used and relied upon to classify women and men and to assign roles and expectations to them. The significance of this is that the lives and experiences of women and men, including their experience of the legal system, occur within complex sets of differing social and cultural expectations. 7 9 Although the effects of gender unite to some degree the experiences of women as a group as they seek to obtain legal advice and representation services, their experiences can vary widely. Other social forces such as ethnicity, age, sexual orientation and disability all operate in distinct ways to affect access to legal advice and representation services. Throughout its consultation processes, the Commission has taken great care to speak with and listen to the concerns of New Zealand women in all their diversity. The effects of gender and other social forces upon women s search for legal services are clearly illustrated by what women have told the Commission. 10 Part 2 of the paper describes the barriers that women told the Commission prevented their access to legal services. Many of the problems relate to the difficulties women experience finding an appropriate lawyer in a legal system that is alien and often distrusted. Part 3 provides an overview of the main providers of legal advice and representation: lawyers, community law centres, and Citizens Advice Bureaux. Part 4 makes suggestions for improving women s choice of legal services and Part 5 makes suggestions for improving communication between women and their legal advisers. 11 This paper does not discuss in detail the cost of legal advice and representation. The effect of the cost of legal services is discussed in the consultation papers Information About Lawyers Fees and Women s Access to Civil Legal Aid, and in the forthcoming paper Lawyers Costs in Family Law Disputes. 12 This paper also does not directly address issues relating to the training of lawyers, which will be considered in a further paper, Lawyers Education, to be issued during May for comment. This paper is based upon the comments made to the Commission by thousands of New Zealand women users and potential users of legal services. The Commission would be very grateful for responses to those comments and/or answers to all or any of the questions asked in the paper about which you have particular knowledge, interest or views. Alternatively, we would be very grateful for a more general submission based on some of the ideas in this paper. Please return these responses to the Women s Access to Justice : He Putanga mo nga Wahine ki te Tika Project, Freepost 56452, Law Commission, PO Box 2590, Wellington. Alternatively, if you would like to make a submission by telephone, please call Michelle Vaughan toll-free on If you would like to make a submission by , please send it to We would like responses by Friday 6 June 1997, please. If you have problems meeting this deadline, please let us know. 7 Equality Before the Law (ALRC DP ) 1.

11 5 PART 2 WHAT WOMEN HAVE TOLD THE COMMISSION 13 Women have told the Commission in detail about the barriers they encounter obtaining and using legal services. The barriers occur in: finding legal advice and representation; choosing an appropriate legal service provider; and working with the legal service provider. 14 This part of the paper examines each stage of that process but it focuses upon women s choice of legal service providers and communication between women clients and those providers. The issues women have identified in finding legal advice and representation, while very important, are very similar to the difficulties they experience finding legal information; these were addressed in the paper Women s Access to Legal Information (NZLC MP4). Difficulties finding legal advice and representation 15 The main reasons identified by women as preventing them from finding legal advice and representation are: fear of the cost of lawyers; lack of information about the law; and lack of information about legal advice and representation. Fear of the cost of lawyers 16 As noted in the consultation paper on Women s Access to Civil Legal Aid (NZLC MP8) women, who are over-represented in part-time paid work and in occupations with low median incomes (eg clerical and service occupations), experience great difficulty affording legal services. Time and time again women described legal services as a luxury which would be foregone except in the most difficult situations of vital importance to them. The cost puts people off they think what s the use of going. Meeting with visually impaired women, Rotorua, 1996 [Cost] is a major problem boy oh boy is this the real problem. I won t go and see any lawyer because of the cost. Transcript of hui held with Maori women in Rohe 3 Lawyers cost, what, $150 per hour? Even if I can find a job that pays $15 an hour it would take me ten hours to earn what I pay for one hour from a lawyer. That s ridiculous. Report on Consultation with Lesbian Women If you are on a benefit you have to think twice before you get a lawyer. Meeting with visually impaired women, Rotorua, 1996

12 6 Lack of information about the law 17 One of the strongest messages to emerge from the Commission s consultations with women is the lack of available and accessible information about the law. At meetings throughout New Zealand the Commission was told that women were very often unsure whether they had a legal problem and/or what type of legal problem it was. I don t know anyone who knows about the law or where to go. Transcript of hui held with Maori women in Rohe 4 I didn t know where to get information to help me decide what to do with my daughter so I was forced to go and see a lawyer. I now know I could have gone to Social Welfare or CAB [Citizens Advice Bureaux] to get the info I needed to make a decision. I learned the expensive way. Report on Consultation with Pacific Island Women 23 Women will not contact recognised places to clarify issues because they do not know what kind of questions to ask to elicit the right reply. Submission 29 A lack of information about available legal advice and representation A lot of the women we see don t know how to get lawyers to help them. Transcript of hui held with Maori women in Rohe 3 I didn t know how to ring the Court or a lawyer because I couldn t find it in the phone book. For Doctors and Hospitals you look in the front. Report on Consultation with Pacific Island Women 4 18 The Commission was also told that a common problem for women is not knowing how to find out where to obtain legal advice. While women are aware that lawyers provide legal advice, many had dismissed the idea of going to a lawyer in private practice because of the cost. For those women it was vitally important to know of the availability of other legal service providers. Yet in many parts of New Zealand lawyers in private practice are the only legal service providers. Even in areas where there are alternative services in the form of community law centres, knowledge of them is not widespread, especially amongst some groups of women. For example, visually impaired women in Wellington were unaware of the Wellington South Community Law Centre, hearing impaired women at a meeting in Palmerston North were unaware of the local Citizens Advice Bureau s free legal advice evening, and disabled women in Invercargill were not aware of the existence of the Southland Community Law Centre. 19 Some women who know of the existence of local Citizens Advice Bureaux and community law centres have reasons for not using their services, including the public nature of the act of approaching the agencies (especially for women attempting to leave violent relationships) and the distance required to travel to them.

13 7 In 1989 our relationship had deteriorated to such an extent that I urgently needed legal advice to protect myself and my assets... There was a major difficulty a small community where we were well known, and I wanted advice I could make decisions on, not inadvertently triggering a reaction that could impact on my life and well-being, nor that of our family. [X] the nearest city, was 100kms away and I needed another reason to be able to go there so my purpose was not revealed. I rang first the CAB who referred me to the Courthouse and from there I was given the names of five women solicitors who I could contact.... Finally I had a name, an appointment and with a family member in hospital a reason to visit [the city]. Submission Women often said they had to be very discreet when seeking legal advice for fear of reprisals should word get back to their partners. I found my lawyer through the yellow pages. As I sought legal advice before my exhusband and I separated I did not want to ask too many people that I knew about who they could suggest for me to talk to, so I found it easier to look in the phone book and be as discreet as I could be. Submission 47 Choosing an appropriate legal service provider 21 If information is obtained about providers of legal advice and representation, the next stage of the process for prospective clients is to choose a legal service provider. From the comments made by New Zealand women it seems that several factors operate to constrain that choice. The factors include: the intensely personal nature of family law related matters; many women s lack of confidence in both the legal system and in their own abilities to manage the processes and interactions which the legal system entails; a desire to be assisted by someone from the same culture; and a fear of discrimination due to sexual orientation. Many women told the Commission that if they could, they would choose to obtain legal services from someone who was similar to themselves in some important respect, such as their culture, sex or sexuality, and that having that choice would allay many of their fears about negotiating the alien terrain of the legal system. Distrust of lawyers and the law There was strong agreement that women lack confidence in the legal system itself. Submission From its consultations the Commission learned that for a disturbingly large number of women fear of lawyers and the law is a barrier to seeking legal advice and representation. This was especially so for women who were least likely to identify with the Pakeha male tradition of the

