BARRY UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK SW ADVANCED CLINICAL SOCIAL WORK PRACTICE WITH GROUPS. Professors Millenbach, Molina, and Tully

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1 BARRY UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK SW ADVANCED CLINICAL SOCIAL WORK PRACTICE WITH GROUPS Spring, 2006 Professors Millenbach, Molina, and Tully I. PREFACE This concentration year course affords students an opportunity for in-depth study of the group as the basic unit of intervention aimed at promoting well-being through the use of Resiliency Theory as a framework for practice. Students develop knowledge, skills and values for several models of group practice. Emphasis is on differential practice to address client need in a wide range of practice settings. The use of group work strategies and skills to mitigate the effects of oppression and social and economic injustices; to serve diverse clients with diverse resources and needs; to enhance client strength and resourcefulness; to respond in professional, social, and political contexts; and to evaluate the effectiveness of their interventions are drawn from a variety of theoretical perspectives. II. COURSE SYNOPSIS AND ORGANIZING PRINCIPLES While the Foundation Year was most attentive to similarities in practice with individuals, families and groups, this Concentration Year course pays attention to advanced clinical practice with groups. Building on the Foundation Year practice courses (Social Work Practice I and II), this Concentration Year course provides an advanced clinical social work practice base emphasizing knowledge of different approaches to practice with groups, advanced universals of group work practice, and the application of this knowledge to practice with diverse populations across phases of the helping process (beginnings, middles, and endings). Skills which strengthen the resiliency of the group as a whole and strengthen the resiliency of members are stressed. Students evaluation of their own practice is informed by advanced knowledge and is strengthened by their increased awareness of their own theoretical orientation to practice. Students critique of their own practice with groups further prepares them for autonomous practice. This course is based in the belief that there are several important forces directing practice: 1) the diverse needs of the oppressed and vulnerable populations we serve; 2) agency and social policy as it identifies the parameters of service, organizes services, determines recipients of service, and defines the personal, interpersonal, and environmental goals of service; 3) ones theoretical orientation to group work practice, and 4) students own evaluation of their practice with an eye toward increasing practice effectiveness. The aim of this course is to develop students' knowledge of different approaches to group work practice, to educate them to the salience of five advanced universals of group work practice, and to increase their awareness of the ways in which specialized knowledge of 1

2 clients' life conditions, life circumstances, and significant life events informs practice with groups. Emphasis is placed upon conceptualizing and analyzing group work skill and the capacity for self-directed practice with groups pointed towards increasing the resiliency of the group as a whole and the resiliency of individual group members. This course begins with an examination of the history of group work theory, the factors which influence clinical group work practice, and different ways of thinking about advanced group work practice. The relation between current approaches and approaches which have preceded them is explored. The features of different paradigms of helping, (systems, medical model, empirical and non-empirical problem-solving) are identified as a bases for examination of five current group work approaches (e.g., interactionist, remedial, psychosocial problem-solving, empowerment, and cognitive-behavioral). The course establishes five advanced universals of group work practice and demonstrates their relevance for practice with clients life conditions, life events, and life circumstances and across the three phases of the helping process (beginnings, middles, and endings). These advanced universals include: 1) the development of the group as a whole over time; 2) differential practice in various stages of group development; 3) the influence of diversity on group interaction and group diversity and the necessity to attend to diversity in groups at different stages of group development, e.g., race, gender, class, ethnicity, age, sexual orientation, differing abilities; 4) the impact of structure on group interaction and group development, e.g., long-term, short term, open-ended, close-ended, co-leadership, group composition, degree of choice (voluntary, proffered, mandated), and 5) the differential use of program and activities to strengthen the resiliency of the group as a whole and the resiliency of individual group members. This course pays particular attention to how the experiences of oppression, powerlessness, and vulnerability affect transactions among group members and between group members and social workers and to the skills necessary to ensure democratic and strengthening group process. Toward this end, significant emphasis is placed upon the ways the social worker s authority is exercised, and the skills for increasing member potency in group. A salient goal is the use of democratic means so that group process in all social work groups reflects a vision of social justice. Toward this end, students process recording is examined. Throughout the Concentration Year Advanced Clinical Practice sequence, all models are critiqued according to: 1) the ideological beliefs and biases and congruence with the profession's historic value base and current ethical precepts and guidelines, 2) attention to human diversity, 3) attention to the influence of oppression and powerlessness, 4) applicability to a variety of settings and problem areas, 5) applicability to special populations, 6) valued skills and methodology, and 7) evidence of empirical validation and/or potential for effectiveness in assisting clients to achieve desired outcomes. The degrees to which approaches focus on personal, intrapersonal, and/or environmental change are highlighted. III. RELATIONSHIP TO THE EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM 2

3 Building on the basic knowledge and skills gained in Practice I and II, this Concentration Year course emphasizes advanced knowledge and the advanced critique of skill sufficient for self-directed practice. Knowledge of human behavior in the social environment provides a foundation for understanding practice with groups. Specifically, an understanding of communities, small group behavior and phenomena, organizations, personality dynamics, resiliency, stages of group development, sociocultural influences, psychopathology, and resiliency underpin the content of this course. Understanding the ways in which agency and social policy affects the creation of group services, practice and the distribution of scare resources, in agency settings, provides essential knowledge for determining the social worker s ethical responsibility to advocate for an increase in social and economic justice for the vulnerable, oppressed, and resilient populations we serve. Additionally, the advanced social policy course provides essential knowledge for understanding how policies influence group work practice in the various settings of service. The integral relation between research and group work practice aids the student in developing and applying a systematic approach to the assessment of client and group problems/needs, the application of practice skills, and the evaluation of individual and group outcomes. The advanced research course emphasizes the use of appropriate qualitative and quantitative methods for assessing client problems. A vital relation exists between Advanced Clinical Practice with Groups and field education. Method courses provide practice concepts and field education provides the arena in which concepts are applied and integrated. IV. COURSE OBJECTIVES Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Articulate the ways in which agency, social policy, and focus areas uniquely influence social work practice with groups, 2. Articulate an understanding of several theoretical models of social work with groups including remedial, reciprocal, and psychosocial problem-solving, empowerment, and cognitive-behavioral models and the degrees to which they focus on personal, intrapersonal, and/or environmental changes, 3. Describe how the group work approaches studied both enhance and constrain practice, 4. Articulate the rationale for practice choices concerning the development of group services and practice with oppressed and vulnerable populations, 5. Apply the critical thinking skills of conceptualizing, labeling, analyzing, and evaluating their own group work skill, particularly with regard to developing the resiliency of the group as a whole and for developing the resiliency of individual members, and indicate areas for continued professional growth, 3

4 6. Articulate practice principles, skills, and strategies for work across stages of group development within different theories of group development and the impact of knowledge of client s significant life conditions, life circumstances, and significant life events on these principles and strategies, 7. Describe the impact of group structure and diversity on group work practice, and articulate strategies in light of this impact, 8. Describe the principles of programming for work in a broad range of social agency settings with consideration to race, gender, social class, age, ethnicity, and sexual orientation, 9. State the ways in which race, social class, sexual orientation, ethnicity, gender, age, and oppression affect group interaction and development within the various settings of service, 10. Describe the influence of specific life conditions, life circumstances and life events on the advanced universals of group work practice, and 11. Discuss ethical issues and dilemmas unique to group work practice in the settings in which students practice. V. TEACHING METHODOLOGY AND CLASSROOM CLIMATE Teaching methodology will be didactic and experimental. Lectures, discussions of group work practice, role play, and class exercises provide the core of the course. Students will be expected to present material from their current group work practice. Reading selected from the attached bibliography will be assigned according to the topic. Students are expected to read further based on interest and the need to become an informed practitioner. Student input into course content and course operation is highly valued. Dialogue is the medium of the course. Social and Economic Justice: The faculty of the School of Social Work believes we all share a responsibility for championing social and economic justice for all members of society. Guided by the Code of Ethics, social workers should strive to: Eliminate personal and institutional discrimination, Ensure access to needed resources and opportunities for all persons, Expand options and opportunities for everyone, but especially for persons who are disadvantaged or disenfranchised, Respect cultural diversity in society, Advocate changes that improve social conditions and promote social justice, Encourage participation in the democratic process, and Encourage people to develop their own voice. 4

5 There will be times during this course when societal isms or prejudicial attitudes and discriminatory practices are examined. Because of our commitment to social and economic justice, we are open to hearing all views and all perspectives will be carefully examined. Students are expected to be respectful of the opinions of others while at the same time striving to attain the ideals of social justice. Disabilities: The Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 requires that the university make reasonable accommodation to persons with disabilities as defined in the act. Students who wish to seek accommodations under the ADA guidelines must contact the Barry University Office of Disability Services in R. Kirk Landon Student Union, Suite 102; telephone The Office of Disability Services will inform faculty of specific classroom and course accommodations consistent with ADA guidelines. Shared Client and Agency Information: As required by the School of Social Work s Core Performance Standards, students must, at all times, protect client confidentiality in the classroom, assignments, and the field agency. All information about clients and agencies should be disguised or eliminated if clients could be identified, and this information is to be held in confidence. You must disguise the identity of clients in written assignments INCLUDING CHANGING THE NAME OF THE CLIENT. VI. ASSIGNMENTS AND GRADING A. Assignments Each student is expected to complete all course readings and assignments as assigned by their course section instructor. Assignments may include, but are not limited to: in-class examinations, take home examinations, research papers, process recordings, book reviews, annotated bibliographies, individual and/or group presentations, student forums and debates, and community projects. The exact structure, combination, and number of course assignment requirements will be determined by the course section instructor B. Grading The criteria for determination of grades are the sole responsibility of each instructor and grades cannot be appealed in the School. The following symbols are used for reporting grades for assignments and final course achievement: A 4.00 B 3.00 C 2.00 F 0.00 I Incomplete - Given only when a small portion of the course work is not completed by the end of the semester for legitimate reasons, and the instructor approves an extension of time to complete assignments. After one year, an "I" grade becomes an "F" unless changed by the faculty member. 5