14 8 legal profession. Many women commented that they did not personally know any lawyers who they could approach. 23 At each of the 48 hui held with Maori women a distrust of lawyers and the law itself was evident. This will be discussed further in a paper presenting the findings of the consultation process with Maori women. The attitudes of lawyers to Maori women are terrible, to the point where Maori women are discriminated against Transcript of hui held with Maori women in Rohe 2 I feel that the justice system fails, irrespective of whether you are Maori or non- Maori Transcript of hui held with Maori women in Rohe 5 24 For some lesbians, fear of disclosing their sexual orientation to their lawyers, due to the uncertainty of knowing whether it was safe to do so, prevented them trusting heterosexual legal advisers. There s so much homophobia from lawyers Report on Consultation with Lesbian Women You know even things like after $7000 and heaps of visits the receptionist still wouldn t say hi to me. Report on Consultation with Lesbian Women You even have to think about whether you will come out it s not just like you re going in for this legal service delivery stuff you ve got this added thing that you re thinking as well. Report on Consultation with Lesbian Women 25 Some refugee and migrant women said that they would not even consider approaching lawyers for help because in their home countries it was not safe to visit lawyers due to the corruption of the legal system. These women were not aware that the New Zealand legal system does not operate in the same way. 26 A theme of the Commission s consultations with Pacific Islands women was that they would shy away from seeking legal assistance because of the shame and humiliation of having to disclose intimate details to a complete stranger. 8 It was disconcerting to learn that many Pacific Islands women s perception of the law is that its main purpose is to punish people by deporting or imprisoning them. 8 Report on Consultation with Pacific Island Women, 11.

15 9 Shortage of women lawyers The way I was feeling at the time I felt I wanted a female lawyer as she would be more supportive of me. Submission At every meeting around New Zealand there were women who told the Commission that they prefer to seek legal advice from a woman lawyer whenever personal matters are central to their legal problems. However, many women who expressed that preference had been unable to engage a woman lawyer for such matters, either because of the shortage of women lawyers in their area or a lack of information about how to contact a woman lawyer. Shortage of Maori lawyers It s horrible to say, but it is terrible communicating with Pakeha. The power goes to their heads and leaves their heart. The culture of Pakeha is not sensitive to our cultural ways. If someone would just try to understand our ways. Transcript of hui held with Maori women in Rohe 3 28 At each of the 48 meetings held with Maori women there was a call for more Maori and, in particular, Maori women, lawyers. Only a Maori can understand what Maori go through. We need to connect with another Maori woman, this is really important for us. Transcript of hui held with Maori women in Rohe 2 We need more Maori women lawyers... Someone who can understand where we come from as Maori. Someone who we do not have to explain ourselves to. Transcript of hui held with Maori women in Rohe 1 We have not one Maori male or woman lawyer who we can turn to and who will understand us as Maori first. We badly need more Maori lawyers in our area. Transcript of hui held with Maori women in Rohe 4 29 Maori women also spoke of the difficulty dealing with lawyers who were unable to meet their cultural needs. They are not even trained to look after Maori clients. Transcript of hui held with Maori women in Rohe 5

16 10 We need [Maori lawyers] because of the cultural barriers that exist between us and the Pakeha lawyers in town. If we had more Maori lawyers it would be much easier for us women to approach them because they know of our culture. So it would be much easier for us to speak more comfortably if we had Maori lawyers... Our elders find it more comfortable talking to a person who is Maori. Transcript of hui held with Maori women in Rohe 7 Shortage of lawyers from Pacific Islands and other cultures 30 In the Commission s consultations with Pacific Islands women, many spoke of their frustration and sadness at not being able to find a lawyer who could understand their cultural needs. [A]nd for me to talk about the personal things that have happened in my life was really hard. PI women don t talk openly like that to Palagi people. We are too shame. Report on Consultation with Pacific Island Women 11 I was too ashamed to ask the lawyer to explain things. I was worried that the lawyer would think that I was just a dumb Samoan. Report on Consultation with Pacific Island Women 4 And I think that if there [were] a lot more PI lawyers out there perhaps I would feel more comfortable. Report on Consultation with Pacific Island Women 18. When I wanted to go to Court about my kids I wanted to find me a Tongan lawyer but I didn t know where to [go]. Report on Consultation with Pacific Island Women 7 31 As well as preferring a lawyer of the same culture, again women lawyers were preferred by many Pacific Islands women. It would be a Pacific Island woman that I would feel more comfortable with. Some things you can t talk to a man about not even your husband. Report on Consultation with Pacific Island Women 10 Shortage of non-english speaking lawyers 32 Women from minority linguistic backgrounds spoke of their acute difficulties seeking legal advice and of their need for interpreters. The women said that it is often incorrectly assumed by lawyers that a family member can and should interpret but, especially when the matter is personal, this can be highly inappropriate.

17 11 33 Deaf women have told the Commission about their need for interpreters and lawyers who can use New Zealand sign language. 9 Again the women said they have been forced to rely on family members to interpret in cases where that was not appropriate. What lawyers are available for deaf people? The lawyer had no sympathy or empathy for this woman. I told the lawyer that I was not an interpreter and this was ignored. Who helps this person? No-one was available to interpret for her. No-one is available to interpret to our people who are deaf. Transcript of hui held with Maori women in Rohe 12 Physical access to legal services 34 Physically getting to services constrains the choice of many women who need legal services, especially for women who live in remote areas, are not able-bodied, or are responsible for children. A lot of women are isolated because they have no vehicle, phone or transport. Transcript of hui held with Maori women in Rohe 1 There are no resident lawyers on the [Chatham] [I]slands nor is there any access to a law centre to obtain advice and information. Submission Rural women invariably spoke of difficulties obtaining legal advice. Women living in some of the smaller settlements have had to travel well away from their local areas to obtain legal advice. In some cases rural women have had to travel to receive legal advice because their male partners business connections in the area meant that local lawyers were unwilling to act on their behalf. This situation was not confined to smaller centres: a number of women living in cities told the Commission that their partners business connections meant local lawyers were not willing to act for them. 36 For women living in the suburbs of larger cities geography also poses problems. Legal offices are generally situated in the central city area or in more affluent suburbs. Travel costs may create difficulties and further constrain choice, especially if there is limited public transport available. Nine times out of ten people just can t afford the fares to travel. It s too expensive. When you weigh the fare up against the kids bread on the table there is no choice. Transcript of hui held with Maori women in Rohe 1 9 Meeting with Deaf women, Palmerston North, 1996.