6 Cheating/Plagiarism A policy on cheating and plagiarism was approved by the faculty in It reads: "Students who cheat/plagiarize on a paper, test, etc., shall be given an "F" grade for the particular incident and/or course." Cheating is defined as the attempt, successful or not, to give or obtain aid and/or information by illicit means in meeting any class requirement. Cheating includes plagiarism or use of other's ideas, etc. without proper acknowledgments. C. Attendance Regular attendance is required of all students. Only excused absences are acceptable. Three or more absences in any class or in field instruction will raise serious questions regarding whether a student may satisfactorily complete studies and continue in the program. VII. REQUIRED AND OPTIONAL TEXTS REQUIRED TEXT Northen, H. & Kurland, R. (2001). Social work with groups (3rd Ed.). New York: Columbia University Press. OPTIONAL TEXTS Berman-Rossi, T. (Ed.). (1994). Social work: The collected works of William Schwartz. Itasca, IL: F.E. Peacock Publishers, Inc. Garvin, C. D., Gutierrez, L. M. & Galinsky, M. J. (Eds.). (2004). Handbook of Social Work with Groups. New York: The Guilford Press. Gitterman, A. (Ed.). (2001). Handbook of social work practice with vulnerable and resilient populations (2 nd ed.). New York: Columbia University Press. Gitterman, A., & Shulman, L. (Eds.). (2005). Mutual aid groups, vulnerable populations, and the life cycle. New York: Columbia University Press. Lee, J. A. B. (2001). The empowerment approach to practice (2 nd ed.). New York: Columbia University Press. Malekoff, A. (2004). Group work with adolescents. New York: Guilford Press. Reid, K. E. (1997). Social work practice with groups: A clinical perspective. Pacific Grove, CA: Brooks/Cole Publishing. Roberts, R., & Northen, L. (Eds.). (1976). Theories of social work with groups. New York: Columbia University Press. 6

7 Rose, S. (1998). Group therapy with troubled youth. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass. Yalom, I.D. (1985). Inpatient group psychotherapy. (3 rd ed.). New York: Basic Books. VIII. GUIDE TO CONTENT AREAS Content Area Pages Unit I 8 Unit II 9 Unit III 11 Unit IV 12 Unit V 19 Unit VI 23 Unit VII 25 Specific Content: Family and Children 27 Aging (community and institutionally based services) 27 Adolescent pregnancy 29 Bereavement and loss 29 Children and adolescents 30 Family violence and abuse and neglect 30 Foster care and adoption 33 Divorce 34 Public school social work 34 Health 35 HIV/AIDS 35 Inpatient services 36 Community services 38 Mental Health 40 In-patient services 40 Community services 41 Residential care 43 Homeless 45 Substance abuse 45 IX. THE COURSE OUTLINE: CONTENT AREAS AND READING ASSIGNMENTS 7

8 UNIT I: INTRODUCTION TO ADVANCED GROUP WORK PRACTICE This unit introduces students to advanced group work practice and to the myriad factors which influence advanced clinical practice with groups. Building on ideas about the importance of the agency and community context taught in Foundation Year Practice courses, this unit stresses the ways in which agency as an organization, social policy, and focus areas uniquely influence social work practice with groups. The range of groups with unitary purposes from treatment to the promotion of social and economic justice is identified, as well as groups that link private troubles and public issues, thus containing more integrated purposes. The ways in which groups serve persons with acute, enduring, or transitory human conditions and foster the resiliency of individuals and the groups as a whole are presented. Special attention will be paid to values and ethics. READINGS Northen & Kurland (2001). Chapter 1, special attention to the section on Values, pp Northen, H. (2004). Ethics and values in group work. In C. D. Garvin, L. M. Gutierrez & M. J. Galinsky (Eds.), Handbook of social work with groups (pp ). New York: The Guilford Press. SUGGESTED READINGS Gitterman, A. (2001). Social work practice with vulnerable and resilient populations. In A. Gitterman (Ed.), Handbook of social work practice with vulnerable and resilient populations (pp. 1-36). New York: Columbia University Press. Gitterman, A. (2004). The mutual aid model. In C. D. Garvin, L. M. Gutierrez & M. J. Galinsky (Eds.), Handbook of social work with groups (pp ). New York: The Guilford Press. Gitterman, A. (2002). Vulnerability, resilience, and social work with groups. In T. Kelly, T. Berman-Rossi & S. Palombo (Eds.), Group work: Strategies for strengthening resiliency (pp ). Binghamton, NY: Haworth Press. Hirayama, H. & Hirayama, K. K. (2002). Fostering resiliency in children through group work: Instilling hope, courage, and life skills. In T. Kelly, T. Berman-Rossi & S. Palombo (Eds.), Group work: Strategies for strengthening resiliency (pp ). Binghamton, NY: Haworth Press. 8

9 Phillips, M. H. & Cohen, C. S. (2000). Strength and resiliency themes in social work practice with groups. In E. Norman (Ed.), Resiliency enhancement (pp ). New York: Columbia University Press. UNIT II: HISTORY OF GROUP WORK THEORY, FACTORS WHICH INFLUENCE THE DEVELOPMENT OF GROUP WORK PRACTICE APPROACHES, AND DIFFERENT WAYS OF THINKING ABOUT ADVANCED GROUP WORK PRACTICE. This unit is designed to familiarize students with the historical evolution of different models of practice with groups, the myriad factors that influenced their development, and the link between past and present ways of thinking about group work practice. Reciprocal, remedial, problem-solving, empowerment, and cognitive-behavioral models are introduced as examples of approaches with roots in the past as well as current vitality. Essential similarities and differences of these five models are noted along critical dimensions, e.g., historical context, theoretical foundations, function of the social worker, conception of the group, valued skills and methodology, valued objectives, and relevance for diverse populations within the three focus areas. The degrees to which models focus on personal, intrapersonal, and/or environmental change are highlighted. Students are introduced to contemporary trends in clinical group work practice by examining how their agencies contexts; client diversity and significant life conditions, circumstances and events; theoretical orientations to practice; social policy, and funding sources influence the organization and delivery of group work services, e.g., licensure, managed care, group types and formulations. Through this analytic process, elements of social and economic justice and injustice, and forms of oppression and discrimination in the provision of group work services, are noted and identified as arenas for practice. Group work strategies for advancing social and economic justice are articulated. This unit emphasizes that becoming educated about different ways of thinking about practice, positions students to make increasingly better informed practice choices concerning the development of group services and practice with different oppressed and vulnerable populations. The ways in which theoretical orientations both enhance and constrain practice with groups is established as a central theme, here and throughout the course. The social worker s ethical obligation to increase service to oppressed and vulnerable populations is highlighted. READINGS Northen & Kurland (2001). Chapter 2, 8 Garvin, C. & Reed, B. (1994). Small group theory and social work practice: Promoting diversity and social justice or recreating inequities. In R. R. Green (Ed.), Human behavior theory: A diversity framework (p. 173). New York: Aldine de Gruyter. 9

10 SUGGESTED READINGS Breton, M. (2004). An empowerment perspective. In C. D. Garvin, L. M. Gutierrez & M. J. Galinsky (Eds.), Handbook of social work with groups (pp ). New York: The Guilford Press. Breton, M. (1990). Learning from social group work traditions. Social Work with Groups, 13(3), Lee, J. A. B. (1994). Beginning an empowerment group. In The empowerment approach to social work (pp ). New York: Columbia University Press Lee, J. A. B. (1996). The empowerment approach to social work practice. In F. J. Turner (Ed.), Social work treatment: Interlocking theoretical approaches (4th ed., pp ). New York: The Free Press. Lee, J. A. B. (2001). The empowerment group approach. In J. A. B. Lee, The empowerment approach to social work practice: Building the beloved community (pp ). New York: Columbia University Press. Lee, J. A. B. (2001). Empowerment groups: Working together toward empowerment. In J. A. B. Lee, The empowerment approach to social work practice: Building the beloved community (pp ). New York: Columbia University Press. Lee, J. A.B. (1997). The empowerment group in action: my sisters' place. In A. Alissi & C. Corto-Mergins (Eds.), Voices from the field: Group work responds (pp ). New York: Haworth Press. Lee, J. A. B. (1997). The empowerment group: The heart of the empowerment approach and an antidote to injustice. In J.K. Parry (Ed.), From prevention to wellness through group work (pp ). New York: Haworth Press. Middleman, R. R., & Wood, G. G. (1987). Social work practice with groups. In A. Minahan (Ed.), Encyclopedia of social work (18th ed., pp ). Silver Spring, MD: National Association of Social Workers. Middleman, R. R., & Wood, G. G. (1990). From social group work to social work with groups. Social Work with Groups, 13(3), Northen, H. (1998). Ethical dilemmas in social work with groups. Social Work with Groups, 21(1/2), Papell, C., & Rothman, B. (1966). Social group work models: Possession and heritage. Journal of Education for Social Work, 2,