18 12 37 Women in prison also described their problems accessing legal advice and representation. Access to a lawyer in prison is difficult. I am in the maximum security wing which means I am unable to use the telephone myself to contact my lawyer. I must rely on staff to do this and often by the time they are able to do this my lawyer is already in court for the day. My lawyer is reluctant to come out to the prison and will only talk to me on the telephone about any problems I may have. Submission Women who provide care for others consistently described to the Commission the difficulties they must overcome in order to attend legal offices and the courts. Women as caregivers are often tied by the needs of those in their care as well as by their budgets to their home and more immediate environment. The prospect of attending a lawyer s office which is not equipped to provide care for children is a powerful deterrent, especially as the children may then hear what is going on. But even if there is childcare provided in lawyers offices, women said that the difficulty and expense involved in bringing children to any appointment, or series of appointments, could make attendance impossible. Women who were unable to arrange alternative care for children or other dependents told the Commission that they could not pursue legal advice and representation. 39 In many of the submissions received from lawyers it was made clear that there are often not adequate facilities for children in law offices and that home visits are not made as a matter of common practice.... the only time that he could find to give appointments was at 7.30am in the morning and [I] had a pre-schooler and 2 school age children. Now you can imagine to get to a lawyer s office by 7.30am you ve got to get the children up an hour early get them all dressed and washed you ve got to either take the toddler to a friend or bring a friend. I had to call on a friend to mind the children and then someone else to get them off to school. Submission 65 A city lawyer was confident a particular woman client could have made a successful claim which would have been very worthwhile financially. However, the woman abandoned the claim when she was made aware of the number of times she would likely have to travel into the city from the outer suburbs to attend appointments with the lawyer and others: it was impossible for her to obtain childcare during the times she would need to be away from home. Submission 8

19 13 Working with the legal service provider 40 The focus of this section is on the problems women have working with their lawyers. The customer service issues which women have identified as deterring them from proceeding with their legal matters are related to a failure of communication in the broadest sense. That failure seems to stem from many lawyers lack of awareness of the general impact of women s socio-economic position upon individual women s interactions with the legal system and lawyers. This lack of awareness then affects all aspects of the communications between lawyers and women clients leading, for example, to assumptions being made by lawyers about women s familiarity with legal matters, about the way in which women should express themselves, and about the priority to be accorded to women s concerns. It is notable that most women spoke of their experiences with lawyers in private practice. The women who had used community law centre services were generally not critical of the skills of law centre staff. 41 An all too common example of lawyers lack of awareness of women s lives was of lawyers failing to respond appropriately to women who were seeking protection from violent partners. Some women reported being told by their lawyers that they were vengeful in their efforts to protect themselves and their children from abusive partners. [L]awyers have some idea that we make up tales of abuse for revenge, anyone who thinks that has never been a single parent, if you thought your kids would be safe you d be more than happy to let their dad have access just to get a break, some time alone. Submission 267 After being told I was over-emotional not trying to understand my husband s needs, not thinking that the children might want to be with their (violent) father, did not need a non-molestation order, was not necessary to get an interim custody order (even after the children had to be put in a safe house as they were all on his current passport) and he had tried to lift them twice all I needed was counselling!! I became very angry and very desperate. I could not change lawyers even though I was quite frightened and intimidated by him. He was and still is a very well respected and liked lawyer I believe. Submission Women also told how their descriptions of their lives have been disbelieved or ignored by their lawyers. One woman told her lawyer that her partner kept a knife under the bed yet was not asked whether her husband was violent towards her (Submission 388). I had no help from anyone. I didn t know who was a good lawyer or anything. I said I want a non-molestation from yesterday, I want a non-molestation order urgently. The lawyer didn t do that, she didn t listen to me. She put it through the normal channels and I didn t get my order in the end. Transcript of hui held with Maori women in Rohe It was common too for women to say that they felt forced by their lawyers to behave in a particular way that was at odds with their nature or situation.

20 14 If you re assertive you are deemed to be too controlling or aggressive. We are expected not to complain. If you get stressed they often believe you can t control yourself and they use that against you in your case. Submission 267 In my experience women seem to be penalised by the current legal system on two counts. On one hand for any display of emotion and on the other because there is no legal channel for so-called emotional issues. I am warned that an emotional outburst in the presence of a judge could cost me my case. Because one speaks with tears in one s eyes, anger in one s voice and pain in one s words does this mean that what is being spoken is invalid? There are male lawyers who do not appear to be able to hear what is being said by a woman client unless she manages to be cool and rational. They seem to switch off and ignore what she is saying because of the way she is saying it. Therefore she feels herself failed by the very person who is there to be her advocate. He might well box on regardless and achieve a satisfactory end solution. How this is achieved is an academic issue for him. For his female client it is possibly a moral one and not unrelated to her personal integrity which includes honouring her emotional equilibrium. Submission While many women said that they resented having their emotions treated as irrelevant and quite separate from their often intensely personal problems, lawyers have indicated that dealing with clients emotions is not their responsibility and that emotions are quite irrelevant to legal matters. [Women] expect you to be in a role of a counsellor as well as legal adviser. They will not keep to relevant details for the ex-parte applications and therefore you use too much time in the consultations. Submission 200 (lawyer) Sometimes [women] clients require more empathy and compassion than budgetary restraints allow. I am there as a lawyer and it is a waste of resources to be used as a counsellor/shoulder to cry on. Submission 84 (lawyer) Women clients often want a friend/counsellor rather than a lawyer hard sometimes to keep them on track.... while you might empathise there are other professionals/avenues for counselling. Submission 95 (lawyer) [As a woman lawyer] I am expected to have more empathy, more compassion and to charge less. Submission 310 (lawyer). 45 Despite lawyers attitude that clients emotions are not their business, lawyers submissions indicate that referrals to relevant support services are not common practice. Women at many of the meetings said that they did not expect lawyers to be social workers but that they would benefit from lawyers referring them to appropriate services. 46 Many women also told the Commission that when they finally found a lawyer, they could not understand the information they were given. For some, the experience was so distressing they did not return.

DOMESTIC VIOLENCE. Do the right thing see your lawyer first

DOMESTIC VIOLENCE. Do the right thing see your lawyer first DOMESTIC VIOLENCE Do the right thing see your lawyer first Contents 1. What is domestic violence? 2. What protection does the law offer? 3. Who can apply for protection? 4. What is a protection order?

More information

gives employees (1) basic information about bullying and harassment points you to sources of further information and advice. (2)

gives employees (1) basic information about bullying and harassment points you to sources of further information and advice. (2) Bullying And Harassment At Work Guidance For Employees Everyone should be treated with dignity and respect at work. Bullying and harassment of any kind are in no-one s interest and should not be tolerated

More information

REPORTING AN OFFENCE TO THE POLICE: A GUIDE TO CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS

REPORTING AN OFFENCE TO THE POLICE: A GUIDE TO CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS REPORTING AN OFFENCE TO THE POLICE: A GUIDE TO CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS If you are experiencing or have experienced domestic volence and/or sexual violence there are a number of ways the law can protect

More information

Miscellaneous Paper 10. Women s Access to Justice: He Putanga Mo Nga Wahine ki te Tika LAWYERS COSTS IN FAMILY LAW DISPUTES. A consultation paper

Miscellaneous Paper 10. Women s Access to Justice: He Putanga Mo Nga Wahine ki te Tika LAWYERS COSTS IN FAMILY LAW DISPUTES. A consultation paper Miscellaneous Paper 10 Women s Access to Justice: He Putanga Mo Nga Wahine ki te Tika LAWYERS COSTS IN FAMILY LAW DISPUTES A consultation paper The Law Commission The Law Commission is an independent advisory

More information

Journeys through the Criminal Justice System for Suspects, Accused and Offenders with Learning Disabilities. A Graphic Representation

Journeys through the Criminal Justice System for Suspects, Accused and Offenders with Learning Disabilities. A Graphic Representation Journeys through the Criminal Justice System for Suspects, Accused and Offenders with Learning Disabilities A Graphic Representation 0 Contents Introduction page 2 Methodology page 4 Stage One Getting

More information

FAMILY COURT PRACTICE NOTE LAWYER FOR THE CHILD: SELECTION, APPOINTMENT AND OTHER MATTERS

FAMILY COURT PRACTICE NOTE LAWYER FOR THE CHILD: SELECTION, APPOINTMENT AND OTHER MATTERS PRINCIPAL FAMILY COURT JUDGE S CHAMBERS FAMILY COURT PRACTICE NOTE LAWYER FOR THE CHILD: SELECTION, APPOINTMENT AND OTHER MATTERS 1 BACKGROUND 1.1 The terms of this Practice Note have been settled in consultation

More information

This submission on the review of the Family Court reflects the views of the National Collective of Independent Women s Refuges.

This submission on the review of the Family Court reflects the views of the National Collective of Independent Women s Refuges. Family Court Review This submission on the review of the Family Court reflects the views of the National Collective of Independent Women s Refuges. The National Collective of Independent Women s Refuges

More information

POWERS OF ATTORNEY. Do the right thing see your lawyer first

POWERS OF ATTORNEY. Do the right thing see your lawyer first POWERS OF ATTORNEY Do the right thing see your lawyer first Contents 1. Powers of attorney 2. What is a general power of attorney? 3. What is an enduring power of attorney (EPA)? 4. A property EPA 5. A

More information

FROM CHARGE TO TRIAL: A GUIDE TO CRIMINAL PROCEEDINGS

FROM CHARGE TO TRIAL: A GUIDE TO CRIMINAL PROCEEDINGS FROM CHARGE TO TRIAL: A GUIDE TO CRIMINAL PROCEEDINGS If you are experiencing, or have experienced, domestic violence and/or sexual violence there are a number of ways the law can protect you. This includes

More information

The Victims Code: Young victims of crime: Understanding the support you should get

The Victims Code: Young victims of crime: Understanding the support you should get The Victims Code: Young victims of crime: Understanding the support you should get If you re a victim of crime, support and information is available to help you get through it. The Victims Code is a Government

More information

PRACTICE NOTE: LAWYER FOR THE CHILD: CODE OF CONDUCT

PRACTICE NOTE: LAWYER FOR THE CHILD: CODE OF CONDUCT PRACTICE NOTE: LAWYER FOR THE CHILD: CODE OF CONDUCT 1 INTRODUCTION AND COMMENCEMENT 1.1 This Code of Conduct for lawyers appointed to act for children in Family Court proceedings replaces the previous

More information

Toolkit for Immigrant Women Working with a Lawyer

Toolkit for Immigrant Women Working with a Lawyer Toolkit Working with a Lawyer NOVEMBER 2010 www.bwss.org www.theviolencestopshere.ca Toolkit Working with a Lawyer NOVEMBER - 2010 www.bwss.org www.theviolencestopshere.ca This resource is part of Battered

More information

Research to Practice Series

Research to Practice Series Institute of Child Protection Studies 4 Children with Parents in Prison The Institute of Child Protection Studies links the findings of research undertaken by the Institute of Child Protection Studies,

More information

Parents Rights, Kids Rights

Parents Rights, Kids Rights Family Law in BC Parents Rights, Kids Rights A parent s guide to child protection law in BC British Columbia www.legalaid.bc.ca March 2013 2013 Legal Services Society, British Columbia First edition: 1997

More information

PROTECTING YOUR HEALTH INFORMATION A GUIDE TO PRIVACY ISSUES FOR USERS OF MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES

PROTECTING YOUR HEALTH INFORMATION A GUIDE TO PRIVACY ISSUES FOR USERS OF MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES PROTECTING YOUR HEALTH INFORMATION A GUIDE TO PRIVACY ISSUES FOR USERS OF MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES Prepared for the Mental Health Commission by the Wellington Community Law Centre, September 1999 The Mental

More information

Violence takes many forms. It is unacceptable whenever it happens.

Violence takes many forms. It is unacceptable whenever it happens. FAMILY VIOLENCE Violence takes many forms. It is unacceptable whenever it happens. Violence by a family member who is loved and trusted can be particularly devastating. Family violence happens where the

More information

RUNNING AN EFFECTIVE INTERNAL COMPLAINTS PROCESS

RUNNING AN EFFECTIVE INTERNAL COMPLAINTS PROCESS RUNNING AN EFFECTIVE INTERNAL COMPLAINTS PROCESS INTRODUCTION Rule 3.4(d) of the Lawyers and Conveyancers Act (Lawyers Rules of Conduct and Client Care) Regulations 2008 requires lawyers to provide clients

More information

Bullying. A guide for employers and workers. Bullying A guide for employers and workers 1

Bullying. A guide for employers and workers. Bullying A guide for employers and workers 1 Bullying A guide for employers and workers Bullying A guide for employers and workers 1 Please note This information is for guidance only and is not to be taken as an expression of the law. It should be

More information

Legal Information for Same Sex Couples

Legal Information for Same Sex Couples Community Legal Information Association of Prince Edward Island, Inc. Legal Information for Same Sex Couples People in same sex relationships often have questions about their rights and the rights of their

More information

Sample Process Recording - First Year MSW Student

Sample Process Recording - First Year MSW Student Sample Process Recording - First Year MSW Student Agency: Surgical Floor, City Hospital Client System: Harold Harper, age 68, retired widower Date: November 18, 20xx Presenting Issues: Cardiologist observed

More information

Customer Journey Mapping

Customer Journey Mapping Customer Journey Mapping Definition Why it s important How can the customer benefit? How does the organisation benefit? A practical session to really bring it to life ( help. how do I do customer journey

More information

Your child s lawyer. Court-appointed lawyer for the child in cases deciding on care of children

Your child s lawyer. Court-appointed lawyer for the child in cases deciding on care of children Your child s lawyer Court-appointed lawyer for the child in cases deciding on care of children When disputes about the care of your children are at the Family Court, the court often appoints an independent

More information

Information for registrants. What happens if a concern is raised about me?