11 Rose. S. (1977). Behavior therapy in groups. In Group therapy: A behavioral approach (pp. 1-13). Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall. Rose, S. (1989). A multimodal approach to working with adults groups. In Working with adults in groups (pp. 1-22). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass. Saulnier, C. F. (2000). Incorporating feminist theory into social work practice: Group work examples. Social Work with Groups, 23(1), Schopler, J. H., & Galinsky, M. J. (1995). Group practice overview. In R.L. Edwards (Ed.), Encyclopedia of social work (19th ed., pp ). Washington, D.C.: National Association of Social Workers. Schwartz, W. (1961). The social worker in the group. In The social welfare forum, 1961 (pp ). New York: Columbia University Press. Schwartz, W. (1985). The group work tradition and social work practice. Social Work with Groups, 8(4), Shulman, L. (1999). The group as a mutual aid system. The skills of helping individuals, families, groups, and communities (4th ed.), (pp ). Itasca, IL: F.E. Peacock Publishers, Inc. Somers, M. L. (1976). Problem-solving in small groups. In R. Roberts & H. Northen (Eds.), Theories of social work with groups (pp ). New York: Columbia University Press. Vinter, R. (1980). Essential components of social group work practice. In A. Alissi (Ed.), Perspectives on social group work practice (pp ). New York: Free Press, Inc. Vinter, R. (1985). An approach to group work practice. In M. Sundel, P. Glasser, R. Sarri, R. Vinter (Eds.). Individual change through small groups (pp. 5-10). New York: The Free Press. UNIT III: CONCEPTUALIZING, ANALYZING, AND LABELING GROUP WORK SKILL Group work method is conceptualized as combining three integrated areas: knowledge, principles of practice, and the hopes and aspirations for which we strive as a result of our knowledge-based practice. Values and ethics are integrated into each of these areas. This unit of study forms the basis for later units with focused attention of conceptualizing, analyzing, and labeling group work skill through the application of the critical thinking skills. Definitions of skill are compared and students become versed in labeling and critiquing their own group work practice. The assessment of skill provides a base for additional growth and learning. Advanced skills of building resiliency within the 11

12 group as a whole and in strengthening the resiliency of individuals within the group are highlighted. READINGS Northen and Kurland (2001). Chapters 3 & 4. SUGGESTED READINGS Fike, D.F. (1980). Evaluating group intervention. Social Work with Groups. 3(2), Glassman, U., & Kates, L. (1986). Techniques of social group work: A framework for practice. Social Work with Groups, 9, Middleman, R., & Wood, G. G. (1990). Introduction. Skills for direct practice in social work (pp. 1-15). New York: Columbia University Press. Phillips, H. U. (1954). What is group work skill? The Group, Schwartz, W. (1961). The social worker in the group. The social welfare forum (pp ). New York: Columbia University Press. Schwartz, W. (1971). On the use of groups in social work practice. In W. Schwartz & S. Zalba (Eds.), The practice of group work (pp. 3-24). New York: Columbia University Press. Shulman, L. (1968). An inventory of interactional techniques. In L. Shulman, A casebook of social work with groups: The mediating model (pp ). New York: Council on Social Welfare Education. Shulman, L. (1969). Social work skill: The anatomy of a helping act. In Social work practice. National Conference of Social Welfare (pp.29-48) New York: Columbia University Press. UNIT IV: ADVANCED UNIVERSALS OF GROUP WORK PRACTIC: STAGES OF GROUP DEVELOPMENT, GROUP STRUCTURE, DIVERSITY, PROGRAM AND ACTIVITIES, BUILDING RESILIENCY OF INDIVIDUALS AND THE GROUP AS A WHOLE This unit takes as its basic premise two interrelated principles. First is the idea that increasing the strength and resiliency of the group as a whole provides the basis for increasing the strength and resiliency of individual group members. Second, that increasing the strength and resiliency of individual members serves to increase the strength and resiliency of the group as a whole. To achieve these desirous outcomes five advanced universal areas of group work theory and practice are studied: 1) the 12

13 development of the group as a whole over time; 2) differential practice in various stages of group development; 3) the influence of diversity on group interaction and group diversity and the necessity to attend to diversity in groups at different stages of group development, e.g., race, gender, class, ethnicity, age, sexual orientation, differing abilities; 4) the impact of structure on group interaction and group development, e.g., long-term, short term, open-ended, close-ended, co-leadership, group composition, degree of choice (voluntary, proffered, mandated), 5) the differential use of program and activities, across settings of service and throughout different phases of the helping process, to strengthen the resiliency of the group as a whole and the resiliency of individual members. A distinguishing feature of this unit is the recognition of the reciprocal influence of these five universals and the need to define helping strategies so that risk and vulnerability are decreased and protective factors are increased. READINGS Northen and Kurland (2001), Chapters 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16 SUGGESTED READINGS Bennis, W., & Shepard, H. (1956). A theory of group development. Human Relations, 9, Berger, R. (1999). Group work with adolescent immigrant groups: Issues, obstacles, and principles. In H. Bertcher, L. Kurtz, & A. Lamont (Eds.), Rebuilding communities: Challenges for group work (pp ). New York: Haworth. Berman-Rossi, T. (1990). Group work and older persons. In A. Monk (Ed.), Handbook of gerontological services (pp ). New York: Columbia University Press. Berman-Rossi, T. (1992). Empowering groups through understanding stages of group development. In J. Garland (Ed.), Group work reaching out: People, places and power. New York: Haworth Press Social Work with Groups, 15(2/3), Berman-Rossi, T. (1993). Tasks and skills of the social worker across stages of group development. In S. Wenocur, P.H. Ephross, T.V. Vassil & R. K. Varghese (Eds.), Social work with groups: Expanding horizons (pp.68-81) New York: Haworth Press. Berhoozi, C. S. (1992). A model for social work with involuntary applicants in groups. Social Work with Groups, 15(2/3), Blankertz, L., Cnann, R., White, K., Fox, J., & Messinger, K. (1990). Outreach efforts with dually-diagnosed homeless people. Families in Society, 9, Breton, M. (1999). The relevance of the structural approach to group work with immigrant and refugee women. Social Work with Groups, 22(2/3),

14 Brower, A. M. (1996). Group development as constructivism of small groups. Families in Society, 77(6), Brown, A., & Mistry, T. (1994). Group work with `mixed membership' groups: Issues of race and gender. Social Work with Groups, 17(3), Caplan, T. & Thomas, H. (1997/1998). Don t worry, it s just a stage he s going through : A reappraisal of the stage theory of group work as applied to an open model treatment group form men who abuse women. Groupwork, 10(3), Chau, K. L. (1992). Needs assessment for group work with people of color: A conceptual formulation. Social Work with Groups, 15(2/3), Chau, K. L. (1990). Social Work with Groups (entire issue), 13(4). Cohen, M. B. (1994). Who wants to chair the meeting? Group development and leadership patterns in a community action group of homeless people. Social Work with Groups, 17(1/2), Congress, E. P., & Lynn, M. (1994). Group work programs in public schools: Ethical dilemmas and cultural diversity. Social Work in Education. 16(2), Davis, L. E. (1979). Racial composition of groups. Social Work, 24(3), Davis, L. E. (1984). Essential components of group work with Black Americans. Social Work with Groups, 7(3), Davis, L. E., & Proctor, E. K. (1989). Race, gender & class. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall, Inc. Chapter 1 (Race as an issue in practice); Chapter 4 (Race and group treatment); Chapter 5 (Guidelines for practice when race is salient); Chapter 6 (Gender as an issue in practice); Chapter 9 (Gender and group treatment); Chapter 10 (Guidelines for practice when gender is salient); Chapter 11 (Socio economic status as an Issue in Practice); Chapter 14 (Socio economic status and group treatment); Chapter 15 (When socio economic status is salient). Dolgoff, R., & Skolnik, L. (1996). Ethical decision-making in social work with groups: An empirical study. Social Work with Groups, 19(2), Evans, T. D. & Kane, D. P. (1996). Sophistry: A promising group technique for the involuntary client. Journal for Specialist in Group Work, 21(2), Fagen, J., & Stevenson, H. (1995). Men as teachers: A self-help program on parenting for African-American men. Social Work with Groups, 17(4),

15 Feinberg, R. I. (1996). Use of reminiscence groups to facilitate the telling of life stories by elderly Russian Jewish immigrants. Smith College Studies in Social Work, 67(1), Frost, J. (1990). A developmentally-keyed scheme for the placement of gay men in psychotherapy groups. The International Journal of Group Psychotherapy, 40(2), Galassi, F. (1991). A life review workshop for gay and lesbian elders. Journal of Gerontological Social Work, 16(1/2), Galinsky, M. J., & Schopler, J. (1989). Developmental patterns in open-ended groups. Social Work with Groups, 12(2), Galinsky, M. J., & Schopler, J. H. (1985). Patterns of entry and exit in open-ended groups. Social Work with Groups, 8(2), Galinsky, M., & Schopler, J.H. (1989). Developmental patterns in open-ended groups. Social Work with Groups, 12(2), Garland, J., Jones, H., & Kolodny, R. (1968). A Model of Stages of Development in Social Group Work Groups. In S. Bernstein, (Ed.), Explorations in group work (pp ). Boston: Boston University School of Social Work. Garvin, C. (2002). The potential impact of small-group research on social group work practice. In T. Kelly, T. Berman-Rossi & S. Palombo (Eds.), Group Work: Strategies for strengthening resiliency (pp ). Binghamton, NY: Haworth Press. Gutierrez, L. & Lewis, E. A. (1999). Strengthening communities through groups: A multicultural perspective. In H. Bertcher, L. Kurtz, & A. Lamont (Eds.), Rebuilding communities: Challenges for group work (pp.5-16). New York: Haworth. Harle, T. & Caplan, T. (1999). Spinning the group process wheel: Effective facilitation techniques for motivating involuntary client groups. Social Work with Groups, 21(4), Ho, M.K. (1984). Social group work with Asian/Pacific-Americans. Social Work with Groups, 7(3), Hollander, J. (1989). Restructuring lesbian social networks: Evaluation of an intervention. Journal of Gay and Lesbian Psychotherapy, 1(2), Hurdle, D. E. (1990). The ethnic group experience. Social Work with Groups, 13(4),