Information for registrants. What happens if a concern is raised about me? Information for registrants What happens if a concern is raised about me? Contents About this brochure 1 What is fitness to practise? 1 What can I expect from you? 3 How are fitness to practise concerns

More information

GUIDELINES ISSUED UNDER PART 5A OF THE EDUCATION ACT 1990 FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF HEALTH AND SAFETY RISKS POSED TO SCHOOLS BY A STUDENT S VIOLENT

GUIDELINES ISSUED UNDER PART 5A OF THE EDUCATION ACT 1990 FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF HEALTH AND SAFETY RISKS POSED TO SCHOOLS BY A STUDENT S VIOLENT GUIDELINES ISSUED UNDER PART 5A OF THE EDUCATION ACT 1990 FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF HEALTH AND SAFETY RISKS POSED TO SCHOOLS BY A STUDENT S VIOLENT BEHAVIOUR CONTENTS PAGE PART A INTRODUCTION AND STATEMENT

More information

A Practical Guide to. Hiring a LAWYER

A Practical Guide to. Hiring a LAWYER A Practical Guide to Hiring a LAWYER A PRACTIAL GUIDE TO HIRING A LAWYER I. Introduction 3 II. When do you Need a Lawyer? 3 III. How to Find a Lawyer 4 A. Referrals 4 B. Lawyer Referral Service 5 C. Unauthorized

More information

DIVORCE LAW REFORM A SUMMARY OF THE LAW REFORM AND DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION PROPOSALS. Legal Assistance Centre 2005

DIVORCE LAW REFORM A SUMMARY OF THE LAW REFORM AND DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION PROPOSALS. Legal Assistance Centre 2005 DIVORCE LAW REFORM A SUMMARY OF THE LAW REFORM AND DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION PROPOSALS Legal Assistance Centre 2005 This is a summary of a bill proposed by the Law Reform and Development Commission (LRDC).

More information

Tool for Attorneys Working with Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) Survivors of Domestic Violence

Tool for Attorneys Working with Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) Survivors of Domestic Violence Section of Individual Rights and Responsibilities Commission on Domestic Violence Criminal Justice Section In collaboration with Tool for Attorneys Working with Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender

More information

JEWISH DIVORCE? Why do I need a. Questions & Answers about Divorce for Jewish Women. www.acttoendvaw.org. 4 Color.

JEWISH DIVORCE? Why do I need a. Questions & Answers about Divorce for Jewish Women. www.acttoendvaw.org. 4 Color. Why do I need a JEWISH DIVORCE? Questions & Answers about Divorce for Jewish Women The views expressed in these materials are the views of Act to End Violence Against Women and FLEW and do not necessarily

More information

Child Abuse, Child Neglect. What Parents Should Know If They Are Investigated

Child Abuse, Child Neglect. What Parents Should Know If They Are Investigated Child Abuse, Child Neglect What Parents Should Know If They Are Investigated Written by South Carolina Appleseed Legal Justice Center with editing and assistance from the Children s Law Center and the

More information

A basic guide to the Court of Protection

A basic guide to the Court of Protection 1 A basic guide to the Court of Protection 2 Table of contents Page Who is this guide for? 4 What is the Court of Protection? 4 What can the Court of Protection do? 5 What is the law that applies to the

More information

Is someone you know being abused? Do you know the warning signs?

Is someone you know being abused? Do you know the warning signs? Is someone you know being abused? Do you know the warning signs? Help, Hope & Healing Are you concerned that someone is being abused, but don t know what to do? You may suspect abuse is happening to a

More information

Law Commission Consultation Paper WOMEN'S ACCESS TO JUSTICE : HE PUTANGA MO NGA WAHINE KI TE TIKA INFORMATION ABOUT LAWYERS' FEES

Law Commission Consultation Paper WOMEN'S ACCESS TO JUSTICE : HE PUTANGA MO NGA WAHINE KI TE TIKA INFORMATION ABOUT LAWYERS' FEES Law Commission Consultation Paper WOMEN'S ACCESS TO JUSTICE : HE PUTANGA MO NGA WAHINE KI TE TIKA INFORMATION ABOUT LAWYERS' FEES The Law Commission The Law Commission is an independent advisory body,

More information

Information, Triage & the Receptionist's Role

Information, Triage & the Receptionist's Role Information, Triage & the Receptionist's Role The Receptionist s Role In most advice services, the receptionist is the first person a client meets when s/he is seeking advice. The receptionist is the public

More information

Personal Safety Intervention Orders

Personal Safety Intervention Orders Personal Safety Intervention Orders A guide to resolving disputes and protecting your safety. This booklet is about personal safety intervention orders, which can help protect you from threats and violence

More information

LEGAL ADVICE AND ASSISTANCE POLICY AND GUIDANCE

LEGAL ADVICE AND ASSISTANCE POLICY AND GUIDANCE LEGAL ADVICE AND ASSISTANCE POLICY AND GUIDANCE Northern Ireland Commissioner for Children and Young People Equality House 7 9 Shaftesbury Square BELFAST BT2 7DP Telephone: 028 9031 1616 Website: www.niccy.org

More information

Guidance on health and character

Guidance on health and character Guidance on health and character Who is this document for?... 2 About the structure of this document... 2 Section 1: Introduction... 4 About us (the HPC)... 4 How we are run... 5 About registration...

More information

Open Adoption: It s Your Choice

Open Adoption: It s Your Choice Open Adoption: It s Your Choice If you re pregnant and thinking about placing your child for adoption (making an adoption plan for your child), you may want to consider open adoption. Ask yourself Read

More information

Parents recording social workers - A guidance note for parents and professionals

Parents recording social workers - A guidance note for parents and professionals Parents recording social workers - A guidance note for parents and professionals The Transparency Project December 2015 www.transparencyproject.org.uk info@transparencyproject.org.uk (Charity Registration

More information

Going to a Mental Health Tribunal hearing

Going to a Mental Health Tribunal hearing June 2015 Going to a Mental Health Tribunal hearing Includes: information about compulsory treatment and treatment orders information about Mental Health Tribunal hearings worksheets to help you represent

More information

Chapter 6B STATE ELIGIBILITY GUIDELINES. Last Amended: 1 July 2006. Manual of Legal Aid

Chapter 6B STATE ELIGIBILITY GUIDELINES. Last Amended: 1 July 2006. Manual of Legal Aid Chapter 6B STATE ELIGIBILITY GUIDELINES Last Amended: 1 July 2006 Manual of Legal Aid TABLE OF CONTENTS CHAPTER 6B - STATE ELIGIBILITY GUIDELINES GENERAL...3 PROVISION OF LEGAL ASSISTANCE...3 GENERAL GUIDELINES

More information

COUNCIL OF EUROPE COMMITTEE OF MINISTERS. RECOMMENDATION No. R (90) 2 OF THE COMMITTEE OF MINISTERS TO MEMBER STATES

COUNCIL OF EUROPE COMMITTEE OF MINISTERS. RECOMMENDATION No. R (90) 2 OF THE COMMITTEE OF MINISTERS TO MEMBER STATES COUNCIL OF EUROPE COMMITTEE OF MINISTERS RECOMMENDATION No. R (90) 2 OF THE COMMITTEE OF MINISTERS TO MEMBER STATES ON SOCIAL MEASURES CONCERNING VIOLENCE WITHIN THE FAMILY 1 (Adopted by the Committee

More information

You ve reported a crime so what happens next?

You ve reported a crime so what happens next? You ve reported a crime so what happens next? This booklet tells you what you can expect from the Criminal Justice System, and explains: what happens now how to get advice and support your rights where

More information

A GUIDE TO DIVORCE. The law

A GUIDE TO DIVORCE. The law A GUIDE TO DIVORCE Deciding that your marriage has ended can be very difficult. If you are not sure whether your marriage is at an end, there are relationship counselling services which may be useful in

More information

Code of Conduct for registered migration agents

Code of Conduct for registered migration agents Code of Conduct for registered migration agents Current from 1 JULY 2012 SCHEDULE 2: CODE OF CONDUCT (regulation 8) Migration Act 1958, subsection 314(1) THIS CODE OF CONDUCT SHOULD BE DISPLAYED PROMINENTLY

More information

Application for bail with electronic monitoring. Section 7(5) Bail Act 2000....[full name]..[address].[occupation] Applicant...