16 Jones, H. (1990). Responding to Urban Conditions. The challenge of social group work in the 1990's. In D. Fike & B. Rittner (Eds.), Working from strengths: The essence of group work (pp ). Miami: Center for Group Work Studies. Kelly, T. B. & Berman-Rossi, T. (1999). Advancing stages of group development theory: The case of institutionalized older persons. Social Work with Groups, 22(2/3), Kelly, T. B. (1999). Mutual aid groups with mentally ill older adults. Social Work with Groups, 22(2/3), Koetting, M. (1996). A group design for HIV-negative gay men. Social Work, 41(4), Lee, J. A. B. (1999). Crossing bridges: Group work in Guyana. Group work, 11(1) Lopez, J. (1991). Group work as a protective factor for immigrant youth. Social Work with Groups, 14(1), Liu, F. (1995). Is it possible to achieve mutual aid in a Chinese society? In R. Kurland & R Salmon (Eds.), Group work practice in a troubled society: Problems and opportunities (pp ). New York: The Haworth Press. Malekoff, A. (2004). The use of "program" in group work. In A. Malekoff, Group work with adolescents: Principles and practice (pp ). New York: The Guilford Press. Malekoff, A. (1994). A guideline for group work with adolescents. Social Work with Groups, 17(1/2), Malekoff, A. (1997). Prejudice reduction, intergroup relations, and group identity: Spontaneous and planned interventions to address diversity in group work. In A. Malekoff, Group work with adolescents: Principles and practice (pp ). New York: Guilford Press. Malekoff, A. & Laser, M. (1999). Addressing the difference in group work with children and young adolescents. Social Work with Groups, 21(4), Marsiglia, F. F., Cross, S. & Mitchell-Enos, V. (1998). Culturally grounded group work with adolescent American Indian students. Social Work with Groups, 21(2/3), Miller, D. B. (1997). Parenting against the odds: African-American parents in the child welfare system, a group approach. Social Work with Groups, 20(1),

17 Mistry, T. & Brown, A. (1997). Black/white co-working in groups. In T. Mistry & A. Brown (Eds.), Race and group work (pp ). London: Whiting & Birch. Modricin, M., & Iyers, N. (1990). Lesbian and gay couples: Where they turn when help is needed. Journal of Gay and Lesbian Psychotherapy, 1(3), Mondros, J. B. & Berman-Rossi, T. (1991). The relevance of stages of group development theory to community organization practice. Social Work with Groups, 14(3/4), Rittner, B., & Nakanishi, M. (1993). Challenging stereotypes and cultural biases through small group process. Social Work with Groups, 16(4), Rooney, R. H. (1992). Strategies for working with involuntary clients. New York: Columbia University Press. Ryan, D., & Doubleday, E. (1995). Group work: A lifeline for isolated elderly. Social Work with Groups 18(2/3), Sarri, R. C. & Galinsky, M. J. (1995). A conceptual framework for group development. In M. Sundel, P. Glasser, R. Sarri, R. Vinter (Eds.), Individual change through small groups (pp ). New York: The Free Press. Satterley, J. (1995). Needed: A fresh start for psychiatric inpatient groups. Social Work with Groups, 17(4), Schiller, L. (1995). Stages of group development in women's groups: A relational model. In R. Kurland & R Salmon (Eds.), Group work practice in a troubled society: Problems and opportunities (pp ). New York: The Haworth Press. Schiller, L. (1997). Rethinking stages of group development in women s groups: Implications for practice. Social Work with Groups, 20(3), 3-19 Shulman, L. (1971). "Program" in group work: Another look. W. Schwartz & S. Zalba, (Eds.), The practice of group work (pp ). New York: Columbia University Press. Sistler, A. & Washington, K.S. (1999). Serenity for African American Caregivers. Social Work with Groups 22(1), Shernoff, M. (1995). Gay men: Direct practice. In R.L. Edwards (Ed.), Encyclopedia of social work (19th ed., pp ). Washington, D.C.: National Association of Social Workers. Steinberg, D.M. (1999). The impact of time and place on mutual-aid practice with shortterm groups. Social Work with Groups.22(2/3),

18 Subramanian, K., Hernandez, S., & Martinez, A. (1996). Psychoeducational group work with low-income Latino mothers with HIV infection. Social Work with Groups, 18(2/3), Toseland, R.W. & Rivas, R.F. (1998). Leadership and Diversity. In Group work practice (3 rd ed., pp ). Boston: Allyn & Bacon Tsui, P., & Schultz, G.L. (1988). Ethnic factors in group process: Cultural dynamics in multi-ethnic therapy groups. American Journal of Orthopsychiatry, 58(1), Turrell, S.C. & de St. Aubin, T. (1995). A relationship-focused group for lesbian college students. Journal of Gay and Lesbian Psychotherapy, 2(3) Van DenBergh, N. (1990). Managing biculturalism at the work place: A group approach. Social Work with Groups, 13(4), Waites, C. (1990). The tradition of group work and natural helping networks in the African- American community. In D. Fike & B. Rittner (Eds.), Working from strengths: The essence of group work, (pp ). Miami: Center for Group Work Studies. Wekselberg, V., Goggin, W.C., & Colllings, T.J. (1997). A multifaceted concept of group maturity and its measurement and relationship to group performance. Small Group Research, 28(1), Wheelan, S & Hochberger, Judith (1996). Validation studies of the group development questionnaire. Small Group Research, 27(1), Wheelan, S. & Kaeser, R. (1997). The influence of task type and designated leaders on developmental patterns in groups. Small Group Research.28 (1), Wheelan, S. (1994). Group processes: A developmental perspective. Boston: Allyn and Bacon. Whittaker, J. (1970). Models of group development: Implications for social group work practice. Social Service Review, 44, Woodcock, J. (1997). Groupwork and refugees and asylum seekers.. In T. Mistry & A. Brown (Eds.), Race and group work, (pp ). London: Whiting & Birch. Woodman, N.J. (1995). Lesbians: Direct practice. In R.L. Edwards (Ed.), Encyclopedia of social work (19th ed., pp ). Washington, D.C.: National Association of Social Workers. 18