Application for bail with electronic monitoring. Section 7(5) Bail Act 2000....[full name]..[address].[occupation] Applicant... Application for bail with electronic monitoring Section 7(5) Bail Act 2000 In the District / High Court at:...........[full name]..[address].[occupation] Applicant This document is filed by: [name and

More information

ERRANT CONDUCT AND POOR PERFORMANCE BY EXTERNAL ADVOCATES CPS GUIDANCE TO CHAIRS OF JOINT ADVOCATE SELECTION COMMITTEES

ERRANT CONDUCT AND POOR PERFORMANCE BY EXTERNAL ADVOCATES CPS GUIDANCE TO CHAIRS OF JOINT ADVOCATE SELECTION COMMITTEES ERRANT CONDUCT AND POOR PERFORMANCE BY EXTERNAL ADVOCATES CPS GUIDANCE TO CHAIRS OF JOINT ADVOCATE SELECTION COMMITTEES 1. BACKGROUND 1.1. The CPS is publicly accountable for the selection and performance

More information

CITY OF LOS ANGELES SEXUAL ORIENTATION, GENDER IDENTITY, AND GENDER EXPRESSION DISCRIMINATION COMPLAINT PROCEDURE

CITY OF LOS ANGELES SEXUAL ORIENTATION, GENDER IDENTITY, AND GENDER EXPRESSION DISCRIMINATION COMPLAINT PROCEDURE CITY OF LOS ANGELES SEXUAL ORIENTATION, GENDER IDENTITY, AND GENDER EXPRESSION DISCRIMINATION COMPLAINT PROCEDURE The policy of the City of Los Angeles has been, and will continue to be, to promote and

More information

Bullying and Harassment at Work Policy

Bullying and Harassment at Work Policy Bullying and Harassment at Work Policy i) Statement Everyone should be treated with dignity and respect at work, irrespective of their status or position within the organisation. Bullying and harassment

More information

= Ó=k~íáçå~ä=pìêîÉó=Ó= = = = oééçêí=çå=íüé=éêç=äçåç=äéö~ä=ïçêâ=çñ=áåçáîáçì~ä= ^ìëíê~äá~å=_~êêáëíéêë=

= Ó=k~íáçå~ä=pìêîÉó=Ó= = = = oééçêí=çå=íüé=éêç=äçåç=äéö~ä=ïçêâ=çñ=áåçáîáçì~ä= ^ìëíê~äá~å=_~êêáëíéêë= Ók~íáçå~äpìêîÉóÓ oééçêíçåíüééêçäçåçäéö~äïçêâçñáåçáîáçì~ä ^ìëíê~äá~å_~êêáëíéêë kçîéãäéêommu ^éééåçáñsfff oéëéçåëéëíçëìêîéóèìéëíáçåëótéëíéêå^ìëíê~äá~ National Pro Bono Resource Centre The Law Building, University

More information

Information for witnesses going to court

Information for witnesses going to court Information for witnesses going to court Useful telephone numbers Witness Service...440496 Victim Support...440496 Women s Refuge...08007 356836 (freephone) Citizen s Advice Bureau...08007 350249 (freephone)

More information

Applicant and Opponent Surveys 2007 Summary of Findings

Applicant and Opponent Surveys 2007 Summary of Findings Scottish Legal Aid Board Applicant and Opponent Surveys 2007 Summary of Findings Introduction 1. This paper provides a summary of findings from the 2007 Applicant and Opponent surveys. The overarching

More information

RESTRAINING ORDERS IN MASSACHUSETTS Your rights whether you are a Plaintiff or a Defendant

RESTRAINING ORDERS IN MASSACHUSETTS Your rights whether you are a Plaintiff or a Defendant RESTRAINING ORDERS IN MASSACHUSETTS Your rights whether you are a Plaintiff or a Defendant Prepared by the Mental Health Legal Advisors Committee October 2012 What is a restraining order? A restraining

More information

RESOLVING DISPUTES AT WORK: New procedures for discipline and grievances A GUIDE FOR EMPLOYEES

RESOLVING DISPUTES AT WORK: New procedures for discipline and grievances A GUIDE FOR EMPLOYEES RESOLVING DISPUTES AT WORK: New procedures for discipline and grievances A GUIDE FOR EMPLOYEES This guide tells you about new rights and procedures you must follow if you have a grievance in work are facing

More information

for Albertans We re Here to Help You can reach us by phone or by visiting one of our offices:

for Albertans We re Here to Help You can reach us by phone or by visiting one of our offices: We re Here to Help You can reach us by phone or by visiting one of our offices: Phone 1.866.845.3425 Monday to Friday The phone service enables Albertans across the province, and in the most remote areas,

More information

CRIMINAL LAW & YOUR RIGHTS MARCH 2008

CRIMINAL LAW & YOUR RIGHTS MARCH 2008 CRIMINAL LAW & YOUR RIGHTS MARCH 2008 1 What are your rights? As a human being and as a citizen you automatically have certain rights. These rights are not a gift from anyone, including the state. In fact,

More information

MOTOR VEHICLES, ACCIDENTS AND ALCOHOL. Do the right thing see your lawyer first

MOTOR VEHICLES, ACCIDENTS AND ALCOHOL. Do the right thing see your lawyer first MOTOR VEHICLES, ACCIDENTS AND ALCOHOL Do the right thing see your lawyer first Contents 1. Motor vehicles, accidents and alcohol 2. Accidents 3. Contact with police officers 4. Breath and blood alcohol

More information

Academic Writing: a language-based approach

Academic Writing: a language-based approach Law The following first year law essay was written in response to this question: The National Legal Aid Advisory Council defined access to justice as meaning: Access to the Australian legal and administrative

More information

A GUIDE TO FAMILY LAW LEGAL AID

A GUIDE TO FAMILY LAW LEGAL AID A GUIDE TO FAMILY LAW LEGAL AID Important new rules in relation to legal aid were introduced on 1 April 2013 by the Legal Aid, Sentencing and Punishment of Offenders Act 2012 (LASPO). This legal guide

More information

A PARENT S GUIDE TO CPS and the COURTS. How it works and how you can put things back on track

A PARENT S GUIDE TO CPS and the COURTS. How it works and how you can put things back on track A PARENT S GUIDE TO CPS and the COURTS How it works and how you can put things back on track HOW YOU CAN USE THIS HANDBOOK We hope that this handbook will be easy for you to use. You can either read through

More information

Complaints, Comments & Compliments Policy

Complaints, Comments & Compliments Policy Complaints, Comments & Compliments Policy 1. INTRODUCTION We welcome our customers views and will use them to improve our services. The purpose of this policy is to provide a framework for dealing with

More information

L ARCHE ONTARIO REGION MANUAL FOR HELPING PEOPLE WITH INTELLECTUAL DISABILITIES CHOOSE AN ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL CARE

L ARCHE ONTARIO REGION MANUAL FOR HELPING PEOPLE WITH INTELLECTUAL DISABILITIES CHOOSE AN ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL CARE L ARCHE ONTARIO REGION MANUAL FOR HELPING PEOPLE WITH INTELLECTUAL DISABILITIES CHOOSE AN ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL CARE This booklet s purpose is to provide information. It is not legal advice, and should

More information

A guide to helping you move on. QualitySolicitors Mirza

A guide to helping you move on. QualitySolicitors Mirza A guide to helping you move on. QualitySolicitors Mirza 2 A guide to help you We understand just how stressful and upsetting ending a relationship can be. We re here to make things as simple and stress-free

More information

Throughout the Procedure outlined below, fitness to study is understood as defined by University legislation:

Throughout the Procedure outlined below, fitness to study is understood as defined by University legislation: This Fitness to Study Procedure has three stages depending on the perceived level of risk, the severity of the problem and the student s engagement with efforts to respond to it. In urgent cases, at the

More information

7. MY RIGHTS IN DEALING WITH CRIMINAL LAW AND THE GARDAÍ

7. MY RIGHTS IN DEALING WITH CRIMINAL LAW AND THE GARDAÍ 7. MY RIGHTS IN DEALING WITH CRIMINAL LAW AND THE GARDAÍ 7.1 Victim of a crime What are my rights if I have been the victim of a crime? As a victim of crime, you have the right to report that crime to

More information

on the 27 FEBRUARY 2009

on the 27 FEBRUARY 2009 ural RECEI VED! 2 7 FEB 2008 JUSTICE AND ELECTORAL SUBMISSION TO THE JUSTICE AND ELECTORAL SELECT COMMITTEE on the 5 MAR 2009 DOMESTIC VIOLENCE (ENHANCING SAFETY) BILL By RURAL WOMEN NEW ZEALAND 27 FEBRUARY

More information

NEW ZEALAND LAWYERS AND CONVEYANCERS DISCIPLINARY TRIBUNAL [2011] NZLCDT 15 LCDT 022/10. of the Lawyers and Conveyancers Act 2006

NEW ZEALAND LAWYERS AND CONVEYANCERS DISCIPLINARY TRIBUNAL [2011] NZLCDT 15 LCDT 022/10. of the Lawyers and Conveyancers Act 2006 NEW ZEALAND LAWYERS AND CONVEYANCERS DISCIPLINARY TRIBUNAL [2011] NZLCDT 15 LCDT 022/10 IN THE MATTER of the Lawyers and Conveyancers Act 2006 BETWEEN AUCKLAND STANDARDS COMMITTEE 1 OF THE NEW ZEALAND

More information

Downloaded from the website of the Data Protection Commissioner on 26 th July, 2011.

Downloaded from the website of the Data Protection Commissioner on 26 th July, 2011. Case Studies relating to privilege and solicitors Downloaded from the website of the Data Protection Commissioner on 26 th July, 2011. 6/2001 CASE STUDY 6/01 Legal firm identification of source of personal

More information

Health (Compulsory Assessment and Treatment) Act 1992

Health (Compulsory Assessment and Treatment) Act 1992 2 Mental Health (Compulsory Assessment and Treatment) Act 1992 PART 1 Terms and definitions 27 PART 2 Compulsory Assessment and Treatment 38 PART 3 Your rights under the Mental Health Act 60 PART 4 Young

More information

REPORT OF THE ACTIVITIES OF THE DISCRIMINATION AND HARASSMENT COUNSEL FOR THE LAW SOCIETY OF UPPER CANADA

REPORT OF THE ACTIVITIES OF THE DISCRIMINATION AND HARASSMENT COUNSEL FOR THE LAW SOCIETY OF UPPER CANADA REPORT OF THE ACTIVITIES OF THE DISCRIMINATION AND HARASSMENT COUNSEL FOR THE LAW SOCIETY OF UPPER CANADA For the period from January 1, 2012 to June 30, 2012 Prepared By Cynthia Petersen Discrimination

More information

Intellectual Disability Rights Service welcomes the opportunity to comment on the proposed Evidence Amendment (Evidence of Silence) Bill 2012.

Intellectual Disability Rights Service welcomes the opportunity to comment on the proposed Evidence Amendment (Evidence of Silence) Bill 2012. 27 September 2012 The Director Criminal Law Review Department of Attorney General and Justice By Email: lpclrd@agd.nsw.gov.au To The Director, Re: Evidence Amendment (Evidence of Silence) Bill 2012 Intellectual

More information

Sterman Counseling and Assessment

Sterman Counseling and Assessment Information for Clients Welcome to Sterman Counseling and Assessment. We appreciate the opportunity to be of assistance to you. This packet answers some questions about therapy services. It is important

More information

Family Violence and Family Law in Australia

Family Violence and Family Law in Australia MONASH UNIVERSITY UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH AUSTRALIA JAMES COOK UNIVERSITY FOR THE AUSTRALIAN ATTORNEY-GENERAL S DEPARTMENT Family Violence and Family Law in Australia The Experiences and Views of Children

More information

Redfern Legal Centre and Sydney Women s Domestic Violence Court Advocacy Service

Redfern Legal Centre and Sydney Women s Domestic Violence Court Advocacy Service Redfern Legal Centre and Sydney Women s Domestic Violence Court Advocacy Service Joint Submission to Senate Committee on Legal and Constitutional Affairs In Support Of FAMILY LAW LEGISLATION AMENDMENT

More information

Domestic Violence: Can the Legal System Help Protect Me?

Domestic Violence: Can the Legal System Help Protect Me? Domestic Violence: Can the Legal System Help Protect Me? What is domestic violence? Domestic violence is a pattern of physically and/or emotionally abusive behavior used to control another person with

More information

Consumer Awareness How to Keep From Getting Ripped Off by Big Insurance

Consumer Awareness How to Keep From Getting Ripped Off by Big Insurance Consumer Awareness How to Keep From Getting Ripped Off by Big Insurance Provided as an educational service by: Anthony D. Castelli, Esq. Concentration in Auto and Work Related Injuries (513) 621-2345 ATTENTION!!!

More information

Research to Practice Series

Research to Practice Series Institute of Child Protection Studies 2 Identity and meaning in the lives of vulnerable young people The Institute of Child Protection Studies links the findings of research undertaken by the Institute

More information

Presented to the House of Representatives pursuant to section 108AAB of the Protection of Personal and Property Rights Act 1988.