19 Worchel, S. (1994). You can go home again: Returning group research to the group context with an eye on developmental issues. Small Group Research, 25(2), UNIT V: APPLICATION OF ADVANCED UNIVERSALS ACROSS PHASES OF WORK AND ACROSS ASSISTING GROUP MEMBERS WITH VARIOUS LIFE CONDITIONS, LIFE CIRCUMSTANCES AND LIFE EVENTS: PLANNING AND BEGINNING GROUPS This unit concentrates upon the application of advanced universals of group work practice (the development of the group as a whole, differential practice in different stages of group development, diversity, and structure) to the planning of groups and to the initial phase of work (beginnings) within the various settings of service. Similarities and differences in approaches to planning and beginning with group members experiencing various life conditions, life circumstances and life events are identified. Planning Groups On occasion, a social work group emerges naturally and spontaneously. Most often, group services are proffered or mandated, and are formed after a careful professional planning process. Such a process can go a long way to ensuring the resiliency of the group and thus, its survival. Clarification of group purpose, composition, size, temporal and spatial arrangements, decisions about structure, organizational sanctions and supports, division of labor between worker and members, are all critical components to consider. This unit advances knowledge of these generic aspects of planning groups in two major ways: by identifying the significance of group members personal, interpersonal and environmental stressors for planning groups and by specifying the ways in which thorough planning can build in elements which strengthen the resiliency of the group as a whole and can strengthen individual group members as well. Beginnings In this unit students will examine advanced clinical skills of beginning with groups during the pre-affiliation stage of group development, as they assist group members with various life stressors. Particular attention is paid to the ways in which specialized life stressors and knowledge of the initial stage of group development (pre-affiliation), inform the initial phase of work and worker skill. For example, what are the most skillful ways of beginning in a substance abuse group where members have been mandated? Or, what are the most skillful ways of beginning in a group for children who have been sexually abused? The skills of contracting, democratic process, and themes of inclusion are highlighted. Democratic means are tied to democratic ends of increasing social and economic justice. These ideas are especially relevant for oppressed and vulnerable populations traditionally excluded from participating in the creation of services for themselves, especially children, adolescents, older persons, and mandated clients. 19

20 READINGS Northen & Kurland (2001), Chapters 5, 6, 7, 12 SUGGESTED READINGS Behroozi, C. (1992). A model for social work with involuntary applicants in groups. Social Work with Groups, 15(2/3), Bertcher, H., & Maple, F. (1974). Elements and issues in group composition. In Glasser, Sarri, Vinter. (Eds.), Individual change through small groups (pp ). New York: The Free Press. Block, L.R. (1985). On the potentiality and limits of time: The single-session group and the cancer patient. Social Work with Groups, 8(2), Boer, A.K., & Lantz, J.E. (1974). Adolescent group therapy membership selection, Clinical Social Work Journal, 2, Bond, G.R., & De Graaf-Kaser, R. (1990). Group approaches for persons with severe mental illness: A typology. Social Work with Groups, 13(1), Bostwick, G. (1987). Where's Mary? A review of the group treatment dropout literature, Social Work with Groups, 10(Fall), Brannen, S., & Rubin, A. (1996). Comparing the effectiveness of gender-specific and couples groups in a mandated spouse abuse treatment program. Research on Social Work Practice, 6(4), Brown, A., & Mistry, T. (1994). Group work with `mixed membership' groups: Issues of race and gender. Social Work with Groups, 17(3), Carlock, C., & Yancey-Martin, P. (1977). Sex composition and the intensive group experience, Social Work, 22(1), Casper, M. (1981). The short-term group. In N. Goroff, (Ed.), Reaping from the field - from practice to principles (pp ). Hebron, Ct.: Practitioner Press. Cohen, C.S. (1995). Making it happen: From great idea to successful support group program. Social Work with Groups, 18(1), Davis, L.E. (1979). Racial composition of groups. Social Work, 24(3), Davis, L.E. (1980). Racial balance - A psychological issue. Social Work with Groups, 3(2),

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