Presented to the House of Representatives pursuant to section 108AAB of the Protection of Personal and Property Rights Act 1988. Report of the Minister for Senior Citizens on the review of the amendments to the Protection of Personal and Property Rights Act 1988 made by the Protection of Personal and Property Rights Amendment Act

More information

Become a carer with the Multicultural Foster Care Service

Become a carer with the Multicultural Foster Care Service Become a carer with the Multicultural Foster Care Service What is the Multicultural Foster Care Service? The Settlement Services International Multicultural Foster Care Service provides foster carers and

More information

Unfair Dismissal Overview Definitions What is a dismissal? Constructive Dismissal not What is unfair dismissal? unfairly dismissed

Unfair Dismissal Overview Definitions What is a dismissal? Constructive Dismissal not What is unfair dismissal? unfairly dismissed Unfair Dismissal Overview This module contains information on the new unfair dismissal laws and covers off the following matters: Definitions surrounding unfair dismissal The Small Business Fair Dismissal

More information

Pro bono legal services in family law and family violence

Pro bono legal services in family law and family violence Pro bono legal services in family law and family violence Understanding the limitations and opportunities Final Report - Executive Summary October 2013 National Pro Bono Resource Centre The Law Building,

More information

BABCP. Standards of Conduct, Performance and Ethics. www.babcp.com. British Association for Behavioural & Cognitive Psychotherapies

BABCP. Standards of Conduct, Performance and Ethics. www.babcp.com. British Association for Behavioural & Cognitive Psychotherapies BABCP www.babcp.com Standards of Conduct, Performance and Ethics British Association for Behavioural & Cognitive Psychotherapies 2 YOUR DUTIES AS A MEMBER OF BABCP The standards of conduct, performance

More information

Glossary. To seize a person under authority of the law. Police officers can make arrests

Glossary. To seize a person under authority of the law. Police officers can make arrests Criminal Law Glossary Arrest Charge Convicted Court Crime/Offence Crown Attorney or Prosecutor Criminal Custody Guilty Illegal Innocent Lawyer To seize a person under authority of the law. Police officers

More information

Women s Aid Federation Northern Ireland. A Briefing Paper on Proposed Changes to Criminal and Civil Legal Aid & Domestic Violence.

Women s Aid Federation Northern Ireland. A Briefing Paper on Proposed Changes to Criminal and Civil Legal Aid & Domestic Violence. Women s Aid Federation Northern Ireland A Briefing Paper on Proposed Changes to Criminal and Civil Legal Aid & Domestic Violence 26 th June 2013 General issues relating to Legal Aid reform Women s Aid

More information

Health Committee information

Health Committee information Health Committee information This leaflet is for nurses and midwives who have been referred to our Health Committee because an allegation has been made against them and, after initial investigation, we

More information

Contents. Section/Paragraph Description Page Number

Contents. Section/Paragraph Description Page Number - NON CLINICAL NON CLINICAL NON CLINICAL NON CLINICAL NON CLINICAL NON CLINICAL NON CLINICAL NON CLINICA CLINICAL NON CLINICAL - CLINICAL CLINICAL Complaints Policy Incorporating Compliments, Comments,

More information

Women's Legal Service (Brisbane) response to Access to Justice Arrangements Productivity Commission Issues Paper

Women's Legal Service (Brisbane) response to Access to Justice Arrangements Productivity Commission Issues Paper 4.14 Lep! 5e.rvice. 3 October 2013 Access to Justice Productivity Commission GPO Box 1428 CANBERRA CITY ACT 2601 By email: access.iustice@pc.gov.au Dear Sir/Madam Women's Legal Service (Brisbane) response

More information

Providing support to vulnerable children and families. An information sharing guide for registered school teachers and principals in Victoria

Providing support to vulnerable children and families. An information sharing guide for registered school teachers and principals in Victoria Providing support to vulnerable children and families An information sharing guide for registered school teachers and principals in Victoria Service Coordination Tool Templates 2006 reference guide Providing

More information

Access to Health Services for Deaf People GPs and PCTs

Access to Health Services for Deaf People GPs and PCTs Access to Health Services for Deaf People GPs and PCTs Welcome to this short report for GPs and PCTs on the findings of the Access to health services for Deaf people project, carried out at Manchester

More information

Submission: Productivity Commission May 2014. Access to Justice

Submission: Productivity Commission May 2014. Access to Justice Submission: Productivity Commission May 2014 Access to Justice Inquiries to: Ms Julie Phillips Manager Disability Discrimination Legal Service Inc Ph: (03) 9654-8644 Email: info@ddls.org.au Web: www.communitylaw.org.au/ddls

More information

Information for Prospective Volunteers

Information for Prospective Volunteers Information for Prospective Volunteers May 2012 35 Beach Street, Frankston Phone: 9783 7284 Information for Potential Volunteers 2012 1 CONTENTS Who We Are 3 What We Do 3 Board of Management 3 Opening

More information

Community Legal Information Association of PEI, Inc. Sexual Assault

Community Legal Information Association of PEI, Inc. Sexual Assault Community Legal Information Association of PEI, Inc. Sexual Assault As an adult in Canada, you have the right to choose when or if you engage in sexual activity. Sexual activity without your consent is

More information

Victims of Crime. information leaflet. Working together for a safer Scotland

Victims of Crime. information leaflet. Working together for a safer Scotland Working together for a safer Scotland If you have been a victim of crime this leaflet is to help let you know about how to find support and help and to tell you about the criminal justice system. Support

More information

STUDENT LEGAL SERVICES CHILD, YOUTH & FAMILY ENHANCEMENT ACT A GUIDE TO THE LAW IN ALBERTA REGARDING OF EDMONTON COPYRIGHT AND DISCLAIMER

STUDENT LEGAL SERVICES CHILD, YOUTH & FAMILY ENHANCEMENT ACT A GUIDE TO THE LAW IN ALBERTA REGARDING OF EDMONTON COPYRIGHT AND DISCLAIMER COPYRIGHT AND DISCLAIMER A GUIDE TO THE LAW IN ALBERTA REGARDING CHILD, YOUTH & FAMILY ENHANCEMENT ACT version: 2010 STUDENT LEGAL SERVICES OF EDMONTON GENERAL All information is provided for general knowledge

More information

What is DOMESTIC VIOLENCE?

What is DOMESTIC VIOLENCE? What is DOMESTIC VIOLENCE? Domestic violence is a pattern of control used by one person to exert power over another. Verbal abuse, threats, physical, and sexual abuse are the methods used to maintain power

More information

Consumer Legal Guide. Your Guide to Hiring a Lawyer

Consumer Legal Guide. Your Guide to Hiring a Lawyer Consumer Legal Guide Your Guide to Hiring a Lawyer How do you find a lawyer? Finding the right lawyer for you and your case is an important personal decision. Frequently people looking for a lawyer ask

More information

Preventing Sexual Harassment in the Workplace. Formulating Corporate Policy on Sexual Harassment

Preventing Sexual Harassment in the Workplace. Formulating Corporate Policy on Sexual Harassment Preventing Sexual Harassment in the Workplace Formulating Corporate Policy on Sexual Harassment I. Introduction Background: Sexual harassment is not harmless play, but an offensive unlawful act. Under

More information

Guidelines for Preventing and Dealing with Bullying Issues

Guidelines for Preventing and Dealing with Bullying Issues Guidelines for Preventing and Dealing with Bullying Issues Stapleford School aims to value all its members, to give all the opportunity to learn, act fairly and celebrate differences between individuals.

More information

Handling a Crime Committed by Someone You Know

Handling a Crime Committed by Someone You Know Handling a Crime Committed by Someone You Know In This Article Friends and family members, not just strangers, are potential identity thieves Victims may feel pressure not to report the crime Dealing with

More information

HR ADVISORY BULLETIN 1. Discipline & Grievance

HR ADVISORY BULLETIN 1. Discipline & Grievance HR ADVISORY BULLETIN 1 Discipline & Grievance V1 January 2012 Protect DISCLAIMER The information contained within this pamphlet is for guidance only. The purpose of this pamphlet is to provide information

More information